Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1588 journals)
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INTERNATIONAL LAW (192 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 192 of 192 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
African Yearbook of International Law Online : Annuaire Africain de droit international Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access  
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access  
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Ocean Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Austrian Review of International and European Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Baltic Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Belli Ac Pacis : Jurnal Hukum Internasional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Chinese Journal of Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Global Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Climate law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 250)
European Journal of Migration and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers of Law in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Georgetown Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 52)
Houston Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Inter: Revista de Direito Internacional e Direitos Humanos da UFRJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 272)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Community Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organizations Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of the History of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Nordic Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Paix et Sécurité Internationales     Open Access  
Palestine Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Videre     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SASI     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Texas International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Yearbook of Polar Law Online     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Arbitration International
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0957-0411 - ISSN (Online) 0957-0411
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [413 journals]
  • The grapes of dispute resolution: arbitration and wine
    • Authors: Menjucq M; Gouiffès L.
      Pages: 465 - 474
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the interplay between arbitration and wine law and the possibility of having increased recourse to arbitration in wine-related disputes. Since Antiquity, wine production and commercialization have been subject to specific regulations, which have progressively given rise to modern wine law. Wine law is primarily focused on the protection of the geographical origin and branding of wine as well as consumer protection, fields typically inadequate for arbitration. However, wine law also covers wine commercialization and related operations such as vineyard sales, which offer many opportunities for arbitration in the wake of the internationalization of wine production and trade. This is particularly true since the wine sector is characterized by both very specific trade usages and a high degree of technicality, which require adjudicators of wine-related disputes to have a high degree of sectorial expertise. Arbitration therefore appears to be a particularly well-suited means of dispute adjudication for wine-related litigation, as illustrated by the authors’ experience.
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Oct 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa037
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Hybrid (institutional) arbitration clauses: party autonomy gone wild
    • Authors: Molina Esteban C.
      Pages: 475 - 489
      Abstract: AbstractHybrid institutional arbitration clauses are situations in which parties choose one arbitral institution to administer a case but under the rules of another arbitral institution. This forces institutions to adapt their organs to the chosen set of rules, making procedures more cumbersome and increasing litigiousness. As a consequence, hybrid arbitration clauses are a prime example of something parties may choose to do under the principle of party autonomy, yet shouldn’t do in the interest of safeguarding the principle of efficiency of arbitral procedure.This article analyses existing cases on the matter in order to extract conclusions as to how the interplay between party autonomy and efficiency operates in each case and at a broader level.While all decisions have upheld the validity of hybrid clauses, the analysed cases open up a whole set of additional questions, on which a consensus may not be reached: Does upholding the validity of hybrid arbitration really further party autonomy if institutions are heavily construing arbitration agreements' Should the choice of an administering institution or the choice of rules prevail' What weight should be attached to an institution's willingness to administer a case' These questions underscore the key tension between party autonomy and procedural efficiency.
      PubDate: Sat, 10 Oct 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa027
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Don’t rage against the machine: why AI may be the cure for the ‘moral
           hazard’ of party appointments
    • Authors: Schwing M.
      Pages: 491 - 507
      Abstract: AbstractIn 2010, Jan Paulsson decried the use of party-appointed arbitrators in international arbitration as a ‘moral hazard' that threatened the legitimacy of arbitration as an impartial method of dispute resolution. He suggested a series of reforms, most notably allowing arbitral institutions to make all arbitrator appointments. Over the past decade, commentators have debated Paulsson's arguments and whether arbitrators should be chosen by parties or arbitral institutions, relying on an assumption that those two methods are the only ways by which arbitrators can be selected. This essay demonstrates that both approaches are fundamentally flawed, because they are subject to the self-interest and biases of human beings. Moreover, it explains how modern technology has produced a new way by which arbitrators can be selected--specifically, via artificial intelligence (AI)--that allows for parties to have input into the selection process but removes the issues that arise when parties select arbitrators directly. As this essay illustrates, using an AI to select arbitrators will allow arbitrators to truly be independent, ensure that arbitrators are selected for their merit and not for their connections, eliminate incentives for compromise awards and the use of dissents to communicate leanings to future appointing parties, and increase diversity in arbitrator appointments.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa033
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Irreconcilable perspectives like in an Escher’s drawing' Extension
           of an arbitration agreement to a non-signatory state and attribution of
           state entities’ conduct: privity of contract in Swiss and investment
           arbitral tribunals’ case law
    • Authors: Magnarelli M; Ziegler A.
