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FORENSIC SCIENCES (42 journals)

Showing 1 - 42 of 42 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Arab Journal of Forensic Sciences & Forensic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 493)
Bulletin of Legal Medicine     Open Access  
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 387)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Colombia Forense     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Medicina Forense     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
European Polygraph     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forensic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Forensic Medicine and Anatomy Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 510)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International : Synergy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forensic Science International Supplement Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Forensic Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forensische Psychiatrie, Psychologie, Kriminologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
GesundheitsRecht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forensic Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Clinical Pathology and Forensic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 431)
Journal of Forensic Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forensic Psychology Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Forensic Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Forensic Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 496)
Journal of Forensic Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Forensic Science Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de la Escuela de Medicina Legal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Skopein : La Justicia en Manos de la Ciencia     Open Access  
Saudi Journal of Forensic Medicine and Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Sri Lanka Journal of Forensic Medicine, Science & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Forensic Science     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Forensic Science International : Synergy
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2589-871X - ISSN (Online) 2589-871X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3200 journals]
  • Application of Facial Recognition Technology on Identification of the Dead
           during Large Scale Disasters

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Lay See Khoo, Mohd Shah Mahmood
       
  • Effective approaches to three-dimensional digital reconstruction of
           fragmented human skeletal remains using laser surface scanning

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 July 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Gargi Jani, Abraham Johnson, Utsav Parekh, Tim Thompson, Astha Pandey
       
  • Collection and disinfection of forensic biological specimens in five cases
           concerning COVID-19 in Guangzhou, China

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Xingyi Yang, Quyi Xu, Hong Liu, Jichao Xu, Dian Yang, Cheng xiao, Huiying Hu, Yunyun Liu, Chao Liu
       
  • Vacuous standards – Subversion of the OSAC standards-development
           process

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Geoffrey Stewart Morrison, Cedric Neumann, Patrick Henry Geoghegan
       
  • The effect of contextual information on decision-making in forensic
           toxicology

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Hilary J. Hamnett, Itiel E. Dror
       
  • A review of the newly identified impurities profiles in methamphetamine
           seizures

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 June 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Isaac Onoka, Andrew Banyika, Protibha Nath Banerjee, John Makangara, Laurence Dujourdy
       
  • Interpol review of detection and characterization of explosives and
           explosives residues 2016-2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Douglas J. Klapec, Greg Czarnopys, Julie Pannuto
       
  • Improving forensic science integration: A Director’s perspective

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Matthew Gamette
       
  • The development of forensic science standards in China

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Wanfeng Zhai, Ning Zhang, Feng Hua
       
  • Prisoners in a pandemic: We should think about detainees during Covid-19
           outbreak

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Pamela Tozzo, Gabriella D'Angiolella, Luciana Caenazzo
       
  • Data driven optimization of sexual assault case processing

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): M. Bazinet, J. Larose, S. Noël, J. Comte, M. Primeau, M. Lapointe, C. Paquet, R. Landry, L. Croteau, F. Gingras
       
  • Working the crowd for forensic research: A review of contributor
           motivation and recruitment strategies used in crowdsourcing and
           crowdfunding for scientific research

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Rebecca Parrick, Brendan Chapman
       
  • Imaging and video

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Zeno Geradts, Nienke Filius, Arnout Ruifrok
       
  • Interpol review of controlled substances review 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Nicole S. Jones, Jeffrey H. Comparin
       
  • A review on toxicology: 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Wing-sum Chan, George Fai Wong, Chi-wai Hung, Yau-nga Wong, Kit-mai Fung, Wai-kit Lee, Kwok-Leung Dao, Chung-wing Leung, Kam-moon Lo, Wing-man Lee, Bobbie Kwok-keung Cheung
       
  • Human factors in forensic science: The cognitive mechanisms that underlie
           forensic feature-comparison expertise

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Bethany Growns, Kristy A. Martire
       
  • Dental autopsy recommendations in SARS-CoV-2 infected cases

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Emilio Nuzzolese, Hemlata Pandey, Francesco Lupariello
       
  • Forensic nursing practice - What do the students know anyway'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Bárbara Pinheiro Machado, Isabel Maria Batista de Araújo, Maria do Céu Barbieri Figueiredo
       
