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    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (155 journals)

UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (155 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 155 of 155 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Nephrology     Open Access  
African Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Renal Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aktuelle Urologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
American Journal of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Andrology and Genital Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Andrology-Open Access     Open Access  
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivio Italiano di Urologia e Andrologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BANTAO Journal     Open Access  
Basic and Clinical Andrology     Open Access  
BJU International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
BMC Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Urological Association Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Clinical and Experimental Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Nephrology and Urology Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Queries: Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Cirugía     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Opinion in Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Urology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Nephrologe     Hybrid Journal  
Der Urologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
EMC - Urología     Full-text available via subscription  
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
European Urology Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Urology Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Forum Nefrologiczne     Full-text available via subscription  
Geriatric Nephrology and Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale di Clinica Nefrologica e Dialisi     Open Access  
Herald Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hong Kong Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Human Andrology     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
IJU Case Reports     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Brazilian Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Urology and Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Jornal Brasileiro de Nefrologia     Open Access  
Journal für Urologie und Urogynäkologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Clinical Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Endoluminal Endourology     Open Access  
Journal of Endourology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Endourology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrative Nephrology and Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Kidney Cancer and VHL     Open Access  
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nephrology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of The Egyptian Society of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access  
Journal of Translational Neurosciences     Open Access  
Journal of Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Urology & Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kidney Disease and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Kidney Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Kidney International Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kidney Medicine     Open Access  
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kidneys (Počki)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nature Reviews Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Nature Reviews Urology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Nefrología (English Edition)     Open Access  
Nefrología (Madrid)     Open Access  
Nephro-Urology Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Nephron     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Experimental Nephrology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nephron Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nephron Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Neurourology and Urodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Open Journal of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Urology & Nephrology Journal     Open Access  
Pediatric Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progrès en Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Progrès en Urologie - FMC     Full-text available via subscription  
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Renal Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Renal Replacement Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research and Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Nefrología, Diálisis y Trasplante     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Urología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Urologia Colombiana     Open Access  
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Seminars in Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Prostate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Therapeutic Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trends in Urology & Men's Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Ukrainian Journal of Nephrology and Dialysis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Uro-News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Urolithiasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Urologia Internationalis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urologia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Urologic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Urologic Radiology     Hybrid Journal  
Urological Science     Open Access  
Urologicheskie Vedomosti     Open Access  
Urologie in der Praxis     Hybrid Journal  
Urologie Scan     Hybrid Journal  
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Urology Annals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urology Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urology Times     Free   (Followers: 3)
Urology Video Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Nephrology and Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
World Journal of Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Canadian Urological Association Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.626
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1911-6470 - ISSN (Online) 1920-1214
Published by Canadian Urological Association Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Truth and consequences — The issue with standards and guidelines

    • Authors: Martin A. Koyle
      Pages: 79 - 80
      PubDate: 2018-02-12
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Credible medical information: Is the internet a patient's best
           friend'

    • Authors: Gerald B. Brock
      First page: 83
      PubDate: 2018-04-04
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • CUA-USANZ exchange: Melbourne 2017

    • Authors: Alice Yu
      First page: 84
      PubDate: 2018-04-10
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Advancing Canadian Urological Association guidelines using GRADE

    • Authors: Philipp Dahm, Jane Lewis, Shahnaz Sultan
      Pages: 93 - 4
      PubDate: 2018-04-10
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Job market for graduating urologists

    • Authors: Omar Nazif
      Pages: 110 - 1
      PubDate: 2018-04-10
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Predictors of lymph node status in penile cancer: High-quality
           administrative datasets give us insight into what’s happening in our own
           backyard

    • Authors: Luke T. Lavallée
      First page: 126
      PubDate: 2018-04-10
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Crédibilité des renseignements médicaux : Internet est-il le meilleur
           ami des patients'

    • Authors: Gerald B. Brock
      First page: 144
      PubDate: 2018-04-10
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Supplementary data: A critical review of recent clinical practice
           guidelines for pediatric urinary tract infection

