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  Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 279 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (25 journals)
    - MACHINERY (32 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (171 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (3 journals)
    - PACKAGING (15 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (5 journals)
    - PLASTICS (27 journals)
    - RUBBER (1 journals)

MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (171 journals)                  1 2     

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Manufacturing: Polymer & Composites Science     Free   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Manufacturing Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Sensor Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Applied Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Biotech News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bharatiya Vaigyanik evam Audyogik Anusandhan Patrika (BVAAP)     Open Access  
Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Building Service Engineering Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
CATTECH     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Centaurus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Cold Regions Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Technology Transfer and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Composites Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 103)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Control Theory and Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cryoletters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Design Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Economics of Innovation and New Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Emerging Materials Research     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Fibers     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Fibers and Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
FORMakademisk     Open Access  
Futures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Gender, Technology and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Green Materials     Hybrid Journal  
History and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Hybrid Materials     Open Access  
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
IETE Journal of Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IETE Technical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Radio & Space Physics (IJRSP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Informaci√≥n Tecnol√≥gica     Open Access  
Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Integrating Materials and Manufacturing Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology , The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Advanced Design and Manufacturing Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Automation and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Biomedical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Business and Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of CAD/CAM     Open Access  
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Design     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Experimental Design and Process Optimisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Innovation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access  
International Journal of Manufacturing, Materials, and Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International journal of materials research     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing-Green Technology     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Quality and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Service and Computing Oriented Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of System of Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technoentrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology and Design Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Technology and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Vehicle Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Wood Products Journal     Hybrid Journal  
ITL - International Journal of Applied Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal for Manufacturing Science and Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)

        1 2     

Journal Cover   International Journal of Technology and Design Education
  [SJR: 0.756]   [H-I: 20]   [12 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-1804 - ISSN (Online) 0957-7572
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2291 journals]
  • An exploratory study on the application of conceptual knowledge and
           critical thinking to technological issues
    • Abstract: Abstract This study explored how senior high school students apply their conceptual knowledge, consisting of theoretical and system knowledge, to think critically when confronted with technological issues. We employed a curriculum on the history of communication technology to teach students about basic concepts in communication technology and to cultivate their ability to use critical thinking to confront issues in this domain. Concept mapping was adopted to assess students’ ability to apply conceptual knowledge to their actual cognitive activities, and a critical thinking test was developed to evaluate students’ performance in this regard. The sample consisted of 98 tenth-grade students. We used descriptive statistics, measures of relationships, and qualitative analyses to examine the data. The results indicated that, during the teaching of conceptual knowledge, most students easily fall victim to misconceptions about concepts that they cannot specifically observe in their own experiences and thus find it difficult to construct complete and correct knowledge. Although students’ critical thinking about technological issues was positively correlated with their application of conceptual knowledge, their incomplete system knowledge could affect their ability to identify core problems of technological issues, and incorrect theoretical knowledge could influence their abilities to interpret information, thereby affecting their judgments.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
       
  • A methodology for improving active learning engineering courses with a
           large number of students and teachers through feedback gathering and
           iterative refinement
    • Abstract: Abstract In the last decade, engineering education has evolved in many ways to meet society demands. Universities offer more flexible curricula and put a lot of effort on the acquisition of professional engineering skills by the students. In many universities, the courses in the first years of different engineering degrees share program and objectives, having a large number of students and teachers. These common courses are expected to provide the students with meaningful learning experiences, which could be achieved by using active learning. The use of active learning in engineering courses improves traditional teaching by promoting students’ participation and engagement, although active learning courses can be very sensitive to differences in learning paces or team conflicts; this being a challenge for the widespread adoption of active learning in courses with many students and teachers. This paper proposes a methodology that facilitates the detection and reaction to problems in active learning engineering courses with many students and teachers. This methodology is based on gathering feedback (from students and teachers) and decision-making processes at selected milestones. The methodology integrates intra-edition mechanisms in order to detect problems and react as the courses are being taught, and inter-edition mechanisms to ensure the persistence of necessary changes in the courses design. The methodology has been successfully applied during four consecutive editions to improve an undergraduate active learning programming course with an average of 257 students and 9 teachers per edition. An extended validation of expert educators suggests that this methodology can also be applied to traditional engineering courses.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
       
