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  Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 272 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (26 journals)
    - MACHINERY (32 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (168 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (3 journals)
    - PACKAGING (14 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (5 journals)
    - PLASTICS (24 journals)

MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (168 journals)                  1 2     

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Manufacturing: Polymer & Composites Science     Free  
Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Manufacturing Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
American Journal of Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Sensor Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Applied Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Biotech News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bharatiya Vaigyanik evam Audyogik Anusandhan Patrika (BVAAP)     Open Access  
Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Building Service Engineering Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
CATTECH     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Centaurus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cold Regions Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Technology Transfer and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Composites Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Control Theory and Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cryoletters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Design Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Economics of Innovation and New Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Emerging Materials Research     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Fibers     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Fibers and Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
FORMakademisk     Open Access  
Futures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Gender, Technology and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Green Materials     Hybrid Journal  
History and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Hybrid Materials     Open Access  
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
IETE Journal of Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IETE Technical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Radio & Space Physics (IJRSP)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Informaci√≥n Tecnol√≥gica     Open Access  
Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Integrating Materials and Manufacturing Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology , The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Advanced Design and Manufacturing Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Automation and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Biomedical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Business and Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of CAD/CAM     Open Access  
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Design     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Experimental Design and Process Optimisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Innovation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access  
International Journal of Manufacturing, Materials, and Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International journal of materials research. IJMR     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing-Green Technology     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Quality and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Service and Computing Oriented Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of System of Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technoentrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Technology and Design Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Technology and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Vehicle Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Wood Products Journal     Hybrid Journal  
ITL - International Journal of Applied Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal for Manufacturing Science and Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Advanced Research in Manufacturing, Material Science & Metallurgical Engineering     Open Access  