    • Authors: Michael Chua, Jessica Ming, Shang-Jen Chang, Joana Dos Santos, Niraj Mistry, Jan Michael Silangcruz, Mark Bayley, Martin A. Koyle
      Pages: 169 - 81
      Abstract: N/A
      PubDate: 2018-04-12
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Canadian Urological Association/Pediatric Urologists of Canada guidelines
           on the investigation and management of antenatally detected hydronephrosis
           

    • Authors: John-Paul Capolicchio, Luis H. Braga, Konrad M. Szymanski
      Pages: 85 - 92
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The use of polyacrylamide hydrogel in the setting of failed female stress
           incontinence surgery

    • Authors: Roderick Clark, Blayne Welk
      Pages: 95 - 7
      Abstract: NA
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The impact of patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors on
           survival in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma

    • Authors: Nahid Punjani, Roderick Clark, Jonathan Izawa, Joseph Chin, Stephen E. Pautler, Nicholas Power
      Pages: 98 - 103
      Abstract: Introduction: Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive endocrine tumour. Most present with advanced disease and have poor prognosis. Optimal treatment includes complete surgical resection. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiation at different stages in this disease. There remain many inconsistencies with respect to diagnosis and workup. There is a lack of uniform guideline recommendations and consensus data.Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients at London Health Sciences Centre between 1990 and 2015 using ICD coding. All paper and electronic charts were reviewed and data was collected. Statistical analysis and survival curves were performed.Results: A total of 29 patients were included in our study. Median age was 55 years (interquartile range [IQR] 45–63); 14 (48%) were male and 15 (52%) were female. Approximately half (14 or 48%) of our patients presented symptomatically. Almost half (41%) of tumours were metabolically active, producing hormones. Most (88%) underwent surgical intervention. Surgical margin status was available in about half of patients and lymphadenectomy was performed in a third (n=8) of open adrenalectomy patients. A third received mitotane treatment (8 [73%] adjuvant and 3 [27%] palliative) and a third of patients received radiation. Two- and five-year median overall survival was 53% and 27%, respectively.Conclusions: ACC is a rare and aggressive tumour. This is the largest Canadian series reported to the best of our knowledge. Limited data for guidelines exists and treatment and workup patterns are inconsistent. Collaborative randomized and prospective studies on a global basis are needed.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Attitudes of graduating Canadian urology residents on the job market: Is
           it getting better or are we just spinning our wheels'

    • Authors: Gregory W. Hosier, Naji J. Touma
      Pages: 104 - 9
      Abstract: Introduction: There has been increasing awareness of employment difficulties for physicians, especially surgeons, in Canada over the past few years. Our objective was to elucidate the attitudes and experiences of graduating Canadian urology residents in obtaining employment.Methods: We surveyed four separate cohorts of graduating urology residents in 2010, 2011, 2016, and 2017. Responses from the 2010 and 2011 cohorts were combined and compared to the combined results of the 2016 and 2017 cohorts. Mean Likert responses were compared using unpaired t-tests. An agreement score was created for those responding with “strongly agree” and “agree” on the Likert scale.Results: A total of 126 surveys were administered with a 100% response rate. The job market was rated as poor or very poor by 64.9% and 58.4% of graduates in 2010/2011 and 2016/2017, respectively (p=0.67). Lack of resources was identified as the biggest barrier to improved employment in both cohorts. Networking at meetings and staff urologists at their institution were the most important factors aiding employment identified by both cohorts. The ideal practice was academic or academically associated community practices in a large urban area, with 5‒10 partners for both cohorts.Conclusions: The majority of graduating urology residents viewed the job market as poor or very poor and this did not change over a six-year period. It is unclear how much personal preference for location and practice type drove the somewhat negative outlook of employment opportunities, as the majority of residents were seeking large urban, academic, or academically associated community practices in competitive locations.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • A critical review of recent clinical practice guidelines for pediatric
           urinary tract infection

