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UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (156 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 156 of 156 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access  
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Andrology-Open Access     Open Access  
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BANTAO Journal     Open Access  
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Kidney Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Nephrology and Urology Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Queries: Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Urology Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Herald Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hong Kong Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Human Andrology     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Jornal Brasileiro de Nefrologia     Open Access  
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Translational Neurosciences     Open Access  
Journal of Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kidney Disease and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access  
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nefrología (Madrid)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Pediatric Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Ukrainian Journal of Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Urologic Radiology     Hybrid Journal  
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urologie Scan     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Urology Annals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)

           

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Journal Cover
International Brazilian Journal of Urology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.367
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1677-5538 - ISSN (Online) 1677-6119
Published by SciELO Homepage  [913 journals]
  • A decisive year to International Brazilian Journal of Urology

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  • The Best reviewers of International Brazilian Journal of Urology in 2020

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  • Selection of best videos of the year for 2020

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  • The association between body mass index and varicocele: A meta-analysis

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objective: Recently, several studies have found that obesity had a protective effect against varicocele, but no meta-analysis has confirmed this finding. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and varicocele. Material and Methods: We searched for studies in PubMed, Science Direct and the Cochrane Library from inception until February 2018. The association between BMI and varicocele was assessed by pooling the odds ratios (ORs). Results: Eleven eligible studies with a total study population of 1.376.658 participants were included in our analysis. According to BMI, the subjects were defined as belonging to the obese, overweight and underweight groups. Our results showed that the obese group had a lower risk of varicocele when compared with the normal weight group (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 0.37-0.58). Additionally, an overweight BMI had a protective effect against varicocele (OR 0.70, 95% CIs, 0.56-0.86). However, underweight patients had a more than 30% higher risk of varicocele (OR 1.31, 95% CI, 1.04-1.64). Furthermore, there was no publication bias in any of the analyses. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that BMI is negatively associated with the presence of varicocele.
       
  • The obesity paradox in varicocele – is the protective effect
           real'

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objective: Recently, several studies have found that obesity had a protective effect against varicocele, but no meta-analysis has confirmed this finding. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and varicocele. Material and Methods: We searched for studies in PubMed, Science Direct and the Cochrane Library from inception until February 2018. The association between BMI and varicocele was assessed by pooling the odds ratios (ORs). Results: Eleven eligible studies with a total study population of 1.376.658 participants were included in our analysis. According to BMI, the subjects were defined as belonging to the obese, overweight and underweight groups. Our results showed that the obese group had a lower risk of varicocele when compared with the normal weight group (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 0.37-0.58). Additionally, an overweight BMI had a protective effect against varicocele (OR 0.70, 95% CIs, 0.56-0.86). However, underweight patients had a more than 30% higher risk of varicocele (OR 1.31, 95% CI, 1.04-1.64). Furthermore, there was no publication bias in any of the analyses. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that BMI is negatively associated with the presence of varicocele.
       
  • Adjunctive medical expulsive therapy with tamsulosin for repeated
           extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a systematic review and
           meta-analysis

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of adjunctive medical expulsive therapy (MET) with tamsulosin for the promotion of stone fragments clearance for repeated extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Materials and Methods: This meta-analysis was conducted by systematic search for randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies in PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science databases in January 2020, which compared tamsulosin with either placebo or non-placebo control for repeated ESWL. The primary endpoint was stone-free rate (SFR), the second endpoints were stone clearance time and complications. The quality assessment of included studies was performed by using the Cochrane System and Jadad score. Results: 7 RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. Tamsulosin provided higher SFR (for stones larger than 1cm, OR: 5.56, p=0.0003), except for patients with stones less than 1cm. For patients with renal stones (OR: 2.97, p=0.0005) or upper ureteral stones (OR: 3.10, p=0.004), tamsulosin can also provide a higher SFR. In addition, tamsulosin provided a shorter stone clearance time (WMD: −9.40, p=0.03) and lower pain intensity (WMD=-17.01, p <0.0001) and incidences of steinstrasse (OR: 0.37, p=0.0002). Conclusion: Adjunctive MET with tamsulosin is effective in patients with specific stone size or location that received repeated ESWL. However, no well-designed RCT that used computed tomography for the detection and assessment of residual stone fragments was found. More studies with high quality and the comparison between tamsulosin and secondary ESWL are needed in the future.
       