        1 2     

Journal Cover   International Journal of Technology and Design Education
  [SJR: 0.756]   [H-I: 20]   [12 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-1804 - ISSN (Online) 0957-7572
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2302 journals]
  • Hopes and Goals Survey for use in STEM elementary education
    • Abstract: Abstract This study reports the development and validation studies of the Hopes and Goals Survey, an assessment designed to measure the level of hope of elementary students from diverse backgrounds, and its relation to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) studies and career. Data collected from students attending urban elementary schools were used for exploratory factor analysis (n = 265) and confirmatory factor analysis (n = 193). Results suggest that Hopes and Goals Survey is a five factor model with internal consistency ranging from 0.609 to 0.904. In addition, multivariate analysis of variance results indicate that students from differing racial groups in the same school district report similar levels of Hopes and Goals related to STEM.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • Comparing personal characteristic factors of imagination between expert
           and novice designers within different product design stages
    • Abstract: Abstract Imagination plays a key role in various domains in helping to create innovative ideas, drawings, poems, movies, products, etc. In product design domain, the personal characteristics of imagination are crucial abilities for conceiving novel ideas during design processes. This study focuses on personal characteristic differences and similarities between expert and novice designers for triggering imagination during four design stages. Using the semantic differential method, this study conducted a questionnaire with ten-paired personal characteristics, and analyzed several identical and different characteristics of expert and novice designers in the process of product design. In sum, the similarities and differentials of personal characteristics between expert and novice designers within four product design stages will be concluded at the end of this paper.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • An aid for teachers to teach science and technology concepts: two studies
           to test the three-domain model
    • Abstract: Helping teachers to move away from a linear approach to teaching, encouraging them to collect knowledge together with their students as well as providing them support to do this are the fundamental issues that this paper wants to explore. In this paper a pilot test of a model designed to help teachers’ plan and teach concepts in science and technology education is presented. The three-domain model (Koski et al. in Des Technol Educ Int J 16:50–61, 2011) suggests that while teaching science and technology lessons, teachers might benefit from paying more attention to three domains; social context, concrete object and abstract knowledge, and furthermore, constantly moving between these. Although the development of the three-domain model is based on real teaching situations, it is not self-evident that the model can be used as such in practice. Two teachers tested the model in their classrooms in order to see if the model helps them in planning a lesson, and if the teachers (and their students) benefit from the approach. The analysis is based on the pre- and post-lesson discussions with the teachers, lesson plans made by the teachers and observations made during the lesson. Analysis revealed that the teachers kept on looking for appropriate moments to bring more insights to the topic and they would have missed those moments without thinking in terms of the model. The model helped the teachers to seek for opportunities for the students to communicate their understanding. The use of the model also introduced them to a non-linear teaching method and to the profits of applying such. The study concludes that both teachers benefited from using the model; in their preparation of the lesson as well as during the lesson.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • An emancipation framework for technology education teachers: an action
           research study
    • Abstract: Abstract This article reports on how action research (AR) was influential in designing an educational instrument to contribute to emancipating teachers with no formal training to teach technology as a subject in secondary schools. The subject technology is referred to using different names in different countries. Some call it ‘science and technology’ (Malawi/Bangladesh), others label it as ‘design and technology’ (UK/Botswana), in some instances it is dubbed ‘technology learning area’ (SA), while others term it ‘technology education’ (TE) (US/NZ/SA). A sample of 18 technology teachers from five secondary schools was engaged in the AR project reported on in this study. The research was designed from both a critical theory perspective and a participatory paradigm. Instruments used to gather data included observations, interviews, field notes, video recordings of lesson presentations and logs of meetings. The research findings revealed that most technology teachers in this study were neither trained nor qualified to facilitate technology or to teach it with confidence. An AR intervention was introduced, which changed the teachers’ situation by generating an instrument. The instrument generated in this study is only a framework, which could contribute towards emancipating incapacitated technology teachers. Even though this framework is applicable to TE, it could hopefully be adopted and adapted for use in other subjects as a way to enhance teachers’ content knowledge and pedagogy.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • Design knowledge interplayed with student creativity in D&T
           projects
    • Abstract: Abstract This study explores how theoretical elements of design knowledge relate to notions of creativity found in literature. The results of this exploration are further applied to analyze four different cross-curricular design and technology projects in Norwegian primary and lower secondary school. All of the school projects examined were intended to be open-ended providing students with opportunities to be creative and develop their own solutions to the given task. The processes in the groups and the outcomes of the groups’ work are analyzed with regards to technological knowledge and how this relates to the students’ creativity in terms of producing genuine solutions. The analysis shows that in some of the projects the variety of solutions produced by students is limited. In these student groups the solutions and procedures bear a high degree of resemblance to each other. The findings further suggest that students’ limited conceptual technological knowledge constrains their ability to be creative and to produce genuine solutions. The results also reveal that the projects showing less student creativity tend to be more controlled by the teacher and less open-ended than presupposed. A suggestion based on the findings is that the key conceptual technological content should be identified and introduced by the teacher prior to or during the project start. Discussing and exploring concepts and principles explicitly with the students before or during the project period may enhance their possibility to be more creative.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • Contextmapping in primary design and technology education: a fruitful
           method to develop empathy for and insight in user needs
    • Abstract: Abstract Human-centered design is of growing importance for professional designers and in the past two decades a series of techniques for designers to develop understanding of and empathy with a diversity of users has been developed within this field. In the second half of the twentieth century, intended users were involved late in the design process, i.e. during the testing of products or prototypes. More recently, the user is involved in the early phases, when the direction is set. Users have rich local contextual knowledge and can work together with professional designers. Although these techniques are now entering mainstream design education at the university level, they have not yet reached Design and Technology Education in primary and secondary schools. Most teachers do not yet provide opportunities for pupils to conduct research to uncover the needs, wishes, and experiences of specific user groups. However, this understanding of users belongs in D&T education, because artifacts have a dual nature: a physical and an intentional nature. In this paper we describe a Contextmapping method for pupils (aged 9–12 years) and illustrate this with a design project. The assignment for the pupils was to “design a playground in which children and elderly people are active together” in which the pupils developed an understanding of elderly people through Contextmapping.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • Gender-based motivational differences in technology education
    • Abstract: Abstract Because of a deeply gendered history of craft education in Finland, technology education has a strong gender-related dependence. In order to motivate girls into pursuing technological studies and to enable them to see their own potential in technology, gender sensitive approaches should be developed in technology education. This study explores differences between girls’ and boys’ motivation towards technology education in primary school (grades one to six). A questionnaire was carried out with pupils in grades five and six (n = 281). An Explorative Factor Analysis was performed on statements of motivation, and the independent samples t test was used to examine gender differences in pupils’ motivation. Factor analyses showed that pupils’ motivation structure consisted of nine factors. The results also showed gender differences in most factors. Compared to boys, girls were significantly more interested in studying environment related issues. They also felt it fundamental to obtain support and encouragement from teachers. Additionally girls enjoyed more than boys making useful and decorative artefacts for their homes. In contrast, boys liked more than girls building electronic devices and, in general, cared what kinds of artefacts were made in craft lessons. Boys were more self-confident; felt that they could learn new things; felt very enthusiastic about craft lessons and felt it was fun to learn how to operate different tools. These findings reveal obvious gender-based differences in pupils’ motivation. Curriculum writers and teachers should therefore pay more attention to girls to assist them with seeing the relevance of technology in their everyday lives as well as technology related careers.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • Gender and technology in free play in Swedish early childhood education
    • Abstract: Abstract In the new Swedish curriculum for the preschool (2010) technology education is emphasized as one of the most significant pedagogical areas to work with. The aim of this article is to investigate how girls and boys explore and learn technology as well as how their teachers frame this in free play in two Swedish preschools. The study is inspired by an ethnographic approach and is based on qualitative data collected through video-taped observations and informal talk with children and teachers in two preschools. It is concluded that girls and boys learn to approach and handle technology differently, thereby confirming rather than dissolving gender boundaries. The girls more often have a special purpose in building something they need in their play, that is, they mostly engage in technological construction as a sideline. The boys, on the other hand, more often award technological construction a central part in their play; building is an end in itself. Teachers are not so active in supporting free play involving technology among the older children, nor in giving boys and girls equal opportunities to explore and use material and toys which are not gender-stereotyped. One important implication is that in-service education needs to address not only experiments and construction but also gender issues and how teachers can create equal opportunities for boys and girls in the free play.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01
       
