Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1528 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (36 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (51 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (89 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (27 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (153 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (189 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (22 journals)
    - LAW (929 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (9 journals)

INTERNATIONAL LAW (189 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 190 of 190 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African Yearbook of International Law Online : Annuaire Africain de droit international Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access  
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access  
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Ocean Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Austrian Review of International and European Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Baltic Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Belli Ac Pacis : Jurnal Hukum Internasional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Journal of Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal  
Chinese Journal of Global Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Climate law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access  
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
European Journal of Migration and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers of Law in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Georgetown Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 51)
Houston Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Inter: Revista de Direito Internacional e Direitos Humanos da UFRJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 261)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Community Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organizations Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the History of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Nordic Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Palestine Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Videre     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Texas International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 4)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Yearbook of Polar Law Online     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of International Law
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.694
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 235  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0938-5428 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3596
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [411 journals]
  • Editorial: On My Way In – I: Impressions of a New Editor-in-Chief’s
           First Months in the EJIL Engine Room; On My Way Out – Advice to Young
           Scholars VI: WeakPoint, On the Uses and Abuses of PowerPoint; In This
           Issue
    • Pages: 711 - 720
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz060
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The European Union and the Law of Treaties: A Fruitful Relationship
    • Authors: Andrés Sáenz De Santa María P.
      Pages: 721 - 751
      Abstract: This article examines the European Union’s (EU) treaty practice from the perspective of the international law of treaties, focusing on its most significant examples. The starting point is the EU’s attitude towards the codification of treaty law involving states and international organizations. The article discusses certain terminological specificities and a few remarkable aspects, such as the frequent use of provisional application mechanisms as opposed to much less use of reservations, the contributions regarding treaty interpretation, the wide variety of clauses and the difficulties in determining the legal nature of certain texts. The study underlines that treaty law is a useful instrument for the Union and is further enriched with creative contributions; the outcome is a fruitful relationship.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz057
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Implementing Decisions of International Human Rights Institutions –
           Evidence from the United Nations Human Rights Committee
    • Authors: Shikhelman V.
      Pages: 753 - 777
      Abstract: In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of research about the implementation of international law. However, there has been almost no empirical research about implementing decisions of international human rights institutions. The decisions of those institutions are usually regarded as soft law, and states do not have a clear legal obligation to implement them. In this article, I bring original empirical data about how and when states implement decisions of the United Nations Human Rights Committee (HRC) in individual communications. I hypothesize that the following factors influence the readiness of states to implement the views of the HRC: (i) the level of democracy and human rights protection in the state; (ii) internal capacity; (iii) strength of civil society; (iv) type of remedy; (v) representation on the HRC; (6) subject matter of the communication. I find that the most important factor for implementing remedies granted by the Committee is the high human rights score of the state. The internal capacity of the state is also significant but to a lesser extent than found in previous studies. Also, I find a certain connection between the state being represented on the HRC and its willingness to implement the remedies.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz047
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The Quiet Expansion of Universal Jurisdiction
    • Authors: Langer M; Eason M.
      Pages: 779 - 817
      Abstract: Based on an original worldwide survey of all universal jurisdiction complaints over core international crimes presented between 1961 and 2017 and against widespread perception by international criminal law experts that universal jurisdiction is in decline, this article shows that universal jurisdiction practice has been quietly expanding as there has been a significant growth in the number of universal jurisdiction trials, in the frequency with which these trials take place year by year and in the geographical scope of universal jurisdiction litigation. This expansion is likely the result of, among other factors, the adoption of International Criminal Court implementing statutes, the creation of specialized international crimes units by states, institutional learning by states and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), technological changes, new migration and refugee waves to universal jurisdiction states, criticisms of international criminal law as neo-colonial and the search of new venues by human rights NGOs. The expansion of universal jurisdiction has been quiet because most tried defendants have been low-level, universal jurisdiction states have not made an effort to publicize these trials and observers have wrongly assumed that Belgium and Spain were representative of universal jurisdiction trends. The article finally assesses positive and negative aspects of the quiet expansion of universal jurisdiction for its defenders and critics.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz050
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • International Commissions of Inquiry: What Difference Do They Make'
           Taking an Empirical Approach
    • Authors: Becker M; Nouwen S.