  • The role of intra-abdominal pressure in human testicular migration

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objectives: This review aims to study the role of the abdominal wall in testicular migration process during the human fetal period. Materials and Methods: We performed a descriptive review of the literature about the role of the abdominal wall in testicular migration during the human fetal period. Results: The rise in intra-abdominal pressure is a supporting factor for testicular migration. This process has two phases: the abdominal and the inguinal-scrotal stages. The passage of the testis through the inguinal canal occurs very quickly between 21 and 25 WPC. Bilateral cryptorchidism in Prune Belly syndrome is explained by the impaired contraction of the muscles of the abdominal wall; mechanical obstruction due to bladder distention and structural alteration of the inguinal canal, which hampers the passage of the testis during the inguinoscrotal stage of testicular migration. Abdominal wall defects as gastroschisis and omphaloceles are associated with undescended testes in around 30 to 40% of the cases. Conclusions: Abdominal pressure wound is an auxiliary force in testicular migration. Patients with abdominal wall defects are associated with undescendend testis in more than 30% of the cases probably due to mechanical factors; the Prune Belly Syndrome has anatomical changes in the anterior abdominal wall that hinder the increase of intra-abdominal pressure which could be the cause of cryptorchidism in this syndrome.
       
  • Translational research in testicular migration

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objectives: This review aims to study the role of the abdominal wall in testicular migration process during the human fetal period. Materials and Methods: We performed a descriptive review of the literature about the role of the abdominal wall in testicular migration during the human fetal period. Results: The rise in intra-abdominal pressure is a supporting factor for testicular migration. This process has two phases: the abdominal and the inguinal-scrotal stages. The passage of the testis through the inguinal canal occurs very quickly between 21 and 25 WPC. Bilateral cryptorchidism in Prune Belly syndrome is explained by the impaired contraction of the muscles of the abdominal wall; mechanical obstruction due to bladder distention and structural alteration of the inguinal canal, which hampers the passage of the testis during the inguinoscrotal stage of testicular migration. Abdominal wall defects as gastroschisis and omphaloceles are associated with undescended testes in around 30 to 40% of the cases. Conclusions: Abdominal pressure wound is an auxiliary force in testicular migration. Patients with abdominal wall defects are associated with undescendend testis in more than 30% of the cases probably due to mechanical factors; the Prune Belly Syndrome has anatomical changes in the anterior abdominal wall that hinder the increase of intra-abdominal pressure which could be the cause of cryptorchidism in this syndrome.
       
  • Partial nephrectomy provides equivalent oncologic outcomes and better
           renal function preservation than radical nephrectomy for pathological T3a
           renal cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Radical nephrectomy (RN) is the standard surgical type for pathological stage T3a (pT3a) renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recently, some studies have suggested equivalence between partial nephrectomy (PN) and RN for oncologic control and have shown the benefits of PN for better renal function. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess oncologic outcomes, perioperative outcomes and renal function between two groups among patients with pT3a RCC. Materials and methods: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar were searched for eligible articles. The endpoints of the final analysis included overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), surgical complications, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results: Twelve studies of moderate to high quality, including 14.152 patients, were examined. PN showed superiority for renal functional preservation, providing higher eGFR (WMD=12.48mL/min; 95%CI: 10.28 to 14.67; P <0.00001) and lower serum creatinine (WMD=-0.31mg/dL; 95%CI: −0.40 to −0.21; P <0.00001). There were no significant differences between PN and RN regarding operative time, EBL, surgical complications, OS, RFS and CSS. Despite inherent selection bias, most pooled estimates were consistent in sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis. More positive margins were found in the PN group (RR=2.42; 95%CI: 1.25-4.68; P=0.009). Conclusions: PN may be more suitable for treating pT3a RCC than RN because it provides a similar survival time (OS or RFS) and superior renal function. Nevertheless, this result is still disputed, and more high-quality studies are required.
       
  • Partial laparoscopic nephrectomy: what really matters'

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Radical nephrectomy (RN) is the standard surgical type for pathological stage T3a (pT3a) renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recently, some studies have suggested equivalence between partial nephrectomy (PN) and RN for oncologic control and have shown the benefits of PN for better renal function. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess oncologic outcomes, perioperative outcomes and renal function between two groups among patients with pT3a RCC. Materials and methods: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar were searched for eligible articles. The endpoints of the final analysis included overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), surgical complications, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results: Twelve studies of moderate to high quality, including 14.152 patients, were examined. PN showed superiority for renal functional preservation, providing higher eGFR (WMD=12.48mL/min; 95%CI: 10.28 to 14.67; P <0.00001) and lower serum creatinine (WMD=-0.31mg/dL; 95%CI: −0.40 to −0.21; P <0.00001). There were no significant differences between PN and RN regarding operative time, EBL, surgical complications, OS, RFS and CSS. Despite inherent selection bias, most pooled estimates were consistent in sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis. More positive margins were found in the PN group (RR=2.42; 95%CI: 1.25-4.68; P=0.009). Conclusions: PN may be more suitable for treating pT3a RCC than RN because it provides a similar survival time (OS or RFS) and superior renal function. Nevertheless, this result is still disputed, and more high-quality studies are required.
       
