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Showing 1 - 98 of 98 Journals sorted alphabetically
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Adipocyte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Animal Models and Experimental Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Applied In Vitro Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Clinical and Experimental Medicine     Open Access  
Archives of Medical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Archives of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Clinica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Clinical & Experimental Metastasis     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Medical Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Experimental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Medicine Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Current Research in Drug Discovery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Drug Design, Development and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ecography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy : Science and Practice (EJHP)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Nanomedicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Experimental & Molecular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Experimental Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Frontiers in Laboratory Medicine     Open Access  
Frontiers in Medical Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IN VIVO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Archives of Biomedical and Clinical Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Experimental Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Health Research and Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Statistics in Medical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cell Science & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Biomaterials & Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Biomedical and Clinical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Medicine and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Clinical Trials     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Current and Advance Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics JDDT     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Enzyme Inhibition and Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Experimental and Clinical Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Experimental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46)
Journal of Experimental Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Histotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of International Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Muhammadiyah Medical Laboratory Technologist     Open Access  
Journal of Operating Department Practitioners     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Lab on a Chip     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Laboratory Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Medical Devices & Sensors     Hybrid Journal  
Medical Image Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Medical Instrumentation     Open Access  
Medical Laboratory Observer     Full-text available via subscription  
Medical Laboratory Technology Journal     Open Access  
Medicinal Chemistry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Medtech Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
New Zealand Journal of Medical Laboratory Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Physical Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Practical Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pulse     Full-text available via subscription  
Qualitative Research in Medicine & Healthcare     Open Access  
Recent Advances in Biology and Medicine     Open Access  
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud P├║blica     Open Access  
Revista Romana de Medicina de Laborator     Open Access  
RSC Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
SA Pharmacist's Assistant     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
SLAS Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Statistics in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192)
Trends in Molecular Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Turkish Journal of Clinics and Laboratory     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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SA Pharmacist's Assistant
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1608-9634 - ISSN (Online) 2220-1068
Published by Medpharm Publications Homepage  [5 journals]
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Changes in the South African healthcare
           environment - examining our past to predict our future : professional
           practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: Re-engineering of the primary healthcare system, National Development Plan 2030, National Health Insurance, Operation Phakisa...so many buzzwords that it isn't surprising that our heads are buzzing and we can't keep up with the change all around us. It is important that every single healthcare professional, including pharmacist's assistants and pharmacy technicians, should know the vision of the government for the future of the country in general, and for healthcare in particular. For this reason, we begin in this issue of SAPA a series of articles that will have a look at national policies and plans that have been developed over the past twenty years. This will give us an idea of the thoughts that have shaped our future, and hopefully we will be able to formulate plans so that we can make the most effective contribution to building the most efficient healthcare system we can. Perhaps we should begin by looking at two documents that were published round about the time of the birth of democracy in this country. They may even have been published before you were born! Certainly they can explain how we got to the current situation, and perhaps leave us with a better sense of where we can go from here.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:54Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Managing the allergic cough : allergies

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacqueline
      Abstract: Coughing is a protective reflex action that occurs when the airway is irritated or obstructed. Its purpose is to clear the airway so that breathing can continue normally. Doctors classify coughs into two categories:. Acute cough that lasts for less than three weeks Chronic cough that lasts for more than three weeks
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:53Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Stop the sneezing and improve the breathing
           Managing allergic rhinitis : allergies

    • Authors: Davis; Sumari
      Abstract: Allergic rhinitis refers to the inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose (rhinitis) that is caused by an allergic reaction to inhaled allergens. An allergen is a harmless substance that causes the release of chemicals (mainly histamine) in a person with an allergy to that specific substance. This reaction then leads to the typical symptoms of allergic rhinitis (often called hay fever) that include a runny nose, itching, sneezing and nasal congestion (swelling). Although allergic rhinitis is not life-threatening, it can have a severe impact on quality of life and can lead to other complications. Allergic rhinitis can be managed effectively in most patients resulting in a substantial improvement in their quality of life.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:53Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Don't always fight fevers in babies and
           children : mother and child

    • Authors: Steyn; Lynda
      Abstract: Many parents fear the worst when their child has a fever and for this reason will seek medical help. While all children will get a fever at some stage in their lives, not all fevers need to be treated. It is important to know why we don't always need to treat a fever and also when it is important to refer a child with a fever to a doctor.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:52Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Don't cry - relief for dry eye : eye care

    • Authors: Schmidt; Stephani
      Abstract: Dry eye syndrome, dysfunctional tear syndrome and keratoconjunctivitis sicca are medical terms for dry eye. It is a common condition and many factors may contribute to dry eye disease. It affects more women than men and the incidence increases with age. Dry eye is important as it may influence vision, workplace productivity, daily activities as well as social and physical functioning.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:52Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: OTC treatments for tonsillitis and pharyngitis
           : ear, nose & throat

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Pharyngitis and tonsillitis are infections causing inflammation in the throat. If the pharynx (or back of the throat) is affected it is known as pharyngitis, if the tonsils are inflamed it is called tonsillitis, and if both are affected it is pharyngotonsillitis.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:51Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: An over-the-counter pocket guide for new
           mothers : mother and child

    • Authors: Van Rensburg; K.
      Abstract: Being a new mother can be both exhilarating and challenging. Breastfeeding, and taking care of a young infant, is a new experience, and can be accompanied by various difficulties.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:51Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Muscle spasms and strains : musculoskeletal
           health

    • Authors: Lambert; Lynn
      Abstract: Muscles are the "powerhouse" of the human body as their main function is to produce motion. Skeletal muscle is responsible for the movement of external areas of the body, for example, the limbs. Most people experience a muscular injury, such as a spasm or a strain, at some time during their lives. Such injuries can occur during sport or exercise, but can also take place while sitting, walking, or even during sleep. Muscle spasms and strains are a common complaint with which patients present at a pharmacy. Therefore, the pharmacist's assistant is in an ideal position to provide practical advice, combined with over-the-counter (OTC) treatment, if applicable, that is of great value to the patient.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:50Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Over-the-counter pain management - paracetamol
           and NSAIDs : pain

