Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1492 journals)
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    - CORPORATE LAW (90 journals)
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    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (151 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (188 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (22 journals)
    - LAW (897 journals)
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INTERNATIONAL LAW (188 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 188 of 188 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
African Yearbook of International Law Online : Annuaire Africain de droit international Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access  
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access  
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Ocean Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Austrian Review of International and European Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Baltic Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Journal of Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal  
Chinese Journal of Global Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Climate law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access  
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 222)
European Journal of Migration and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers of Law in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Georgetown Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 51)
Houston Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 261)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Community Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organizations Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of International Commercial Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the History of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Nordic Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Palestine Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Texas International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 4)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yearbook of Polar Law Online     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of International Political Theory
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1755-0882 - ISSN (Online) 1755-1722
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1085 journals]
  • Life in the nuclear age: Classical realism, critical theory and the
           technopolitics of the nuclear condition
    • Authors: Columba Peoples
      Pages: 279 - 296
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 279-296, October 2019.
      Classical realist thought provides a diagnosis of the significance nuclear weapons that calls into question the very possibility of politics in the nuclear age. While sharing similarities with this outlook, critical theoretic reflections suggest a more expansive consideration of the nuclear condition as underpinned by combinations of dystopian fears of nuclear destruction and utopian visions of nuclear futures. Most prominently Herbert Marcuse’s critical theory intimates an understanding of the nuclear condition as one that is rendered tolerable so long as nuclear technologies are associated with and related to innovation, progress and modernity. The study of the technopolitics of the nuclear condition might thus look not only to classical realists’ concern with ‘Death in the Nuclear Age’ but also incorporate corresponding critical awareness of claims to the life-sustaining applications of nuclear technologies in areas such as energy production, industry and medicine. Applying an ‘aporetic’ form of immanent critique, and to exemplify how the international politics of the nuclear age has often been predicated on efforts to distinguish and relate different kinds of nuclear technologies, the article revisits the United States–led post-war vision of ‘Atoms for Peace’ and compares it to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s contemporary ‘How the Atom Benefits Life’ campaign.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218788888
       
  • A new “nuclear normalcy”'
    • Authors: Sonja D Schmid
      Pages: 297 - 315
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 297-315, October 2019.
      This article focuses on a part of the “nuclear condition” that is often overlooked in philosophical discussions: that of materiality. Connecting the spheres of nuclear weapons (and associated security threats), and of nuclear power generation (and associated safety concerns), are the materials that bombs and electricity can be made of, and the machines that produce either enriched uranium or plutonium. We now have evidence of just how fragile the machines and devices were (and are) that sustained the nuclear age, but also how tenuous and artificial the boundary is that we assume between “peaceful” and “military” purposes. And yet, each new “nuclear deal” affirms this boundary, and the possibility of its existence. While the community of scholars and policymakers who prioritize nuclear security strive to label as many steps of the process as “special,” and therefore subject to inspection, accounting, and international control, multinational power companies and national nuclear industries promote “technical fixes” for lingering safety concerns, and advance the opposite strategy: to “normalize” many processes to the point of including severe accident response into the industry’s business-as-usual. The article argues that different kinds of “nuclearities” have increasingly become accepted as “normal”: on one hand, international diplomacy that foregrounds legal and regulatory strategies to nip potential nuclear weapons programs in the bud, and on the other, national nuclear power programs growing their fleets and attempting to expand their market reach. By accepting the divide between the “security community” and the “safety community” as the new “nuclear normalcy,” the shared nuclear materiality threatens to slip out of view, or at the very least, out of focus.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218796674
       
  • After tragedy: Melodrama and the rhetoric of realism
    • Authors: Daniel J Levine
      Pages: 316 - 331
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 316-331, October 2019.
      Responding to renewed interest in political rhetoric among contemporary International Relations (IR)–realists, this article advances three main claims. First, it suggests that tragedy—the dominant aesthetic-narrative mode to which these realists have turned in their rhetorical considerations—is ill-suited to the contemporary political moment. In the context of a late-modern “nuclear condition,” the turn to classical tragedy seems set to reproduce the resentful, anti-realist hubris that its promulgators hope to dispel or disenchant. Second, it suggests that late modern politics is widely experienced not in tragic terms but in melodramatic ones, and that contemporary reflexive realists would do well to alter their rhetorical approaches accordingly. Third, it explores rhetorical frameworks that might better meet the challenges posed by politics experienced in such terms.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218790987
       