  • To what extent if any has Twitter disrupted hierarchies in forensic
           pathology'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Ken Obenson
       
  • Interpol review of questioned documents 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Capitaine Marie Deviterne-Lapeyre
       
  • Erratum to “What is open-access publishing and what it means for the
           forensic enterprise” [Forensic Sci. Int.: Synergy (2019) 290–293]

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): M.M. Houck, G. Horsman, G. Sauzier, M. Bidmos
       
  • #Forensic

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Max Houck
       
  • Domestic violence homicide in Maputo Province, Mozambique

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Casimiro M. Macucha
       
  • Perspectives on the death investigation during the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Ye Xue, Liying Lai, Chao Liu, Yong Niu, Jian Zhao
       
  • Corrigendum to “An inconvenient truth: More rigorous and ecologically
           valid research is needed to properly understand cognitive bias in forensic
           decisions” [Forensic Sci. Int. Synergy 2 (2020) 107–109]

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Lee J. Curley, James Munro, Martin Lages
       
  • Interpol Review of Tool Marks 2016-2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Martin Baiker-Sørensen, Koen Herlaar, Isaac Keereweer, Petra Pauw-Vugts, Richard Visser
       
  • Author Response: No need for throwing stones – wherever you
           live…

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Lee J. Curley, James Munro, Martin Lages
       
  • International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC): General Guidance for the
           Management of the Dead Related to COVID-19

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Oran FINEGAN, Stephen FONSECA, Pierre GUYOMARC’H, Maria Dolores MORCILLO MENDEZ, Jacqueline RODRIGUEZ GONZALEZ, Morris TIDBALL-BINZ, Kristy A. WINTER, ICRC Advisory Group on the Management of COVID-19 Related Fatalities
       
  • Multidisciplinary approach; towards training of the next generation of
           forensic DNA analysts in Africa; a Kenyan perspective

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Eva Aluvaala Nambati, Muturi Njoka, Fred Eyase, Janet Majanja, Naomi Njuguna, Sophie M. Gitonga, Nicholas Mwikwabe, Eric Lelo, Milka Mwangi, Allan kingoro, Francis Kimani, Kizito Lubano, Wallace Bulimo
       
  • Interpol review of digital evidence 2016 - 2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Paul Reedy
       
  • Interpol review of glass and paint evidence 2016-2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Jose Almirall, Tatiana Trejos, Katelyn Lambert
       
  • Interpol review of fingermarks and other body impressions 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Andy Bécue, Heidi Eldridge, Christophe Champod
       
  • Interpol review of gunshot residue 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Sébastien Charles, Nadia Geusens, Emeline Vergalito, Bart Nys
       
  • Interpol review papers special edition preface

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Paul S. Ludik
       
  • Interpol review of fire investigation 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Éric Stauffer
       
  • Interpol review of fibres and textiles 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Laurent Lepot, Kyra Lunstroot, Kris De Wael
       
  • Interpol review of forensic firearm examination 2016-2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Erwin J.A.T. Mattijssen
       
  • Interpol review of forensic science management literature 2016–2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): William P. McAndrew, Max M. Houck
       
  • People who live in ivory towers shouldn’t throw stones: A refutation
           of Curley et al.

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Jeff Kukucka
       
  • Cadaveric blood cards: Assessing DNA quality and quantity and the utility
           of STRs for the individual estimation of trihybrid ancestry and admixture
           proportions

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Frankie L. West, Bridget F.B. Algee-Hewitt
       
  • Interpol review of forensic biology and forensic DNA typing 2016-2019

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): John M. Butler, Sheila Willis
       
  • DNA backlog reduction strategy: Law enforcement agency partnerships for a
           successful biological screening laboratory

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Cecelia A. Crouse, Tara Sessa, Julie Sikorsky, Dustin T. Yeatman, Crystal Conway, Caralee Daugherty, Jeri D. Ropero-Miller
       
  • DNA barcode reveals the illegal trade of rays commercialized in
           fishmongers in Brazil

