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  Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 291 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (26 journals)
    - MACHINERY (32 journals)
    - PACKAGING (15 journals)
    - PLASTICS (28 journals)
    - RUBBER (2 journals)

MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (180 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 73 of 73 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advanced Manufacturing: Polymer & Composites Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Manufacturing Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Technology Innovation     Open Access  
Afrique Science : Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Sensor Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Applied Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Biotech News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bharatiya Vaigyanik evam Audyogik Anusandhan Patrika (BVAAP)     Open Access  
Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Building Service Engineering Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CATTECH     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Centaurus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Cold Regions Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Technology Transfer and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Composites Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 138)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Computer-Aided Design and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Control Theory and Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cryoletters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Design Journal : An International Journal for All Aspects of Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Design Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Innovation and New Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Materials Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Fibers     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fibers and Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
FORMakademisk     Open Access  
Futures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Gender, Technology and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Green Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
History and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Human Factors in Design     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hybrid Materials     Open Access  
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
IETE Journal of Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
IETE Technical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Indian Journal of Radio & Space Physics (IJRSP)     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Información Tecnológica     Open Access  
Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrating Materials and Manufacturing Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Advanced Design and Manufacturing Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Automation and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Business and Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of CAD/CAM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Design     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Engineering and Manufacturing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Experimental Design and Process Optimisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Information Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Innovation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Manufacturing, Materials, and Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International journal of materials research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing-Green Technology     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Quality and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Quality Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Service and Computing Oriented Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of System of Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technoentrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Technology and Design Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Technology and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Vehicle Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Wood Products Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
ITL - International Journal of Applied Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal for Manufacturing Science and Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Analytical Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Control & Instrumentation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Control Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Design Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enterprise Transformation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Frugal Innovation     Open Access  
Journal of High Technology Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Industrial and Production Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Law, Information and Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Machinery Manufacturing and Automation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Materials Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Micro-Bio Robotics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Middle European Construction and Design of Cars     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nanobiotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Operations and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Production Research & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Remanufacturing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research (JSIR)     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Sensor Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sensors and Sensor Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sustainable Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology Management in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Chinese Institute of Industrial Engineers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of The Royal Society Interface     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Urban Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Energi Dan Manufaktur     Open Access  
Lasers in Manufacturing and Materials Processing     Full-text available via subscription  
Lightweight Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Main Science and Technology Indicators - Principaux indicateurs de la science et de la technologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Management and Production Engineering Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Manufacturing Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Materials Science and Engineering: B     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Materials testing. Materialprüfung     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Microgravity Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal  
