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  Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 279 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (25 journals)
    - MACHINERY (32 journals)
    - PACKAGING (15 journals)
    - PLASTICS (27 journals)
    - RUBBER (1 journals)

MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (171 journals)                  1 2     

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Manufacturing: Polymer & Composites Science     Free   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Manufacturing Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
American Journal of Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Sensor Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Applied Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific Biotech News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bharatiya Vaigyanik evam Audyogik Anusandhan Patrika (BVAAP)     Open Access  
Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Building Service Engineering Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
CATTECH     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Centaurus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Cold Regions Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Technology Transfer and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Composites Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Control Theory and Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cryoletters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Design Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Economics of Innovation and New Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Emerging Materials Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Fibers     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Fibers and Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
FORMakademisk     Open Access  
Futures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Gender, Technology and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Green Materials     Hybrid Journal  
History and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Hybrid Materials     Open Access  
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
IETE Journal of Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IETE Technical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Radio & Space Physics (IJRSP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Informaci√≥n Tecnol√≥gica     Open Access  
Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Innovations : Technology, Governance, Globalization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Integrating Materials and Manufacturing Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology , The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Advanced Design and Manufacturing Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Automation and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Biomedical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Business and Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of CAD/CAM     Open Access  
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Design     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Experimental Design and Process Optimisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Innovation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access  
International Journal of Manufacturing, Materials, and Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International journal of materials research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing-Green Technology     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Quality and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Quality Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Service and Computing Oriented Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of System of Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technoentrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology and Design Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Technology and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Vehicle Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Wood Products Journal     Hybrid Journal  
ITL - International Journal of Applied Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal for Manufacturing Science and Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)

        1 2     

Journal Cover   International Journal of Technology and Design Education
  [SJR: 0.756]   [H-I: 20]   [12 followers]  Follow
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-1804 - ISSN (Online) 0957-7572
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2280 journals]
  • Mediation of artefacts, tools and technical objects: an international and
           french perspective
    • Abstract: Abstract In this article we present a review of literature on the concept of Artefact, Tool and Technical Object in the light of in sociocultural approach. Particular attention is given to present and discuss the French research tradition on the Technical Object and Technological education. The aim is to give a broad perspective to explore the mediation between the individual and their environment.
      PubDate: 2015-09-29
  • Book Reviews
    • PubDate: 2015-09-28
  • Towards effective group work assessment: even what you don’t see can
           bias you
    • Abstract: Abstract In project-based learning (PBL) courses, which are common in design and technology education, instructors regard both the process and the final product to be important. However, conducting an accurate assessment for process feedback is not an easy task because instructors of PBL courses often have to make judgments based on a limited view of group work. In this paper, we provide explanations about how in practice instructors actually exhibit cognitive biases and judgments made using incomplete information in the context of an engineering design education classroom. More specifically, we hypothesize that instructors would be susceptible to human errors that are well known in social psychology, the halo effect and the fundamental attribution error, because they have a limited view of group work when they facilitate distributed and remote groups. Through this study, we present two main contributions, namely (1) insights based on classroom data about limitations of current instructor assessment practices, (2) an illustration of using principles from social psychology as a lens for exploring important design questions for designing tools that monitor support oversight of group work. In addition to the study, we illustrate how the findings from our classroom study can be used for effective group assessments.
      PubDate: 2015-09-23
  • Monopolising the STEM agenda in second-level schools: exploring power
           relations and subject subcultures
    • Abstract: Abstract The ubiquitous and often pervasive expansion of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) agenda across global education systems has largely gone uncontested. Strategic efforts to build on perceived natural subject synergies across the separate STEM disciplines are promoted as central to supporting the growth of economies through the development of human capital and by ensuring the supply of suitably trained individuals for vocational roles in these areas. However, these efforts are predicated on the assumption that such perceived natural subject synergies can easily support pedagogical complimentary and in so doing, often fail to acknowledge the social histories of the subjects involved. In this paper the authors examine the divergence in treatment of STEM subjects within the Irish second-level context through the lenses of subject hierarchies and social class. The cultural capital associated with studying each of the respective STEM subjects in school is considered and the objectives of the STEM agenda are problematised.