    • Authors: Van Wyk; Haley
      Abstract: Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience, associated with actual or potential tissue damage. Pain may be experienced as anything from a dull ache to a sharp stabbing sensation, and can range from mild to extreme. Pain may be located in one part of the body or it may be widespread. There are two types of pain:. Acute pain is a normal response to tissue injury, which starts suddenly and is usually short-lived. The pain is related to an identifiable cause such as trauma, surgery or inflammation. Chronic (ongoing) pain persists beyond the normal time of healing and generally lasts longer than three months. Pain is personal and each person will experience it differently. The most reliable description of pain is from the patient, and thorough questioning should be used to understand the nature, history and severity of the pain (See Table I).
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:50Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Patients with dandruff : skin care

    • Authors: Moroney; Yolanda Agnes
      Abstract: Dandruff is a common, chronic skin condition which is characterised by flaking and itching of the skin on the scalp. The condition usually appears during puberty, and reaches a peak during early adulthood. It is not contagious, and can be effectively treated, but may return when treatment is stopped.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:50Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Probiotics : don't let it bug you :
           gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Lambert; Lynn
      Abstract: The human body is a complex system, with the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) being one of the largest interfaces between the outside world and the internal system of the body. The GIT is also home to a large community of bacteria, also known as the intestinal flora. The intestinal bacteria within the GIT form a diverse ecosystem that provide many benefits to the optimal functioning of the body such as digestion, metabolism, regulation of the immune system and protection against harmful bacteria that cause disease (pathogens). In addition, the intestinal bacteria synthesise vitamins and may play a role in preventing diseases, such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, any disturbance to the balance of the intestinal bacteria may lead to the production of toxins, disease or infection. Antibiotic use commonly causes disruption to the normal ecosystem in the gut, resulting in diarrhoea. Studies have shown that taking a probiotic with a prescribed antibiotic can reduce the extent to which the antibiotic alters the balance of the intestinal bacteria.
      PubDate: 2016-10-18T13:26:49Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Nourishing our nerves : neurotropic B Vitamins
           and their role in nerve care : supplements

    • Abstract: Overview of neurotropic B vitamins. Neurotropic B vitamins are a combination of vitamins that play an important role in the health of the nervous system; they nourish and help regenerate nerves. These vitamins, thiamine (B1), pyridoxine (B6), and cobalamin (B12), are naturally obtained by eating meat, eggs, and grains. Because of the unique roles each of the neurotropic vitamins play in the health of the nervous system, all of them are essential, and a combination of all three may be needed to treat deficiencies. In an animal model, a combination of neurotropic B vitamins was found to be more effective at alleviating symptoms of neuropathy than B1, B6, or B12 given alone.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:23Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: On your marks, rub it in, go... topical
           treatments for musculoskeletal pain : review

    • Authors: Schmidt; Stephani
      Abstract: Musculoskeletal pain may be associated with a wide range of disorders such as ankle sprains, osteoarthritis, muscle pain syndromes and various spine-related neck and low back conditions. This article will be focusing briefly on the musculoskeletal system and the use of topical treatments formusculoskeletal pain.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:23Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: What do health awareness days mean to you'
           : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: Whether we listen to the radio or watch TV, or even if we read magazines or go to websites, we are constantly reminded of threats to our health, and what to do about it. In your case, what are you supposed to do about it' As a healthcare professional, you not only need to take care of your own health, but you owe it to the public you serve to be aware of current health issues, and to steer them towards solutions for their health problems. Obviously this needs to be done within your scope of practice as a pharmacist's assistant or pharmacy technician. You may, in fact you must, provide information that will promote health. Clearly if you or the patient identifies a need for consultation with the pharmacist or a medical practitioner, you must refer the patient to the appropriate person.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:23Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Human rhinovirus infection - a frequent cause
           of the common cold : colds and flu

    • Authors: Bouwer; Annatjie
      Abstract: Rhinoviruses are the most common viral infectious agents in humans and are the predominant cause of the common cold. Rhinovirus infections proliferate in temperatures between 33-35°C, the temperatures found in the nose. Most people get colds in the winter and spring, but it is possible to get a cold any time of the year. Symptoms usually include sore throat, runny nose, coughing, sneezing, watery eyes, headaches and body aches. Most people recover within about 7-10 days. However, people with weakened immune systems, asthma, or respiratory conditions may develop serious illnesses, such as pneumonia.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:22Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: The trouble with teething : mother and child

    • Authors: Steyn; Lynda
      Abstract: The term "teething" refers to a process where a baby's teeth begin to push through the gums. This process usually begins around 6 months of age. By the age of 3 years, most children will have a complete set of baby teeth (primary teeth). With some babies, the first sign of teething may be the appearance of a tooth. Other babies may experience a few symptoms or signs that a tooth may be appearing.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:21Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Minor skin infections in the pharmacy -
           treatment with topical antibiotics and topical antivirals

    • Authors: Van Wyk; Haley
      Abstract: An important function of the skin is to protect the body from infection. The main causes of a skin infection include bacteria and viruses. Although many bacteria come in contact with or reside on the skin, they normally do not cause an infection. When bacterial skin infections do occur, they can range insize from a tiny spot to the entire body surface. They can range in seriousness as well, from harmless to life-threatening. Bacterial skin infections are commonly caused by the bacteriaStaphylococcus and Streptococcus. There are several types of bacterial skin infections, for example, impetigo. Viral skin infections are commonly caused by the herpes simplex virus. Viral infections that affect only the skin may result in cold sores or other lesions.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:21Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Headaches : pain

    • Authors: Van Aswegen; Tami
      Abstract: Why are headaches so common' Nearly every person experiences a headache at some time or another. Headache scan range from mild to severe, and can be mildly annoying or completely disabling.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:20Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Tea therapy : mother and child