  • Appetite for destruction: Günther Anders and the metabolism of
           nuclear techno-politics
    • Authors: Rens van Munster, Casper Sylvest
      Pages: 332 - 348
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 332-348, October 2019.
      It is well recognized how the modern social sciences, particularly in the United States, fed off and contributed to a nuclear state associated with the military-industrial complex. But it is less known that the thermonuclear revolution also constituted a productive moment for critical theories of (nuclear) techno-politics. In this article, we recover a strand of the latter by focusing on Günther Anders (1902–1992), a German philosopher of technology for whom thermonuclear weapons symbolized the self-destructive capacity embedded in a disenchanted modernity. We stress the techno-political dimensions of Anders’ philosophy by approaching it through his concept and metaphor of metabolism. Anders sought to update Marxist thinking to the age of technology to reawaken his readers to the realities and power dynamics of the nuclear condition and the ways in which these were consistently obscured. He pondered the grotesque human ability to live with a monstrous and suicidal weapon, while highlighting the dynamics of extraction and consumption that characterized both modern ‘mass’ society and nuclear techno-politics. Anders’ quest for emancipation focused on a nurturing of the imagination of modern human beings. We stress the critical, global and activist orientation of his analysis and discuss its merits and contemporary relevance.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218796536
       
  • Solving the nuclear dilemma: Is a world state necessary'
    • Authors: Campbell Craig
      Pages: 349 - 366
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 349-366, October 2019.
      The unique dangers raised by the possibility of nuclear warfare have long prompted intensive debates about what political action is needed to avoid it. While most scholars contend that it is possible to prevent a nuclear war without fundamental political change, others argue that a substantial solution to the problem demands the abolition of the existing interstate system. Two such ‘radical’ positions are the ‘Weberian’ school, which insists that an authoritative world state is necessary, and Daniel Deudney’s alternative, a liberal order based upon republican traditions of mutual restraint, internal power balancing and powerful arms control institutions. In this essay, I argue, using both historical and theoretical analysis, that the regime Deudney envisions would amount to the establishment of a Pax Americana. This would be rejected by illiberal nuclear powers and therefore fail to solve the nuclear problem.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218795981
       
  • Going critical: Toward a modified nuclear one worldism
    • Authors: Daniel H Deudney
      Pages: 367 - 385
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 367-385, October 2019.
      Nuclear weapons posed a profound conceptual problem for classical realism, forcing into collision two of its long-standing core dictums: oppose world government as a source of insecurity and un-freedom, and exit anarchy into authoritative government when levels of violence interdependence in particular spaces become very high. Initially, leading realists (Burnham, Morgenthau, and Herz) chose world government, hoping internal restraints (analogous to the role played by the balance of power in anarchies with lesser levels of violence interdependence) could overcome its threat to freedom and its political impracticality. But this option reached a conceptual and practical dead end. Building on Herz’s suggestion of a generalized historical materialist base-superstructural model to theorize security practices and orders, the actual materiality of the nuclear situation (previously dimly understood) points toward the obsolescence of the statist mode of protection, and toward arms control, as the practices of an alternative, republican-federal, mode of protection whose operation gradually moves world order from anarchy, but not toward a world state. Until this shift is complete, world order remains in fundamental contradiction with the nuclear forces of destruction.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218796689
       
  • The next great hope: The humanitarian approach to nuclear weapons
    • Authors: Jan Ruzicka
      Pages: 386 - 400
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 386-400, October 2019.
      This article examines the humanitarian approach to nuclear weapons, which has reinvigorated the efforts to achieve their prohibition. It explores the fundamental arguments made by the ‘Humanitarian Initiative’ and their grounding in a relationship between international law and international politics. The analysis draws on the emphasis that classical realists put on the political nature of international problems, primarily shaped by considerations of power. Such approach is useful because the humanitarian approach attempts to address the political problem of nuclear weapons by recourse to claims about morality and through the means of international law, most notably the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, deliberately choosing to circumvent politics and its concern with power. The classical realist perspective suggests that to overlook the power political dimension and to consider the problem of nuclear weapons chiefly as a moral and legal issue is likely to lead to yet another failure in efforts to achieve nuclear disarmament.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218785922
       