Modern Electronic Materials     Open Access  
Multicultural Education & Technology Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
NanoEthics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nature Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 405)
NDT & E International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Perspectives on Global Development and Technology     Hybrid Journal  
Plastics, Rubber and Composites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Procedia CIRP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Procedia IUTAM     Open Access  
Procedia Manufacturing     Open Access  
Production     Open Access  
Production & Manufacturing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Reliability Engineering & System Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Remote Sensing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Research Papers Faculty of Materials Science and Technology Slovak University of Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Latinoamericana de Metalurgia y Materiales     Open Access  
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Science China Materials     Hybrid Journal  
Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine / Scientia Canadensis : revue canadienne d'histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Strategic Design Research Journal     Open Access  
Structural Health Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sustainability : The Journal of Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Synthesis Lectures on Engineers, Technology and Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Synthesis Lectures on Image, Video, and Multimedia Processing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Technical Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Techniques et culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technological Forecasting and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Technology Analysis & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Technology in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Tire Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Traitements et Materiaux     Free   (Followers: 19)
Tsinghua Science & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Underwater Technology: The International Journal of the Society for Underwater     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)


Journal Cover International Journal of Technology and Design Education
  [SJR: 0.573]   [H-I: 24]   [12 followers]  Follow
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-1804 - ISSN (Online) 0957-7572
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2336 journals]
  • Constructing the ScratchJr programming language in the early childhood
    • Authors: Dylan J. Portelance; Amanda L. Strawhacker; Marina Umaschi Bers
      Pages: 489 - 504
      Abstract: Abstract This paper seeks to contribute to the growing literature on children and computer programming by focusing on a programming language for children in Kindergarten through second grade. Sixty-two students were exposed to a 6-week curriculum using ScartchJr. They learned foundational programming concepts and applied those concepts to create personally meaningful projects using the ScratchJr programming app. This paper addresses the following research question: Which ScratchJr programming blocks do young children choose to use in their own projects after they have learned them all through a tailored programming curriculum? Data was collected in the form of the students’ combined 977 projects, and analyzed for patterns and differences across grades. This paper summarizes findings and suggests potential directions for future research. Implications for the use of ScratchJr as an introductory programming language for young children are also discussed.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9325-0
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • Piloting technological understanding and reasoning in Icelandic schools
    • Authors: Gisli Thorsteinsson; Brynjar Olafsson
      Pages: 505 - 519
      Abstract: Abstract A pilot research was undertaken in Icelandic schools during the 2013–2014 school year, in order to explore students’ technological understanding and reasoning at the ages of 11 and 13. The survey included a questionnaire regarding mechanical movement, power and thermodynamics, while the project considered the congruity between students’ undertakings within Design and Craft education in the national curricula and their ability to understand technology. This article examines the literature and considers the value of technology lessons within Icelandic Design and Craft education, in terms of students’ technological competence. Data was collected using a questionnaire distributed to three elementary schools and is highlighted with the researchers’ reviews of the national curricula. Findings were discussed and conclusions drawn and the results highlighted a general lack of understanding in technology, within the context of students’ daily lives. In addition, there were differences between boys and girls.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9301-8
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • Design and evaluation of a DIY construction system for educational robot
    • Authors: Cesar Vandevelde; Francis Wyffels; Maria-Cristina Ciocci; Bram Vanderborght; Jelle Saldien
      Pages: 521 - 540
      Abstract: Abstract Building a robot from scratch in an educational context can be a challenging prospect. While a multitude of projects exist that simplify the electronics and software aspects of a robot, the same cannot be said for construction systems for robotics. In this paper, we present our efforts to create a low-cost do-it-yourself construction system for small robots. We have created three different construction systems (laser-cut screw connectors, printed friction-fit connectors, and printed hybrid connectors) using small aluminium T-slot extrusions, based on prior work done by Industrial Design college students. Eighty-six secondary school students and 35 teachers tested these three systems during a five-day robotics contest where they had to build firefighting robots. Follow-up questionnaires and an expert evaluation were used to measure the usability, affective appraisal and functionality of the three systems in order to determine which system should serve as a basis for further design iterations. Overall, a clear preference was shown for the hybrid system, which relies on its interlocking shape as well as on a screw connection to create robot frames that are both quick to construct and very rigid once assembled. We believe our work represents a solid first step toward an inexpensive, “hackable” construction system for educational robotics.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9324-1