  • Examining the gaps between teaching and learning in the technology
           curriculum within Taiwan’s 9-year articulated curriculum reform from
           the perspective of curriculum implementation
    • Abstract: Abstract Curriculum reform has frequently focused on the curriculum-development stage, overlooking considerations regarding curriculum implementation, which has led to reform failure. In this study, consideration was placed primarily on the curriculum implementation stage. The gaps between teachers’ and students’ perceptions of content, learning activities, and teaching methods in Taiwan’s technology curriculum were analyzed. Based on the results of the questionnaires, the major results are as follows. (1) Both teachers and students perceive a gap between education reform policy and curriculum implementation in the technology curriculum within Taiwan’s 9-year articulated technology curriculum. (2) When implementing the ideas of the curriculum reform plan, technology teachers continued to encounter practical problems with the curriculum content, learning activities, and teaching methods. (3) In terms of suggestions for future curriculum development, science and living technology can be regarded as separate areas of learning.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
       
  • Collaborative sketching in crowdsourcing design: a new method for idea
           generation
    • Abstract: Abstract Design integrates concepts and solves problems. Crowdsourcing design imports vast knowledge and produces creative ideas. It publishes design tasks, collects dozens of contributors’ ideas and reward the best. Contributors in crowdsourcing design work individually when generating ideas. However, those who collaborate could make better use of crowd’s knowledge, which might produce ideas of higher quality. By analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of crowdsourcing design, this article proposes a collaborative crowdsourcing design method that integrates crowd’s sketching processes. This method uses a tree to arrange crowd’s ideas and enable flexible modifications of prior ideas. A demonstration system named Sketchfans is developed, and the results of a crowdsourcing sketching experiment using this system are presented. The experimental results validate that this method is effective; participants rely heavily on the idea tree for inspiration, and the best ideas appear around the ends of branches on the idea tree. Moreover, participants displayed unique development patterns. They often developed high-quality ideas from initial ideas that were regarded as poor quality. The demonstration system Sketchfans, supports this method well. Finally, we optimize Sketchfans based on analysis of participants’ activities and feedback.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
       
  • “I want my robot to look for food”: Comparing
           Kindergartner’s programming comprehension using tangible, graphic,
           and hybrid user interfaces
    • Abstract: Abstract In recent years, educational robotics has become an increasingly popular research area. However, limited studies have focused on differentiated learning outcomes based on type of programming interface. This study aims to explore how successfully young children master foundational programming concepts based on the robotics user interface (tangible, graphical, hybrid) taught in their curriculum. Thirty-five Kindergarten students participated in a 9-week robotics curriculum using the LEGO WeDo robotics construction kit and the Creative Hybrid Environment for Robotic Programming (CHERP) programming language. A mixed methods data collection approach was employed, including qualitative observational data from the classrooms, as well as quantitative mid- and post-test assessments of students’ programming knowledge using CHERP. The findings show little association between user interface and programming comprehension, although there may be an order-affect when introducing user interfaces. Implications for best practices when introducing programming in early childhood settings are discussed.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
       
  • Investigating technology teachers’ self-efficacy on assessment
    • Abstract: Abstract This study explores possible differences in the views on assessment between two groups of teachers teaching technology in compulsory school: (1) teachers with subject-specific teacher training in technology education; and (2) teachers without such training. This topic is of particular interest because of the recent changes in the regulations that govern compulsory schools in Sweden, such that only certified teachers now will be permitted to teach and assign grades, despite the clear lack of certified teachers in technology education. The study is situated in two fields of interest—technology education and assessment. Both topics are highly relevant, especially in combination, because previous research on teachers’ assessment practices in technology is rare. In this study, the goal is to contribute to deepening the understanding of how subject-specific teacher training affects teachers’ ability to assess students’ knowledge while maintaining alignment with stated regulations. The results show significant difference between these two groups’ use of curriculum documents as the basis of their teaching and their self-efficacy in assessing student’s knowledge in technology. The results suggest interesting possibilities for curriculum alignment and indicate that the opportunities for student learning increase according to whether teachers are specifically trained in the subject.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
       