  • Let’s quarrel (streiten)! Introducing a Kantian framework for social
           interaction in international politics
    • Authors: Jiun Bang
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Actors in international politics have been driven predominantly by two (maybe three) logics of social interaction: fighting, bargaining, and some arguing. Yet, if international politics is characterized by a lack of determinate laws unlike its domestic corollary, it would be unrealistic to expect leaders to simply rely on a singular mode of evaluating facts based primarily on cognition and interests. In turn, I offer quarreling to address this gap. As a type of affective social interaction based on the subjective validity of one’s feelings and thus one that goes beyond mere disagreement to disapproval, quarreling tries to establish who is right about what is right. I establish a theoretical framework based on Kant’s intuitions of a quarrel (streiten) and in so doing clarify both the purpose and utility of quarreling: to demand assent for one’s feelings (in the absence of established rules and norms) and expose an underlying contention involving values.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-11-29T02:44:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219890371
       
  • A pragmatic methodology for studying international practices
    • Authors: Sasikumar S Sundaram, Vineet Thakur
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Practice turn marks an important advancement in International Relations theorizing. In challenging abstract meta-theoretical debates, practice theorizing in International Relations aims to get close to the lifeworld(s) of the actual practitioners of politics. Scholars from different positions such as constructivism, critical theory, and post-structuralism have critically interrogated the analytical framework of practices in international politics. Building upon these works, we are concerned with a question of how to examine the context of international practices that unfolds in multiple ways in practitioners’ performances. Our central thesis is that a distinct pragmatic methodology offers an opportunity to keep with the practice turn and avoid the problematic foundational moves of mainstream practice theorizing. This involves foregrounding three interrelated processes in examining practices: the role of exceptions in the normal stream of performances, normative uptake of the analysts, and the semantic field that actors navigate in political performances. We argue that this methodology is predicated on its usefulness to interpret practices through reflective social-science inquiry.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-03T01:50:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219879177
       
  • On biodiplomacy: Negotiating life and plural modes of existence
    • Authors: Costas M Constantinou, Sam Okoth Opondo
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the intersection of biopolitics with diplomacy and engages its dynamic re-envisioning as biodiplomacy. It revisits Michel Foucault’s peripheral attention to diplomacy and his framing of the concept in his writings on raison d’état and the government of the living. The article suggests that biodiplomacy can help us understand better the complexity of global biopolitical projects, moving us beyond governmentality and sensitizing us about the continuous negotiation of the meaning and materiality of particular ways of living vis-à-vis other ways of being. Specifically, the article addresses modes of existence peculiar to the postcolony or encompassing antithetical value systems and argues that biodiplomacy opens up a wider field of ethical and cosmopolitical possibilities by making visible the interconnected plurality of human and non-human forces.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-10-03T01:48:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219877423
       
  • On the relevance of Carl Schmitt’s concept of Großraum in contemporary
           international politics
    • Authors: Roberto Orsi
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Since the end of the Cold War, a number of authors have affirmed the relevance of Carl Schmitt’s concept of Großraum for contemporary international politics. This article reviews those claims and argues that Großraum has little to offer in analytical terms to enhance our understanding of the international political situation in this early twenty-first century. Those authors who wish to revive Großraum for the sake of their theoretical work overlook vitally important components of this concept. Furthermore, their claims fail to meet the criteria of Reinhart Koselleck’s structural iterability.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-09-12T12:47:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219874431
       
  • Rethinking harmony in international relations
    • Authors: Damien Mahiet
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Harmony is a generally agreed-upon idea in international and diplomatic discourse. A common theme in multiple traditions of thought, Platonist and Confucian among others, it underlies today’s significant investments in musical activism, cultural diplomacy, conflict resolution and peace building. Yet despite this wide currency and long history, the idea of harmony seldom receives more than liminal attention in political theory. In the context of Western thought, an essay written in the 1830s by the French philosopher Jean Reynaud offers a striking point of departure: Reynaud defines diplomacy as ‘the science of harmony among states’. This article, drawing from Reynaud’s text as well from the wider history of music, art and political thought, maps a series of conceptual fault lines that touch on the concept’s function in international thought; the inscription of difference, dissonance, conflict and even war within the idea of harmony; the hegemonic and imperial temptations harmony encompasses and legitimizes; and the theoretical sources of harmony in nature and artifice. In effect, the concept of harmony offers less a blueprint than a forum for imagining peace.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T09:11:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219868825
       