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • What is the function of a figurine? Can the repertory grid technique
    • Authors: Helena Isakssson Persson
      Pages: 541 - 565
      Abstract: Abstract Teaching design and product development at upper secondary school level in Sweden is a matter of interdisciplinary considerations. Education in product development, at this level, prepares students for further studies and career in engineering or industrial design. Knowledge of artefacts is an important element in the education. In coherence with the visual and rhetorical strategies characterising the knowledge field, students learn how to develop an idea to a final product. In this study twelve engineers and industrial designers, professionals representing the knowledge field of product development are studied regarding their interpretations of eight pre-selected artefacts. Data is collected and analysed using repertory grid technique. The aim of the study is to examine whether/what we can learn from the informants’ experiences and knowledge that is relevant to education in design and product development at upper secondary school level. Findings show that four of the artefacts appear to be carriers of attributes that reveal the interviewees’ definitions of the artefacts’ functional nature. From these findings it is shown that the interviewees’ definitions of concepts concerning aesthetics/decoration and function can be seen as cultural expressions. How the repertory grid technique is used in this particular study is thoroughly described and the results relevance for education is discussed.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9323-2
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • Does the medium matter in collaboration? Using visually supported
           collaboration technology in an interior design studio
    • Authors: Ji Young Cho; Moon-Heum Cho; Nadya Kozinets
      Pages: 567 - 586
      Abstract: Abstract With the recognition of the importance of collaboration in a design studio and the advancement of technology, increasing numbers of design students collaborate with others in a technology-mediated learning environment (TMLE); however, not all students have positive experiences in TMLEs. One possible reason for unsatisfactory collaboration experiences is that existing text-oriented collaboration technology may not fully support interior design students’ needs for spontaneous interaction with visual images. The purpose of the current research was to determine whether a visually supported collaboration technology (VSCT) for designers, enhances students’ collaboration experiences in a TMLE. A total of 28 junior interior design students participated in the study, all of whom engaged in similar group projects via two collaboration modalities: face-to-face and VSCT. The results show that collaboration modalities influence students’ learning experiences, in particular, achievement and confidence in completing collaborative tasks. When using VSCT, students achieved significantly higher grade and demonstrated higher confidence in completing collaborative tasks compared to face-to-face collaboration; however, no significant differences were reported in either their perception of the collaboration process or their evaluation of the medium in the two collaboration modalities. The findings demonstrate that VSCT enhanced students’ collaboration experiences in design studio. Discussion and implications are provided to facilitate design students’ positive collaboration experiences in a TMLE.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9322-3
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • Consequential creativity
    • Authors: Tamer S. Hamza; Doaa K. Hassan
      Pages: 587 - 612
      Abstract: Abstract Creativity is an original cognitive ability and problem solving process which enables individuals to use their intelligence in a way that is unique and directed toward coming up with a product. Architectural education is one of the fields in which human creativity has been exhibited; because, it can be defined as a design study that correlates with other disciplines: social sciences, management, history, operational research, philosophy, graphic design, math and etc. These features which distinguish architecture from other disciplines ascribe different kind of responsibilities for architectural education; since beside technical and professional skills, an architect must have imagination and to be creative at many levels. Thus, this research aims at proving that students can be trained in creative thinking via acquiring specific skills and systematic techniques, which directly acts on design product. The study methodology depends on the concept of experimental research that targets at exposing students to creative problem solving experience via carrying out a creative training course that concerns “Consequential Creativity”. That experiment examined the potentiality of enhancing the students’ ability of viewing problems in non-traditional perspectives that counts on the systematic procedures of problem solving. Tools for assessment before and after training have been implemented. The Experiment findings proved that the students’ creative thinking skill has been clearly improved after attending the course. Therefore, training in creative thinking can be considered as independent courses or within specific architectural curricula.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9321-4
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • Materials experience as a foundation for materials and design education
    • Authors: Owain Pedgley; Valentina Rognoli; Elvin Karana
      Pages: 613 - 630
      Abstract: Abstract An important body of research has developed in recent years, explaining ways in which product materials influence user experiences. A priority now is to ensure that the research findings are adopted within an educational context to deliver contemporary curricula for students studying the subject of materials and design. This paper reports on an international initiative to develop ‘materials experience’ as a formal subject of study, complementary to traditional technical and engineering approaches to materials and design education. General learning objectives for materials experience are established, followed by specific attention to three kinds of experience that arise during user–material–product interaction: gratification of senses, conveyance of meanings, and elicitation of emotions. For each of these kinds of experience, a specially devised active learning exercise is explained in detail. In combination, these exercises are argued to deliver a good foundation for student appreciation and action on designing for material experiences in product design. The paper concludes with recommendations for how to responsibly redress the imbalance that exists in materials and design education, by transitioning from a culture of ‘imparting knowledge about materials’ to a culture of ‘generating experience with materials’.
