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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 7439 journals)
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GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (163 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 163 of 163 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acta Gastroenterologica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Akademik Gastroenteroloji Dergisi     Open Access  
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Symposium Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Gastroenterology Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Gastroenterology, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Annals of Gastroenterological Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Gastroenterology     Open Access  
Arab Journal of Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos de Gastroenterologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
BMC Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
BMJ Open Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clinics in Liver Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Colon & Rectum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
coloproctology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Colorectal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Comparative Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Bladder Dysfunction Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Colorectal Cancer Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Gastroenterology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Hepatitis Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Der Gastroenterologe     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 454)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access  
Dialysis & Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Digestion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Digestive and Liver Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Digestive Disease Interventions     Hybrid Journal  
Digestive Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Digestive Diseases and Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Digestive Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diseases of the Colon & Rectum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Diseases of the Esophagus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dysphagia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Aparato Digestivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Endoscopia     Open Access  
Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Endoscopy International Open     Open Access  
Endoskopie heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Esophagus     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Evidence-Based Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontline Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gastric Cancer     Hybrid Journal  
Gastroenterologia Kliniczna. Postępy i Standardy     Open Access  
Gastroenterología y Hepatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Gastroenterología y Hepatología (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gastroenterología y Hepatología Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gastroenterologie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 164)
Gastroenterology and Hepatology from bed to bench     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Gastroenterology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gastroenterology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gastroenterology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gastrointestinal Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Gastrointestinal Tumors     Full-text available via subscription  
GE Portuguese Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access  
Gut     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 171)
Gut Microbes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Gut Pathogens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatic Medicine: Evidence and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Hepatology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Hepatology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Hernia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
HPB: The official journal of the International Hepato Pancreato Biliary Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Inflammatory Intestinal Diseases     Full-text available via subscription  
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Celiac Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Colorectal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
Journal Africain d'Hépato-Gastroentérologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Coloproctology     Open Access  
Journal of Crohn's and Colitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Crohn's and Colitis Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Diabetes Research and Clinical Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Digestive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Obesity and Metabolic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Viral Hepatitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Kidney Disease and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kidney International Supplements     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Liver Cancer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Liver International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Liver Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Methods in Enzymology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Neurogastroenterology & Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oncology, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pancreatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Coloproctologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gastroenterología de México     Open Access  
Revista de Gastroenterología de México (English Edition)     Open Access  
Revista de Gastroenterología del Perú     Open Access  
Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas     Open Access  
Revue de Stomatologie et de Chirurgie Maxillo-faciale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Saudi Journal of Obesity     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Seminars in Liver Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
South African Gastroenterology Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Techniques in Coloproctology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Techniques in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 135)
Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
United European Gastroenterology Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Viszeralmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
World Council of Enterostomal Therapists Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
World Journal of Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Zeitschrift für Gastroenterologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)

           

Journal Cover Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
  [SJR: 1.238]   [H-I: 68]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0889-8553
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3175 journals]
  • Nutritional Management of Gastrointestinal Disease
    • Authors: Andrew Ukleja
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 47, Issue 1
      Author(s): Andrew Ukleja


      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0889-8553(17)30146-2
       
  • The Role of Diet in the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    • Authors: Rajdeep Singh; Ahmed Salem; Julie Nanavati; Gerard E. Mullin
      Pages: 107 - 137
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 47, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rajdeep Singh, Ahmed Salem, Julie Nanavati, Gerard E. Mullin
      Teaser Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifaceted illness involving maladaptive shifts in the gut microbiota that affect the enteric nervous and immune systems, mucosal barrier function, the balance of neurotransmitters and hormones, and emotional well-being. There is abundant evidence indicating that certain foods elicit symptoms in IBS. Numerous elimination-type diets have been shown to alleviate symptoms. However, among these, the most controversial is a group of foods called fructo, oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This paper reviews the role of diet and systematically analyze the literature for the role of FODMAPs in IBS.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.10.003
       
  • The Need to Reassess Dietary Fiber Requirements in Healthy and Critically
           Ill Patients
    • Authors: Stephen J.D. O’Keefe
      Pages: 219 - 229
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 47, Issue 1
      Author(s): Stephen J.D. O’Keefe
      Teaser This article provides evidence that current dietary fiber intake levels may be insufficient to maintain colonic mucosal health and defense, and reduce inflammation and cancer risk in otherwise healthy people. Current commercial tube feeds generally overlook the metabolic needs of the colon and may predispose patients to dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth with pathogens such as Clostridium difficile, and acute colitis. These results raise concern about the wide-scale use of prophylactic antibiotics in the intensive care unit and the use of elemental, fiber-depleted tube feeds. Nutrition support is not complete without the addition of sufficient fiber to meet colonic nutritional needs.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.10.005
       