  • The patronising Kantianisms of hospitality ethics in International
           Relations: Towards a politics of imposition
    • Authors: Mark FN Franke
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The contemporary international regime of law and politics regarding human migration largely follows Immanuel Kant’s contradictory approach, supporting the cosmopolitical rights of humans to move and expect hospitality while privileging the rights of sovereign states to assert territorial security against movement. International Relations scholars informed by Jacques Derrida’s ethical theory argue that one may press this tension to positive dynamics through affirmation of the aporia that a secured home is a requirement for the possibility of the hospitality that might undo conflict between migrants and emplaced citizens. Yet, the attraction of Derrida’s critical Kantianism and this revival of hospitality depends on asserting the primacy of habitation to how citizen subjects stand with respect to foreigners who move. It depends on neglecting how any assumption of home is not based on a given home but, rather, on movements to impose the boundaries and bounty of a home. No one faces the movement of others who seek to make home from the position of home but only also in movements of homemaking. Both the citizen and the migrant move in forms of imposition. And it is only in a politics of imposition that rights to move can be affirmed and gain respect.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-08-13T07:19:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219869362
       
  • Taking responsibility in an unjust world
    • Authors: Joe Hoover
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T09:47:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219867103
       
  • Max Weber’s ethics
    • Authors: Richard Ned Lebow
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      I offer a critique of Weber’s two ethics. The first layer is internal and concerned with their logics. The second layer considers the external knowledge necessary to apply them appropriately and argues that it is extremely difficult to come by. The third layer connects Weber’s ethics to his politics because the choice of either ethic in almost any context is a value choice. This is apparent in Weber’s application of these ethics to Germany foreign policy. He used his ethics in a rhetorical way to justify his values rather than using these values as a guide to policy assessment. This reversal is endemic to politics. One response might be to stipulate beforehand the kinds of policies that are unacceptable in democracies regardless of their expected outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-07-05T07:12:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219854780
       
  • Potentiality, political protest and constituent power: A response to the
           special issue
    • Authors: Michael PA Murphy
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Emergent forms of political protest and constitution often provide limit cases for their contemporary theoretical models, and transnational protest movements from Occupy to Democracy in Europe 2025 are no exception. The recent special issue of the Journal of International Political Theory offers a number of different conceptual paths towards understanding these developments, revising and refreshing categories like civil disobedience, opposition, resistance, as well as constituent and destituent power. However, the plurality of perspectives in the special issue leads to a certain degree of uncertainty in the use of terms. This response to the special issue begins with a reflection on its major conceptual developments, addresses the missed encounter with Giorgio Agamben’s theory of ‘destituent potential’ and develops a framework for contrasting different theoretical approaches to political protest and constitution through their relation to potentiality. This taxonomy of emergent forms of political protest and constitution complements the substantial theoretical developments undertaken in the special issue by making the important conceptual relationships between them more readily visible. As well, by demonstrating the applicability of potentiality to the study of International Relations, this framework contributes to the project of the theoretical investigation of international politics.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-06-29T09:59:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219860858
       
  • Challenging borders: The case for open borders with Joseph Carens and
           Jean-Luc Nancy
    • Authors: James A Chamberlain
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Joseph Carens develops one of the most prominent cases for open borders in the academic literature on the basis of freedom and equality. Yet the implementation of his social membership theory would mean that immigrants who have not yet lived in a country long enough to become members would be excluded from political and social rights, thus raising the possibility of their domination and subordination by citizens. Given that these problems arise because Carens aims to balance the freedom of individuals with the “claims of belonging” to a political community, can we theorize the relationship between freedom and community differently' French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy does just that, by showing how to think freedom and community as mutually constitutive. Nancy thus offers the resources for an alternative case for open borders, grounded on the claim that the freedom of community entails openness to the outside. Drawing also on Nancy’s account of the common and of democratic politics, my Nancean argument for open borders challenges Carens’s exclusion of nonmembers from the rights of citizens, emphasizing instead the need for an ongoing political struggle to expand who is eligible to claim rights as well as the scope of the rights themselves.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-06-27T09:58:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219859919
       