    • Abstract: Tea originated in southwest China 5000 years ago and was originally used as a medicine for various illnesses, suggesting that tea containing young leaves rich in plant parts such as caraway fruit, anise fruit, sweet fennel and catechins were used. These plant parts were brewed and ingested as tea proved to have many health benefits, in pregnant women it has been implicated to help with nausea, morning sickness, flatulence, abdominal cramps, swelling of legs, back pain and migraines. In children, tea has been noted to help with colic, fever and constipation.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:20Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Oral Ulcers : oral health

    • Authors: Moroney; Yolanda
      Abstract: Oral ulcers are painful sores which appear inside the mouth. They occur quite commonly and affect about one in five people. Usually they are self limiting, although they may be a recurrent problem in some people. Occasionally, oral ulcers may be a symptom of a more serious disease.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:19Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Cough syrups for a dry cough : respiratory

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacky
      Abstract: Cough is one of the most common conditions for which patients seek the advice of pharmacists and pharmacist's assistants. Most cases of acute cough (i.e. lasting three weeks or less) presenting in the pharmacy are symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection associated with the common cold. Although an acute cough following an upper respiratory tract infection is usually self-limiting and subsides within one to two weeks with or without treatment, it can be bothersome for patients and their caregivers. As such, patients seeking advice on an acute cough do so because they want relief from symptoms, especially if the cough interferes with sleep and daytime functioning.
      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:16:19Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Patients' rights and responsibilities part 1 -
           the Patients' Rights Charter : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: We hear a lot about patients' rights. Everyone's right to access to healthcare is protected by the Constitution of our country. The National Department of Health took the rights of the patient further than merely access to healthcare. The Patients' Rights Charter has set standards for healthcare since 1999. In addition, the Patients' Rights Charter was adapted by the SA Pharmacy Council to be a Charter of Patients' Rights in the Pharmacy.This article will examine the Department of Health's Charter, and in each case will give a few examples from the pharmacy. There are obviously going to be more opportunities to fulfil the patients' rights, so you are welcome to send your suggestions to the editor.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:17:02Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: The common cold and influenza : colds &
           flu

    • Authors: Van Wyk; Haley
      Abstract: The common cold and influenza are respiratory illnesses. However, they are caused by different viruses. Because these two types of illnesses have similar symptoms, it can be difficult to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. Colds are usually milder than the flu and people with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough are more common and intense.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:17:01Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Magnesium : effects on physical and mental
           performance : supplements

    • Authors: Outhoff; Kim
      Abstract: Magnesium is a chemical element used by every organ in the body, especially the brain, skeletal muscles and the heart. It functions as a cofactor in approximately 600 enzyme systems that regulate many different biochemical reactions, including aerobic and anaerobic energy production, protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium is instrumental in combating fatigue and energy loss, and is essential for optimal physical and mental performance.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:17:00Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Nasal congestion and the paediatric patient :
           ear, nose & throat

    • Authors: Steyn; L.
      Abstract: A blocked, "stuffy" nose is not considered to be a serious condition. However, it has a considerable negative impact on the quality of life of both the parent and child. Infants with blocked noses struggle to breathe while feeding, and young children are unable to blow their noses properly to ease their discomfort. Infants and children with a blocked nose have difficulty sleeping at night too. Parents often seek help on how to clear their child's nose. The focus of this article is how to ease the discomfort of a blocked nose in a child until the condition resolves.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:17:00Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: "Eye-spy" a bright eye : OTC eye
           drops reviewed : eye care

    • Authors: Schmidt; Stephani
      Abstract: Several eye drops are available without prescription. It is important to understand the role of the active ingredients included in over-the-counter (OTC) eye products before recommending an eye drop. In addition, it is also important to understand the basics of common eye conditions and to know when to refer the patient to the doctor for further investigation.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:16:59Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Managing fever blisters in the pharmacy :
           infection control

    • Authors: Moroney; Yolanda
      Abstract: Fever blisters, also known as cold sores or herpes labialis, are small, painful, fluid filled, and appear in groups on the lips and around the mouth. They form into scabs over a few days, and usually heal any time between several days and two weeks. Fever blisters are caused by a virus which is not completely eliminated by the body's defenses. Thus, they often recur.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:16:59Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease
           : gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacky
      Abstract: Heartburn occurs when acid from the stomach refluxes back up the oesophagus. It is described as a burning sensation, felt in the centre of the chest behind the breastbone, moving up toward the throat and neck. It is the most common symptom of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), together with the regurgitation of stomach acid. GORD is defined on the basis of troublesome symptoms and/or physical damage resulting from gastro-oesophageal reflux, also called acid reflux.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15T09:16:58Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Do you know what you're selling' :
           professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: How do you know if the medicines you are selling really do what the manufacturers claim' Can you trust the labels to tell you exactly what's in the medicine' How do you know that they're safe'
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:33Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: A word in you ear : letter from the editor

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: Recently, considerable coverage has been given to complementary medicines in the media. It’s really frightening when you read stories such as the one that appeared in the Sunday Times. The headline was : "Herbal pills poison girls". When several teenage girls and a parent were hospitalised with lead poisoning, it was found that they had all used a particular herbal product to treat acne. It claimed to contain zinc as the active ingredient, but on testing, it was found to contain excessive quantities of lead which can damage the brain, central nervous system, kidneys and reproductive system.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:33Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Making sense of laxatives : gut health

    • Authors: Van Rensburg; Karen
      Abstract: Constipation can be defined as a reduced frequency of defecation that results in the production of hard stools that are difficult to pass. In essence, it is a change in bowel habits (in a particular individual) from what is considered to be the norm. This is because what is "normal" is different for different people. It might be usual for a patient to have three bowel movements per day, whereas someone else might normally have only three bowel movements per week.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:32Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Anti-allergy medicines : a review : allergies

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: An allergy is an exaggerated or abnormal response of the immune system to a perceived threat. This article will take a brief look at allergies and discuss the medicines that are used to treat allergic conditions.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:32Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Iron supplementation in the pharmacy :
           supplements