      Pages: 509 - 520
      Abstract: AbstractA matter of perspective' When a dispute arises and on the government’s side a non-signatory to the arbitration agreement or investment treaty adopted the contested action, privity of contract and rules of attribution of conduct may apply. Both have been interpreted in different manners. When one put all these interpretations together, the result is a picture of impossible spaces and irreconcilable scenarios like in a drawing of Escher. If Escher expressed his artistic inspiration by challenging gravity and visual logic, practitioners may nowadays find challenging solving the dilemma of when and how an arbitration agreement can be extended to a non-signatory state or the conduct of a state entity be attributed to the state.In its recent decision 4 A_636/2018, the Swiss Supreme Court confirmed its case law that exceptions to the doctrine of privity of contract exist under Swiss law, but these are limited in number and scope. The same applies regardless of whether private or public entities are concerned. This article will examine decision 4 A_636/2018 in light of Swiss case law and draw a comparison with investment arbitral tribunals’ jurisprudence applying rules of attribution of conduct of customary international law when privity of contract lacks on the government’s side.
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa034
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Resurrecting the debate on ‘due process paranoia’ in Centrotrade:
           Paranoia or Judiciousness'
    • Authors: Saha S; Shukla S.
      Pages: 521 - 528
      Abstract: AbstractRecently, the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India in Centrotrade Minerals and Metals Inc v Hindustan Copper Ltd, rejected an application for non-enforcement of a foreign award and justified its ‘pro-enforcement’ bias. The Apex Court was of the opinion that there was no due process violation as the arbitrator provided enough opportunities to the parties to present the case but the respondent failed to abide by the timelines. Although, the Court has correctly interpreted the scope of due process but unfortunately, failed to address the repeated extension of arbitral proceeding at the cost of efficiency and speed. On a closer study, the Apex Court’s ruling resurrects a puzzling question of the arbitrator’s perceived reluctance to reject dilatory tactics of the respondent during arbitral proceeding. This article examines the implications of the ruling on arbitrators as they may be more exposed to the unscrupulous attempts of the parties to wilful delay under the garb of ‘due process paranoia’.
      PubDate: Fri, 28 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa035
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • To boycott proceedings or not' Recourse against arbitral awards on
           jurisdictional grounds by different categories of respondents under the
           Model Law
    • Authors: Chan D; Neoh C.
      Pages: 529 - 556
      Abstract: AbstractThe remedies that award debtors have under Articles 16(3), 34 and 36 of the Model Law, and more critically the inter-relationship between those remedies, has attracted much debate. Yet there is a dearth of analysis on how the availability of each remedy may differ according to the award debtor’s degree of participation in the arbitral process. Such analysis carries significant practical value for parties in considering whether and to what extent they should participate in any arbitral process when they harbour jurisdictional objections. This article distils Singapore’s experience, describing how Singapore has implemented the ‘choice of remedies’ principle for participating, non-participating, and boycotting respondents with jurisdictional objections, with comparative observations from Hong Kong, England, and New Zealand. This article shows that the ultimate matrix of remedies chosen by Singapore is far from straightforward. The question whether a respondent has participated in the arbitral process is also a vexed one. The analysis in this article begs the question whether in pursuit of harmonization future reforms to the Model Law ought to be considered.
      PubDate: Sun, 04 Oct 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa029
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • The Silent Spring of Human Rights in Investment Arbitration: Jurisprudence
           Constante through Case-Law Trajectory
    • Authors: Joshi R; Gurpur S.