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Raul B. Camacho-Oliveira, Cahique M. Daneluz, Fernanda D. do Prado, Ricardo Utsunomia, Carlos E. Rodrigues, Fausto Foresti, Fábio Porto-Foresti
       
  • Improving forensic processes performance: A Lean Six Sigma approach

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Carolina Rojas Alfaro, Gina Bagnarello Madrigal, Mauricio Chacón Hernández
       
  • Is police investigation of rape biased by characteristics of victims'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Bjarte Frode Vik, Kirsten Rasmussen, Berit Schei, Cecilie Therese HagemannAbstractAimTo explore differences in police investigations between cases of rape against women with and without vulnerability factors.MethodsRetrospective, descriptive study of cases of rape against women ≥16 years of age. Cases involving victims with and without vulnerability factors were compared regarding the quality of police investigation.ResultsVulnerability was present among 68% of the victims. Cases with vulnerable victims had an adjusted odds ratio for a low-quality police investigation of 2.1 (95% CI [1.0–4.4]) compared to cases where victims were non-vulnerable.ConclusionsOur results do not prove that rape myths existed among police officers. Our findings show a trend indicating that vulnerable victims may have been less prioritized compared to non-vulnerable victims. More studies are needed regarding how the police respond to rape complaints and to what degree police investigations are influenced by different characteristics of victims.
       
  • ASCLD+statement+on+volume+of+untested+sexual+assault+evidence+kits&rft.title=Forensic+Science+International+:+Synergy&rft.issn=2589-871X&rft.date=&rft.volume="> ASCLD statement on volume of untested sexual assault evidence kits

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Laura Sudkamp, Matthew Gamette, Ray Wickenheiser, ASCLD BOARD OF DIRECTORS, Brooke Arnone, Erin Forry, Matthew Gamette, Linda Jackson, Rita C. Dyas, Lisa Burdett, Bruce Houlihan, Jennifer McNair, Jeffrey Nye, Scott O'Neill, Timothy Scanlan, Tony Tessarolo, Christian Westring, ASCLD STAFF, John Byrd, Ramona Robertson
       
  • An inconvenient truth: More rigorous and ecologically valid research is
           needed to properly understand cognitive bias in forensic decisions

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Lee J. Curley, James Munro, Martin Lages
       
  • Choose your own murder: Non-linear narratives enhance student
           understanding in forensic science education

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Tim ThompsonAbstractHigher education teaching in the forensic sciences tends to follow a traditional format of lectures followed by practical laboratory sessions. Sometimes this approach is not possible or viewed as not innovative enough. The free, open access software Twine was used with final year undergraduates in forensic and crime scene science in a UK university in order to create an interactive learning experience based around the creation of non-linear stories. Evaluation of this approach demonstrated the positive impact on student understanding when compared to the traditional lecture model. Students found the experience engaging and were keen to use Twine again.
       
  • The long arm of the algorithm' Automated Facial Recognition as
           evidence and trigger for police intervention

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Kyriakos N. Kotsoglou, Marion OswaldCriminal law's efficient and accurate administration depends to a considerable extent on the ability of decision-makers to identify unique individuals, circumstances and events as instances of abstract terms (such as events raising ‘reasonable suspicion’) laid out in the legal framework. Automated Facial Recognition has the potential to revolutionise the identification process, facilitate crime detection, and eliminate misidentification of suspects. This paper commences from the recent decision regarding the deployment of AFR by South Wales Police in order to discuss the lack of underpinning conceptual framework pertinent to a broader consideration of AFR in other contexts. We conclude that the judgment does not give the green light to other fact sensitive deployments of AFR. We consider two of these: a) use of AFR as a trigger for intervention short of arrest; b) use of AFR in an evidential context in criminal proceedings. AFR may on the face of it appear objective and sufficient, but this is belied by the probabilistic nature of the output, and the building of certain values into the tool, raising questions as to the justifiability of regarding the tool's output as an ‘objective’ ground for reasonable suspicion. The means by which the identification took place must be disclosed to the defence, if Article 6 right to a fair trial is to be upheld, together with information regarding disregarded ‘matches’ and error rates and uncertainties of the system itself. Furthermore, AFR raises the risk that scientific or algorithmic findings could usurp the role of the legitimate decision-maker, necessitating the development of a framework to protect the position of the human with decision-making prerogative.
       
