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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6695 journals)
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GASTROENTEROLOGY (148 journals)                  1 2     

Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Gastroenterologica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Symposium Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Gastroenterology Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Gastroenterology, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
Arab Journal of Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arquivos de Gastroenterologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access  
Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMJ Open Gastroenterology     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access  
Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinics in Liver Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Colon & Rectum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
coloproctology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Colorectal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Comparative Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Colorectal Cancer Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Current Gastroenterology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Hepatitis Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Gastroenterologe     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 247)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access  
Digestion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Digestive and Liver Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Digestive Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Digestive Diseases and Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Digestive Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Diseases of the Colon & Rectum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Diseases of the Esophagus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dysphagia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endoscopy International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endoskopie heute     Hybrid Journal  
Esophagus     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Evidence-Based Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Frontline Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Gastric Cancer     Hybrid Journal  
Gastroenterología y Hepatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Gastroenterología y Hepatología Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Gastroenterologie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 113)
Gastroenterology and Hepatology from bed to bench     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gastroenterology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gastroenterology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gastroenterology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gastrointestinal Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Gastrointestinal Intervention     Full-text available via subscription  
GE-Portuguese Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access  
Gut     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 141)
Gut Microbes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Gut Pathogens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hepatic Medicine: Evidence and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Hepatology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
HPB: The official journal of the International Hepato Pancreato Biliary Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Immuno-Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription  
Indian Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Celiac Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Colorectal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
Journal Africain d'Hépato-Gastroentérologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

        1 2     

Journal Cover   Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
  [SJR: 1.142]   [H-I: 62]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0889-8553
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2812 journals]
  • Treatment Strategy for Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Shotaro Nakamura , Takayuki Matsumoto

      Teaser Recent trends and current knowledge on the diagnosis and treatment strategy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma are reviewed. Helicobacter pylori infection plays the causative role in the pathogenesis, and H pylori eradication is the first-line treatment of this disease, which leads to complete remission in 60% to 90% of cases. A Japanese multicenter study confirmed that the long-term outcome of gastric MALT lymphoma after H pylori eradication is excellent. Treatment strategies for patients not responding to H pylori eradication including “watch and wait” strategy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, rituximab immunotherapy, and combination of these should be tailored in consideration of the disease extent in each patient.

      PubDate: 2015-06-26T05:10:47Z
       
  • How to Effectively Use Bismuth Quadruple Therapy The Good, the Bad, and
           the Ugly
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): David Y. Graham , Sun-Young Lee

      Teaser Bismuth triple therapy was the first effective Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. The addition of a proton pump inhibitor helped overcome metronidazole resistance. Its primary indication is penicillin allergy or when clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance are both common. Resistance to the primary first-line therapy have centered on complexity and difficulties with compliance. Understanding regional differences in effectiveness remains unexplained because of the lack of studies including susceptibility testing and adherence data. We discuss regimen variations including substitutions of doxycycline, amoxicillin, and twice a day therapy and provide suggestions regarding what is needed to rationally and effectively use bismuth quadruple therapy.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Screening to Identify and Eradicate Helicobacter pylori Infection in
           Teenagers in Japan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Taiji Akamatsu , Takuma Okamura , Yugo Iwaya , Tomoaki Suga

      Teaser The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence and effect of Helicobacter pylori infection in Japanese teenagers. The study subjects were students ages 16 to 17 from one high school studied between 2007 and 2013. Students who tested positive on this screening examination underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and biopsy samples to determine their H pylori status using culture and histology. Cure of H pylori infections was determined by urea breath test. The low rate of prevalence of H pylori infection in present Japanese teenagers makes it possible and cost effective to perform examinations and carry out treatment of this infection in nationwide health screenings of high school students.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Practical Aspects in Choosing a Helicobacter pylori Therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Javier Molina-Infante , Akiko Shiotani