  • What is the function of a figurine? Can the repertory grid technique
           tell?
    • Abstract: Abstract Teaching design and product development at upper secondary school level in Sweden is a matter of interdisciplinary considerations. Education in product development, at this level, prepares students for further studies and career in engineering or industrial design. Knowledge of artefacts is an important element in the education. In coherence with the visual and rhetorical strategies characterising the knowledge field, students learn how to develop an idea to a final product. In this study twelve engineers and industrial designers, professionals representing the knowledge field of product development are studied regarding their interpretations of eight pre-selected artefacts. Data is collected and analysed using repertory grid technique. The aim of the study is to examine whether/what we can learn from the informants’ experiences and knowledge that is relevant to education in design and product development at upper secondary school level. Findings show that four of the artefacts appear to be carriers of attributes that reveal the interviewees’ definitions of the artefacts’ functional nature. From these findings it is shown that the interviewees’ definitions of concepts concerning aesthetics/decoration and function can be seen as cultural expressions. How the repertory grid technique is used in this particular study is thoroughly described and the results relevance for education is discussed.
      PubDate: 2015-07-28
       
  • Design and evaluation of a DIY construction system for educational robot
           kits
    • Abstract: Abstract Building a robot from scratch in an educational context can be a challenging prospect. While a multitude of projects exist that simplify the electronics and software aspects of a robot, the same cannot be said for construction systems for robotics. In this paper, we present our efforts to create a low-cost do-it-yourself construction system for small robots. We have created three different construction systems (laser-cut screw connectors, printed friction-fit connectors, and printed hybrid connectors) using small aluminium T-slot extrusions, based on prior work done by Industrial Design college students. Eighty-six secondary school students and 35 teachers tested these three systems during a five-day robotics contest where they had to build firefighting robots. Follow-up questionnaires and an expert evaluation were used to measure the usability, affective appraisal and functionality of the three systems in order to determine which system should serve as a basis for further design iterations. Overall, a clear preference was shown for the hybrid system, which relies on its interlocking shape as well as on a screw connection to create robot frames that are both quick to construct and very rigid once assembled. We believe our work represents a solid first step toward an inexpensive, “hackable” construction system for educational robotics.
      PubDate: 2015-07-18
       
  • Consequential creativity
    • Abstract: Abstract Creativity is an original cognitive ability and problem solving process which enables individuals to use their intelligence in a way that is unique and directed toward coming up with a product. Architectural education is one of the fields in which human creativity has been exhibited; because, it can be defined as a design study that correlates with other disciplines: social sciences, management, history, operational research, philosophy, graphic design, math and etc. These features which distinguish architecture from other disciplines ascribe different kind of responsibilities for architectural education; since beside technical and professional skills, an architect must have imagination and to be creative at many levels. Thus, this research aims at proving that students can be trained in creative thinking via acquiring specific skills and systematic techniques, which directly acts on design product. The study methodology depends on the concept of experimental research that targets at exposing students to creative problem solving experience via carrying out a creative training course that concerns “Consequential Creativity”. That experiment examined the potentiality of enhancing the students’ ability of viewing problems in non-traditional perspectives that counts on the systematic procedures of problem solving. Tools for assessment before and after training have been implemented. The Experiment findings proved that the students’ creative thinking skill has been clearly improved after attending the course. Therefore, training in creative thinking can be considered as independent courses or within specific architectural curricula.
      PubDate: 2015-06-27
       
  • Does the medium matter in collaboration? Using visually supported
           collaboration technology in an interior design studio
    • Abstract: Abstract With the recognition of the importance of collaboration in a design studio and the advancement of technology, increasing numbers of design students collaborate with others in a technology-mediated learning environment (TMLE); however, not all students have positive experiences in TMLEs. One possible reason for unsatisfactory collaboration experiences is that existing text-oriented collaboration technology may not fully support interior design students’ needs for spontaneous interaction with visual images. The purpose of the current research was to determine whether a visually supported collaboration technology (VSCT) for designers, enhances students’ collaboration experiences in a TMLE. A total of 28 junior interior design students participated in the study, all of whom engaged in similar group projects via two collaboration modalities: face-to-face and VSCT. The results show that collaboration modalities influence students’ learning experiences, in particular, achievement and confidence in completing collaborative tasks. When using VSCT, students achieved significantly higher grade and demonstrated higher confidence in completing collaborative tasks compared to face-to-face collaboration; however, no significant differences were reported in either their perception of the collaboration process or their evaluation of the medium in the two collaboration modalities. The findings demonstrate that VSCT enhanced students’ collaboration experiences in design studio. Discussion and implications are provided to facilitate design students’ positive collaboration experiences in a TMLE.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24
       