  • Durability of cling film plastic wrap usage on dead body towards human
           decomposition changes

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Lay See Khoo, Mohd Shah MahmoodAbstractThis study explores the practicability and usability of the cling film plastic wrap on the dead body with decomposition changes, whereby the feasibility of wrapping the remains to ensure the containment of the decomposition fluid within the cling film plastic wrap. Unknown and unclaimed dead bodies were used. Wrapping and preservation of human remains using the cling film plastic wrap could be the best operational practices for first responders rather than leaving bodies exposed on the disaster site, when the supplies of the cadaver body bags are inadequate. Thinking out of the box, the conventional way of using cadaver body bags to the cling film plastic wrap forms a new perspective in managing the dead and facilitating the human identification needs. New inventive idea of adopting the cling film plastic wrap as means of protecting the dignity of the dead person, could be the way forward in humanitarian forensic action.
       
  • Publication trends in forensic science research: Friction ridge discipline

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2020Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Maria Antonia Roberts, Kyle R. Tom, Kathryn B. KnorrAbstract2019 commemorates the 10 year anniversary of the National Academy of Sciences report, “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward,” and one valuable way to measure progress in forensic science is through published research. The purpose of this study is to examine where the friction ridge discipline stands with respect to published research. Two time periods were selected (2005–2009 and 2010–2014) and two different methods were used to describe research growth and publication trends in this discipline. A bibliometric review was conducted using an online literature-indexing tool, Web of Science™, as well as an empirical method involving subject matter experts. Both methods showed an increased number of friction ridge articles published in scientific journals over time.
       
  • Forensic epistemology: A need for research and pedagogy

    • Abstract: Publication date: 2020Source: Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 2Author(s): Mike Illes, Paul Wilson, Cathy BruceAbstractThis is the third in a series of articles reporting on forensic epistemology. Our first two research articles presented scientific results that are based in experimental design; including quantitative and qualitative responses from forensic science practitioners to scenarios and evidence. Based on a synthesis of this research there is evidence of a knowledge gap in formal reasoning for some forensic practitioners, and a limited understanding of case-specific research. Combining these results with a review of the current literature in the field of forensic reasoning, we now offer evidence of teaching and research strategies that can help increase the epistemic status (Confidence in, and justification of knowledge) of forensic science claims. This paper focuses on an integrated narrative review using hermeneutic methods of analysis to identify: (i) the epistemic state of forensic science; (ii) strategies to increase of knowledge; (iii) the need for collaboration between practitioners and academics; and, (iv) areas for future research.
       
  • The rise and development of forensic anthropology in Brazil

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Melina Calmon
       
  • Increasing the accessibility and impact of justice-related student and
           practitioner research

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Rachel S. Bolton-King, Helen Kara, John P. Cassella, Brian W.J. Rankin, Ruth M. Morgan, Siobhan Burke, Dom Fripp, John P. KayeAbstractMuch good quality research by pre-doctoral students and case-work focused practitioners remains unpublished. However, their findings could contribute to the evidence base underpinning science and practice within international justice system contexts. There are two main challenges to making findings accessible: reaching all criminal justice stakeholders, and encouraging collaborative efforts in research addressing ‘real world’ problems.This article presents the rationale for a new, open access repository. The aim is to share good quality pre-doctoral and practitioner criminal justice research across traditional disciplinary and international borders. Such a repository should be easy to use, well maintained and sustainable. Its reach, value and impact also need to be measurable. We present the major considerations relating to the operation and workflow of such a repository, and outline the potential value, benefits and limitations. Our research suggests that the proposed repository could foster interdisciplinary and collaborative work to benefit global justice systems and societies.
       
