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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1577 journals)
    - HISTORY (932 journals)
    - History (General) (57 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (61 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (68 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (227 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (167 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (55 journals)

HISTORY OF AFRICA (61 journals)

Showing 1 - 61 of 61 Journals sorted alphabetically
África     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Africa Renewal     Free   (Followers: 7)
Africa Review : Journal of the African Studies Association of India     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
African Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
African Journal of History and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Social Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Afrika Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Afriques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afro Eurasian Studies     Open Access  
Annales islamologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annali Sezione Orientale     Hybrid Journal  
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cadernos de Estudos Africanos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of African Studies / La Revue canadienne des études africaines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
CONTRA : RELATOS desde el Sur     Open Access  
Critical African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International African Bibliography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Islamic Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of African Cinemas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Conflicts and Peace Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of African Cultural Heritage Studies     Open Access  
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of African Studies and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of African Union Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Africana Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Namibian Studies : History Politics Culture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Retracing Africa     Open Access  
Journal of Somali Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Kronos : Southern African Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Libyan Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Modern Africa : Politics, History and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of African Studies     Open Access  
Philosophia Africana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Sierra Leone Studies : Weave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Estudos Africanos / Brazilian Journal of African Studies     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica Discente História.com     Open Access  
Settler Colonial Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Southern African Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studia Orientalia Electronica     Open Access  
Thought and Practice : A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Namibian Studies : History Politics Culture
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1863-5954 - ISSN (Online) 2197-5523
Published by Ruhr-Universität Bochum Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Pre-colonial and postcolonial identity formations in Namibia: an
           exploration of the origin of Nehale lyaMpingana’s dualism
    • Authors: Job Shipululo Amupanda
      Pages: 7 - 27
      Abstract: Nehale lyaMpingana is not only one of the best-known historical figures in Aandonga history, he is one of the most celebrated figures in the history of anti-colonialism in Namibia. Despite being such a well-known historical figure, there is still some confusion as to his identity. He is often referred to as a ‘King’ and/or ‘Chief’ on the one hand, and ‘warrior’ on the other. This confusion has prevailed not only amongst ordinary people but is also to be found in state institutions and academic historical writings. This article explores the origin of lyaMpingana’s dual identity by looking at identity formation in pre-colonial and post-colonial Namibia. In precolonial and colonial Namibia Nehale lyaMpingana was simply known as a member of the Aakwanekamba family, the Ondonga royal family, and as a fearless warrior who fought against the colonial forces. In post-colonial Namibia, the state, and its principal officials such as the President, used their constitutional powers and relevant laws to bestow upon Nehale lyaMpingana the titles of ‘King’ or ‘Chief’. The evidence, particularly from the Aandonga customs, shows that Nehale lyaMpingana was never a ‘King’ or ‘Chief’ of the Aandonga. The article further demonstrates the state’s monopoly on national identity formation in post-independence Namibia, sometimes to the exclusion and suppression of indigenous communities’ positions and customs.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • From German South West Africa to the Third Reich. Testing the continuity
           thesis
    • Authors: Klaus Bachmann
      Pages: 29 - 52
      Abstract: The connections between the atrocities committed by German colonial forces in German South West Africa and the mass murders perpetrated by Nazi Germany later in Central and Eastern Europe have become an important aspect of the scholarly debate about German colonialism. This article tests several elements of these continuity claims: whether there was elite continuity between the Kaiserreich and the Third Reich, whether formal and informal knowledge about the atrocities in the German colony were available to and used by the Nazi elites and whether the former German colonies played a role in foreign policy strategies of the Third Reich. The author deems it more appropriate to speak about a rupture rather than continuity between colonial elites and the Nazi movement, he argues, that formal knowledge about colonial violence was hardly available to the Nazis and they did not even consult the scarce institutional knowledge which would have been available. Informal knowledge was available but tended to downplay or negate the atrocities and therefore was unsuitable to inform policy makers of the Third Reich. Their main objective in Southern Africa was to pull South Africa out of the British war effort, rather than reconquering their former colonies.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Adjusting to the challenges of democracy: Afrikaners in Namibia and South