      PubDate: 2015-09-22
  • The abilities of understanding spatial relations, spatial orientation, and
           spatial visualization affect 3D product design performance: using carton
           box design as an example
    • Abstract: Abstract Three-dimensional (3D) product design is an essential ability that students of subjects related to product design must acquire. The factors that affect designers’ performance in 3D design are numerous, one of which is spatial abilities. Studies have reported that spatial abilities can be used to effectively predict people’s performance in conducting complex operations. Nevertheless, few studies have explored the relationship between spatial abilities and designers’ performance in 3D product design. Spatial ability is a type of mental ability and comprises numerous factors. Carton box design is a typical type of standardized 3D product design, in which designers’ performance is affected by the spatial abilities they possess. The most crucial factor among these abilities is the space conversion ability, which is the ability to convert two-dimensional (2D) surface developments into 3D perspective views and convert 3D carton boxes into 2D plans. These operations require an in-depth perception of objects, an understanding of the relative spatial relations among objects, and spatial visualization. In this study, carton box design was used as an example to investigate, using structural equation modeling, the effects that the ability to understand spatial relations, spatial orientation, and spatial visualization have on designers’ performance in 3D product design. The results indicated that all three spatial abilities (i.e., understanding spatial relations, spatial orientation, and spatial visualization) directly influence designers’ performance in carton box design. Therefore, spatial abilities are vital factors affecting designers’ performance in 3D product design.
      PubDate: 2015-09-11
  • Perception by French students of the gendered nature of material artifacts
           studied in technology education
    • Abstract: Abstract Many studies have shown the importance of the socio-cultural factors that lead girls to desert scientific and technological courses. Over a long period, the contents of the French technology education (TE) college curricula may well have contributed to strengthening the feeling among girls that this discipline was better suited to boys. The choice of technical artifacts that embody the knowledge taught could be partially responsible for this. Our investigation was conducted in two stages. Firstly, we made an inventory of artifacts presented in four TE schoolbooks for the 6th grade. Secondly, we submitted this list to a population of 98 girls and boys (12–14 years). Our results indicate that most of these artifacts were categorized as mixed. However, those that are classed as masculine are more numerous than feminine one’s. They are also more prevalent among girls and their number increases with age. The grouping of these artifacts by families also shows gender differences.
      PubDate: 2015-09-11
  • How an integrative STEM curriculum can benefit students in engineering
           design practices
    • Abstract: Abstract STEM-oriented engineering design practice has become recognized increasingly by technology education professionals in Taiwan. This study sought to examine the effectiveness of the application of an integrative STEM approach within engineering design practices in high school technology education in Taiwan. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to investigate the respective learning performance of students studying a STEM engineering module compared to students studying the technology education module. The student performances for conceptual knowledge, higher-order thinking skills and engineering design project were assessed. The data were analyzed using quantitative (t test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, correlation analysis) approaches. The findings showed that the participants in the STEM engineering module outperformed significantly the participants studying the technology education module in the areas of conceptual knowledge, higher-order thinking skills, and the design project activity. A further analysis showed that the key differences in the application of design practice between the two groups were (a) their respective problem prediction and (b) their analysis capabilities. The results supported the positive effect of the use of an integrative STEM approach in high school technology education in Taiwan.
      PubDate: 2015-09-08
  • Materials experience as a foundation for materials and design education
    • Abstract: Abstract An important body of research has developed in recent years, explaining ways in which product materials influence user experiences. A priority now is to ensure that the research findings are adopted within an educational context to deliver contemporary curricula for students studying the subject of materials and design. This paper reports on an international initiative to develop ‘materials experience’ as a formal subject of study, complementary to traditional technical and engineering approaches to materials and design education. General learning objectives for materials experience are established, followed by specific attention to three kinds of experience that arise during user–material–product interaction: gratification of senses, conveyance of meanings, and elicitation of emotions. For each of these kinds of experience, a specially devised active learning exercise is explained in detail. In combination, these exercises are argued to deliver a good foundation for student appreciation and action on designing for material experiences in product design. The paper concludes with recommendations for how to responsibly redress the imbalance that exists in materials and design education, by transitioning from a culture of ‘imparting knowledge about materials’ to a culture of ‘generating experience with materials’.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27
  • To explore the effect of sub consciousness on Sudden Moments of
           Inspiration (SMI) in the sketching process of industrial design
    • Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study is to identify the occurrence of Sudden Moments of Inspiration (SMI) in the sketching process of industrial design through experiments to explain the effect of sub consciousness on SMI. There are a pre-experiment and a formal experiment. In the formal experiment, nine undergraduates majoring in industrial design with same education experience were selected to receive a design task. In the task, nine undergraduates were divided into three groups randomly by lot. While two groups received A or B subliminal suggestions through a slide picture presentation, the other one group was not. The design processes and sketches of the three groups were recorded and analyzed, using concurrent and scientifically experimental methods such as real-time videos and protocol interviews. Comparison of the three experiments provided convincing evidences of the effect of sub consciousness on SMI in the sketching process of industrial design.