  • Forensic science needs registered reports

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Jason M. Chin, Rory McFadden, Gary EdmondAbstractThe registered report (RR) format is rapidly being adopted by researchers and journals in several scientific fields. RRs flip the peer review process, with reviewers evaluating proposed methods, rather than the data and findings. Editors then accept or reject articles based on the pre-data collection review. Accordingly, RRs reduce the incentive for researchers to exaggerate their findings, and they make any data-driven changes to the methods and analysis more conspicuous. They also reduce publication bias, ensuring studies with null or otherwise unfavorable results are published. RRs are being used in many fields to improve research practices and increase confidence in study findings. The authors suggest RRs ought to be the default way in which validation studies are conducted and reported in forensic science. They produce more reliable findings, advance criminal justice values, and will lead to several efficiencies in the research process.
       
  • Must the random man be unrelated' A lingering misconception about
           forensic genetics

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Emmanuel Milot, Simon Baechler, Frank CrispinoAbstractA nearly universal practice among forensic DNA scientists includes mentioning an unrelated person as the possible alternative source of a DNA stain, when one in fact refers to an unknown person. Hence, experts typically express their conclusions with statements like: “The probability of the DNA evidence is X times higher if the suspect is the source of the trace than if another person unrelated to the suspect is the source of the trace.” Published forensic guidelines encourage such allusions to the unrelated person. However, as the authors show here, rational reasoning and population genetic principles do not require the conditioning of the evidential value on the unrelatedness between the unknown individual and the person of interest (e.g. a suspect). Surprisingly, this important semantic issue has been overlooked for decades, despite its potential to mislead the interpretation of DNA evidence by criminal justice system stakeholders.
       
  • The war on drugs, forensic science and the death penalty in the
           Philippines

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Maria Corazon A. De Ungria, Jose M. JoseAbstractThe effectiveness of the death penalty to deter heinous crimes remains a contentious issue even though it has been abolished in many countries. Three years into President Rodrigo Duterte's administration, the push to re-impose the death penalty is being taken seriously. There is urgency in providing options to the drug problem other than killing drug suspects in the streets or sentencing them to death. The drug problem is a complex issue and exposes the human vulnerability of its users for criminal exploitation. We propose here that addressing these vulnerabilities in a balanced and comprehensive manner through health-focused, rights-based criminal justice responses, conducting forensic science-based drug investigations and determining the social causes of drug abuse is an alternative solution that demands cooperation across different sectors of society as well as underscores the fundamental value of human life.
       
  • Touch DNA in forensic science: The use of laboratory-created eccrine
           fingerprints to quantify DNA loss

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Jessica Tang, Jennifer Ostrander, Ray Wickenheiser, Ashley HallAbstractTouch samples typically contain a limited quantity of DNA, which can be further reduced during collection and analysis. It is not clear, however, at which point(s) the majority of the DNA is lost because there is not a reliable positive control to track the quantity of DNA through the analysis procedures. To take the first step in bridging this gap, we established a set of laboratory-created eccrine, or mock, fingerprints containing known quantities of DNA. Next, we defined a set of process controls to quantify loss at key fail points in the collection/extraction procedures, analyzing a total of 1200 mock fingerprints deposited on four different surfaces. We quantified DNA loss to the surface, the swab and at extraction, completing the evaluation with ANOVA. With better understanding of DNA yields and the mechanisms of loss, targeted process improvements will bring touch DNA samples into even more routine use with standardized, optimized procedures.
       
  • Cemetery hoodoo: Culture, ritual crime and forensic archaeology

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2019Source: Forensic Science International: SynergyAuthor(s): Sharon K. MosesAbstractIn 2012 and 2014 the author was a consultant to law enforcement regarding crime scenes of a ritualistic nature in the American Southeast. These ritual activities were expressions of folk magic spells linked to certain West African traditions. These spells were used for magico-religious, curative, and ‘justice’ (i.e. revenge) practices known as hoodoo, conjure or rootwork.The ritual activities were conducted at gravesites in a public cemetery. When standard investigative police procedures failed to produce anything substantive with which to solve, prevent, or even understand the motive beyond one of “vandalism,” or ‘kids fooling around,’ the author was approached to contribute forensic archaeological and anthropological insights that had thus far proved elusive. This article is an examination of how cultural anthropological understanding and a forensic archaeological “eye” to an outdoor crime scene can re-define crime scene investigative methodology and interpretation.
       
 
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