      Pages: 819 - 841
      Abstract: Introducing a symposium on the question of what difference international commissions of inquiry (COIs) make, this article frames the debate methodologically and theoretically. COIs have become a common feature of responses to issues of international concern. While aspects of their work have received substantial scholarly attention, less is known about the concrete, case-specific effects of past COIs. This symposium therefore encourages empirical research into the consequences of COIs, absent or present, intended or not. After discussing some of the common challenges to the empirical research required, this framework article sets forth a non-exhaustive typology of ways in which COIs could end up making a difference, such as inspiring further action or substituting for such action; justifying decision-making, ex ante or ex post; fostering a shared narrative or hardening competing narratives; legitimizing some groups while delegitimizing others; enhancing political dialogue or intensifying division; spurring reform or encouraging more of the same; promoting (international) law or exposing its limitations. This typology is presented as a resource for hypotheses not only for this symposium but also for future empirical research into the differences made (or not) by COIs.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz043
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • At Least Something: The UN Special Committee on the Problem of Hungary,
           1957–1958
    • Authors: Lieblich E.
      Pages: 843 - 876
      Abstract: In late 1956, the United Nations (UN) faced a remarkable test, as the Soviet Union invaded and crushed a burgeoning rebellion in Hungary, then a Soviet satellite. After the Soviet Union disregarded repeated UN calls to withdraw, the UN General Assembly established, in January 1957, a Commission of Inquiry (COI) to investigate the crisis. This article explores the forgotten story of the Special Committee on Hungary as a case study for the effects of COIs. This commission is of special interest for several reasons. Namely, it was one of the first mandated by a UN body to investigate a specific conflict, not least a Cold War struggle, in which a superpower was directly involved. Furthermore, it was clear from the beginning that the Committee was not likely to compel, in itself, the Soviet Union to change its behaviour. Moreover, 1956 was a time of global political transformation, as the non-aligned movement emerged as a key player in UN politics and, accordingly, became a target in the Cold War battle for influence. Under such circumstances, the effects of COIs are complex and difficult to gauge. While the Committee did not lead to the Soviet Union’s withdrawal from Hungary, it had many unforeseen and conflicting effects. These are grouped into two categories – effects relating mainly to times of ideological conflict and political transformation and effects that relate to parallel multilateral efforts and institutional dynamics. Among other effects, the article demonstrates how, under such political circumstances, COIs can create new points of contention and cause backlash precisely from those that they seek to influence. Having cascading and conflicting effects, the central conclusion is that COIs do not lend themselves easily to clean and linear theories. Recognition of the field’s inherent complexity is therefore needed in any attempt to study this international phenomenon.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz042
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The Unintended Consequences of the Goldstone Commission of Inquiry on
           Human Rights Organizations in Israel
    • Authors: Khoury-Bisharat H.
      Pages: 877 - 901
      Abstract: Scholarly writings on internationally constituted commissions of inquiry (COIs), as outlined in the introduction to this symposium, give inadequate attention to the effects that they might have on local disputes that these bodies are often created to address. The United Nations Fact-Finding Mission on the Gaza Conflict (2009), popularly known as the Goldstone Commission, had unintended and unforeseen consequences at the domestic level. Specifically, the Commission caused a severe backlash against human rights organizations in Israel (IsHROs). This article analyses the backlash against the Commission and the effect of that backlash on human rights organizations and human rights advocacy in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory in the first few years after the release of the Goldstone report. This case study reveals how a government can use a COI intervention in an ongoing conflict to deflect criticism against it and to delegitimize local human rights organizations and, as a result, to intensify enemy–friend dynamics within a conflict. The findings of this case study thus challenge the assumption of much of the socio-legal literature that the interaction of international human rights institutions with domestic actors leads to positive human rights change. But the case study also adds a new dimension to the academic and policy literature that has been critical of the international human rights enterprise in recent years. Despite delegitimization campaigns, international funding has increased for many IsHROs, and, eventually, some groups have become even more visible and have enjoyed, internationally, a higher reputation and greater credibility. The Commission’s experience thus demonstrates that the establishment of COIs in deeply divided conflict societies can have negative, as well as positive, implications on human rights.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz044
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Two Seas Apart: An Account of the Establishment, Operation and Impact of
           the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI)
    • Authors: Helal M.