  • Response strategies for curriculum change in engineering
    • Abstract: Abstract During the last 25 years, there have been many calls for new engineering competencies and a corresponding gradual change in both curriculum and pedagogy in engineering education. This has been a global trend, in the US, Europe, Australia and now emerging in the rest of the world. Basically, there have been two main types of societal challenges that many engineering institutions have responded to: the employability skills of graduates and the need for a sustainability approach to engineering. These are two very different challenges and societal needs; however, the ways engineering institutions have responded form a consistent pattern across many of the content aspects. No matter the specific character of change, three very different curriculum strategies seem to have evolved: an add-on strategy, an integration strategy or a re-building strategy; the latter involves substantial curriculum re-design. The add-on strategy and integration strategy are the ones most commonly used, whereas the re-building strategy is at an emerging stage in most engineering education communities. Most engineering schools find it very challenging to re-build an entire curriculum, so smaller changes are generally preferred. The purpose of this article is to conceptualise these institutional response strategies in a wider literature and present examples of curriculum change within both employability and sustainability. We will maintain that all these strategies are based on management decisions as well as academic faculty decisions; however the implications for using the various strategies are very different in terms of system change, role of disciplines, leader interventions and faculty development strategies. Furthermore, institutions might use all types of response strategies in different programs and in different semesters. The conceptual framework presented here can provide analytical anchors, hopefully creating more awareness of the complexity of systemic change.
      PubDate: 2015-06-18
       
  • Epistemic habits: primary school teachers’ development of
           pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in a design-based research project
    • Abstract: Abstract Generalist primary school teachers often have little or no training in school subjects such as science and technology. Not surprisingly, several studies show that they often experience difficulties when teaching these subjects, in fact some primary teachers even avoid teaching them. The over all aim of this study is to contribute to new theoretical and methodological tools for the study of how teachers develop knowledge for teaching, i.e. pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). And based on this, elaborate on implications for the professional development of primary school teachers. The teachers in the study participated in a design-based research project concerning technology education in Grade 1. We were especially interested in whether the teachers displayed any habits that contributed to the development of their personal PCK. We found three significant patterns in how the teachers, together with the researcher, developed knowledge of how to teach a specific topic in technology. We argue that these patterns tell us something about the teachers’ epistemic habits in relation to the teaching of technology. The existence of these habits could help to explain how teachers with little or no experience of teaching a subject can develop relevant PCK.
      PubDate: 2015-06-18
       
  • Analysing the correlation between social network analysis measures and
           performance of students in social network-based engineering education
    • Abstract: Abstract Social network-based engineering education (SNEE) is designed and implemented as a model of Education 3.0 paradigm. SNEE represents a new learning methodology, which is based on the concept of social networks and represents an extended model of project-led education. The concept of social networks was applied in the real-life experiment, considering two different dimensions: (1) to organize the education process as a social network-based process; and (2) to analyze the students’ interactions in the context of evaluation of the students learning performance. The objective of this paper is to present a new model for students evaluation based on their behavior during the course and its validation in comparison with the traditional model of students’ evaluation. The validation of the new evaluation model is made through an analysis of the correlation between social network analysis measures (degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality, eigenvector centrality, and average tie strength) and the grades obtained by students (grades for quality of work, grades for volume of work, grades for diversity of work, and final grades) in a social network-based engineering education. The main finding is that the obtained correlation results can be used to make the process of the students’ performance evaluation based on students interactions (behavior) analysis, to make the evaluation partially automatic, increasing the objectivity and productivity of teachers and allowing a more scalable process of evaluation. The results also contribute to the behavioural theory of learning performance evaluation. More specific findings related to the correlation analysis are: (1) the more different interactions a student had (degree centrality) and the more frequently the student was between the interaction paths of other students (betweenness centrality), the better was the quality of the work; (2) all five social network measures had a positive and strong correlation with the grade for volume of work and with the final grades; and (3) a student with high average tie strength had a higher grade for diversity of work than those with low ties.
      PubDate: 2015-06-11
       