    • Authors: Michael Chua, Jessica Ming, Shang-Jen Chang, Joana Dos Santos, Niraj Mistry, Jan Michael Silangcruz, Mark Bayley, Martin A. Koyle
      Pages: 112 - 8
      Abstract: Introduction: Concerns regarding the quality, credibility, and applicability of recently published pediatric urinary tract infection (UTI) clinical practice guidelines have been raised due to the inconsistencies of recommendations between them. We aimed to determine the quality of the recent clinical practice guidelines on pediatric UTI by using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument, and summarize the standard of care in diagnosis and management of pediatric UTI from the top three clinical practice guidelines.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed on medical literature electronic databases and international guideline repository websites. English language-based clinical practice guidelines from 2007–2016 endorsed by any international society or government organization providing recommendations for the management of pediatric UTI were considered. Eligible clinical practice guidelines were independently appraised by six reviewers using the AGREE II tool. Clinical practice guidelines were assessed for standardized domains and summarized for overall quality. Interrater reliability was assessed using inter-class coefficient (ICC).Results: Thirteen clinical practice guidelines were critically reviewed. The Spanish clinical practice guidelines, American Academy of Pediatrics, and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence clinical practice guidelines consistently scored high on all AGREE domains (total averaged domain scores 90, 88, and 88, respectively). Among the six reviewers, there was a high degree of inter-rater reliability (average measure ICC 0.938; p<0.0001). There is reasonable consensus among the top three clinical practice guidelines in their major recommendations.Conclusions: The clinical practice guidelines from Spain, American Academy of Pediatrics, and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, with their major recommendations being similar, have scored highly on the AGREE II indicators of quality for the clinical practice guidelines development process.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Validation of predictors for lymph node status in penile cancer: Results
           from a population-based cohort

    • Authors: X. Melody Qu, D. Robert Siemens, Alexander V. Louie, Darwin Yip, Aamer Mahmud
      Pages: 119 - 25
      Abstract: Introduction: The ability to predict lymph node (LN) status is essential in the management of men with localized squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. There has been limited external validation of available risk stratification tools, particularly in routine clinical care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive variables of LN metastases within a large population-based cohort of patients.Methods: In this population-based cohort study, surgical pathology reports were linked to the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry to identify all patients who were diagnosed with penile cancer in Ontario, Canada. Multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate predictive variables for LN involvement. Three contemporary risk stratification schemes used to predict LN status were analyzed by logistic regression.Results: The study included 380 localized penile SCC cases treated between 2000 and 2010. Sixty-three (17%) had pathologically confirmed LN metastases. Among these, 35 (56%) were diagnosed within three months of the initial penile SCC diagnosis and these patients had a worse five-year disease-specific survival (43%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 26–64) compared to patients who were diagnosed at a delayed LN dissection. On multivariable analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 0.68; 95% CI 0.52–0.88), pathological stage (≥pT1b; OR 3.32; 95% CI 1.38–8.01), and tumour grade (Grade 2 OR 2.98; 95% CI 1.26–7.62; Grade 3 OR 3.97; 95% CI 1.32–11.9) were associated with an increased risk of LN metastases. Candidate risk stratification schemes demonstrated moderate to good property, with C-statistics ranging from 0.662–0.747.Conclusions: Using a population-based cohort of penile cancer patients with a relatively low proportion of patients with pathologically confirmed LN involvement, we confirm and externally validate the importance of age, stage, and grade of the primary tumour in predicting nodal status.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Moses technology in a stone simulator

    • Authors: Ahmed Ibrahim, Shadi Badaan, Mostafa M. Elhilali, Sero Andonian
      Pages: 127 - 30
      Abstract: Introduction: The objective of this study was to compare fragmentation efficiency of the conventional regular mode of holmium laser to the Moses contact mode on a stone simulator.Methods: The Lumenis® PulseTM P120 H holmium laser system, together with Moses D/F/L fibers were used to compare regular mode with Moses contact mode in a stone simulator model using flexible ureteroscopy with artificial stones. Efficiency of laser lithotripsy was measured by procedural time. Degree of stone retropulsion was also compared between regular and Moses modes using a Likert scale from 0 (no retropulsion) to 3 (maximum retropulsion).Results: Using the stone simulator model, a significant reduction in stone retropulsion was noticed when comparing regular mode to the Moses contact mode (mean Grade 2.5 vs. Grade 1; p<0.01). When compared with the regular mode, the Moses contact mode was associated with significantly shorter procedural time during fragmentation (13.9 vs. 9.1 minutes; p≤0.01) and dusting (9.3 vs. 7.1 minutes; p≤0.01). In addition, when compared with the regular mode, the laser pedal was pressed significantly less often with the Moses mode during fragmentation (86 vs. 43 times; p<0.01) and dusting (50 vs. 26 times; p<0.01). Moses contact mode was associated with significantly higher percentage of lasing vs. pausing when compared with the regular mode for both fragmentation (0.8 J/10 Hz) and pulverization (0.4 J/50 Hz) settings (both p<0.05).Conclusions: Using the stone simulator setup, Moses technology was associated with more efficient laser lithotripsy (shorter operative time) due to significantly reduced stone retropulsion.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating factors that dictate struvite stone composition: A
           