  • Comparison of retrograde ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous
           anterograde ureteroscopy for removal of impacted upper ureteral stones
           >10mm in the elderly population

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: We aimed to compare the success and complication rates of the anterograde and retrograde Ureterorenoscopy (URS) for impacted upper ureteral stones in patients > 65 years of age. Materials and Methods: Data of 146 patients >65 years of age and underwent anterograde URS (n=68) in supine position or retrograde URS (n=78) for upper ureteral impacted stones>10 mm between January 2014 and September 2018 were collected prospectively. The groups were compared for success and complication rates, duration of operation, hospital stay, and ancillary procedures. Results: Anterograde and retrograde URS groups were similar for demographic and stone related characteristics. The success rate of the anterograde URS group was significantly higher than the retrograde URS group (97.1% vs. 78.2%, p=0.0007). The complication rates were similar for the two groups (p=0.86). Clavien grade I and II complications were observed in 3 patients in each group. The mean hemoglobin drop was 0.5 g/dL in the anterograde URS group and blood transfusion was not performed in any of the patients. The mean duration of operation was 41.2±12.5 minutes in the mini-PNL group and 59.6±15.1 minutes in the RIRS group and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.02). The median duration of hospitalization was 1 day for both groups. Conclusions: Performing anterograde URS in supine position provided better success rates and similar complication rates compared to retrograde URS. Based on these results anterograde URS shall be considered as one of the primary treatment options for management of impacted upper ureteral stones in the elderly population.
       
  • Impacted large ureteral stone: What is the best approach'

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: We aimed to compare the success and complication rates of the anterograde and retrograde Ureterorenoscopy (URS) for impacted upper ureteral stones in patients > 65 years of age. Materials and Methods: Data of 146 patients >65 years of age and underwent anterograde URS (n=68) in supine position or retrograde URS (n=78) for upper ureteral impacted stones>10 mm between January 2014 and September 2018 were collected prospectively. The groups were compared for success and complication rates, duration of operation, hospital stay, and ancillary procedures. Results: Anterograde and retrograde URS groups were similar for demographic and stone related characteristics. The success rate of the anterograde URS group was significantly higher than the retrograde URS group (97.1% vs. 78.2%, p=0.0007). The complication rates were similar for the two groups (p=0.86). Clavien grade I and II complications were observed in 3 patients in each group. The mean hemoglobin drop was 0.5 g/dL in the anterograde URS group and blood transfusion was not performed in any of the patients. The mean duration of operation was 41.2±12.5 minutes in the mini-PNL group and 59.6±15.1 minutes in the RIRS group and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.02). The median duration of hospitalization was 1 day for both groups. Conclusions: Performing anterograde URS in supine position provided better success rates and similar complication rates compared to retrograde URS. Based on these results anterograde URS shall be considered as one of the primary treatment options for management of impacted upper ureteral stones in the elderly population.
       
  • A comparison of the efficacy and tolerability of treating primary
           nocturnal enuresis with Solifenacin Plus Desmopressin, Tolterodine Plus
           Desmopressin, and Desmopressin alone: a randomized controlled clinical
           trial

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Introduction: Nocturnal enuresis (enuresis) is one of the most common developmental problems of childhood, which has often a familial basis, causes mental and psychological damage to the child and disrupts family solace. Objectives: In this study, we compared therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of treating primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) with solifenacin plus desmopressin, tolterodine plus desmopressin, and desmopressin alone. Because we don't have enough information about this comparison especially about solifenacin plus desmopressin. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed on 62 patients with enuresis aged 5-15 years who referred to the urology clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Ahwaz in 2017-2018. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the three different therapeutic protocols and any participants were given a specific code. After that, we compared the therapeutic response and the level of satisfaction of each therapeutic group in different months. Data were analyzed using SPSS 22 software and descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The mean age of patients was 8.70±66 years. In the therapeutic group with desmopressin and solifenacin, 19 of 20 patients (95%) achieved complete remission (1) after a 3-month treatment in comparison with monotherapy group in which 14 of 22 patients (63.63%) achieved complete remission; and in the combination therapy group of desmopressin and tolterodine, in the study and the evaluation of the consequences of 3-month treatment of this group, it was found that 17 of 20 patients (85%) had complete remission. Overall, the therapeutic response in combination therapy groups of desmopressin plus anticholinergic was higher than the monotherapy group of desmopressin alone. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the combination of desmopressin and an anticholinergic agent is highly effective in treatment of children with PMNE. Although desmopressin has long been a first - line treatment for PMNE, desmopressin monotherapy often fails to achieve a successful response in patients with PMNE.
       