      PubDate: 2015-08-21
  • Constructing the ScratchJr programming language in the early childhood
    • Abstract: Abstract This paper seeks to contribute to the growing literature on children and computer programming by focusing on a programming language for children in Kindergarten through second grade. Sixty-two students were exposed to a 6-week curriculum using ScartchJr. They learned foundational programming concepts and applied those concepts to create personally meaningful projects using the ScratchJr programming app. This paper addresses the following research question: Which ScratchJr programming blocks do young children choose to use in their own projects after they have learned them all through a tailored programming curriculum? Data was collected in the form of the students’ combined 977 projects, and analyzed for patterns and differences across grades. This paper summarizes findings and suggests potential directions for future research. Implications for the use of ScratchJr as an introductory programming language for young children are also discussed.
      PubDate: 2015-08-05
  • An exploratory study on the application of conceptual knowledge and
           critical thinking to technological issues
    • Abstract: Abstract This study explored how senior high school students apply their conceptual knowledge, consisting of theoretical and system knowledge, to think critically when confronted with technological issues. We employed a curriculum on the history of communication technology to teach students about basic concepts in communication technology and to cultivate their ability to use critical thinking to confront issues in this domain. Concept mapping was adopted to assess students’ ability to apply conceptual knowledge to their actual cognitive activities, and a critical thinking test was developed to evaluate students’ performance in this regard. The sample consisted of 98 tenth-grade students. We used descriptive statistics, measures of relationships, and qualitative analyses to examine the data. The results indicated that, during the teaching of conceptual knowledge, most students easily fall victim to misconceptions about concepts that they cannot specifically observe in their own experiences and thus find it difficult to construct complete and correct knowledge. Although students’ critical thinking about technological issues was positively correlated with their application of conceptual knowledge, their incomplete system knowledge could affect their ability to identify core problems of technological issues, and incorrect theoretical knowledge could influence their abilities to interpret information, thereby affecting their judgments.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
  • A methodology for improving active learning engineering courses with a
           large number of students and teachers through feedback gathering and
           iterative refinement
    • Abstract: Abstract In the last decade, engineering education has evolved in many ways to meet society demands. Universities offer more flexible curricula and put a lot of effort on the acquisition of professional engineering skills by the students. In many universities, the courses in the first years of different engineering degrees share program and objectives, having a large number of students and teachers. These common courses are expected to provide the students with meaningful learning experiences, which could be achieved by using active learning. The use of active learning in engineering courses improves traditional teaching by promoting students’ participation and engagement, although active learning courses can be very sensitive to differences in learning paces or team conflicts; this being a challenge for the widespread adoption of active learning in courses with many students and teachers. This paper proposes a methodology that facilitates the detection and reaction to problems in active learning engineering courses with many students and teachers. This methodology is based on gathering feedback (from students and teachers) and decision-making processes at selected milestones. The methodology integrates intra-edition mechanisms in order to detect problems and react as the courses are being taught, and inter-edition mechanisms to ensure the persistence of necessary changes in the courses design. The methodology has been successfully applied during four consecutive editions to improve an undergraduate active learning programming course with an average of 257 students and 9 teachers per edition. An extended validation of expert educators suggests that this methodology can also be applied to traditional engineering courses.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
  • Examining the gaps between teaching and learning in the technology
           curriculum within Taiwan’s 9-year articulated curriculum reform from
           the perspective of curriculum implementation