  • Adult Intestinal Transplantation
    • Authors: Cal S. Matsumoto; Sukanya Subramanian; Thomas M. Fishbein
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Cal S. Matsumoto, Sukanya Subramanian, Thomas M. Fishbein
      Teaser Adult intestinal transplantation differs significantly from pediatric intestinal transplantation. While indications have remained largely consistent since 2000, indications for adults have expanded over the last two decades to include motility disorders and desmoid tumors. Graft type in adult recipients depends on the distinct anatomic characteristics of the adult recipient. Colonic inclusion, while initially speculated to portend unfavorable outcomes due to complex host-bacterial interactions has increased over the past two decades with superior graft survival and improved patient quality of life. Overall, outcomes have steadily improved. For adult intestinal transplant candidates, intestinal transplantation remains a mainstay therapy for complicated intestinal failure and is a promising option for other life threatening and debilitating conditions.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.011
       
  • Pediatric Intestinal Transplantation
    • Authors: Neslihan Celik; George V. Mazariegos; Kyle Soltys; Jeffrey A. Rudolph; Yanjun Shi; Geoffrey J. Bond; Rakesh Sindhi; Armando Ganoza
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Neslihan Celik, George V. Mazariegos, Kyle Soltys, Jeffrey A. Rudolph, Yanjun Shi, Geoffrey J. Bond, Rakesh Sindhi, Armando Ganoza
      Teaser Pediatric intestinal transplantation has moved from the theoretic to an actual therapy for children with irreversible intestinal failure who are suffering from complications of total parenteral nutrition. Owing to significant advancement in the management of intestinal failure and prevention of parenteral nutrition-related complications that have led to reduction in incidence of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and have improved intestinal adaptation, the indications for intestinal transplantation are evolving. Long-term outcomes have improved, but challenges in long-term graft function owing to chronic rejection and immunosuppressant-related complications remain the major opportunities for improvement.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.007
       
  • Intestinal Failure and Rehabilitation
    • Authors: Alan L. Buchman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Alan L. Buchman
      Teaser The rendering of proper care for the patient with intestinal failure requires the provider to have a functional understanding of digestion and absorption, nutrient requirements, and intestinal adaptation. Inherent in those concepts is that not only is nutritional absorption compromised, but medication absorption is as well. The principles of the management of home parenteral nutrition must be mastered and then proper and controlled weaning of parenteral nutrition may be commenced by use of dietary and pharmacologic means with appropriate clinical outcome measures followed. This complicated management requires a team experienced in both medical and surgical management of intestinal failure.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.006
       
  • Modern Management of Acute Liver Failure
    • Authors: Ruben Khan; Sean Koppe
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Ruben Khan, Sean Koppe
      Teaser Acute liver failure is a rare but life-threatening disease that can lead to progressive encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, and multiorgan failure. In the developed world, the most common cause remains acetaminophen overdose, but there are still many cases in which there is acute liver failure of unknown etiology. The mainstay of acute liver failure management remains supportive care in the critical care setting. If supportive treatment does not stabilize the disease process, the patient may require emergent liver transplantation. This article summarizes the current management of acute liver failure.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.005
       
  • Living Donor Intestinal Transplantation
    • Authors: Ivo Tzvetanov; Kiara Tulla; Giuseppe D’Amico; Enrico Benedetti
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Ivo Tzvetanov, Kiara Tulla, Giuseppe D’Amico, Enrico Benedetti
      Teaser Living donor intestinal transplantation (LDIT) has been improved leading to results comparable to those obtained with deceased donors. LDIT should be limited to specific indications and patient selection. The best indication is combined living donor intestinal/liver transplantation in pediatric recipients with intestinal and hepatic failure; the virtual elimination of waiting time may avoid the high mortality experienced by candidates on the deceased waiting list. Potentially, LDIT could be used in highly sensitized recipients to allow the application of de-sensitization protocols. In the case of available identical twins or HLA-identical sibling, LDIT has a significant immunologic advantage and should be offered.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.008
       
  • Robotic Pancreas Transplantation
    • Authors: Mario Spaggiari; Ivo G. Tzvetanov; Caterina Di Bella; Jose Oberholzer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Mario Spaggiari, Ivo G. Tzvetanov, Caterina Di Bella, Jose Oberholzer
      Teaser Obesity is considered a relative contraindication to pancreas transplantation due to an overall increased risk in wound-related complications and surgical site infections. The rationale for performing pancreas transplantation in a minimally invasive fashion is to reduce these risks, which can be associated with inferior patient and graft survival following pancreas transplantation in morbidly obese patients. At the University of Illinois at Chicago, the initial series of robotic-assisted pancreas transplantation in obese patient with type 1 and 2 diabetes has been performed. In this article, surgical technique and world experience in robotic pancreas transplantation are described.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.010
       
  • Gastrointestinal Transplantation
    • Authors: Enrico Benedetti; Ivo G. Tzvetanov
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Enrico Benedetti, Ivo G. Tzvetanov


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T08:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2018.01.014
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 47, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:34:54Z
       
  • Nutritional Management of Gastrointestinal Diseases
    • Authors: Andrew Ukleja
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Andrew Ukleja


      PubDate: 2018-01-04T22:52:24Z
       
  • Nutrition and Disease
    • Authors: Alan Buchman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Alan L. Buchman


      PubDate: 2018-01-04T22:52:24Z
       
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Ali Keshavarzian; Ece A. Mutlu
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ali Keshavarzian, Ece A. Mutlu