  • How are students’ attitudes related to learning outcomes?
    • Abstract: Abstract This article is a part of a research project aimed to find out how different background variables are related to learning outcomes in technology education related to the school subject Sloyd (craft). The research question of this article is: “How are ninth grade students’ attitudes towards the subject related to their learning outcomes?” The empirical data (n = 4792) was collected by stratified sampling from 152 secondary schools as a part of the Finnish National Board of Education (FNBE) assessment. A shortened Finnish version of the Fennema–Sherman attitude test was carried out in a narrowed sample (n = 1548). The three attitude factors for learners were ‘Liking Sloyd as a school subject’, ‘Experiencing Utility in Sloyd’ and ‘Self-concept in Sloyd’. Structural equation modelling revealed that ‘Experiencing Utility’ predicts learning outcomes while ‘Liking’ and ‘Self-concept’ were interveners. The results suggest more learner-centred pedagogics for developing technology education.
      PubDate: 2015-06-07
       
  • Research in technology education: looking back to move forward …
           again
    • Abstract: Abstract In 2013 I published, in this Journal, a review of journals and conference publications in Technology Education from 2006 to 2010 as one measure of the nature of research that was being conducted in the area (Williams in Int J Technol Des Educ 23(1):1–9, 2013). An element of that review was a prediction of trends, from the findings, to speculate about what research areas may develop and become more significant and more common in the future. This prediction was integrated with personal experiences and understandings to result in a speculative discussion of future trends. This Research Note represents an extended review, both in terms of the journals and conferences covered, and the time period to include 2011–2013, in order to evaluate those predictions and refine possible future trends, and to answer the research question: What are the developments and trends in Technology Education research? It is hoped that this will be useful to researchers in the area of Technology Education who are planning research, and to stimulate discussion about the research that is needed in this area.
      PubDate: 2015-05-29
       
  • Innovation learning in comprehensive education?
    • Abstract: Abstract The goal of this article is to clarify the concept of innovation and by presenting a research on the basic education outcome assessment data from an innovation learning perspective, answer to a question: Do students learn innovation in comprehensive education? The empirical information in this research is based on data collected in the national assessment of the subject craft, design and technology education (CDT) in Finland in 2010. The comprehensive education in Finland, the basic education, means grades 1–9 in comprehensive schools from age 7 to 16. This assessment included a design task, a test of knowledge and skills and an attitude test in CDT. This research focuses on two central concepts: (1) innovation is defined as a novel, inventive and usable solution, in either material or immaterial space: an end-product, process or method related to people’s practical needs and purposes and (2) innovation learning is defined as a problem based and creative process of using and implementing knowledge and skills in iterative and critical manner in designing and making a novel and practical solution with high usability. The assessment data was marked off to tasks which indicated the innovation learning (n = 661 out of the sample n = 4792). Brim quartiles were used as a methodological solution; the brim quartiles of usability formed the sample of this research. The statistical differences were tested using the Kruskal–Wallis test and the Pearson Chi Square test. Innovation learning includes the process of designing, planning, making and the practical solution itself. The national data allow general conclusions according to the level of innovation learning in comprehensive education. The central observation is that students learn innovation in comprehensive education varying from good to moderate levels. However, if students have not studied design and technology since 7th grade, they are twice as likely to be negative underachievers as to be either positive achievers or positive underachievers. This is useful for governments to know when trying to increase innovation on a national level, as well as when considering the well-being of people and society.
      PubDate: 2015-05-16
       