  • Effects of mesh surgery on sexual function in pelvic prolapse and urinary
           incontinence

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: We aimed to determine pre-operative and post-operative sexual function scores of patients who underwent four-arm polypropylene mesh implantation surgery to treat urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. Materials and Methods: A prospective study from January 2011 to November 2015 including patients (n: 72) submitted to surgical mesh implantation (four-arm anterior mesh implant (Betamix POP4®, Betatech Medical, Turkey) questioned the patients with Female Sexual Function Index evaluation form. The questionnaire was applied to all patients at pre-operative, post-operative 3rd month and post-operative 1st year periods. Results: The mean age of the patients was 47.2±7.1 years. The mean Body Mass Index (kg/m2) was 28.7±3.7. The average of incontinence duration (year) was 4.6±2.6 and the average for operation time (min) was 35.7±2.1. After the urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse surgery, it was observed that incontinence complaints of patients reduced. Furthermore, there was a positive change in quality of life and sexual function of patients at the post-operative period. There was a statistically significant increase according to Female Sexual Function Index score among all three periods (16%, 86% and 100% respectively, p=0.001) and improvement of sexual functions was observed. Conclusions: Transvaginal mesh use in the surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse improves quality of life. However, risk factors such as transvaginal mesh usage indication, surgical technique and experience of the surgeon, suitability of the material, the current health status of the patient and postoperative personal care of the patient may affect the success of operations.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Effects of mesh surgery on sexual function in pelvic
           prolapse and urinary incontinence

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: We aimed to determine pre-operative and post-operative sexual function scores of patients who underwent four-arm polypropylene mesh implantation surgery to treat urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. Materials and Methods: A prospective study from January 2011 to November 2015 including patients (n: 72) submitted to surgical mesh implantation (four-arm anterior mesh implant (Betamix POP4®, Betatech Medical, Turkey) questioned the patients with Female Sexual Function Index evaluation form. The questionnaire was applied to all patients at pre-operative, post-operative 3rd month and post-operative 1st year periods. Results: The mean age of the patients was 47.2±7.1 years. The mean Body Mass Index (kg/m2) was 28.7±3.7. The average of incontinence duration (year) was 4.6±2.6 and the average for operation time (min) was 35.7±2.1. After the urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse surgery, it was observed that incontinence complaints of patients reduced. Furthermore, there was a positive change in quality of life and sexual function of patients at the post-operative period. There was a statistically significant increase according to Female Sexual Function Index score among all three periods (16%, 86% and 100% respectively, p=0.001) and improvement of sexual functions was observed. Conclusions: Transvaginal mesh use in the surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse improves quality of life. However, risk factors such as transvaginal mesh usage indication, surgical technique and experience of the surgeon, suitability of the material, the current health status of the patient and postoperative personal care of the patient may affect the success of operations.
       
  • Endoclips as novel fiducial markers in trimodality bladder-preserving
           therapy of muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma: feasibility and patient
           outcomes

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Hypothesis: Endoclip can be used as fiducial marker in urology. Objective: To assess the feasibility, cost effectiveness and reliability of endoclips as novel fiducial markers in precision radiotherapy, as part of a trimodality bladder-preserving treatment (TBPT) of muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed at Weifang People's Hospital (Weifang, China) from January 2015 to June 2018. A total of 15 patients underwent TBPT. Endoclips were applied to healthy edges of the resected bladder wall as novel fiducial markers. Radio-sensitizing chemotherapy and routine precision radiotherapy were given. The number and position of the endoclips during radiotherapy sessions were monitored. Complications and tumor recurrence were analyzed. Results: The mean age (±standard deviation) of the patients was 67±10 years (range 46-79). There were 3 females and 12 males. Forty-nine endoclips were applied in all patients (3.3±0.8). The tumor was completely visibly resected in all patients. The number of endoclips remained the same through the planned last radiotherapy session (3.3±0.8), i.e., none were lost. All endoclips were removed after the last radiotherapy session. The average number of follow-up months was 38.9±13.2 (range 11-52). There were no procedure-related complications at discharge or follow-up. At one-year, overall recurrence-free survival was 93.3%. Two patients had recurrences at 18 months and 10 months after TBPT, respectively, and salvage radical cystectomy was performed with no further recurrences. Another patient died due to metastasis 9 months after the completion of therapy. Conclusions: Endoclips are reliable, safe and cost-effective as novel fiducial markers in precision-radiotherapy post-TBPT.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Endoclips as novel fiducial markers in trimodality
           bladder preserving therapy of muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma:
           feasibility and patient outcomes