      PubDate: 2016-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9327-y
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2016)
  • Two elementary schools’ developing potential for sustainability of
           engineering education
    • Authors: Kerrie Anna Douglas; Anastasia Rynearson; So Yoon Yoon; Heidi Diefes-Dux
      Pages: 309 - 334
      Abstract: Abstract The Next Generation Science Standards present a way for engineering lessons to be formally integrated into elementary classrooms at a national level in the United States. Professional development programs are an important method for preparing teachers to enact the new engineering practices in their science classrooms. To better understand what contextual factors help a professional development program have a sustained effect on the implementation of engineering, we closely examined two elementary schools within the same school district that participated in the same professional development program but had very different outcomes in their lasting implementation of engineering. Using the case study method, we corroborate quantitative and qualitative sources of data measuring students’ learning and attitudes; teachers’ learning, attitudes, and implementation fidelity; perceived teacher community; and administrative support. Our analysis revealed that although the professional development program had district-level administrative support, there was considerable variation between schools in how teachers’ perceived school level support. In addition, teachers at the sustaining school collaborated and co-taught with one another. Our findings support previous literature on the role of administrative support and teacher learning communities. We discuss practical ways that professional development programs can seek to foster a context which is supportive of sustaining curriculum change for engineering.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9313-4
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2016)
  • Epistemic habits: primary school teachers’ development of pedagogical
           content knowledge (PCK) in a design-based research project
    • Authors: Magnus Hultén; Eva Björkholm
      Pages: 335 - 351
      Abstract: Abstract Generalist primary school teachers often have little or no training in school subjects such as science and technology. Not surprisingly, several studies show that they often experience difficulties when teaching these subjects, in fact some primary teachers even avoid teaching them. The over all aim of this study is to contribute to new theoretical and methodological tools for the study of how teachers develop knowledge for teaching, i.e. pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). And based on this, elaborate on implications for the professional development of primary school teachers. The teachers in the study participated in a design-based research project concerning technology education in Grade 1. We were especially interested in whether the teachers displayed any habits that contributed to the development of their personal PCK. We found three significant patterns in how the teachers, together with the researcher, developed knowledge of how to teach a specific topic in technology. We argue that these patterns tell us something about the teachers’ epistemic habits in relation to the teaching of technology. The existence of these habits could help to explain how teachers with little or no experience of teaching a subject can develop relevant PCK.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9320-5
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2016)
  • How are students’ attitudes related to learning outcomes?
    • Authors: Mika Metsärinne; Manne Kallio
      Pages: 353 - 371
      Abstract: Abstract This article is a part of a research project aimed to find out how different background variables are related to learning outcomes in technology education related to the school subject Sloyd (craft). The research question of this article is: “How are ninth grade students’ attitudes towards the subject related to their learning outcomes?” The empirical data (n = 4792) was collected by stratified sampling from 152 secondary schools as a part of the Finnish National Board of Education (FNBE) assessment. A shortened Finnish version of the Fennema–Sherman attitude test was carried out in a narrowed sample (n = 1548). The three attitude factors for learners were ‘Liking Sloyd as a school subject’, ‘Experiencing Utility in Sloyd’ and ‘Self-concept in Sloyd’. Structural equation modelling revealed that ‘Experiencing Utility’ predicts learning outcomes while ‘Liking’ and ‘Self-concept’ were interveners. The results suggest more learner-centred pedagogics for developing technology education.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9317-0
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2016)
  • Innovation learning in comprehensive education?