           Africa
    • Authors: Christo Botha
      Pages: 53 - 85
      Abstract: Afrikaners in South Africa and to a lesser extent in Namibia, appeared to have made a reasonably successful transition to the post-apartheid dispensation in both countries. They continue to benefit from the advantages that apartheid has bestowed upon them, such as quality education, preferential access to employment as well as land and property ownership. On a material level they can be considered to have adjusted relatively successfully to the loss of direct state support and patronage. Nevertheless there appears to be an enduring sense of unease among many Afrikaners. This is especially evident in the way they respond to issues such as attacks on white farmers, affirmative action, the gradual loss of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction at school and university level and threats about the confiscation of land. One reason for this state of affairs appears to be the failure to intellectually engage with key issues in the past, as well as the fact that religious leaders of various denominations for a long time provided them with moral justifications for apartheid. Afrikaners have resolutely turned their backs on the past and largely refuse to reflect on the damaging legacy of apartheid.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Native recruiters’ activities along the Kavango River boundary in
           north-east Namibia, 1925-1943
    • Authors: Kletus Likuwa, Napandulwe Shiweda
      Pages: 87 - 100
      Abstract: The article examines the activities of native recruiters along the Kavango River boundary. Native recruiters (NRs) were local people appointed by an Assistant Native Commissioner (ANC) of Rundu on behalf of the Northern Labour Organization (NLO) to recruit contract labourers from the Kavango area and Angola for farms and mines in Namibia. The article looks specifically at their collaboration with individuals and institutions in the recruiting process. It further highlights NRs difficulties of establishing networks in distant villages, the unpredictable population movements and settlement patterns across the Kavango River, conditions of wealth and food self-reliance of local communities and the Bushmen attacks as impediments to their recruiting activities.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Thinking and writing liberation politics – a review article of: Hans
           Beukes, Long Road to Liberation. An Exiled Namibian Activist’s
           Perspective
    • Authors: André du Pisani
      Pages: 101 - 123
      Abstract: Thinking and Writing Liberation Politics is a review article of: Hans Beukes, Long Road to Liberation. An Exiled Namibian Activist’s Perspective; with an introduction by Professor Mburumba Kerina, Johannesburg, Porcupine Press, 2014. 376 pages, appendices, photographs, index of names. ISBN: 978-1-920609-71-9. The article argues that Long Road to Liberation, being a rich, diverse, uneven memoir of an exiled Namibian activist, offers a sobering and critical account of the limits of liberation politics, of the legacies of a protracted struggle to bring Namibia to independence and of the imprint the struggle left on the political terrain of the independent state. But, it remains the perspective of an individual activist, who on account of his personal experiences and long absence from the country of his birth, at times, paints a fairly superficial picture of many internal events in the country
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Oomambo wandje komuhoko wOvaherero. Lothar von Trotha’ s ‘Words to the
           Ovaherero people’
    • Authors: Andreas Eckl, Mathias Häussler, Jekura Kavari
      Pages: 125 - 133
      Abstract: Lothar von Trothas ‘Words to the Ovaherero people’ – or, as he himself referred to these words, the “Proklamation” or “Erlaß” (edict) – is often referred to as ‘extermination order’ (Vernichtungsbefehl), ‘firing order’ (Schießbefehl) or ‘genocide order’ (Genozidbefehl). The proclamation is crucial in the documentation of the Herero genocide. A copy of the proclamation written in Otjiherero is kept in the National Archives of Botswana. Given the significance of the document, it is appropriate to re-publish the handwritten document and to provide a transcription of the text letter by letter which is hard to decipher. As the original text contains many spelling and grammatical mistakes, a version in proper Otjherero will also be presented. Finally, a literal translation into English is provided. The latter two have been secured by Jekura Kavari, associate professor in Otjiherero Section of the Department of Language and Literature Studies at the University of Namibia (UNAM).
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Review: Hartmut Bartmuß, Alexander Lion: Arzt, Sanitätsoffizier,
           Pfadfinder, Series: Jüdische Miniaturen, vol. 210, Berlin, Hentrich &
           Hentrich, 2017
    • Authors: Julia Kleinemeyer-Hale
      Pages: 135 - 136
      Abstract: Review: Hartmut Bartmuß, Alexander Lion: Arzt, Sanitätsoffizier, Pfadfinder, Series: Jüdische Miniaturen, vol. 210, Berlin, Hentrich & Hentrich, 2017.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Review: Christiane Bürger, Deutsche Kolonialgeschichte(n). Der Genozid in
           Namibia und die Geschichtsschreibung der DDR und BRD, Bielefeld,
           transcript 2017
    • Authors: Henning Melber
      Pages: 137 - 140
      Abstract: Review: Christiane Bürger, Deutsche Kolonialgeschichte(n). Der Genozid in Namibia und die Geschichtsschreibung der DDR und BRD, Bielefeld, transcript 2017.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
  • Review: Felix Schürmann, Der graue Unterstrom. Walfänger und
           Küsten-gesellschaften an den tiefen Stränden Afrikas (1770-1920),
           Frankfurt am Main, Campus, 2017
    • Authors: Jakob Zollmann
      Pages: 141 - 143
      Abstract: Review: Felix Schürmann, Der graue Unterstrom. Walfänger und Küsten-gesellschaften an den tiefen Stränden Afrikas (1770-1920), Frankfurt am Main, Campus, 2017.
      PubDate: 2018-07-06
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2018)
       
 
 
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