  • Criteria for continuing professional development of technology
           teachers’ professional knowledge: a theoretical perspective
    • Abstract: Abstract Continuing professional teacher development (CPTD) is generally accepted as an indispensable tool for the professional development of technology teachers. The current theoretical framework for CPTD comprises a variety of models. However, criteria underpinning these models are not explicit. If, in turn, the criteria were explicit, it could serve as part of the pre-determined criteria for the evaluation of the quality of CPTD programmes. The quality of higher education is important to its stakeholders and the assurance thereof should be a continuous process. The aim of this article is to determine criteria for evaluating CPTD programmes through an analysis of CPTD models in different educational settings. The article takes the form of a literature study to determine which CPTD models exist and which aspects of such models are most suitable for facilitating development of technology teachers’ professional knowledge. A significant finding of this study is eight criteria for evaluating CPTD programmes.
      PubDate: 2015-04-25
       
  • Study choice and career development in STEM fields: an overview and
           integration of the research
    • Abstract: Abstract Although science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) study paths and STEM work fields may be relatively difficult and therefore not appropriate for everyone, too many children prematurely exclude STEM-related study and work options, based on negative images of the field or negative ability beliefs. In the present article, we provide an overview of the literature from different research perspectives that shows that study choice and career decisions made by young adults have their roots in earlier in childhood. In our view, the literature reviewed points to three interrelated factors that are important in the study choice and career development of children aged 8–16: knowledge, affective value, and ability beliefs and self-efficacy building. Based on this review, we argue that knowledge of the STEM field, and of the self in STEM activities, and parents’ and teachers’ knowledge of the early circumscription processes of children aged 8–16 needs to be broadened. Also, negative and often-stereotypical affective values adhered to STEM study choices or careers among parents and teachers need to be countered. With regard to ability beliefs, we argue that we should focus more attention on turning pupils’ entity beliefs into incremental ones.
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
       
  • Influence of problem-based learning strategy on enhancing student’s
           industrial oriented competences learned: an action research on learning
           weblog analysis
    • Abstract: Abstract In order to respond to the ever-changing global economic environment, the technological and vocational education system in Taiwan needs to be dramatically reformed to the changing needs of the domestic industrial structure. Integrating practical talents with practical industrial experiences and competences can help avoid discrepancy and close the gap between vocational education and the practical demands of industries. Thus, to achieve the goals of technological and vocational education, it is necessary to incorporate instruction that meets the demands of the industrial-oriented manpower in Taiwan. In this study, the well-known problem-based learning (PBL) approach, utilized commonly in the educational area of medicine and business management, was integrated with the qualitative method of action research to explore how such a learning strategy could influence college students’ learning outcomes regarding industrial-oriented competences. The research results were induced from the empirical data collected via participatory classroom observations, and analyses of teachers’ instructional journals and semi-structural interviews. A survey with quasi-experimental design of the control group pretest and posttest was conducted by using an industrial-oriented competences scale to explore the influences of PBL on students’ learning outcomes of industrial-oriented competences. The findings are expected to shed light on the teaching and learning strategy of college students’ industrial-oriented competences and contribute to theoretical implications and future educational and industrial development of Taiwan.
      PubDate: 2015-04-18
       