  • Global justice, sovereignty, and the problem of perspective
    • Authors: Jennifer Szende
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that a state-centered theory of global justice exhibits an epistemic problem of perspective, and that this worry exhibits a gendered character. Within a liberal domestic theory of justice, the public/private distinction has been repeatedly shown to be bad for women because it creates a domain for injustice that becomes invisible to public policy and the law. This article argues that state-centered theories of global justice create an analogous space that is cut off from questions of global justice. The article therefore suggests that this way of framing questions of global justice is problematic, and is problematic for women in particular. Just as the public/private distinction in liberal domestic justice leaves cases of injustice outside the vision of the law, the hard distinction between the domestic (state) sphere and the international realm of justice leaves cases of injustice invisible to international law. For the question of global justice, the privileging of sovereignty and non-intervention compromises the ability of the theory to achieve its purported goal of universal justice.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T10:24:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219852646
       
  • Cosmopolitan disobedience
    • Authors: Steve Cooke
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T05:39:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219850196
       
  • Democracy, free association and boundary delimitation: The cases of
           Catalonia and Tabarnia
    • Authors: Guillermo Graíño Ferrer, Adriaan Ph V Kühn
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T08:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219848460
       
  • Debating global justice with Carr: The crisis of laissez faire and the
           legitimacy problem in the twenty-first century
    • Authors: Haro L Karkour
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T09:40:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219838295
       
  • Revisiting Rosa Luxemburg’s internationalism
    • Authors: Robert O’Brien
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-03-05T10:28:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219833416
       
  • Are human rights western—And why does it matter' A perspective from
           international political theory
    • Authors: Janne Mende
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-03-02T07:28:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219832992
       
  • Feminist foreign policy as ethical foreign policy' A care ethics
           perspective
    • Authors: Fiona Robinson
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-02-26T06:38:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219828768
       
  • The nuclear condition in the twenty-first century: Techno-political
           aspects in historical and contemporary perspectives
    • Authors: Richard Beardsworth, Hartmut Behr, Timothy W Luke
      First page: 270
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      PubDate: 2019-03-11T10:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218796683
       
  • Interpreting the English school: History, science and philosophy
    • Authors: Mark Bevir, Ian Hall
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces the Special Issue on ‘Interpretivism and the English School of International Relations’. It distinguishes between what we term the interpretivist and structuralist wings of the school and argues that disagreement about its preferred approach to the study of international relations has generated confusion about what it stands for and weakened its capacity to respond to alternative approaches. It puts the case for a reconsideration of the underlying philosophical positions that the school wishes to affirm and suggests that a properly grounded interpretivism may serve it best. The final part of the article discusses the topics and arguments of the remaining pieces in the Special Issue.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219898884
       
  • The English school and the classical approach: Between modernism and
           interpretivism
    • Authors: Mark Bevir, Ian Hall
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the evolution of the English school’s approach to international relations from the work of the early British Committee in the late 1950s and early 1960s to its revival in the 1990s and afterwards. It argues that the school’s so-called ‘classical approach’ was shaped by the crisis of developmental historicism brought on by the First World War and by the reactions of historians like Herbert Butterfield and Martin Wight to the rise of modernist social science in the twentieth century. It characterises the classical approach, as advanced by Hedley Bull, as a form of ‘reluctant modernism’ with underlying interpretivist commitments and unresolved tensions with modernist approaches. It argues that to resolve some of the confusion concerning its preferred approach to the study of international relations, the English school should return to the interpretivist commitments of its early thinkers.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219898883
       
  • The lex of the Earth' Arendt’s critique of Roman law
    • Authors: Shinkyu Lee
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      How political communities should be constituted is at the center of Hannah Arendt’s engagement with two ancient sources of law: the Greek nomos and the Roman lex. Recent scholarship suggests that Arendt treats nomos as imperative and exclusive while lex has a relationship-establishing dimension and that for an inclusive form of polity, she favors lex over nomos. This article argues, however, that Arendt’s appreciation occurs within a general context of more reservations about Rome than Roman-centric interpretations admit. Her writings show that lex could not accommodate the agonistic spirit and Homeric impartiality that helped the Greeks achieve human greatness and surpassing excellence. Arendt also points out that Roman peace alliances occurred at the expense of disclosive competition among equals and assumed some form of domination. Indeed, although Arendt appreciates lex’s relationship-establishing aspect, she is undoubtedly critical of anti-political practices accompanying lex, manifested when the Romans required enemies’ submission to terms of peace the Romans themselves set. In the end, Arendt’s statements regarding nomos and lex highlight the fundamental challenge in free politics: balancing the internal demand of agonistic action with the external need to expand lasting ties.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219898237
       