    • Authors: Ryan K. Flannigan, Andrew Battison, Shubha De, Mitchell R. Humphreys, Markus Bader, Ekaterina Lellig, Manoj Monga, Ben H. Chew, Dirk Lange
      Pages: 131 - 6
      Abstract: Introduction: Struvite stones account for 15% of urinary calculi and are typically associated with urease-producing urinary tract infections and carry significant morbidity. This study aims to characterize struvite stones based on purity of stone composition, bacterial speciation, risk factors, and clinical features.Methods: Retrospective data was collected from patients diagnosed with infection stones between 2008 and 2012. Stone analysis, perioperative urine cultures, bacterial speciation, and clinical data were collected and analyzed. The purity of struvite stones was determined. Statistical comparisons were made among homogeneous and heterogeneous struvite stones.Results: From the four participating centres, 121 struvite stones were identified. Only 13.2% (16/121) were homogenous struvite. Other components included calcium phosphate (42.1%), calcium oxalate (33.9%), calcium carbonate (27.3%), and uric acid (5.8%). Partial or full staghorn calculi occurred in 23.7% of cases. Ureaseproducing bacteria were only present in 30% of cases. Proteus, E. coli, and Enterococcus were the most common bacterial isolates from perioperative urine, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy was the most common modality of treatment. Only 40% of patients had a urinalysis that was nitrite-positive, indicating that urinalysis alone is not reliable for diagnosing infection stones. The study’s limitation is its retrospective nature; as such, the optimal timing of cultures with respect to stone analysis or treatment was not always possible, urine cultures were often not congruent with stone cultures in the same patient, and our findings of E. coli commonly cultured does not suggest causation.Conclusions: Struvite stones are most often heterogeneous in composition. Proteus remains a common bacterial isolate; however, E. coli and Enterococcus were also frequently identified. This new data provides evidence that patients with struvite stones can have urinary tract pathogens other than urease-producing bacteria, thus challenging previous conventional dogma.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Urologist burnout: Frequency, causes, and potential solutions to an
           unspoken entity

    • Authors: Julie Franc-Guimond, Brian McNeil, Steven M. Schlossberg, Amanda C. North, Alp Sener
      Pages: 137 - 42
      Abstract: Physician burnout has been linked to decreased job performance, increased medical errors, interpersonal conflicts, and depression. Recent multispecialty studies suggest that urologists have higher rates (up to 63.6%) of burnout compared to physicians in other specialties; however, these reports were limited by low sample sizes.1 We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of urologist burnout, verify risk factors, and recommend preventative measures and solutions for colleagues at risk or suffering from burnout. Urologist burnout is a true entity that transcends level of training and nationality. Its roots appear to be deep-seated in our tireless efforts to strive for excellence in care for our patients, our growing academic and research pursuits, and surmounting administrative responsibilities; these virtues, which are regarded as the foundations of our career successes, are often obtained at the expense of personal health and wellbeing, as well as family sacrifice. Various other medical societies have become increasingly vocal about the issue of physician burnout and have actively initiated successful strategies to minimize its impact on their members. As an organization with a strong national presence, the Canadian Urological Association (CUA) should promote tools to prevent and interventions to assist those at risk for and suffering from burnout. Increased awareness in the general medical community has led to strategies and tools that can help prevent, identify, or assist physicians in their recovery from burnout. The CUA should develop and facilitate access to information and offer comprehensive support for urologists struggling with burnout.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Perioperative chemotherapy for bladder cancer: A qualitative study of
           physician knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour

    • Authors: Melanie Walker, R. Christopher Doiron, Simon D. French, Deb Feldman-Stewart, D. Robert Siemens, William J. Mackillop, Christopher M. Booth
      Pages: 182 - 90
      Abstract: Introduction: Use of chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is known to be low. To understand factors driving practice we use the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify barriers and enablers of chemotherapy use.Methods: A convenience sample of Canadian urologists, medical oncologists (MOs), and radiation oncologists (ROs) participated in individual, semi-structured, one-hour telephone interviews. An interview guide was developed using the TDF to assess potential barriers and enablers of chemotherapy use. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Two investigators independently identified barriers and enablers and assigned them to specific themes. Participant recruitment continued until saturation.Results: A total of 71 physicians were invited to participate and 34 (48%) agreed to be interviewed: 13 urologists, 10 MOs, and 11 ROs. We identified the following barriers to the use of chemotherapy (relevant TDF domains in parentheses): 1) belief that the benefits of chemotherapy are not clinically important (beliefs about consequences); 2) inadequate multidisciplinary collaboration (environmental context and resources); 3) absence of “champions” advocating the use of chemotherapy (social and professional role); and 4) a lack of organizational clarity/policy regarding the referral process (environmental context and resources). The predominant enablers identified included: 1) “champions” who believe in the value of chemotherapy (social and professional role); 2) urologists who refer all patients to MO (behavioural regulation; memory, attention, and decision-making); and 3) system-level factors, including automatic multidisciplinary referral (environmental context and resources).Conclusions: We have identified several system-level factors associated with delivery of chemotherapy. Behaviour change interventions should optimize multidisciplinary care of patients with MIBC.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • CanMEDS scholars: A national survey on urology residents’ attitudes
           towards research during training

    • Authors: Ogi Solaja, Thomas A.A. Skinner, Thomas B. McGregor, D. Robert Siemens
      Pages: 191 - 6
      Abstract: Introduction: Participation in scholarly activity is an important tenet of residency training and is firmly entrenched in Canada since the introduction of CanMEDS roles by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. As Canadian residency programs transition to competency- based training, it will remain important to understand how to best implement and encourage scholarly pursuits among resident trainees. The objective of this study was to understand the experiences, attitudes, and barriers that surgical residents face when pursuing research during their training.Methods: An anonymous, cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire was administered to chief residents of all English-speaking urology programs in Canada in 2015. Questions were open- and close-ended, including an agreement score based on a five-point Likert scale. Questions addressed residents’ involvement in and attitudes towards research, as well as their perceptions of the utility of research involvement during training. The residents were also asked about the support they received and potential areas to improve the attainment of this competency. Descriptive and correlative statistics were used to analyze the responses.Results: There was a 100% overall response rate to the questionnaire. This study revealed that Canadian urology residents have a high rate of participation in scholarly work, with the vast majority (94%) publishing at least one manuscript with a mean of four papers. Despite this, there appeared to be significant variation in the respondent’s experiences, including protected time for research. Furthermore, many residents appeared unconvinced of the importance of research involvement, with only 51% agreement that participation was important to their overall training. As well, a significant number of residents reported largely external, rather than internal, motivations for research participation, such as attaining a preferred fellowship (66% agreement). While the majority of respondents felt (66% agreement) that the scholar role was important in residency training, it would appear that significant barriers, including time and mentorship, limited the effectiveness of research participation to gain those competencies.Conclusions: The results of this self-report survey outline the significant differences in attitudes and experience towards mandatory research as a component of scholarship in Canadian urology training programs. As postgraduate medical education evolves, particularly with the uptake of competency-based medical education, programs and residents will need to address the motives and barriers to better foster academic pursuits during urology training.
      PubDate: 2017-12-16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Miramichi Regional Hospital, NB

    • Authors: Editorial CUAJ
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4
       
  • Alberta Health Services & University of Calgary

    • Authors: Editorial CUAJ
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 4
       
 
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