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Hypothesis: Endoclip can be used as fiducial marker in urology. Objective: To assess the feasibility, cost effectiveness and reliability of endoclips as novel fiducial markers in precision radiotherapy, as part of a trimodality bladder-preserving treatment (TBPT) of muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed at Weifang People's Hospital (Weifang, China) from January 2015 to June 2018. A total of 15 patients underwent TBPT. Endoclips were applied to healthy edges of the resected bladder wall as novel fiducial markers. Radio-sensitizing chemotherapy and routine precision radiotherapy were given. The number and position of the endoclips during radiotherapy sessions were monitored. Complications and tumor recurrence were analyzed. Results: The mean age (±standard deviation) of the patients was 67±10 years (range 46-79). There were 3 females and 12 males. Forty-nine endoclips were applied in all patients (3.3±0.8). The tumor was completely visibly resected in all patients. The number of endoclips remained the same through the planned last radiotherapy session (3.3±0.8), i.e., none were lost. All endoclips were removed after the last radiotherapy session. The average number of follow-up months was 38.9±13.2 (range 11-52). There were no procedure-related complications at discharge or follow-up. At one-year, overall recurrence-free survival was 93.3%. Two patients had recurrences at 18 months and 10 months after TBPT, respectively, and salvage radical cystectomy was performed with no further recurrences. Another patient died due to metastasis 9 months after the completion of therapy. Conclusions: Endoclips are reliable, safe and cost-effective as novel fiducial markers in precision-radiotherapy post-TBPT.
       
  • Comparison of functional outcomes of off-clamp laparoscopic partial
           nephrectomy access techniques: A preliminary report

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objective: This study aims to compare renal functional outcomes of access techniques in patients who underwent off-clamp (Off-C) laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN). Materials and Methods: Thirty-four Off-C LPNs in patients with functioning contralateral kidney from March 2011 to June 2018 were included in the study. Twenty-two patients underwent transperitoneal, 12 patients underwent retroperitoneal Off-C LPN. The primary outcome was glomerular filtration rate changes over time, postoperatively. The secondary outcome was the evaluation of trifecta and pentafecta rate. Results: Preoperative demographics, tumor size (26.59 vs. 22.83mm, p=0.790), RENAL score (5.45 vs. 5.33, p=0.990), operation time (79.95 vs. 81.33 min, p=0.157), blood loss (170.23 vs. 150.83mL, p=0.790) were similar in both groups. Although preservation of renal function was better in group 2 in the early period, similar results were found in both groups at the end of the first year, postoperatively. No positive surgical margin and postoperative major complications were detected in any patient. While trifecta goals were achieved in all the patients in the cohort, pentafecta rates were 90.9% and 91.7% in the transperitoneal and retroperitoneal groups, respectively. Conclusions: Transperitoneal and retroperitoneal access were found to have similar outcomes in terms of preservation of renal function at the end of the first year postoperatively. Off-C LPN may be considered as a safe and effective treatment option in patients having non-complex renal tumors.
       
  • The association of seminal oxidation reduction potential with sperm
           parameters in patients with unexplained and male factor ınfertility

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Understanding the effects of high oxidation reduction potential (ORP) levels on sperm parameters will help to identify patients with unexplained and male factor infertility who may have seminal oxidative stress and determine if ORP testing is needed. This study aimed to evaluate the association between seminal ORP and conventional sperm parameters. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 patients who provided a semen sample for simultaneous evaluation of sperm parameters and ORP between January and September 2019 were enrolled in this retrospective study. To identify normal and high ORP levels, a static ORP (sORP) cut-off value of 1.36mV/106sperm/mL was used. Sperm parameters were compared between infertile men with normal sORP (control group, n=23) and high sORP values (study group, n=35). Results: Men with sORP values >1.36mV/106sperm/mL had significantly lower total sperm count (TSC) (p <0.001), sperm concentration (p <0.001) and total motile sperm count (TMSC) (p <0.001). In addition, progressive motility (p=0.04) and fast forward progressive motility (p <0.001) were significantly lower in the study group. A negative correlation was found between sORP and TSC (r=-0.820, p <0.001), sperm concentration (r=-0.822, p <0.001), TMSC (r=-0.808, p <0.001) and progressive motility (r=-0.378, p=0.004). Non-progressive motility positively correlated with sORP (r=0.344, p=0.010). Conclusions: This study has shown that TSC, sperm concentration, progressive motility and TMSC are associated with seminal oxidative stress, indicated by a sORP cut-off of 1.36mV/106sperm/mL. Presence of oligozoospermia, reduced progressive motilty or low TMSC in sperm analysis should raise the suspicion of oxidative stress and warrants seminal ROS testing.
       