    • Authors: Eila Lindfors; Antti Hilmola
      Pages: 373 - 389
      Abstract: Abstract The goal of this article is to clarify the concept of innovation and by presenting a research on the basic education outcome assessment data from an innovation learning perspective, answer to a question: Do students learn innovation in comprehensive education? The empirical information in this research is based on data collected in the national assessment of the subject craft, design and technology education (CDT) in Finland in 2010. The comprehensive education in Finland, the basic education, means grades 1–9 in comprehensive schools from age 7 to 16. This assessment included a design task, a test of knowledge and skills and an attitude test in CDT. This research focuses on two central concepts: (1) innovation is defined as a novel, inventive and usable solution, in either material or immaterial space: an end-product, process or method related to people’s practical needs and purposes and (2) innovation learning is defined as a problem based and creative process of using and implementing knowledge and skills in iterative and critical manner in designing and making a novel and practical solution with high usability. The assessment data was marked off to tasks which indicated the innovation learning (n = 661 out of the sample n = 4792). Brim quartiles were used as a methodological solution; the brim quartiles of usability formed the sample of this research. The statistical differences were tested using the Kruskal–Wallis test and the Pearson Chi Square test. Innovation learning includes the process of designing, planning, making and the practical solution itself. The national data allow general conclusions according to the level of innovation learning in comprehensive education. The central observation is that students learn innovation in comprehensive education varying from good to moderate levels. However, if students have not studied design and technology since 7th grade, they are twice as likely to be negative underachievers as to be either positive achievers or positive underachievers. This is useful for governments to know when trying to increase innovation on a national level, as well as when considering the well-being of people and society.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9311-6
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2016)
  • Analysing the correlation between social network analysis measures and
           performance of students in social network-based engineering education
    • Authors: Goran Putnik; Eric Costa; Cátia Alves; Hélio Castro; Leonilde Varela; Vaibhav Shah
      Pages: 413 - 437
      Abstract: Abstract Social network-based engineering education (SNEE) is designed and implemented as a model of Education 3.0 paradigm. SNEE represents a new learning methodology, which is based on the concept of social networks and represents an extended model of project-led education. The concept of social networks was applied in the real-life experiment, considering two different dimensions: (1) to organize the education process as a social network-based process; and (2) to analyze the students’ interactions in the context of evaluation of the students learning performance. The objective of this paper is to present a new model for students evaluation based on their behavior during the course and its validation in comparison with the traditional model of students’ evaluation. The validation of the new evaluation model is made through an analysis of the correlation between social network analysis measures (degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality, eigenvector centrality, and average tie strength) and the grades obtained by students (grades for quality of work, grades for volume of work, grades for diversity of work, and final grades) in a social network-based engineering education. The main finding is that the obtained correlation results can be used to make the process of the students’ performance evaluation based on students interactions (behavior) analysis, to make the evaluation partially automatic, increasing the objectivity and productivity of teachers and allowing a more scalable process of evaluation. The results also contribute to the behavioural theory of learning performance evaluation. More specific findings related to the correlation analysis are: (1) the more different interactions a student had (degree centrality) and the more frequently the student was between the interaction paths of other students (betweenness centrality), the better was the quality of the work; (2) all five social network measures had a positive and strong correlation with the grade for volume of work and with the final grades; and (3) a student with high average tie strength had a higher grade for diversity of work than those with low ties.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9318-z
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2016)
  • Exploring the learning problems and resource usage of undergraduate
           industrial design students in design studio courses
    • Authors: Wenzhi Chen
      Pages: 461 - 487
      Abstract: Abstract Design is a powerful weapon for modern companies so it is important to have excellent designers in the industry. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning problems and the resources that students use to overcome problems in undergraduate industrial design studio courses. A survey with open-type questions was conducted to collect data. Participants in this study were 189 undergraduate industrial design students from three universities, and two coding schema were formulated for analysing the data. The results demonstrated that the most difficult design tasks included concept generation, design presentation, and design research. The learning resources used to solve the learning problems included four categories: people, object, method, and environment. This information will increase the understanding of the learning process of students and provide a reference for teaching and the setting of learning resources in industrial design education.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-015-9315-2
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2016)
  • A path model of factors affecting secondary school students’
           technological literacy
    • Authors: Stanislav Avsec; Janez Jamšek
      Abstract: Abstract Technological literacy defines a competitive vision for technology education. Working together with competitive supremacy, technological literacy shapes the actions of technology educators. Rationalised by the dictates of industry, technological literacy was constructed as a product of the marketplace. There are many models that visualise different dimensions of technological literacy, but clear empirical evidence on how these interact is still lacking. A measurement method that comprehensively evaluates technological literacy is missing. Insights into the stem structure and interaction of technological literacy dimensions could be useful for technology education curriculum design and its implementation. In this study, the multifaceted nature of technological literacy was measured using a new assessment method, and dimensions of secondary school students’ technological literacy were empirically investigated. A total of 403 students participated in the quasi-experimental research design. The treatment group consisted of 121 students taught optional subjects relating to technology education. The control group consisted of 282 students. Results from variance analysis showed that optional technology subjects enhance technological literacy, especially students’ technological capacity where a large effect size (η 2  = 0.14) was noted. Results from a path analysis revealed critical thinking and decision-making as the most important dimensions of technological literacy while the predictor of active participation in out-of-school technical activities and technology homework was a key independent influencing factor. A large effect size (R 2  = 0.4) for career path orientation predictors was detected. Technological capacity was revealed as a decisive predictor for a career path in vocational education and technical high school.