  • Spatial ability learning through educational robotics
    • Abstract: Abstract Several authors insist on the importance of students’ acquisition of spatial abilities and visualization in order to have academic success in areas such as science, technology or engineering. This paper proposes to discuss and analyse the use of educational robotics to develop spatial abilities in 12 year old students. First of all, a course to introduce robotics to 6th grade primary school students was designed. The key intention was to prepare practical and motivating sessions in order to foster the students’ involvement in hands-on learning. Hence, during the sessions of the course, challenges were provided for the students, in order to develop their capabilities as proficient problem solvers. The teacher assisted and guided the students, and the students were encouraged to solve the problems by themselves, working in 3-members teams. The main goal of this paper is to discuss and analyse the potential usefulness of educational robotics to develop spatial abilities. To carry out the analysis, students were randomly divided into an experimental group (EG), which participated in the robotics course, and a control group (CG), which did not take part in the robotics course. The extensive existing literature for spatial ability evaluation was analysed and reviewed and a pre-test and a post-test were prepared for use in the research study. Initially, the spatial ability of both EG and CG students was assessed with the pre-test. Then, after finishing the robotics course, the same sets of students were tested with the post-test. An extensive analysis of the results is provided in the paper. Results show that the positive change in spatial ability of the participants in the robotics course (EG) was greater than change evident in the students who did not join the course (CG). The improvement was statistically significant. The results also show that the overall performance of the students depends on the instruments used to evaluate their spatial abilities. Hence, this study manifests clearly the importance of the selection of those instruments.
      PubDate: 2015-04-18
       
  • What preconceptions and attitudes about engineering are prevalent amongst
           upper secondary school pupils? An international study
    • Abstract: Abstract In the Netherlands, as well as in many other countries, there is an increasing interest in implementing education about engineering as a part of general education at the upper secondary school level. In order to know what pupils at that level think about engineering, a study has been done to investigate their attitude towards and their concept of engineering. This study was done not only in the Netherlands but also in 39 other countries. In the preparation of the study, pupils were asked to draw concept maps of what they thought engineering was about. In the quantitative main part of the study, pupils were asked to respond to 33 Likert-type attitude items and 32 concept-items of the same type. A factor analysis was done in order to reveal the dimensions in the pupils’ attitude and concept. In contrast to studies carried out amongst students in lower secondary school levels, a fairly clear concept about engineering was found. The gender differences relating to engineering, found in lower secondary education, were not found in upper secondary education. The prevalent attitude of students towards engineering indicated a fairly positive image of engineering.
      PubDate: 2015-03-24
       
  • Robotics in the early childhood classroom: learning outcomes from an
           8-week robotics curriculum in pre-kindergarten through second grade
    • Abstract: Abstract In recent years there has been an increasing focus on the missing “T” of technology and “E” of engineering in early childhood STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) curricula. Robotics offers a playful and tangible way for children to engage with both T and E concepts during their foundational early childhood years. This study looks at N = 60 children in pre-kindergarten through second grade who completed an 8-week robotics curriculum in their classrooms using the KIWI robotics kit combined with a tangible programming language. Children were assessed on their knowledge of foundational robotics and programming concepts upon completion of the curriculum. Results show that beginning in pre-kindergarten, children were able to master basic robotics and programming skills, while the older children were able to master increasingly complex concepts using the same robotics kit in the same amount of time. Implications for developmentally appropriate design of technology, as well as structure and pace of robotics curricula for young children are addressed.
      PubDate: 2015-03-22
       
  • Influence of design training and spatial solution strategies on spatial
           ability performance
    • Abstract: Abstract Numerous studies have reported that spatial ability improves through training. This study investigated the following: (1) whether design training enhances spatial ability and (2) whether differing solution strategies are applied or generated following design training. On the basis of these two research objectives, this study divided the participants into design and non-design groups. Each participant in these groups was required to complete three spatial tests and one solution strategy questionnaire. This study found that the participants in the design group outperformed those in the non-design group regarding spatial visualization and spatial relations; however, the two groups showed no difference in visuospatial perceptual speed performance. The design and non-design groups adopted different solution strategies; the design group used the holistic strategy, whereas the non-design group used the analytical strategy.
      PubDate: 2015-02-19
       