      Teaser Cure rates greater than 90%-95% should be expected with an antimicrobial therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection. Standard triple therapy does not guarantee these efficacy rates in most settings worldwide anymore. The choice of eradication regimen should be dictated by factors that can predict the outcome: (1) H. pylori susceptibility; (2) patients' history of prior antibiotic therapy; and (3) local data, either resistance patterns or clinical success. Currently, the preferred first-line choices are 14-day bismuth quadruple and 14-day non-bismuth quadruple concomitant therapy. Bismuth quadruple (if not used previously), fluoroquinolone-, furazolidone- and rifabutin-containing regimens might be effective rescue treatments.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • When Is Endoscopic Follow-up Appropriate After Helicobacter pylori
           Eradication Therapy'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Ernst J. Kuipers

      Teaser The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment needs confirmation in patients with persistent symptoms and in those with complicated peptic ulcer. Endoscopic surveillance after eradication is needed in patients with advanced premalignant gastric lesions, previous early gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, and in those with a hereditary gastric cancer risk.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Rationale for a Helicobacter pylori Test and Treatment Strategy in
           Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Nimish Vakil

      Teaser Conflicting data have been published on the effect of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy on the gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori–infected subjects. In this article, the available data are reviewed and a rationale is offered for why infected patients who are about to commence long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy should be offered eradication therapy.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in the Proton Pump Inhibitor
           Era
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Xavier Calvet

      Teaser Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are a major cause of false-negative Helicobacter pylori test results. Detecting PPI use and stopping it 2 weeks before testing is the preferred approach to improve the reliability of H pylori diagnostic tests. Immunoblot and molecular methods may be useful for the detection of H pylori infection in difficult cases. When conventional tests are negative and eradication is strongly indicated, empirical H pylori treatment should be considered. In this article, an updated critical review of the usefulness of the various invasive and noninvasive tests in the context of extensive PPI use is provided.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2
      Author(s): Prasad G. Iyer , Navtej S. Buttar



      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Chemoprevention in Barrett’s Esophagus Current Status
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2
      Author(s): Muhammad H. Zeb , Anushka Baruah , Sarah K. Kossak , Navtej S. Buttar

      Teaser Chemoprevention in Barrett’s esophagus is currently applied only in research settings. Identifying pathways that can be targeted by safe, pharmaceutical or natural compounds is key to expanding the scope of chemoprevention. Defining meaningful surrogate markers of cancer progression is critical to test the efficacy of chemopreventive approaches. Combinatorial chemoprevention that targets multiple components of the same pathway or parallel pathways could reduce the risk and improve the efficacy of chemoprevention. Here we discuss the role of chemoprevention as an independent or an adjuvant management option in BE-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma.

      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Index
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Endoscopic Mucosal Resection and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for
           Endoscopic Therapy of Barrett’s Esophagus-related Neoplasia
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2
      Author(s): Shivangi Kothari , Vivek Kaul

      Teaser A major paradigm shift has occurred in the management of dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and early esophageal carcinoma. Endoscopic therapy has now emerged as the standard of care for this disease entity. Endoscopic resection techniques like endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection combined with ablation techniques help achieve long-term curative success comparable with surgical outcomes, in this subgroup of patients. This article is an in-depth review of these endoscopic resection techniques, highlighting their role and value in the overall management of BE-related dysplasia and neoplasia.

      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Ablative Endoscopic Therapies for Barrett’s-Esophagus-Related
           Neoplasia
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2
      Author(s): Shajan Peter , Klaus Mönkemüller

      Teaser Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is more common in developed countries. Endoscopic therapy is an effective treatment method in management of dysplastic BE. Ablation by thermal energy, freezing, or photochemical injury completely eradicates dysplasia and specialized intestinal metaplasia resulting in neosquamation of esophagus. Among the ablative modalities, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the most studied with safe, effective, and durable long-term outcomes. Cryotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, and photodynamic therapy can be offered in select patients when RFA is unavailable, has failed, or is contraindicated. Future research on natural disease progression, biomarkers, advanced imaging, and application of endoscopic techniques will lead to better clinical outcomes for BE-associated neoplasia.