  • Pelvic floor muscles after prostate radiation therapy: morpho-functional
           assessment by magnetic resonance imaging, surface electromyography and
           digital anal palpation

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the radiotherapy (RT) effect in the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) function in men with prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study included three groups of patients with PC and RT indication: 1) Pre-RT group: evaluated before the beginning of RT; 2) Acute group: evaluated between six months and one year after RT; 3) Late Group: evaluated between two and a half years and four years post-RT. PFM assessment was divided into: a) functional assessment through the digital anal palpation (Modified Oxford Scale) and surface electromyography (sEMG) with anal probe; b) anatomical assessment by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thickness measurements of levator ani muscle and pelvic specific parameters at rest and under Valsalva maneuver. We used Student t test, considering as significant p <0.05. Results: Thirty-three men were assessed: Pre-RT (n=12); Acute (n=10) and Late (n=11) groups. PFM functional assessment showed Late group with lower electromyographic activity, especially in the sustained contractions when compared to the Pre-RT (p=0.003) and Acute groups (p=0.006). There was no significant difference between groups in MRI. Conclusion: PFM functional assessment showed a decrease in sEMG activity in the Late group post-RT. Most of the sample (72.7%) did not know how to actively contract the PFM or had a weak voluntary contraction when assessed by digital anal palpation. Also, these patients presented higher prevalence of pelvic complaints. No changes were observed in the morpho-functional parameters evaluated by MRI, except the measurement of the membranous urethra length when comparing Pre-RT Group and Acute and Late Groups.
       
  • A prospective randomized study comparing bipolar plasmakinetic
           transurethral resection of the prostate and monopolar transurethral
           resection of the prostate for the treatment of Benign Prostatic
           Hyperplasia: efficacy, sexual function, Quality of Life, and complications
           

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objective: To generate high-quality data comparing the clinical efficacy and safety profile between monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP) and bipolar plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PK-TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized, single-blinded study conducted in a tertiary-care public institution (Dec/2014-Aug/2016). Inclusion criteria: prostate of <80g in patients with drug-refractory lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), complications derived from BPH, or both. Exclusion criteria: a history of pelvic surgery/radiotherapy, neurogenic bladder dysfunction or documented/suspected prostate carcinoma. Treatment efficacy evaluated at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Efficacy outcomes: international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality-of-life (QoL) score, international index of erectile function-5 (IIEF-5), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual urine (PVRU) volume, and prostate volume (PV). Complications and sequelae also assessed. Comparisons performed with parametric/non-parametric tests. Results: Out of the 100 hundred patients, 84 qualified for the analysis (45 M-TURP/39 PK-TURP). No significant differences found in baseline characteristics or operative data, except for a longer operative time in PK-TURP (MD:7.9min; 95%CI:0.13-15.74; p=0.04). No differences found in IPSS, Qmax or PVRU volume. QoL score at 12 months was higher in PK-TURP (MD:0,9points; 95%CI:0.18-1.64; p=0.01). No differences in sexual function, PV, complications or sequelae were found. This study is “rigorous” (Jadadscale) and has a low risk of bias (Cochrane-Handbook). Conclusions: Based on this controlled trial, there is not significant variation in effectiveness and safety between M-TURP and PK-TURP for the treatment of BPH. The small difference in QoL between PK-TURP and M-TURP at the one-year follow-up is not perceivable by the patients and, therefore, not clinically relevant.
       
  • Bipolar and monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate are equally
           effective and safe in this high quality randomized controled trial

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Objective: To generate high-quality data comparing the clinical efficacy and safety profile between monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP) and bipolar plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PK-TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized, single-blinded study conducted in a tertiary-care public institution (Dec/2014-Aug/2016). Inclusion criteria: prostate of <80g in patients with drug-refractory lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), complications derived from BPH, or both. Exclusion criteria: a history of pelvic surgery/radiotherapy, neurogenic bladder dysfunction or documented/suspected prostate carcinoma. Treatment efficacy evaluated at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Efficacy outcomes: international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality-of-life (QoL) score, international index of erectile function-5 (IIEF-5), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual urine (PVRU) volume, and prostate volume (PV). Complications and sequelae also assessed. Comparisons performed with parametric/non-parametric tests. Results: Out of the 100 hundred patients, 84 qualified for the analysis (45 M-TURP/39 PK-TURP). No significant differences found in baseline characteristics or operative data, except for a longer operative time in PK-TURP (MD:7.9min; 95%CI:0.13-15.74; p=0.04). No differences found in IPSS, Qmax or PVRU volume. QoL score at 12 months was higher in PK-TURP (MD:0,9points; 95%CI:0.18-1.64; p=0.01). No differences in sexual function, PV, complications or sequelae were found. This study is “rigorous” (Jadadscale) and has a low risk of bias (Cochrane-Handbook). Conclusions: Based on this controlled trial, there is not significant variation in effectiveness and safety between M-TURP and PK-TURP for the treatment of BPH. The small difference in QoL between PK-TURP and M-TURP at the one-year follow-up is not perceivable by the patients and, therefore, not clinically relevant.
       