      Pages: 557 - 570
      Abstract: AbstractAs a niché body of jurisprudence, International Investment Arbitration has paradoxically remained aloof from developments in other related spheres of law. Increasingly, however, Tribunals have been compelled to reflect on matters arising out of a human rights narrative. This article studies the perspectives of certain stakeholders in choosing to employ human rights to further social, economic or environmental interests in an investment arbitration. These stakeholders are: Claimant, Respondent, Third Party Interveners, Tribunal, and Enforcing Jurisdiction. Reliance is placed on awards spanning 28 years from 1989 to 2017 under the ICSID regime as well as in ad hoc arbitrations under the UNCITRAL Rules. An analysis of trends in case law sheds light on the nature of a jurisprudence constante developing in this regard. The article also explores limitations to, and recommendations for, the engagement of human rights within the realms of Investment Arbitration.
      PubDate: Sun, 03 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa020
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • The extension of arbitration agreements to third parties through the lens
           of Egyptian courts
    • Authors: Shehata I.
      Pages: 571 - 581
      Abstract: AbstractExtending arbitration agreements to third parties has long been a recurring debate in the world of international commercial arbitration. There are various mechanisms by which an arbitration agreement might be extended to third parties. This includes the doctrines of group of companies, group of contracts, universal succession, and assignment of contracts. The fact that the Egyptian Arbitration Law—alike most arbitration laws—does not deal specifically with this issue leaves a gap to be filled by the courts. This article tries to analyse and synthesize the various decisions rendered by the Egyptian courts in an attempt to identify their stance in this area. In this regard, this article will first discuss the privity of contracts from an Egyptian legal perspective, then will delve into the various constructs and mechanisms that could be utilized under Egyptian law when it comes to the extension of arbitration agreements to third parties. Special attention will then be paid to a specific issue, namely the extension of arbitration agreements under a contract to the letters of guarantee issued in connection with the same contract.
      PubDate: Sun, 03 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa013
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Exploring the prospects of host-state counterclaims in corruption disputes
    • Authors: Vijayvergia C; Belmannu P.
      Pages: 583 - 600
      Abstract: AbstractWhile the regime of investment treaty arbitration has evolved manifold over the decades, has the position of the host-states as a Respondent improved' The authors argue that it has not. Bilateral Investment Treaties (hereinafter BIT(s)) are still asymmetrical in nature where the states are obliged to protect the rights of the foreign investors but are not provided with any remedy against the corrupt activities of the investors. While tribunals have denied jurisdiction over the investors’ claims tainted with corruption, they have provided states with no consequent remedy against such investors. Consequently, the states have to first bear the loss of a failed investment in its territory and then pay for the exorbitant costs of international arbitration as well. Where scholars are arguing for attribution of liability of corrupt activities of the public officials to the states, the authors here raise an important question of what if the liability cannot be attributed to the states due to lack of apparent authority' Should the states be then allowed to move forward from the jurisdictional stage to raise counterclaims to seek damages for the loss caused by the investors' In this article, the authors explore these questions and present arguments in favour of the inclusion of corruption-based counterclaims.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Oct 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa041
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Portigon v Spain: new frontiers for financial institutions in
           investor–state arbitration'
    • Authors: Apostolova K.
      Pages: 601 - 609
      Abstract: AbstractHistorically, financial institutions have preferred litigation over arbitration as a dispute resolution mechanism. In recent years, however, financial institutions have turned to international arbitration more often. This is reflected in the 2018 Queen Mary International Arbitration Survey which concluded that financial institutions are ‘contemplating arbitration with much greater interest than ever before’. In addition to incorporating international arbitration clauses more often in their contracts, financial institutions have become increasingly aware of the protections established by international investment treaties and are more actively seeking to benefit from the rights they establish for qualifying investors. A recent decision has revealed how important those rights could be. In August 2020, for the first time in investor–state arbitration, in Portigon v Spain, a tribunal found that a financial institution may seek protection under an investment treaty for project finance because project finance, in the form of long-term loans and swaps, constitutes a protected ‘investment’ under the relevant investment treaty. While the decision remains confidential as of the publication of this article, it is an opportune moment to review the proposition that project financiers may seek protection under investment treaties against state actions that affect adversely the projects they are financing.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arbint/aiaa045
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2020)
       
 
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