      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Screening for Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2
      Author(s): Milli Gupta , Prasad G. Iyer

      Teaser There is substantial interest in identifying patients with premalignant conditions such as Barrett’s esophagus (BE), to improve outcomes of subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, there is limited consensus on the rationale for screening, the appropriate target population, and optimal screening modality. Recent progress in the development and validation of minimally invasive tools for BE screening has reinvigorated interest in BE screening. BE risk scores combining clinical, anthropometric, and laboratory variables are being developed that may allow more precise targeting of screening to high-risk individuals. This article reviews and summarizes data on recent progress and challenges in screening for BE.

      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
  • Epidemiology of Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Thomas M. Runge , Julian A. Abrams , Nicholas J. Shaheen

      Teaser Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a disease with increasing burden in the Western world, especially in white men. Risk factors for BE include obesity, tobacco smoking, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). EAC is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the United States. Risk factors include GERD, tobacco smoking, and obesity, whereas nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and statins may be protective. Factors predicting progression from nondysplastic BE to EAC include dysplastic changes on esophageal histology and length of the involved BE segment. Biomarkers have shown promise, but none are approved for clinical use.

      PubDate: 2015-04-12T00:10:55Z
       
  • Barrett’s Esophagus: New Insights and Progress
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Prasad G. Iyer , Navtej S. Buttar



      PubDate: 2015-04-12T00:10:55Z
       
  • Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Gary W. Falk



      PubDate: 2015-04-12T00:10:55Z
       
  • Role of Obesity in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Barrett’s
           Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Apoorva Krishna Chandar , Prasad G. Iyer

      Teaser Central obesity is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of Barrett’s esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Involved are likely both mechanical and nonmechanical effects. Mechanical effects of increased abdominal fat cause disruption of the gastroesophageal reflux barrier leading to increased reflux events. Nonmechanical effects may be mediated by inflammation, via classically activated macrophages, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and adipokines such as Leptin, all of which likely potentiate reflux-mediated inflammation. Insulin resistance, associated with central obesity, is also associated with both Barrett’s pathogenesis and progression to adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathways activated in obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance overlap with those involved in Barrett’s pathogenesis and progression.

      PubDate: 2015-04-07T14:20:51Z
       
  • Challenges with Endoscopic Therapy for Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Sachin Wani , Prateek Sharma

      Teaser Barrett’s esophagus is the only identifiable premalignant condition for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic eradication therapy (EET) has revolutionized the management of Barrett’s-related dysplasia and intramucosal cancer. The primary goal of EET is to prevent progression to invasive esophageal adenocarcinoma and ultimately improve survival rates. There are several challenges with EET that can be encountered before, during, or after the procedure that are important to understand to optimize the effectiveness and safety of EET and ultimately improve patient outcomes. This article focuses on the challenges with EET and discusses them under the categories of preprocedural, intraprocedural, and postprocedural challenges.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • The Effect of Proton Pump Inhibitors on Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Kerry B. Dunbar , Rhonda F. Souza , Stuart J. Spechler

      Teaser Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may protect against carcinogenesis in Barrett’s esophagus because they eliminate the chronic esophageal inflammation of reflux esophagitis, and because they decrease esophageal exposure to acid, which can cause cancer-promoting DNA damage and increase proliferation in Barrett’s metaplasia. Most clinical studies of PPIs and cancer development in Barrett’s esophagus have found a cancer-protective effect for these drugs, although there are some contradictory data. Chemoprevention of dysplasia and cancer in Barrett’s esophagus with PPIs appears to be cost-effective, and the indirect evidence supporting a cancer-protective role for PPIs is strong enough to warrant PPI treatment of virtually all patients with Barrett’s esophagus.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Surveillance in Barrett’s Esophagus Utility and Current
           Recommendations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Joel H. Rubenstein