    • Abstract: Abstract Curriculum reform has frequently focused on the curriculum-development stage, overlooking considerations regarding curriculum implementation, which has led to reform failure. In this study, consideration was placed primarily on the curriculum implementation stage. The gaps between teachers’ and students’ perceptions of content, learning activities, and teaching methods in Taiwan’s technology curriculum were analyzed. Based on the results of the questionnaires, the major results are as follows. (1) Both teachers and students perceive a gap between education reform policy and curriculum implementation in the technology curriculum within Taiwan’s 9-year articulated technology curriculum. (2) When implementing the ideas of the curriculum reform plan, technology teachers continued to encounter practical problems with the curriculum content, learning activities, and teaching methods. (3) In terms of suggestions for future curriculum development, science and living technology can be regarded as separate areas of learning.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
  • Collaborative sketching in crowdsourcing design: a new method for idea
    • Abstract: Abstract Design integrates concepts and solves problems. Crowdsourcing design imports vast knowledge and produces creative ideas. It publishes design tasks, collects dozens of contributors’ ideas and reward the best. Contributors in crowdsourcing design work individually when generating ideas. However, those who collaborate could make better use of crowd’s knowledge, which might produce ideas of higher quality. By analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of crowdsourcing design, this article proposes a collaborative crowdsourcing design method that integrates crowd’s sketching processes. This method uses a tree to arrange crowd’s ideas and enable flexible modifications of prior ideas. A demonstration system named Sketchfans is developed, and the results of a crowdsourcing sketching experiment using this system are presented. The experimental results validate that this method is effective; participants rely heavily on the idea tree for inspiration, and the best ideas appear around the ends of branches on the idea tree. Moreover, participants displayed unique development patterns. They often developed high-quality ideas from initial ideas that were regarded as poor quality. The demonstration system Sketchfans, supports this method well. Finally, we optimize Sketchfans based on analysis of participants’ activities and feedback.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
  • “I want my robot to look for food”: Comparing
           Kindergartner’s programming comprehension using tangible, graphic,
           and hybrid user interfaces
    • Abstract: Abstract In recent years, educational robotics has become an increasingly popular research area. However, limited studies have focused on differentiated learning outcomes based on type of programming interface. This study aims to explore how successfully young children master foundational programming concepts based on the robotics user interface (tangible, graphical, hybrid) taught in their curriculum. Thirty-five Kindergarten students participated in a 9-week robotics curriculum using the LEGO WeDo robotics construction kit and the Creative Hybrid Environment for Robotic Programming (CHERP) programming language. A mixed methods data collection approach was employed, including qualitative observational data from the classrooms, as well as quantitative mid- and post-test assessments of students’ programming knowledge using CHERP. The findings show little association between user interface and programming comprehension, although there may be an order-affect when introducing user interfaces. Implications for best practices when introducing programming in early childhood settings are discussed.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
  • Investigating technology teachers’ self-efficacy on assessment
    • Abstract: Abstract This study explores possible differences in the views on assessment between two groups of teachers teaching technology in compulsory school: (1) teachers with subject-specific teacher training in technology education; and (2) teachers without such training. This topic is of particular interest because of the recent changes in the regulations that govern compulsory schools in Sweden, such that only certified teachers now will be permitted to teach and assign grades, despite the clear lack of certified teachers in technology education. The study is situated in two fields of interest—technology education and assessment. Both topics are highly relevant, especially in combination, because previous research on teachers’ assessment practices in technology is rare. In this study, the goal is to contribute to deepening the understanding of how subject-specific teacher training affects teachers’ ability to assess students’ knowledge while maintaining alignment with stated regulations. The results show significant difference between these two groups’ use of curriculum documents as the basis of their teaching and their self-efficacy in assessing student’s knowledge in technology. The results suggest interesting possibilities for curriculum alignment and indicate that the opportunities for student learning increase according to whether teachers are specifically trained in the subject.