      PubDate: 2016-09-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9382-z
  • Line by line, part by part: collaborative sketching for designing
    • Authors: Tellervo Härkki; Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarainen; Kai Hakkarainen
      Abstract: Abstract While sketching has an established role in professional design, its benefits and role in design education are subjects that invite research and opinions. We investigated how undergraduates studying to become design educators and textile teachers used sketching to generate and develop design solutions in a collaborative setting. The students were given an authentic design assignment involving three detailed tasks, one of which was 2D visualisation by sketching. Adopting a micro-analytical approach, we analysed the video-recorded visualisation session to understand how teams used sketching to collaborate and to generate and develop design solutions. To that end, we set three research questions: (1) What ways of collaborative working are reflected in actions of sketching? (2) In what ways do sequences of collaborative sketching contribute to designing? (3) What kinds of collaborative sequences of sketching advance designing? Our analysis identified three collaborative ways of sketching (co-ordinated, collective and disclosed) and confirmed that sketching is an important facilitator of mutual appropriation, adaption and adoption. Next, we identified three ways of contributing to designing, as well as three functions and six capacities for advancing designing. Our analysis shows that sketching can lead to invaluable advances in designing, although each team had its own way of using and benefiting from sketching. We further consider that the teams’ diverse sketching processes and rich content owed, at least in part, to the task structure and imposed constraints. We continue to see sketching as an important design tool, one among many.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9379-7
  • Hierarchical thinking: a cognitive tool for guiding coherent decision
           making in design problem solving
    • Authors: Grietjie Haupt
      Abstract: This paper builds on two concepts, the first of which is the extended information processing model of expert design cognition. This proposes twelve internal psychological characteristics interacting with the external world of expert designers during the early phases of the design process. Here, I explore one of the characteristics, hierarchical abstraction, and adapt it into an alternative ontological model of decision making. The model serves as an in-depth descriptor of how designers from different domains transform their mental states using judgment and decision making through hierarchical abstraction. The second concept entails an expansion of the idea of synergistic vertical transformation as a framework for mapping expert designers’ design process. Here, I focus on hierarchical decision making as multi-directional, and inter-relating the internal and external world of designers. In doing so, I provide a coding tool for researchers interested in exploring designers’ complex decision making processes. Concurrently, the model serves as decision making tool in design and technology education classrooms. As such, the paper focuses on the ontology of conceptual structures that support the early phases of the design process. This was based on empirical research.