      Teaser Surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus for preventing death from esophageal adenocarcinoma is attractive and widely practiced. However, empirical evidence supporting its effectiveness is weak. Longer intervals between surveillance examinations are being recommended, supported by computer simulation analyses. If surveillance is performed, an adequate number of biopsies should be performed or the effect of surveillance would be squandered.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Biomarkers in Barrett’s Esophagus Role in Diagnosis, Risk
           Stratification, and Prediction of Response to Therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Ajay Bansal , Rebecca C. Fitzgerald

      Teaser Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased dramatically in the past 3 decades, making its precursor lesion Barrett’s esophagus (BE) an important clinical problem. Effective interventions are available, but overall outcomes remain unchanged. Most of the BE population remains undiagnosed; most EACs are diagnosed late, and most BE patients will never progress to cancer. These epidemiologic factors make upper endoscopy an inefficient and ineffective strategy for BE diagnosis and risk stratification. In the current review, biomarkers for diagnosis, risk stratification, and predictors of response to therapy in BE are discussed.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Advanced Imaging in Barrett's Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): V. Raman Muthusamy , Stephen Kim , Michael B. Wallace

      Teaser Barrett's esophagus (BE) is present in up to 5.6% of the US population and is the precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Surveillance endoscopy is the primary management approach for BE. However, standard protocol biopsies have been associated with significant miss rates of dysplastic lesions in patients with BE. Thus, a variety of methods to optimize the imaging of BE have been developed to improve the efficiency and diagnostic yield of surveillance endoscopy in detecting early neoplasia. These techniques use changes that occur at macroscopic, microscopic, and subcellular levels in early neoplasia and are the focus of this article.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Cost-Analyses Studies in Barrett’s Esophagus What Is Their
           Utility'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Lauren B. Gerson

      Teaser Approximately 10% to 15% of the chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease population is at risk for the development of Barrett’s esophagus, particularly in the setting of other risk factors, including male gender, Caucasian race, age more than 50, and central obesity. The risk of cancer progression for patients with nondysplastic BE has been estimated to be approximately 0.2% to 0.5% per year. Given these low progression rates and the high cost of endoscopic surveillance, cost-effectiveness analyses in this area are useful to determine appropriate resource allocation.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Surgical Management of Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Christian G. Peyre , Thomas J. Watson

      Teaser Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus can be a management challenge for the treating physician or surgeon. The goals of therapy include relief of reflux symptoms, induction of histologic regression, and prevention of progression of intestinal metaplasia to dysplasia or invasive carcinoma. Antireflux surgery is effective at achieving these end points, although ongoing follow-up and endoscopic surveillance are essential. In cases of dysplasia or early esophageal neoplasia associated with Barrett’s esophagus, endoscopic resection and ablation have supplanted esophagectomy as the standard of care in most cases. Esophageal resection continues to have a role, however, in a minority of appropriately selected candidates.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Predictors of Progression to High-Grade Dysplasia or Adenocarcinoma in
           Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Matthew J. Whitson , Gary W. Falk

      Teaser The prevalence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing dramatically. Barrett’s esophagus remains the most well-established risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. There are multiple clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic factors that increase the risk of neoplastic progression to high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus. This article reviews both risk and protective factors for neoplastic progression in patients with Barrett’s esophagus.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Molecular Pathogenesis of Barrett Esophagus Current Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Kausilia K. Krishnadath , Kenneth K. Wang

      Teaser This article focuses on recent findings on the molecular mechanisms involved in esophageal columnar metaplasia. Signaling pathways and their downstream targets activate specific transcription factors leading to the expression of columnar and the more specific intestinal-type of genes, which gives rise to Barrett metaplasia. Several animal models have been generated to validate and study these distinct molecular pathways but also to identify the Barrett progenitor cell. Currently, the many aspects involved in the development of esophageal metaplasia that have been elucidated can serve to develop novel molecular therapies to improve treatment or prevent metaplasia. Nevertheless, several key events are still poorly understood and require further investigation.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Barrett’s Esophagus and
           Esophageal Adenocarcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Andrew M. Kaz , William M. Grady , Matthew D. Stachler , Adam J. Bass