  • Exploring the learning problems and resource usage of undergraduate
           industrial design students in design studio courses
    • Abstract: Abstract Design is a powerful weapon for modern companies so it is important to have excellent designers in the industry. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning problems and the resources that students use to overcome problems in undergraduate industrial design studio courses. A survey with open-type questions was conducted to collect data. Participants in this study were 189 undergraduate industrial design students from three universities, and two coding schema were formulated for analysing the data. The results demonstrated that the most difficult design tasks included concept generation, design presentation, and design research. The learning resources used to solve the learning problems included four categories: people, object, method, and environment. This information will increase the understanding of the learning process of students and provide a reference for teaching and the setting of learning resources in industrial design education.
      PubDate: 2015-05-16
       
  • Two elementary schools’ developing potential for sustainability of
           engineering education
    • Abstract: Abstract The Next Generation Science Standards present a way for engineering lessons to be formally integrated into elementary classrooms at a national level in the United States. Professional development programs are an important method for preparing teachers to enact the new engineering practices in their science classrooms. To better understand what contextual factors help a professional development program have a sustained effect on the implementation of engineering, we closely examined two elementary schools within the same school district that participated in the same professional development program but had very different outcomes in their lasting implementation of engineering. Using the case study method, we corroborate quantitative and qualitative sources of data measuring students’ learning and attitudes; teachers’ learning, attitudes, and implementation fidelity; perceived teacher community; and administrative support. Our analysis revealed that although the professional development program had district-level administrative support, there was considerable variation between schools in how teachers’ perceived school level support. In addition, teachers at the sustaining school collaborated and co-taught with one another. Our findings support previous literature on the role of administrative support and teacher learning communities. We discuss practical ways that professional development programs can seek to foster a context which is supportive of sustaining curriculum change for engineering.
      PubDate: 2015-05-14
       
  • Designing interaction : How do interaction design students address
           interaction?
    • Abstract: Abstract Interaction design is usually described as being concerned with interactions with and through artifacts but independent of a specific implementation. Design work has been characterized as a conversation between the designer and the situation and this conversation poses a particular challenge for interaction design as interactions can be elusive and difficult to describe. Moreover, current trends in interaction design introduce physical materials to a higher degree resulting in even more complex design situations. There is a lack of knowledge about how interaction designers, and especially students, address the very phenomenon of interaction. This study contributes by describing how interaction design students attempt to address aspects of interaction and by presenting an in-depth analysis in the context of an interactionary-type design exercise. The quantitative and qualitative findings showed that (1) the design students brought up aspects of interactivity and dynamics through talk and gestures but (2) a comprehensive design idea about interaction did not guide the design work and they were to a little degree engaged in planning sequences of interactions or interaction on a longer time scale, (3) using physical materials disrupted interaction design, and, (4) there was a lack of continuity when addressing interaction compared to how proposals about artifacts were pursued. As interaction is the core of interaction design, the findings are discussed in terms of how the immaterial design materials may “talk back” to designers. Practical strategies for how the observed phenomena could be constructively addressed within interaction design education are suggested.
      PubDate: 2015-05-10
       
  • Experiential learning of electronics subject matter in middle school
           robotics courses
    • Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the experiential learning of electronics subject matter is effective in the middle school open learning of robotics. Electronics is often ignored in robotics courses. Since robotics courses are typically comprised of computer-related subjects, and mechanical and electrical engineering, these three areas should be emphasized equally. Many studies reveal impressive learning of computer science and mechanical engineering, but clear evidence of the effectiveness of electronics learning in the higher order thinking skills of middle school students is still lacking. We designed three different robotics courses with electronics subject matter introduced through experiential learning. A parallel group design was used, where three different open learning courses were implemented for middle school students. Based on results of the first and second implementations, we improved students’ learning of relevant content for each successive step of the experiment. In total, 381 middle school students participated in all experiments and were surveyed using pre- and post-tests. The collected data were analyzed using a quantitative research methodology. The findings revealed that the teaching approach was effective. During the learning process, student interest in robotics increased, and overall achievement improved with a medium effect size (η2 = 0.13). The best results for the learning of electronics subject matter were found in the learning process (η2 = 0.44), where experimental sharing of electronics parts was the most evident approach used by the students. Examination of learning material structure in light of the shared electronics subject matter is analyzed and discussed and possible directions for future research are presented.
      PubDate: 2015-05-09
       
 
 
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