  • Ciceronian international society
    • Authors: Stephen Patrick Sims
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores what Cicero as a political thinker can offer to the study of international relations. Although previous readings of Cicero have emphasized his Stoic influences and his natural law teaching as the basis of a cosmopolitan world society, I emphasize the way in which Cicero can deepen the concept of international society. International society relies on certain norms and institutions to function properly, such as international law, sovereignty, and the use of war to restrain violence and redress injustice. We find all these concepts articulated clearly in Cicero’s moral and political thought. Cicero also shows the limits of these institutions and norms, explaining why none of them is absolute. Finally, Cicero adds to our theorizing about international society by drawing attention to the role of honor, ruling, and inequality in international society. As such, classical political thought, and Cicero’s in particular, provide a valuable resource for future thinking about international theory.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088219895789
       
  • Sovereign myths in international relations: Sovereignty as equality and
           the reproduction of Eurocentric blindness
    • Authors: Xavier Mathieu
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of sovereignty still generates a considerable amount of debate in the discipline of International Relations. Using myth as a heuristic device, I argue that part of this confusion results from a mythical understanding of ‘sovereignty as equality’. Following the myth, sovereignty is seen as playing an equalising role in international relations, while international inequalities are depicted as existing despite the norm of sovereignty (and not as a result of it). The myth of sovereignty as equality thus enables international relations scholars to separate the inequalities instituted and legitimised by sovereignty from the concept itself. As a consequence, sovereignty is considered as normatively desirable since it is the best tool to offset inequalities. This article argues that the myth rests on three interlinked building blocks and that its maintenance can be explained by its normative appeal (more than by its dubious analytical value). Indeed, even those scholars who reproduce the myth acknowledge that international relations do not conform to it. As such, an effective critique of sovereignty requires both factual disproval (to reveal what the myth contributes to hide) and the construction of an alternative, more desirable myth.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218814072
       
  • Defining a relationship between transitional justice and jus post bellum:
           A call and an opportunity for post-conflict justice
    • Authors: Kirsten J Fisher
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      While there is an acknowledged overlap of transitional justice and jus post bellum, there has been no real attention to delineating a clear relationship between the two or addressing the significant differences regarding aims, scope and audience. These differences must be acknowledged and a clear relationship between the two fields needs to be demarcated for both intellectual clarity and practical reasons. It seems right to question not only where these fields of inquiry fall in relation to each other but how the two can co-exist and inform each other in a meaningful way that works to the benefit of victims of conflict and mass atrocity. Done correctly, this overlap can be ushered into a coherent research agenda where the two perspectives can be brought together in a careful and concise manner. This article aims to start to address this gap.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218814038
       
  • Daring and deliberation: Virtue, rhetoric, and diplomacy in Thucydides’
           account of the Athenian empire
    • Authors: Eric A Fleury
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      In Thucydides’ account of the Peloponnesian War, the juxtaposition between the speeches in defense of the Athenian empire and their political effects uncovers critical insights into the need for rhetoric to balance the tasks of domestic enthusiasm and diplomatic interaction. In Thucydides’ account of the Peloponnesian War, Pericles boasts that Athens has perfected “daring and deliberation,” having built an empire through courageous deeds while maintaining a democracy in which competing interests and perspectives receive a fair hearing. These qualities justify Athenian supremacy, but actually maintaining it instead calls for Athens to be cautious and for its subjects to accept the status quo without question. As Athens perceives a decline in its wartime fortunes, it struggles to preserve a reputation for daring and deliberation without undertaking actions that would falsify its self-representation. Its virtues become a substitute for its interests, so that it can no longer act with either morally or prudently. The declining effectiveness of Athenian rhetoric speaks to Thucydides’ teaching that warfare, while presenting an opportunity for a city to display its greatest traits, is far more likely to corrupt them, which requires that orators reconcile the city’s sense of its own righteousness with the realities of its situation.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218812096
       