      Pages: 903 - 927
      Abstract: The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI) was established to investigate the civil unrest that occurred in Bahrain during February and March 2011. This article employs qualitative empirical techniques to provide an account of the impact of the commission during three periods: (i) the period of the establishment of the commission; (ii) the five-month period of the commission’s presence in Bahrain; and (iii) the period following the submission of the commission’s report. The establishment of BICI was part of a government strategy to deflate domestic political tension and deflect international opprobrium in the aftermath of the crackdown on anti-government protestors in March 2011. Reformists within the government, especially Bahrain’s King Hamad, also hoped to utilize the report as a catalyst for implementing political reforms. The establishment of the BICI contributed to reducing the severity of the criticism directed at Bahrain from foreign governments, international organizations and domestic opposition actors. This article also describes the intercessions undertaken by the BICI on behalf of the victims of human rights abuses during its presence and operation in Bahrain and identifies some of the reforms that were recommended by the commission and executed by the Government of Bahrain during that period. Finally, this article examines the impact of the BICI following the submission of its report. It argues that, despite undertaking some positive institutional and administrative reforms, the Government of Bahrain has failed to fully implement the commission’s recommendations, especially those relating to holding those responsible for human rights abuses accountable. The article concludes that the failure of the BICI to make a substantial difference, especially in the area of accountability, is reflective of a general lack of political will to undertake the comprehensive reforms necessary to address the systemic sources of popular discontent that fuelled the 2011 protests.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz045
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Roaming Charges: Moments of Dignity: Mekong River
    • Pages: 929 - 932
      Abstract: We deal in EJIL with the world we live in – often with its worst and most violent pathologies, often with its most promising signs of hope for a better world. But, inevitably, since our vehicle is scholarship, we reify this world. Roaming Charges is designed not just to offer a moment of aesthetic relief, but to remind us of the ultimate subject of our scholarly reflections: we alternate between photos of places – the world we live in – and photos of people – who we are, the human condition. We eschew the direct programmatic photograph: people shot up; the ravages of pollution or the latest group photograph of ICJ judges.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz048
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The Relationship between the European Court of Human Rights and the
           Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation: Conflicting Conceptions of
           Sovereignty in Strasbourg and St Petersburg
    • Authors: Kahn J.
      Pages: 933 - 959
      Abstract: Russia eagerly ratified the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in 1998. Twenty years later, the chair of its Constitutional Court now expresses resentment at the subordination of Russian sovereignty. A new law expands his Court’s jurisdiction to deny effect to judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, an unprecedented power that has already been used twice. This article analyses this law and its application in its first two years. Both the claim of ‘subordination’ and the Russian response to it, in law and practice, rest on weak legal ground. But Russia’s action also raises deeper theoretical and practical questions for the ECHR as a ‘living instrument’ subject to the ‘evolutive’ interpretations of the Strasbourg Court. If other member states mimic Russia’s response to these issues, a European human rights system premised on the final interpretive authority of an international court could come to its end.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz049
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The Relationship between the European Court of Human Rights and the
           Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation: A Reply to Jeffrey Kahn
    • Authors: Blankenagel A.
      Pages: 961 - 969
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz059
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Populist Governments and International Law
    • Authors: Krieger H.