  • Piloting technological understanding and reasoning in Icelandic schools
    • Abstract: Abstract A pilot research was undertaken in Icelandic schools during the 2013–2014 school year, in order to explore students’ technological understanding and reasoning at the ages of 11 and 13. The survey included a questionnaire regarding mechanical movement, power and thermodynamics, while the project considered the congruity between students’ undertakings within Design and Craft education in the national curricula and their ability to understand technology. This article examines the literature and considers the value of technology lessons within Icelandic Design and Craft education, in terms of students’ technological competence. Data was collected using a questionnaire distributed to three elementary schools and is highlighted with the researchers’ reviews of the national curricula. Findings were discussed and conclusions drawn and the results highlighted a general lack of understanding in technology, within the context of students’ daily lives. In addition, there were differences between boys and girls.
      PubDate: 2015-02-11
       
  • The reality of STEM education, design and technology teachers’
           perceptions: a phenomenographic study
    • Abstract: Abstract The supply of highly qualified scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians is perceived by governments globally as being vital in securing economic prosperity, but somewhere along the line pupils are being ‘switched off’, and disengage with the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) beyond compulsory schooling. Improved STEM Education is presented as a way forward, and the supply of well qualified teachers is perceived as integral to achieving this vision. However in England and Wales, as government funded teacher training bursaries rise for those seeking to pursue a career in mathematics or science, funding for those wishing to train to teach engineering or design and technology is less lucrative. As individual disciplines both hold enormous potential to contribute to the STEM agenda, however currently this is not wholly realised. Set against a background of policy reform and curriculum change, this paper seeks to explore the ways teachers of design and technology perceive STEM, and how the range in variation of perception, relates to design and technology pedagogy. Phenomenography is the adopted methodology, and as such this paper explores participant’s pedagogical understanding and perceptions from a non-dualistic ontological stance. The primary research tool was interview, which following data analysis, categories of description were formed to create empirically grounded outcome spaces. Outcomes from this study show that teacher’s perception of STEM, their personal knowledge, and understanding of that knowledge, is intrinsically linked to the effectiveness of STEM delivery in their own classroom practice. In conclusion, findings from this study would support, in order for learners (pupils) to become STEM literate, that teachers of all STEM subjects be supported to explore ways in which they can best foster mutually reciprocal arrangements with their STEM counterparts.
      PubDate: 2015-02-08
       
  • The role of mental models in collaborative sketching
    • Abstract: Abstract Designers often collaborate to explore creative ideas, especially during the early stages of conceptual design, and their mental models, as the framework of design tasks, greatly influence the collaborative sketching process. Such models have multiple kinds of differences and each kind might have unique effects, yet previous studies analyzed these differences as a whole and have reported only the effects of overall similarity. Because ideas are the embodiments of mental models, this study referred to the components of ideas to construct the structure of mental models. We constructed a three-level mental model involving goals, functions, and structures and arranged the ideas in sketching accordingly into a three-level idea tree. A collaborative sketching experiment was conducted, and the effects of the three levels of mental models were compared. Participants accepted different goals and produced large numbers of new functions. They stuck with similar functions and continued to generate new structures. Participants had different strategies when exploring the levels of the mental models, providing possibilities for new methods of collaborative sketching.
      PubDate: 2015-02-01
       
  • An effective educational tool: construction kits for fun and meaningful
           learning
    • Abstract: Abstract The integration of robotics in education is still relatively new and represents an important advance in education practices. So, this paper aims to share the results from the perspectives of both students and trainers in an experimental case research in which LEGO Mindstorms construction kits were used. Sixty-two students between the ages of 8 and 14 participated in the study. Multiple data collection methods were used to ensure the richness and diversity of the data. According to the findings, constructivist learning experiences that students had in this training program were themed into the four major themes; active learning, authentic learning, multiple perspectives and collaborative learning. Learning through construction kits offered opportunities to deepen the students’ understanding of various concepts with hands-on exploration and design, resulting in fun and enjoyment. It also promoted students’ active involvement and fostered the collaboration that leads to developing multiple perspectives.
      PubDate: 2015-02-01
       
  • Role of graphics tools in the learning design process
    • Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses the design activities of students in secondary school in France. Graphics tools are now part of the capacity of design professionals. It is therefore apt to reflect on their integration into the technological education. Has the use of intermediate graphical tools changed students’ performance, and if so in what direction, in phase of seeking solutions through a design activity in a situation of teaching and learning? The influence of computer aided design (CAD) tools on design professional activities has been the subject of much research, but little has focused on student activity. Thus, analysing student work through an experimental device, we ask that students produce more solutions without using CAD tools. Do CAD activities encourage the modelling of a particular solution? Does drawing by hand before CAD activities support the production of various solutions and define them more precisely? Through the analysis of solutions developed by students, including traces of their activity (sketches, digital files), we test our hypotheses.
      PubDate: 2015-02-01
       
 
 
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