      Teaser Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) develops from Barrett’s esophagus (BE), wherein normal squamous epithelia is replaced by specialized intestinal metaplasia in response to chronic gastroesophageal acid reflux. BE can progress to low- and high-grade dysplasia, intramucosal, and invasive carcinoma. Both BE and EAC are characterized by loss of heterozygosity, aneuploidy, specific genetic mutations, and clonal diversity. Given the limitations of histopathology, genomic and epigenomic analyses may improve the precision of risk stratification. Assays to detect molecular alterations associated with neoplastic progression could be used to improve the pathologic assessment of BE/EAC and to select high-risk patients for more intensive surveillance.

      PubDate: 2015-04-02T08:15:11Z
       
  • Gastroparesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1
      Author(s): Henry P. Parkman , Pankaj Jay Pasricha



      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Gastroparesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1
      Author(s): Gary W. Falk



      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Diabetic Gastroparesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1
      Author(s): Kenneth L. Koch , Jorge Calles-Escandón

      Teaser Gastroparesis is a complication of long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms associated with gastroparesis include early satiety, prolonged postprandial fullness, bloating, nausea and vomiting, and abdominal pain. Mortality is increased in patients with diabetic gastroparesis. A subset of patients with diabetic gastroparesis have pylorospasm that results in obstructive gastroparesis. Current treatment approaches include improving glucose control with insulin and prescribing antinauseant drugs, prokinetic agents, and gastric electric stimulation. Future directions include improved diet counseling based on gastric emptying rate, continuous insulin delivery systems with glucose sensor-augmented monitoring, and drugs for correcting gastric neural and electric abnormalities.

      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-08T14:37:02Z
       
  • Improving Our Understanding of Gastroparesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Henry P. Parkman , Pankaj Jay Pasricha



      PubDate: 2015-01-15T12:18:36Z
       
  • Pyloric Sphincter Therapy Botulinum Toxin, Stents, and Pyloromyotomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): John O. Clarke , William J. Snape

      Teaser Gastroparesis is a syndrome characterized by delayed gastric emptying with associated symptoms. Gastric emptying is a complex process and pyloric dysfunction may play a key role in select subsets of patients with gastroparesis. Diagnostic tests to measure pyloric physiology are now available and have the potential to be more widely used in clinical practice. Targeted therapies including botulinum toxin, transpyloric stent placement, surgical pyloroplasty and endoscopic pyloromyotomy have been developed. Data are emerging regarding efficacy and durability, but these therapies may play a prominent role in select patients with gastroparesis and pyloric dysfunction.

      PubDate: 2015-01-15T12:18:36Z
       
  • Clinical Presentation and Pathophysiology of Gastroparesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Linda Anh Nguyen , William Snape Jr.

      Teaser Gastroparesis is a heterogeneous disorder defined by delay in gastric emptying. Symptoms of gastroparesis are nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating, and/or abdominal pain. Normal gastric motor function and sensory function depend on a complex coordination between the enteric and central nervous system. This article discusses the pathophysiology of delayed gastric emptying and the symptoms of gastroparesis, including antropyloroduodenal dysmotility, impaired gastric accommodation, visceral hypersensitivity, and autonomic dysfunction. The underlying pathophysiology of gastroparesis is complex and multifactorial. The article discusses how a combination of these factors leads to symptoms of gastroparesis.

      PubDate: 2015-01-06T07:20:50Z
       
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Gastroparesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2014
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Linda A. Lee , Jiande Chen , Jieyun Yin

      Teaser Complementary and alternative medicine is of great interest to patients with gastrointestinal disorders and some will choose to ask their health care providers about those therapies for which some scientific evidence exists. This review focuses on those therapies most commonly used by patients, namely acupuncture/electroacupuncture and various herbal formulations that have been the focus of clinical and laboratory investigation. A discussion of their possible mechanisms of action and the results of clinical studies are summarized.

      PubDate: 2015-01-01T04:41:25Z
       
 
 
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