      Pages: 971 - 996
      Abstract: The worldwide populist wave has contributed to a perception that international law is currently in a state of crisis. This article examines how far populist governments have challenged prevailing interpretations of international law. The article links structural features of populism with an analysis of populist governmental strategies and argumentative practices. It demonstrates that, in their rhetoric, populist governments promote an understanding of international law as a mere law of coordination. However, this is not entirely reflected in their legal practices where an instrumental, cherry-picking approach prevails. The article concludes that policies of populist governments affect the current state of international law on two different levels: in the political sphere, their practices alter the general environment in which legal rules are interpreted and, in the legal sphere, populist governments push for changes in the interpretation of established international legal rules. The article substantiates these propositions by focusing on the principle of non-intervention and foreign funding for non-governmental organizations.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz046
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Populist Governments and International Law: A Reply to Heike Krieger
    • Authors: Rudolphy M.
      Pages: 997 - 1008
      Abstract: In this article, I argue that there are two main objections against Heike Krieger’s view on what ‘a populist approach to international law’ entails. First, there are two methodological obstacles that counsel against constructing ‘a populist approach to international law’: populism varies significantly depending on its definition of ‘the people’ and international law is a fragmented regime. Second, the opposition between a ‘law of coordination’ and a ‘law of cooperation’ to which Krieger resorts is misleading, for it obscures the fact that the value of cooperation and coordination lies primarily in the values for which we coordinate and cooperate. As such, I argue that this opposition may make us partially blind to two important dangers that some forms of populism may pose right now: their cooperating to reshape international law and institutions according to (some) of their values and their refusing to cooperate or coordinate in the achievement of urgent goals. Nonetheless, I conclude that the precise shape of these dangers – as well as how to resist them – remains blurry if we do not pay proper attention to the ways in which different forms of populism define ‘the people’.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz058
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Populist Governments and International Law: A Reply to Heike Krieger
    • Authors: Blokker P.
      Pages: 1009 - 1016
      Abstract: The article by Heike Krieger, published in this issue, is an important contribution to the debate on populism and the law, not least because of its emphasis on a distinctive populist approach to the law. Krieger’s account lacks however in providing sufficient attention to three dimensions: popular sovereignty, constituent power and a shifting imaginary of the law. The relation of populism with popular sovereignty (and populism as a reaction to unresponsive institutions) is little discussed, and, hence, the explicit democratic claim of populists is downplayed. Constituent power is equally little touched upon, meaning that the populist understanding of the law as an obstacle but equally as a means to institutionalize a different democratic order is overlooked. The most important argument in the paper, which remains however too implicit, is that of a potentially shifting imaginary of the law. Krieger’s argument points in the right direction, but it could be developed further by stressing the essentially and historically contested nature of the progressive international system and its weak spots in terms of legitimacy and accountability.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz055
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • From an Unpaid Electricity Bill to the Primacy of EU Law: Gian Galeazzo
           Stendardi and the Making of Costa v. ENEL
    • Authors: Arena A.
      Pages: 1017 - 1037
      Abstract: Whilst Costa v. ENEL is the starting point for most accounts of the primacy of EU law, the story of that lawsuit is still relatively unknown. What drove Flaminio Costa to sue his electricity provider over a bill of as little as £1,925 (about €22 in 2019)' Why did the small-claims court of Milan decide to involve both the Italian Constitutional Court and the European Court of Justice in such a ‘petty’ lawsuit' Why did those two courts hand down rulings going in opposite directions' How did the lawsuit end when it came back to the Milan small-claims court' Relying upon previously undisclosed court documents and interviews with some of the actors involved, this article seeks to shed some light on the less-known aspects of the Costa v. ENEL lawsuit, against the background of electricity nationalization in Italy at the height of the Cold War, and to assess the contribution of that lawsuit and of its ‘architect’, Gian Galeazzo Stendardi, to the development of the doctrine of primacy of European Union law.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz056
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • FIFA – The Beautiful Game – The Ugly Organization
    • Pages: 1039 - 1040
      Abstract: As would be expected, we typically publish reviews of books that deal with international law. The legal topics which form part of the books under review in this essay are linked to corruption and various other forms of criminality or alleged criminality, but not directly to international law. And it is precisely for this reason that we thought it is urgent to bring the saga, which in different ways all five of these books narrate, to the attention of the international legal field.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz061
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Whose Game' FIFA, Corruption and the Challenge of Global Governance
    • Authors: Gill S; Adelus E, de Abreu Duarte F.