  • Clinical factors that influence the occurrence of symptomatic
           pseudoaneurysms and arteriovenous fistulas after partial nephrectomy:
           multi-institutional study of renal function outcomes after one year of
           selective arterial embolization

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Renal artery pseudoaneurysms (RAPs) and arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are rare but potentially life-threatening complications after partial nephrectomy (PN). Selective arterial embolization (SAE) is an effective method for controlling RAPs/AVFs. We assessed the clinical factors affecting the occurrence of RAPs/AVFs after PN and the effects of SAE on postsurgical renal function. Materials and Methods: Four hundred ninety-three patients who underwent PN were retrospectively reviewed. They were placed in either the SAE or the non-SAE group. The effects of clinical factors, including R.E.N.A.L. scores, on the occurrence of RAPs/AVFs were analyzed. The influence of SAE on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) during the first postoperative year was evaluated. Results: Thirty-three (6.7%) patients experienced RAPs/AVFs within 8 days of the median interval between PN and SAE. The SAE group had significantly higher R.E.N.A.L. scores, higher N component scores, and higher L component scores (all, p <0.05). In the multivariate analysis, higher N component scores were associated with the occurrence of RAPs/AVFs (Odds ratio: 1.96, p=0.039). In the SAE group, the mean 3-day postembolization eGFR was significantly lower than the mean 3-day postoperative eGFR (p <0.01). This difference in the eGFRs was still present 1 year later. Conclusions: Renal tumors located near the renal sinus and collecting system were associated with a higher risk for RAPs/AVFs after PN. Although SAE was an effective method for controlling symptomatic RAPs/AVFs after PN, a procedure-related impairment of renal function after SAE could occur and still be present at the end of the first postoperative year.
       
  • Preoperative hydronephrosis predicts adverse pathological features and
           postoperative survival in patients with high-grade upper tract urothelial
           carcinoma

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Epidemiological studies reported conflicting results about preoperative hydronephrosis in upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). This study aimed to investigate the association between preoperative hydronephrosis and pathologic features and oncologic outcomes in patients with UTUC treated by radical nephroureterectomy (RNU). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, single-center cohort study of 377 patients treated by RNU without perioperative chemotherapy between January 2001 and December 2014. Logistic regression, Cox regression, and survival analyses were performed. Results: Among the 226 patients with high-grade UTUC, 132 (58%) had preoperative hydronephrosis. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that hydronephrosis was independently associated with advanced pT stage (P=0.017) and lymph node or lymphovascular invasion (P=0.002). Median follow-up was 36 months (interquartile range: 20-48 months). The 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates in patients with hydronephrosis were significantly lower than in those without hydronephrosis (both P <0.001). The 3- and 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rates in patients with hydronephrosis were significantly lower than in those without hydronephrosis (both P=0.001). Hydronephrosis was independently associated with OS and CSS (P=0.001 and P=0.004, respectively). Among the 151 patients with low-grade UTUC, hydronephrosis was not associated with pathologic features and postoperative survival. Conclusions: Preoperative hydronephrosis was significantly associated with adverse pathologic features and postoperative survival in patients with high-grade UTUC.
       
  • Personal and familial factors associated with toilet training

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Interim Guidance for Urodynamic Practice during COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Effects of Covid-19 on male reproductive system

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Long-term effectiveness and complication rates of
           bladder augmentation in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: A
           systematic review

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Adjuvant Single-Dose Upper Urinary Tract Instillation
           of Mitomycin C After Therapeutic Ureteroscopy for Upper Tract Urothelial
           Carcinoma: A Single-Centre Prospective Non-Randomized Trial

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Continuous monitoring of intrapelvic pressure during
           flexible ureteroscopy using a sensor wire: a pilot study

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Impact of Obesity on Perioperative Outcomes at
           Robotic-assisted and Open Radical Prostatectomy: Results From the National
           Inpatient Sample

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Editorial Comment: Abiraterone in “High-” and “Low-risk”
           Metastatic Hormone-sensitive Prostate Cancer

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • 18F-FDG PET/CT in pure testicular Yolk Sac Tumor in adult

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Atypical metastases from prostate cancer detected on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT: a
           case series

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Purpose: Toilet training (TT) is an important marker in a child's physical and psychosocial development. The present study aimed to evaluate aspects associated to delayed TT. Material and Methods: We interviewed 372 parents of children who had completed TT up to 48 months before the interview. The questionnaires were applied at school exits when parents went to pick their children up and at public parks. Questions included demographics, aspects related to TT, dysfunction voiding symptom score and evaluation of constipation. Results: The interviews were performed at a mean of 15.3±10.4 (0 to 47) months after the end of TT. Girls accounted for 53% of the sample. The mean age at finishing TT was 31.6±9.3 months and similar in both genders (p=0.77). TT occurred before school entry in 45.7% of the children and medical advice for TT was sought only by 4.8% of the parents. No association was observed of age at completing TT and presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (p=0.57) and/or constipation (p=0.98). In the univariate analysis, prematurity (OR=2.7 [95% CI 2.3-3.1], p <0.0001) and mothers who work outside their household (OR=1.8 [95% CI 1.4-2.3], p <0.0001) were associated to delayed TT. Conclusion: Children completed TT at a mean of 2 years and 7 months of age. The age of completing TT was not related to LUTS and/or constipation. Premature children and those whose mothers work outside the home finish TT later.
       