  • Towards International Relations beyond the mind
    • Authors: Dirk Nabers
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The analysis focuses on the centrality of the mind and the mental, and their relationship with the notion of discourse in International Relations theorizing. While many forms of discourse theory are linked with anti-materialist idealism, the article develops an alternative argument, that is, that discourse theory should primarily be situated ‘beyond the mind’. The analysis starts with a discussion of prominent International Relations work on ideas and discourse and argues that that a large segment of International Relations work is insufficiently clear on these crucial notions. I therefore contend subsequently that this state of the art is reflected in how the philosophy of science and the philosophy of the mind have been treated in prominent International Relations work by following a particular version of Cartesian rationalism. It is on this basis that the article proposes to transcend the antinomies between mind and world as well as ideas and materiality by advancing a political ontology that stresses a particular concept of discourse in the final section. On that basis, it will become possible in the conclusion to summarize a path towards International Relations beyond the mind that engages in the study of the political more seriously.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218812910
       
  • Why does global democracy not inspire explanatory research' Removing
           conceptual obstacles toward a new research agenda
    • Authors: Hans Agné
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Democratic practices exist in politics within and beyond individual states. To date, however, it is only the democratic practices within states that have been analyzed in search for causal explanations of political outcomes, for example, peace and human rights protection. Having established the problematic nature of this situation, the purpose of this article is to explain why the situation emerges in political science and then to suggest a strategy to overcome it. The lack of attention to global democracy, or democracy beyond the state more generally, in explanatory theory is suggested to depend on prevalent but unnecessary conceptual delimitations of democracy which contradict standard assumptions about international politics. Those contradictions can be avoided, however, by defining democracy as rule by the largest group. It is argued that the concept of rule by the largest group, while protecting traditional virtues of democracy such as freedom and equality of individual persons in politics, allows scholars to describe a wider range of international practices than have been available for empirical research based on the dominating conceptions of democracy in normative and empirical literatures. Most fundamentally, it frees future research on the effects of democracy beyond the state from a key risk of self-contradiction.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218801659
       
  • Can federations expel member states' On the political theory of
           expulsion
    • Authors: Eva Marlene Hausteiner
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      When, if at all, can a federal political order expel a member state against its will' In political theory, expulsion has—unlike the scenario of secession as voluntary separation—so far received no systematic attention; an omission that is reinforced by the paucity of historical precedent. However, current debates around the potential disintegration of the European Union show that expulsion, as a theoretical and political possibility, deserves a more careful analysis. The article sets out to consider a route toward theorizing expulsion in systematic and realist terms. It outlines possible motivational constellations, feasibility constraints, legitimacy issues, as well as procedural dimensions. The resulting claim—that expulsion may be feasible in some circumstances but that its legitimacy is bound to remain contested—is applied to the case of the European Union.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218801041
       
  • Rawls’s duty of assistance and relative deprivation: Why less is
           more and more is even more
    • Authors: Jan Niklas Rolf
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      John Rawls’s case for a duty of assistance is partially premised on the assumption that liberal societies have an interest in assisting burdened societies to become well-ordered: Not only are well-ordered peoples inherently peaceful, but negative spillover effects would also disappear where peoples have a just or decent institutional order. Drawing on relative deprivation theory, this article argues that the kind of limited assistance that Rawls proposes to help burdened societies to become well-ordered would not reduce but actually increase international terrorism and unwanted immigration by raising unwarranted expectations and enhancing the resources that are needed to emigrate. Thus, if Rawls is concerned about negative externalities, he should argue for either more extensive assistance or no assistance at all.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218798657
       
  • Integration after totalitarianism: Arendt and Habermas on the postwar
           imperatives of memory
    • Authors: Peter J Verovšek
      Abstract: Journal of International Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Collective memories of totalitarianism and the industrialized slaughter of the Holocaust have exerted a profound influence on postwar European politics and philosophy. Two of the most prominent political theorists and public intellectuals to take up the legacy of total war are Hannah Arendt and Jürgen Habermas. However, their prescriptions seem to pull in opposite directions. While Arendt draws on remembrance to recover politics on a smaller scale by advocating for the empowerment of local councils, Habermas draws on the past to justify his search for postnational forms of political community that can overcome the bloody legacy of nationalism. My argument brings these two perspectives together by examining their mutual support for European integration as a way of preserving the lessons of totalitarianism. I argue that both Arendt and Habermas reject the technocratic tendencies of the European Union while maintaining hope that it can develop a truly postnational form of politics.
      Citation: Journal of International Political Theory
      DOI: 10.1177/1755088218796535
       
 
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