    • Authors: Whittaker; Catherine
      Abstract: Iron is involved in multiple critical functions in the body. It is a component of haemoglobin and myoglobin and is required for many enzyme-based biochemical processes. It is essential for the transportation and storage of oxygen, and is required for normal growth, development, and immune function.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:31Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Treating haemorrhoids : gut health

    • Authors: Van Rensburg; Karen
      Abstract: Haemorrhoids, also known as piles, are a fairly common ailment. By the age of 50, most people will have experienced haemorrhoids at some stage in their lives.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:31Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Eye care : infection or allergy' : eye care

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Red eyes are a common complaint with which patients present in the pharmacy. Usually, they are caused by allergies or infections. Evaluating the symptoms accompanying red eyes should provide assistance when selecting a suitable product to treat the condition.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:30Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye) : eye care

    • Authors: Johnston; Leilani
      Abstract: Dry eye is an extremely common condition, which affects most people at some stage in their lives. It is also the most common ocular condition that is seen by eye care practitioners.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:30Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Over-the-counter anti-dandruff preparations :
           skin care

    • Authors: Whittaker; Catherine
      Abstract: Skin cells on the scalp are constantly being replaced. This results in dead skin cells being washed or brushed away. If the cells are replaced abnormally fast, dead cells may clump together to form larger, visible greyish-white flakes or dandruff.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:29Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Menstrual pain (dysmenorrhoea) : women's health

    • Authors: Johnston; Leilani
      Abstract: On average, women have a menstrual period every 28 days with bleeding (menstruation) lasting approximately four to seven days. During this time, the muscles of the uterus contract in response to hormone-like substances called prostaglandins, produced by the lining of the uterus. The levels of the prostaglandins increase prior to menstruation, and peak at the start of the menses. The levels decline again as a woman menstruates, resulting in less uterine discomfort or cramps after the first few days of the menstrual period.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:29Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: A story from Pharmacy Week : news

    • Abstract: If a picture is worth a thousand words, the following pictures tell an interesting story. On Saturday, 1 September, the City of Tshwane Pharmaceutical Services and the Pretoria Regional Pharmacy launched their Pharmacy Week celebrations at the Attlyn Shopping Centre in Atteridgeville.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:28Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Which over-the-counter medications should be
           included in a first aid kit' : first aid

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Almost everyone will need a first aid kit at some time. People may think that their kit is adequately equipped, but it is a good idea to check the medicine cupboard and the first aid kit and to rethink the family's first aid needs on a regular basis.
      PubDate: 2016-04-08T06:46:28Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: When patients present at the pharmacy with
           nausea and vomiting : gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Farrer; F.
      Abstract: Nausea and vomiting are not diseases in themselves, but are symptoms of many conditions, some of which are very serious. Patients presenting in the pharmacy with nausea and vomiting must be evaluated to determine the underlying cause.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:08Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: The next stage of the pharmacy technician
           journey : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: The journey from pharmacist's assistant to pharmacy technician has been a long, difficult one, with many false starts, delays and obstacles. There is however progress, which we will examine in this article, together with the implications for current pharmacist's assistants.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:08Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Oral rehydration therapy for gastroenteritis :
           gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Lambert; L.
      Abstract: Water makes up approximately 60% of a healthy human body. It aids digestion, flushes out waste and toxins, lubricates the joints and eyes, and keeps the skin healthy. The normal functioning of the body allows for the loss of water from daily urine and bowel movements. When the normal water content in the body is reduced, it upsets the balance of minerals (salt and sugar), and this affects the normal functioning of the body. Dehydration is usually caused by not drinking enough fluid to replace what has been lost. In certain circumstances, such as excessive sweating from heavy exercise, a high fever, when taking medication or during gastroenteritis, the body may lose more water than usual, which can lead to dehydration. This article focuses on how to prevent dehydration caused by gastroenteritis.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:07Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Heartburn or GORD : gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Van Wyk; H.
      Abstract: With gravity's help, a muscular valve called the lower oesophageal sphincter, helps to keep stomach acid in the stomach. Normally it opens to allow food to pass into the stomach, then it closes again. If the lower oesophageal sphincter opens too often or does not close tight enough, stomach acid can reflux, or seep, into the oesophagus and cause a burning sensation. The passage of stomach contents into the oesophagus (gastroesophageal reflux) is a normal process. Most episodes are brief and do not cause symptoms, injury, or other complications. However, reflux becomes a disease when it either causes damage to the oesophagus or causes symptoms that reduce the quality of life for the patient.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:07Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: A review of nasal preparations : ear, nose and
           throat

    • Authors: Farrer; F.
      Abstract: Glands in the nose produce mucus, which moistens and cleans the nasal membranes, humidifies the air, traps and clears inhaled foreign matter and fights infection. Changes in the mucus production, i.e. increased mucus or a change in consistency, occur in the presence of an allergen or infection, with the resulting symptoms of congestion and a runny nose. A nasal preparation is used to treat a blocked, runny and itchy nose, and to alleviate the symptoms of sniffing and sneezing. This article considers available nasal preparations in South Africa.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:06Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Summer "sniffles" : ear, nose and
           throat

    • Authors: Davis; S.
      Abstract: "Rhinorrhoea", the term used to describe a runny nose, can manifest as a watery nasal discharge, either at the front or back (postnasal drip) of the nose. Postnasal drip can lead to coughing and a sore throat. A runny nose which occurs more often in summer is likely to be due to grass and weed allergies. "Rhinitis" refers to inflammation of the nasal tissue, which can cause rhinorrhoea (a runny nose). Although the symptoms of allergic rhinitis are worse in summer, they can continue for approximately 10 months of the year owing to the prevalence of an extended grass pollen season in South Africa. Some patients even experience symptoms throughout the year. Symptoms wax and wane with the seasons and exposure to allergens.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:06Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Treatment options for dandruff : review