      PubDate: 2015-08-01
  • What is the function of a figurine? Can the repertory grid technique
    • Abstract: Abstract Teaching design and product development at upper secondary school level in Sweden is a matter of interdisciplinary considerations. Education in product development, at this level, prepares students for further studies and career in engineering or industrial design. Knowledge of artefacts is an important element in the education. In coherence with the visual and rhetorical strategies characterising the knowledge field, students learn how to develop an idea to a final product. In this study twelve engineers and industrial designers, professionals representing the knowledge field of product development are studied regarding their interpretations of eight pre-selected artefacts. Data is collected and analysed using repertory grid technique. The aim of the study is to examine whether/what we can learn from the informants’ experiences and knowledge that is relevant to education in design and product development at upper secondary school level. Findings show that four of the artefacts appear to be carriers of attributes that reveal the interviewees’ definitions of the artefacts’ functional nature. From these findings it is shown that the interviewees’ definitions of concepts concerning aesthetics/decoration and function can be seen as cultural expressions. How the repertory grid technique is used in this particular study is thoroughly described and the results relevance for education is discussed.
      PubDate: 2015-07-28
  • Design and evaluation of a DIY construction system for educational robot
    • Abstract: Abstract Building a robot from scratch in an educational context can be a challenging prospect. While a multitude of projects exist that simplify the electronics and software aspects of a robot, the same cannot be said for construction systems for robotics. In this paper, we present our efforts to create a low-cost do-it-yourself construction system for small robots. We have created three different construction systems (laser-cut screw connectors, printed friction-fit connectors, and printed hybrid connectors) using small aluminium T-slot extrusions, based on prior work done by Industrial Design college students. Eighty-six secondary school students and 35 teachers tested these three systems during a five-day robotics contest where they had to build firefighting robots. Follow-up questionnaires and an expert evaluation were used to measure the usability, affective appraisal and functionality of the three systems in order to determine which system should serve as a basis for further design iterations. Overall, a clear preference was shown for the hybrid system, which relies on its interlocking shape as well as on a screw connection to create robot frames that are both quick to construct and very rigid once assembled. We believe our work represents a solid first step toward an inexpensive, “hackable” construction system for educational robotics.
      PubDate: 2015-07-18
  • Consequential creativity
    • Abstract: Abstract Creativity is an original cognitive ability and problem solving process which enables individuals to use their intelligence in a way that is unique and directed toward coming up with a product. Architectural education is one of the fields in which human creativity has been exhibited; because, it can be defined as a design study that correlates with other disciplines: social sciences, management, history, operational research, philosophy, graphic design, math and etc. These features which distinguish architecture from other disciplines ascribe different kind of responsibilities for architectural education; since beside technical and professional skills, an architect must have imagination and to be creative at many levels. Thus, this research aims at proving that students can be trained in creative thinking via acquiring specific skills and systematic techniques, which directly acts on design product. The study methodology depends on the concept of experimental research that targets at exposing students to creative problem solving experience via carrying out a creative training course that concerns “Consequential Creativity”. That experiment examined the potentiality of enhancing the students’ ability of viewing problems in non-traditional perspectives that counts on the systematic procedures of problem solving. Tools for assessment before and after training have been implemented. The Experiment findings proved that the students’ creative thinking skill has been clearly improved after attending the course. Therefore, training in creative thinking can be considered as independent courses or within specific architectural curricula.
      PubDate: 2015-06-27
  • Does the medium matter in collaboration? Using visually supported
           collaboration technology in an interior design studio
    • Abstract: Abstract With the recognition of the importance of collaboration in a design studio and the advancement of technology, increasing numbers of design students collaborate with others in a technology-mediated learning environment (TMLE); however, not all students have positive experiences in TMLEs. One possible reason for unsatisfactory collaboration experiences is that existing text-oriented collaboration technology may not fully support interior design students’ needs for spontaneous interaction with visual images. The purpose of the current research was to determine whether a visually supported collaboration technology (VSCT) for designers, enhances students’ collaboration experiences in a TMLE. A total of 28 junior interior design students participated in the study, all of whom engaged in similar group projects via two collaboration modalities: face-to-face and VSCT. The results show that collaboration modalities influence students’ learning experiences, in particular, achievement and confidence in completing collaborative tasks. When using VSCT, students achieved significantly higher grade and demonstrated higher confidence in completing collaborative tasks compared to face-to-face collaboration; however, no significant differences were reported in either their perception of the collaboration process or their evaluation of the medium in the two collaboration modalities. The findings demonstrate that VSCT enhanced students’ collaboration experiences in design studio. Discussion and implications are provided to facilitate design students’ positive collaboration experiences in a TMLE.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24
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