  • Complex Re-do robotic pyeloplasty using cryopreserved placental tissue: an
           adjunct for success

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Introduction and Objectives: Management of recurrent ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) following pyeloplasty presents a challenging clinical problem. Failure of initial pyeloplasty is, in part, secondary to ureteral devascularization and subsequent fibrosis. In this video, we present a case of an anastomotic augmentation with cryopreserved placental tissue (CPT) to improve tissue healing and angiogenesis, and aid with the success of re-do robotic pyeloplasty. Materials and Methods: We present a 46-year-old female with history of recurrent left-sided UPJO treated by initial endopyelotomy and then open pyeloplasty. She underwent re-do robotic pyeloplasty (DaVinci Si™, Intuitive Surgical) with CPT. The patient was placed in the flank position; a 12mm camera port, three 8mm robotic ports, and a 12mm assistant port were used. The renal pelvis and upper ureter were mobilized to reveal a dense scar at the UPJ. A dismembered pyeloplasty was performed with barbed suture. After completion of the anastomosis, a section of CPT (Stravix™, Osiris Therapeutics) was wrapped around the anastomosis. CPT is composed of umbilical amnion and Wharton's jelly, which contains a mixture of extracellular matrix, and growth factors. The CPT is prepared and thawed on the bedside table, and placed into the peritoneum through the 12mm port in the correct orientation. The wrap is secured to the anastomosis with a fibrin sealant (EVICEL™, Johnson & Johnson). Results: The patient experienced resolution of flank pain. MAG3 renogram demonstrated resolution of obstruction at 6 months, with improvement of T½ time from 34 minutes to 7 minutes, with sustained improvement with repeat scan 18 months after surgery. Ureteroscopy demonstrated a patent UPJ. Strategies for successful robotic pyeloplasty after initial failed management include: (1) use of appropriate CPT agent to support the anastomosis - selection of thicker, more durable CPT to allow passage through laparoscopic port, (2) preparation on bedside table with enough time to allow thawing, (3) marking Wharton's jelly side of tissue for orientation, and (4) use of sealing agent to secure CPT to the anastomosis and prevent dislodgement. Conclusions: We demonstrate a novel approach to manage recurrent UPJ obstruction with robotic surgery using CPT. Placenta-derived products may have an increasing role in the performance of complex robotic urologic reconstructive surgery.
       
  • Re: Uretero-inguinal hernia with obstructive urolithiasis

    • Abstract: ABSTRACT Introduction and Objectives: Management of recurrent ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) following pyeloplasty presents a challenging clinical problem. Failure of initial pyeloplasty is, in part, secondary to ureteral devascularization and subsequent fibrosis. In this video, we present a case of an anastomotic augmentation with cryopreserved placental tissue (CPT) to improve tissue healing and angiogenesis, and aid with the success of re-do robotic pyeloplasty. Materials and Methods: We present a 46-year-old female with history of recurrent left-sided UPJO treated by initial endopyelotomy and then open pyeloplasty. She underwent re-do robotic pyeloplasty (DaVinci Si™, Intuitive Surgical) with CPT. The patient was placed in the flank position; a 12mm camera port, three 8mm robotic ports, and a 12mm assistant port were used. The renal pelvis and upper ureter were mobilized to reveal a dense scar at the UPJ. A dismembered pyeloplasty was performed with barbed suture. After completion of the anastomosis, a section of CPT (Stravix™, Osiris Therapeutics) was wrapped around the anastomosis. CPT is composed of umbilical amnion and Wharton's jelly, which contains a mixture of extracellular matrix, and growth factors. The CPT is prepared and thawed on the bedside table, and placed into the peritoneum through the 12mm port in the correct orientation. The wrap is secured to the anastomosis with a fibrin sealant (EVICEL™, Johnson & Johnson). Results: The patient experienced resolution of flank pain. MAG3 renogram demonstrated resolution of obstruction at 6 months, with improvement of T½ time from 34 minutes to 7 minutes, with sustained improvement with repeat scan 18 months after surgery. Ureteroscopy demonstrated a patent UPJ. Strategies for successful robotic pyeloplasty after initial failed management include: (1) use of appropriate CPT agent to support the anastomosis - selection of thicker, more durable CPT to allow passage through laparoscopic port, (2) preparation on bedside table with enough time to allow thawing, (3) marking Wharton's jelly side of tissue for orientation, and (4) use of sealing agent to secure CPT to the anastomosis and prevent dislodgement. Conclusions: We demonstrate a novel approach to manage recurrent UPJ obstruction with robotic surgery using CPT. Placenta-derived products may have an increasing role in the performance of complex robotic urologic reconstructive surgery.
       
 
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