    • Authors: Van Wyk; H.
      Abstract: Dandruff is a common, non-contagious condition, marked by itching and flaking of the skin on the scalp. It is considered to be a mild form of seborrhoeic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition which usually occurs in areas of the body that have many oil-producing glands, such as the scalp. It is also common during infancy and causes a condition known as cradle cap.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:05Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Common male conditions requiring
           self-medication in the pharmacy : review

    • Authors: Bouwer; A.
      Abstract: Various men's health issues can be dealt with at pharmacy level, and most people can manage the discomfort of certain conditions with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter (OTC) medication. Some of the conditions with which male patients often present include heartburn, athlete's foot and hair loss. This article will focus on the causes and symptoms of these conditions, as well as OTC treatment options.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:05Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Why use sedative antihistamines at all' :
           allergies

    • Authors: Davis; S.
      Abstract: First-generation antihistamines can cause side-effects, such as drying the mucous membranes and drowsiness, which makes them unsuitable for use during the day. However, these same effects may render them useful in certain situations. This article will discuss the first-generation antihistamines and their place in therapy.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:04Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: The traveller's medicine bag : the medicine
           cupboard

    • Authors: Moroney; Y.
      Abstract: Travellers should assemble and carry a traveller's medicine bag, regardless of whether they are travelling locally or abroad. The contents thereof should be tailored to the traveller's needs, type and duration of travel, and destination.. The traveller's medicine bag can help to ensure that travellers have the necessary supplies to manage pre-existing medical conditions, prevent illness and injury relating to travelling, and take care of minor health problems, if they occur.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:04Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Blepharitis : eye care

    • Authors: Farrer; F.
      Abstract: Blepharitis is inflammation of the eyelids and causes red, irritated, itching and sometimes swollen eyelids, with scaling on the eyelashes.
      PubDate: 2015-12-14T10:47:03Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: How to treat a sore throat

    • Authors: Smith; Haley
      Abstract: A sore throat (pharyngitis) is one of the most common conditions with which patients present in the pharmacy. Usually, a sore throat is the result of a viral or bacterial infection, which may cause symptoms such as discomfort, pain, or scratchiness in the throat. Generally, minor sore throats resolve on their own without any complications, although it is important to know when to seek medical attention.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:02Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Understanding the medicine schedules part 3 -
           medicines that fall into more than one schedule : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: In previous issues of SAPA, we learned about the scheduling of medicines, and the type of controls that we, as pharmacy professionals, must put in place to make sure that medicines are used correctly and safely. The situation appears to be complicated, however, by the fact that some medicines appear in more than one schedule. In this issue, we identify some of these medicines, and talk about how to handle them in the pharmacy.. We have previously discussed the controls needed for schedule 1 to schedule 8 medicines. Before looking at medicines that fall into more than one schedule, let's take another look at the reasons why medicines are placed into a schedule in the first place. We'll then look at specific examples of commonly used medicines.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:02Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Long-term antihistamine use : making the right
           choice for your patient : allergies

    • Authors: Davis; S.
      Abstract: Spring is in the air, and with it:. Sneezing Postnasal drip and coughing Runny noses Itching of the nose, eyes, throat and ears Nasal congestion General irritability and fatigue.These symptoms are reported by patients with allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis is often ignored, misdiagnosed or mistreated, and has a negative impact on quality of life, quality of sleep and productivity, and can also cause or worsen asthma. Although allergic rhinitis mostly occurs as a seasonal condition, it can also persist throughout the year. It may even be a lifelong condition for some people, with the symptoms waxing and waning over time. Therefore, the trend is to treat these patients with long-term therapy, rather than treating them intermittently. Antihistamines reduce itching, sneezing and a runny nose, but have less of an effect on nasal congestion. Since they are among the most widely prescribed and safest drugs in the world, second-generation antihistamines remain the first-line option for the oral treatment of many allergic conditions.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:01Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Mouthwashes and gargles : oral health

    • Authors: Schmidt; S.
      Abstract: A variety of mouthwashes and gargles are commercially available. Although cosmetic mouthwashes may have the ability to temporarily control or reduce bad breath, and leave the mouth with a pleasant taste, they don't kill the bacteria causing the bad breath. Neither do they help reduce plaque, gingivitis, cavities or chemically inactivate odour-causing compounds.. Therapeutic mouthwashes may be used as part of an oral treatment regime, i.e. to treat infection, prevent or reduce gingivitis (an early stage of gum disease), reduce inflammation, relieve pain, reduce halitosis and freshen the breath, or to deliver fluoride locally for caries prevention. These mouthwashes can also be used to help reduce plaque, decrease the speed with which tartar forms on the teeth and to control tooth decay.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:01Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Swimmer's ear : ear, nose and throat

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Swimmer's ear or external otitis is an infection, irritation or inflammation of the outer ear and the ear canal. It is frequently caused by excess moisture remaining in the ear canal promoting bacterial growth.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:00Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: An approach to headaches : pain

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Almost everyone will suffer from a headache at some time of his or her life. The underlying causes of headaches are many and varied. Most are benign and are easily treated, while a few have symptoms that suggest a more serious condition.Evaluation of each patient is important in determining the most effective treatment. This article takes a brief look at different types of headaches and when a patient with a headache should be referred to the doctor.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:00Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Probiotics : review

    • Authors: Smith; Haley
      Abstract: Probiotics are live nonpathogenic microorganisms (yeasts and bacteria) that live in the intestines and vagina. They fend off attacks by harmful microorganisms, preventing illness. The term "probiotics" also refers to the same yeasts and bacteria available as dietary suppliments or added to certain foods. Most commercial products have been derived from food sources, especially cultured milk products. Commercial products may improve the health of the host when given in adequate amounts. The list of such microorganisms continues to grow and includes strains of lactic acid bacilli (e.g, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces boulardii (a nonpathogenic strain of yeast).
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:32:00Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Managing an allergic cough : respiratory health