      Pages: 1041 - 1066
      Abstract: The present review essay provides an analysis of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) from the point of view of global governance. Through a review of five books on corruption in FIFA, written for a general audience, the essay describes FIFA as an institution of global governance in which several forms of corruption are widespread among its member organizations and confederations and within the FIFA leadership. This review essay uses the accounts of corruption in FIFA that these books provide to argue that corruption helps solve coordination problems in FIFA by coordinating divergent interests, allocating or distributing funds and allowing for a network of diverse and diffuse actors to fundamentally shape global football. The systemic use of bribing and the exchange of political favours and other means of informal allocation of power are more than mere spontaneous illegalities; they represent an informal, but systematic, means of governance in FIFA. We argue that the February 2016 FIFA reforms fell short of addressing this activity. The reviewed books all call for governing FIFA in the public interest, and the essay presents some pathways to reform and potential replacements for the use of corruption with the aim of returning the game to the general public.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz054
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The Trial of the Kaiser
    • Authors: O’Keefe R.
      Pages: 1067 - 1071
      Abstract: SchabasWilliam A.. The Trial of the Kaiser.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. 432. £24.99. ISBN: 9780198833857
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz053
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Neoliberal Legality: Understanding the Role of Law in the Neoliberal
           Project
    • Authors: Chadwick A.
      Pages: 1071 - 1076
      Abstract: BrabazonHonor (ed.). Neoliberal Legality: Understanding the Role of Law in the Neoliberal Project.New York: Routledge, 2016. Pp. 214. £93.99. ISBN: 9781138684171
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz051
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Between the Lines of the Vienna Convention' Canons and Other
           Principles of Interpretation in Public International Law
    • Authors: Gardiner R.
      Pages: 1077 - 1081
      Abstract: KlinglerJoseph, ParkhomenkoYuri and SalonidisConstantinos (eds). Between the Lines of the Vienna Convention' Canons and Other Principles of Interpretation in Public International Law.Alphen aan den Rijn: Kluwer Law International, 2019. Pp. xxvii + 426. €204. ISBN: 9789041184030
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz052
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Pages: 1083 - 1084
      Abstract: International Law of Customs Unions: Conceptual Variety, Legal Ambiguity
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz041
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The Last Page
    • Pages: 1085 - 1085
      Abstract: Litanyhere along the long white shadowwhere I thought where I thought I’d leave the litany of locustof locust and death I’ll always hear the litany of soundhere along the long white shadowwhere I grab lustre grab honour that once was lustre and whitethe truth I’ve heard and how to molest itthat I travel I travel along the corn or chaff of my pastthat my past crawls forth on its deadly knees without once looking upthat I claw on my knees claw to that placethat light place that does not want to dimhere along the long white shadow of mortal and molested truthwe buried many we buried without shroud or ritualmany we buried and from the graves it sproutsthe shadow sprouts of lustre, burdock and wheat the locusts of soundhere along the long white shadowand my past sits so well in its teeth all alongits teeth sit well in the shadow of sulphur and lime it’s timethe time of assassin and shame and tinI keep slipping out of truthwhile next to me along the long white shadow walks the shudderthat I was walks the long white shudder of ashset me I who keep slipping in the long white shadowout of time out of random and lies I want slipping from the shudderalong the emptiness of litany and shadowset me set me from revenge and lossfrom ruin set me from the long white scar the lichen and ash set mefree into remorse oh my hand my hand grabs the sheet like a throatAntjie KrogLimits of Forgiveness in the New South Africa, by Antjie Krog, copyright © 1998, 2000 by Antjie Samuel. Used by permission of Crown Books, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. All rights reserved. In the UK and Commonwealth permission is provided courtesy of Random House Struik 1998, 2002. Text © Antjie Samuel 1998, 2002.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ejil/chz062
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)
       
 
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