      PubDate: 2016-09-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9381-0
  • Reflection and professional identity development in design education
    • Authors: Monica W. Tracey; Alisa Hutchinson
      Abstract: Abstract Design thinking positions designers as the drivers of the design space yet academic discourse is largely silent on the topic of professional identity development in design. Professional identity, or the dynamic narratives that individuals construct and maintain to integrate their personal qualities with professional responsibilities, has not been widely addressed in design education either. The study investigated the use of reflective writing in an introductory design course to help students explore and interpret their design beliefs, experiences, and self-awareness in support of professional identity development work. The results indicate that authorial presence, analysis, and narrative quality are common qualities in reflective responses, but emotion is notably lacking from student writing. Students were highly reflective in relation to a general experience with uncertainty and were least reflective when discussing ideation processes. Implications for design education and related research are analysed and discussed.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9380-1
  • A place for food in Australian schools: a socio-historical review of food
    • Authors: Angela Turner; Judith Wilks
      Abstract: Abstract The historical development of food education in secondary schools in New South Wales Australia is a compelling yet under-researched area of interest. This review starts by exploring how food curricula have evolved since the 1700s to the present day juxtaposed on socio-economic and political factors. This review is interested in the role secondary food education may play in ‘supplying’ people into professional studies towards a career as a food technologist. Accordingly this review compares contemporary secondary food curriculum with related curricula in the higher education sector and establishes a marked dissonance between the two. The implications of this are then put forward. The drive to empower students to be enterprising and innovative twenty first century problem solvers in relation to food design through the interdisciplinary nature of food science is discussed, despite the uncertainty as to what degree Food Technology in schools is currently promoting these life-long and life-wide abilities in students. The authors suggest the lack of a theoretical underpinning may be holding the subject back from becoming a robust discipline. For this reason this review puts forward a conceptual framework for the study of food. The following review is relevant to secondary and higher education food education stakeholders (teachers, academics, curriculum developers, professional food industry) and higher education providers nationally and internationally, as the way in which food education is presented in secondary schooling is not contained to the Australian context alone.
      PubDate: 2016-08-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9377-9
  • The experiential domain: developing a model for enhancing practice in
           D&T education
    • Authors: Adrian O’Connor; Niall Seery; Donal Canty
      Abstract: Abstract Creativity and innovation are leading topics for the twenty-first century, not only in individual, cultural or social contexts but also within a wider perspective in business or economic development. For that reason, creative and innovative activities have started to feature in many design-based programs in second level education. Design and Technology (D&T) education has a special importance in promoting creativity and innovation, particularly when conceptual and material aspects of the design process reciprocally support one another. In the classroom, it is common for pupils to take part in creative and innovative activities in pairs or small groups. However, the complex and non-linear nature of these design-based activities calls for dynamic, collaborative problem solving. While collaborative settings and virtual learning environments in D&T education are receiving considerable attention in current research literature, we know very little about shared interactions in design-based activity. Accordingly, there is a need to examine both the collaborative and individual evidence of design-based activity by turning our attention to the interactions around that evidence as teachers and pupils engage in these activities. The purpose of this paper is to examine a pedagogical approach focusing on the social and cognitive interaction of teachers and pupils which is supported by technology and situated in the context of design-based activity. This research found that such interactions not only augmented the design process but led to a conceptual model which demonstrates evidence-based progress through the active configuration of knowledge and understanding.
      PubDate: 2016-08-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9378-8
  • Informing a pedagogy for design and problem-solving in hard materials by
           theorising technologists’ learning experiences
    • Authors: Patricia Potter; Bev France
      Abstract: Abstract Design and problem solving are central to technology and have distinguished learning in technology from other curriculum areas. This research investigated how expert technologists learn design and problem solving through experience. Data was collected from four expert technologists and this information was analysed using learning theories that focus on learning through experience—that is experiential learning theory, situated cognition, distributed cognition and activity theory. This framework of analysis provided evidence that learning through experience is central to these experts’ development and justify a broader construct of experience than normally associated with hard materials. This information supports curriculum development in hard materials technology that employs a wide range of experiences and provides justification for curriculum developers and teachers to justify, inform and develop effective design and problem solving learning programmes focussed on a broadened construct of experience.
      PubDate: 2016-08-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s10798-016-9376-x
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