    • Authors: Van Wyk; H.
      Abstract: Coughing is a physiological protective reflex action which is meant to clear the airway of mucus, infection, foreign bodies or irritants. Its purpose is to clear the airway so that breathing can continue normally. However, when a cough persists for many weeks or months, it becomes a disabling medical problem which can lead to loss of sleep, muscle pain and stress. Chronic cough sufferers lose sleep and miss work, and also experience exhaustion, frustration, embarrassment and frequent doctor visits. A persistent cough is a major quality-of-life issue.. Coughs can be either acute or chronic. Acute coughs begin suddenly and are often due to a cold, flu, sinus infection or acute bronchitis. Coughing which lasts for more than three weeks is considered to be chronic. Bouts of coughing which last for three weeks or longer might signify an allergy. A cough can be productive, or dry and irritating. The over secretion of sputum and phlegm, which then cause coughing, is described as a productive cough.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:31:59Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Combination aluminium and magnesium antacids :
           gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Antacids are a class of medicines used to neutralise stomach acid. They are commonly used as the first-line treatment for the symptoms of indigestion and heartburn. Antacids include aluminium hydroxide, magnesium carbonate and magnesium trisilicate. Some also contain simeticone to reduce flatulence, or alginates to protect the oesophagus from acid reflux.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:31:59Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Common conditions in the elderly for
           self-medication in the pharmacy : OTC medicines

    • Abstract: Various health issues in elderly patients can be dealt with at pharmacy level. Osteoarthritis pain, calluses and corns, as well as insomnia, are some of the conditions with which elderly patients often present. This article will focus on the causes and symptoms of these conditions, as well as over-the-counter (OTC) treatment options.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:31:58Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Excipients explained : the medicine cupboard

    • Authors: Moroney; Yolanda
      Abstract: Excipients are inactive ingredients which are added during the manufacturing process of pharmaceutical products, such as oral and injectable preparations, topical products, eye, ear and nasal formulations, and suppositories. Their purpose is to aid the manufacturing process.. Although excipients are regarded as inactive, they can cause allergic reactions or adverse effects, such as hyperactivity, bronchoconstriction, itching and rashes on the skin, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The excipients contained in a medication do not always appear on the package insert.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:31:57Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Understanding contact dermatitis : skin care

    • Authors: Lambert; L.
      Abstract: Contact dermatitis is characterised by a red, itchy rash caused by a substance which comes into contact with the skin. Although the rash is not contagious or life threatening, it can cause a great degree of discomfort. Soaps, cosmetics, fragrances, jewellery and certain plants can cause contact dermatitis. It is diagnosed by its clinical appearance, together with a compatible history taken from the patient. It is necessary to identify and avoid the substance which causes such a reaction in order to treat contact dermatitis. These substances are either an allergen (a substance which provokes an allergic reaction) or an irritant (a substance which damages the skin). Symptoms vary depending on the cause and type of contact dermatitis present. The symptoms may be severe in certain patients, and may warrant referral to a doctor.
      PubDate: 2015-10-16T13:31:57Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Seasonal, bird and swine flu explained : colds
           and flu

    • Authors: Schmidt; Stephani
      Abstract: Influenza, commonly known as the "flu", is a highly contagious disease. It can cause mild to severe illness, and even death, especially in high-risk individuals. Sporadic human infection and outbreaks caused by certain avian influenza A viruses and swine influenza A viruses have been reported, even though it is unusual for people to contract influenza virus infections directly from animals.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:22Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: A word in your ear : letter to the editor

    • Abstract: It's been a long time since I wrote a column called "A Word in Your Ear". I do hope that some pharmacist's assistants actually remember it! Every issue, I used to write one page with bits and pieces of information that I thought might interest you, or that I thought I should mention.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:22Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Cough syrup for a tight chest : respiratory
           health

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: The feeling of having a tight chest may be caused by many different conditions, some of which are not chronic, while others can be relieved by OTC medication. This article will examine a tight chest associated with coughing due to nonchronic illness.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:21Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: A review of over-the-counter pain medication :
           pain

    • Authors: Van Wyk; Haley
      Abstract: Over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers are among the most widely used medications in the world that can be bought without a prescription from the doctor. OTC pain relievers include paracetamol, aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The choice of analgesic should be based on the type and duration of pain, and the likely benefits and risks. Most analgesics are effective for nociceptive pain which is pain due to ordinary tissue injury. They are less effective for neuropathic pain due to damage to or dysfunction of the nerves, spinal cord or brain, for which different medicines are often required.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:21Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Topical antiviral drugs and antibiotics for
           minor viral and bacterial infections in the pharmacy : skin care

    • Authors: Moroney; Yolanda
      Abstract: Skin conditions, such as warts and cold sores, are viral skin infections. Conditions such as impetigo and boils are examples of bacterial infections of the skin. Advice can be offered for both in the pharmacy. Viral skin infections will be discussed first in this article, followed by bacterial skin infections.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:20Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Chronic nasal congestion : ear, nose and throat

    • Authors: Bouwer; Annatjie
      Abstract: Nasal congestion, a "stuffy" or blocked nose, is a term that refers to the obstruction of air flow in and out of the nose. This occurs when the nasal and adjacent tissues and blood vessels become swollen with excess fluid, causing a "stuffy" feeling. It can also be accompanied by a nasal discharge or "runny" nose. Chronic nasal congestion can cause sleep-disordered breathing and fragmented sleep, reduced sleep time and quality, as well as daytime sleepiness and fatigue. It can be serious in infants, who might find it difficult to nurse or breathe as a result.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:20Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Abdominal pain in babies : gastrointestinal
           tract

    • Authors: Lambert; Lynn
      Abstract: Abdominal pain in babies is a common complaint for which parents seek medical advice at the pharmacy. Almost all babies experience pain in the abdomen at one point or another. Most of the time, it is self-limiting and is not caused by a serious medical problem. Although many different conditions cause abdominal pain in babies, it is important to identify the need for referral to the doctor for further investigation.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:19Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Topical gels and creams for musculoskeletal
           pain : musculoskeletal health

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Most people experience muscular pain now and again. Musclular pain (myalgia) can be mild or extremely painful. This article will briefly examine musculoskeletal pain and the topical preparations used to treat this problem.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:19Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Urinary alkalinisers for cystitis in women :
           the medicine cupboard

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacky
      Abstract: Cystitis or "inflammation of the bladder" is a term used to describe a collection of urinary symptoms, including pain on passing urine, frequency of urination and an urgent need to pass small volumes of urine. The need to pass urine during the night, lower abdominal pain and low back pain are also common symptoms.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:19Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Common female conditions requiring
           self-medication in the pharmacy : women's health

    • Authors: Bouwer; A.
      Abstract: Various women's health issues can be dealt with at pharmacy level. Some of the conditions with which female patients often present include dysmenorrhoea (painful periods), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), mild cystitis (bladder infection) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This article will focus on the causes and symptoms of these conditions, as well as over-the-counter (OTC) treatment options.
      PubDate: 2015-07-16T13:47:18Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Improving medicine compliance : the medicine
           cupboard

    • Authors: Lambert; Lynn
      Abstract: The problem of noncompliance with medicines is recognised worldwide, affecting almost half of the patients for whom the medication is prescribed. Internationally, noncompliance accounts for almost 6% of hospital admissions, and is an expensive healthcare burden. More than 40% of patients with disease conditions risk their health by misunderstanding, forgetting or ignoring healthcare advice.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:43Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Understanding the medicine schedules part 2 -
           schedules 3 to 8 : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: In the last issue of SAPA, we examined the impact of Schedules 0, 1 and 2 on your practice. In this issue, we look at the types of control for supply of Schedules 3 to 8 substances in a pharmacy. Please note that the article refers to pharmacist's assistants throughout, and does not mention Pharmacy Technicians or Pharmacy Technical Assistants. The article applies to both Post-Basic Pharmacist's Assistants and Pharmacy Technicians, as they are currently practising within the same scope of practice. Before examining Schedules 3 to 8, we need to remind ourselves of the factors that the Medicines Control Council (MCC) takes into account when allocating substances and medicines to a Schedule.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:43Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Ready, steady, winter : what the pharmacist's
           assistant should know about vaccination, colds and flu : colds and flu

    • Authors: Schmidt; Stephani
      Abstract: Influenza, commonly known as the flu, occurs in epidemics almost every year, and mainly in the winter season in moderate climates. Even though some flu and cold symptoms are similar, the common cold is a separate and distinct entity. Flu and cold viruses are spread from person to person through direct contact, sneezing and coughing, or indirectly via contact with contaminated surfaces.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:42Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Probiotics : new trend or old medicine' :
           review

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacky
      Abstract: Probiotics may be described as live organisms that are microscopic in size, which when administered in adequate amounts, improve an individual's health. Probiotics, such as lactobacilli that is ingested in yoghurt, have been used since the early 20th century to treat a variety of ailments, typically infections of the mucosal surfaces of the body, such as the gastrointestinal tract or the vagina. In fact, probiotics have been used for as long as people have been eating fermented foods. Most probiotics are bacteria, but some yeasts are also used as probiotics, e.g. Saccharomyces boulardii (also called S. cerevisiae or Brewer's yeast).
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:42Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Distinguishing between heartburn and
           gastro-oesophageal reflux disease : gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Van Wyk; Haley
      Abstract: With gravity's help, a muscular valve called the lower oesophageal sphincter helps to keep stomach acid in the stomach. Normally, it opens to allow food to pass into the stomach, then closes again. If the lower oesophageal sphincter opens too often or does not close tightly enough, stomach acid can reflux or seep into the oesophagus and cause a burning sensation. The passage of stomach contents into the oesophagus (gastro-oesophageal reflux) is a normal process. Most episodes are brief and do not cause symptoms, injury or other complications. However, reflux becomes a disease when it either causes damage to the oesophagus or results in symptoms that reduce the patient's quality of life.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:41Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Abdominal pain : gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Davis; S.
      Abstract: Abdominal pain occurs in almost everyone at some stage or another. Although it is often a symptom that can be easily managed, there are instances when abdominal pain should be considered a medical emergency. It is important to obtain as much information as possible in order to identify and correctly advise or refer patients presenting with abdominal pain.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:41Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: More about over-the-counter eyedrops : eye care

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Many topical eye products are available without prescription. These include decongestants, antihistamines, mast cell stabilisers, anti-infective preparations and lubricants.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:41Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: The prevention and treatment of acute asthma
           attacks : respiratory health

    • Authors: Van Wyk; H.
      Abstract: Asthma is a common disease, affecting an estimated 300 million individuals worldwide. It is a serious global health problem that has an impact upon all age groups. There is an increasing prevalence of asthma in many developing countries, together with rising treatment costs; constituting an escalating burden for patients and the community. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells play a role. The inflammation is associated with hyperreactive airways that lead to episodes of chest tightness, wheezing, breathlessness and coughing, especially at night or in the early morning. These episodes are usually associated with airflow obstruction due to narrowing of the airways, which is often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:40Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Aphthous and other oral ulcers : oral health

    • Authors: Davis; Sumari
      Abstract: Mouth ulcers are extremely common, occurring in one in five people in the population. Although they usually heal without serious consequences, they can be very painful and can cause discomfort to patients, leading to difficulty in chewing and swallowing, which can result in weight loss. Occasionally, mouth ulcers may be due to more serious diseases, such as cancer, and it is important to identify and refer these patients for appropriate assessment and treatment.
      PubDate: 2015-05-12T12:20:40Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Vaginal preparations : the medicine cupboard

    • Authors: Smith; Haley
      Abstract: Vaginal preparations are applied or inserted into the vagina to obtain a local effect. Some contain antifungal or antibacterial agents to treat infection, while others contain hormones to help to relieve vaginal menopausal symptoms.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:40Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Understanding the medicine schedules - Part 1:
           Schedules 0, 1 and 2 : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: Schedule 2 medicine' Schedule 6 medicine' Unscheduled medicine' What is this all about' What does it mean in your life, as a healthcare professional, and how on earth is the patient supposed to understand it'. The scheduling of medicines can be very confusing, so perhaps it is important to go back to the basics and to try to understand why the schedules exist.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:40Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Traveller's diarrhoea : gastrointestinal tract

    • Authors: Moroney; Yolanda
      Abstract: Traveller's diarrhoea is a common travel-related illness which causes loose stools and abdominal cramps. It includes intestinal infections from a variety of bacteria, viruses and parasites. It is caused by eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water. Contamination can be transmitted to food, e.g. by washing fruit and vegetables in stool-contaminated water, or by those who prepare the food and who do not wash their hands properly after going to the toilet, or who use contaminated water to do so. Although traveller's diarrhoea is unpleasant, it usually resolves itself without specific treatment.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:39Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Headaches : pain

    • Authors: Van Aswegen; Tami
      Abstract: Why are headaches so common' Nearly every person experiences a headache at some time or another. Headaches can range from mild to severe, and can be mildly annoying or completely disabling.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:39Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Medicines and the sun : family feature

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Summer! Sunshine! Time to have fun! But what about the medicine that you are taking' Some medicines react to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and cause a photosensitive reaction that is similar to sunburn. Knowing which medicines cause these problems ensures that patients know when to stay in the shade.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:38Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Insomnia : family feature

    • Authors: Farrer; Fae
      Abstract: Insomnia is a sleep disorder characterised by difficulty falling asleep and/or staying asleep despite adequate time and opportunity to do so, leading to daytime functional impairment. Insomnia is common, and affects adults and children, although it is more common in adults and its frequency increases with age.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:38Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: It's the time, it's the season, for malaria! :
           family feature

    • Authors: Baker; Lee
      Abstract: Summertime has arrived. This means warmth, sunshine and much needed rain, but also mosquitoes! Unfortunately, there is an increased risk of malaria in some parts of our country and in many areas in other African countries.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:38Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Skin care : five basic principles to keep the
           skin healthy : skin care

    • Authors: Bouwer; Annatjie
      Abstract: The pharmacist's assistant is at the forefront in the pharmacy to answer questions and advise customers on the basics of good skin care. With the advent of puberty, younger customers may need information on how to treat and prevent acne. On the other hand, life expectancy is continuously rising in developed countries, but the mystery of ageing remains partially unresolved, and customers are more aware of skin care than ever before. Skin ageing is also particularly important because of its social impact. This article will provide an overview of skin ageing, acne skin care and suggest five basic principles that can be followed in order to keep the skin healthy.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:37Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Herbal medicines for menopausal flushes : still
           just "hot air"' : women's health

    • Authors: Van Schoor; J.
      Abstract: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including herbal medicines, has become popular because of the mistaken belief that "natural" or herbal medicines have no side-effects. The term "natural" or "herbal" sends a message to the consumer that the medicine is safe. However, there is no such thing as a "natural" medicine, and all medicinal products, "natural", herbal or conventional, are made in factories.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:37Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Douw Greeff : 6 November 1974 to 11 November
           2014 : obituary

    • Abstract: The South African Pharmacist's Assistant mourns the death of Dr Douw Greeff, director of Medpharm, our publisher. We will not forget his eagerness to make sure that pharmacist's assistants were given the information that they need in their daily practice.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:36Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Sexually transmitted infections : reproductive
           health

    • Authors: Smith; Haley
      Abstract: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can be transferred from one person to another during any type of sexual contact. There are at least 25 different STIs, with a range of different symptoms.
      PubDate: 2014-12-11T11:53:36Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Rescheduling of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and
           d-nor-pseudoephedrine - what does it mean' : professional practice

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: The Medicines Control Council recently rescheduled products containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, d-nor-pseudoephedrine and 1-benzylpiperazine (BZP). This article deals with what the changes in scheduling mean, and how the changes affect the sale of these products.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:11Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: A word in your ear : letter from the editor

    • Authors: Osman; Lorraine
      Abstract: Have customers been driving you crazy' Asking for products you can't sell any more' If the answer's yes, you probably won't have to read the professional practice article this month! You've probably already heard about the rescheduling of pseudoephedrine and d-nor-pseudoephedrine, and you've had to explain it to customers.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:11Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Cough mixtures : OTC products

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacqueline
      Abstract: Cough remains one of the most common complaints motivating patients to seek medical attention. The most common causes of a chronic persistent cough in a non-smoking immunocompetent person with a normal chest X-ray are postnasal drip, asthma and gastro-esophageal reflux, while an acute cough is a frequent symptom associated with viral respiratory tract infections such as colds and flu.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:10Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Viral rhinitis - red, raw and runny : OTC
           management

    • Authors: Van Schoor; Jacqueline
      Abstract: The pharmacist's assistant plays an important role in assisting patients in the selection of the most appropriate medication for a runny nose caused by a viral infection. It is important to check the composition of the recommended products to ensure that patients do not 'double-up' on the same or similar medicines. Also, to help reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance, it is helpful to educate patients that not every runny nose is caused by a bacterial infection and therefore not every sniffle needs antibiotic treatment.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:10Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Pharmacy Week 2008 : professional practice

    • Abstract: The Pharmaceutical Society of South Africa invites all pharmacists and pharmacist's assistants to participate in Pharmacy Week 2008. This is our opportunity to promote pharmacy while we educate and inform consumers about an important health and environmental issue.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:10Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Understanding cardiovascular risk factors :
           clinical

    • Authors: McGee; Shelly
      Abstract: Stopping smoking is the single most effective measure to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. It exceeds even the benefits seen from medicines such as those used to lower blood pressure or cholesterol.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:09Z
       
  • SA Pharmacist's Assistant: Family feature

    • Authors: Albrich; Jennifer
      Abstract: Babies - Nappy rash . Children / Toddlers - Wheezing . Adolescents - Menstrual Pains . Women's health - Cystitis . Men's health - Barber's Rash . Grandparent health - Acute and Chronic Constipation
      PubDate: 2014-12-01T13:34:09Z
       
 
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