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0889-8553(17)30126-7
       
  • Complementary and Alternative Treatments Are Needed to Enhance the Care of
           the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient
    • Authors: Ali Keshavarzian; Ece A. Mutlu
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ali Keshavarzian, Ece A. Mutlu


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.09.001
       
  • Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Inflammatory Bowel
           Disease Around the World
    • Authors: Petros Zezos; Geoffrey C. Nguyen
      Pages: 679 - 688
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Petros Zezos, Geoffrey C. Nguyen
      Teaser Use of complementary sand alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CAM can be broadly categorized as whole medical systems, mind-body interventions, biologically based therapies, manipulative and body-based methods, and energy therapies. Most do not use it to treat IBD specifically, and most take it as an adjunct to conventional therapy not in place of it. However, patients are frequently uncomfortable initiating a discussion of CAM with their physicians, which may impact adherence to conventional therapy. A greater emphasis on CAM in medical education may facilitate patient-physician discussions regarding CAM.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.001
       
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine Strategies for Therapeutic Gut
           Microbiota Modulation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and their
           Next-Generation Approaches
    • Authors: Abigail R. Basson; Minh Lam; Fabio Cominelli
      Pages: 689 - 729
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Abigail R. Basson, Minh Lam, Fabio Cominelli
      Teaser The human gut microbiome exerts a major impact on human health and disease, and therapeutic gut microbiota modulation is now a well-advocated strategy in the management of many diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Scientific and clinical evidence in support of complementary and alternative medicine, in targeting intestinal dysbiosis among patients with IBD, or other disorders, has increased dramatically over the past years. Delivery of “artificial” stool replacements for fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) could provide an effective, safer alternative to that of human donor stool. Nevertheless, optimum timing of FMT administration in IBD remains unexplored, and future investigations are essential.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.002
       
  • Dietary Therapies in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Erin R. Lane; Dale Lee; David L. Suskind
      Pages: 731 - 744
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Erin R. Lane, Dale Lee, David L. Suskind
      Teaser Nutrition has long been recognized as a critical component in the treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Formerly, nutritional interventions have focused on targeting improved weight gain and linear growth, as well as correction of micronutrient deficiencies. Recently, there has been growing interest and study of dietary interventions for induction and maintenance of remission. In addition to exclusive enteral nutrition, successes have been achieved with specific exclusion diets. This article evaluates current literature regarding the role of diet and nutrition in pathogenesis of disease, as well as the role of diet as primary therapy for pediatric IBD.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.012
       
  • Diet as a Therapeutic Option for Adult Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Samir Kakodkar; Ece A. Mutlu
      Pages: 745 - 767
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Samir Kakodkar, Ece A. Mutlu
      Teaser There are many mechanisms to explain how food may drive and ameliorate inflammation. Although there are no consistent macronutrient associations inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development, many exclusion diets have been described: IgG-4 guided exclusion diet; semivegetarian diet; low-fat, fiber-limited exclusion diet; Paleolithic diet; Maker’s diet; vegan diet; Life without Bread diet; exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) and the low FODMAP diet. The literature on diet and IBD is reviewed with a particular focus on EEN, SCD, and low FODMAP diets. Lessons learned from the existing observations and strengths and shortcomings of existing data are presented.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.016
       
  • Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Bincy P. Abraham; Eamonn M.M. Quigley
      Pages: 769 - 782
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Bincy P. Abraham, Eamonn M.M. Quigley
      Teaser Evidence indicates that the gut microbiota and/or interactions between the microbiota and the host immune system are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Strategies that target the microbiota have emerged as potential therapies and, of these, probiotics have gained the greatest attention. Data derived from animal models of IBD have revealed the potential of several bacterial strains to modify the natural history of IBD. However, there has been little indication that probiotics exert any benefit in Crohn disease. More targeted approaches involving live bacteria, genetically modified bacteria, and bacterial products are now being evaluated.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.003
       
  • Prebiotics and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Heather E. Rasmussen; Bruce R. Hamaker
      Pages: 783 - 795
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Heather E. Rasmussen, Bruce R. Hamaker
      Teaser Dietary fiber, specifically prebiotics, is the primary source of energy for the gut microbiota and thus has the potential to beneficially modify microbiota composition. Prebiotics have been used in both in vitro studies and with animal models of colitis with largely positive results. Human studies are few and have been conducted with only a few select prebiotics, primarily fructan-containing fibers. Although disease activity and inflammatory markers have improved, more needs to be learned about the specific prebiotic compounds and how they can be used to best improve the gut microbiota to counter changes induced by inflammatory bowel disease.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.004
       
  • Vitamins and Minerals in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Fayez K. Ghishan; Pawel R. Kiela
      Pages: 797 - 808
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Fayez K. Ghishan, Pawel R. Kiela
      Teaser Indiscriminate multivitamin and mineral supplementation is seen as useless and sometimes harmful, and patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) must be monitored for nutritional and metabolic losses. Mechanistic links between vitamin and mineral deficiencies and IBD has been found for some nutrients; normalizing their systemic level is beneficial. Others, like vitamin A, although instinctively desirable, had disappointing results. Restoring normal levels of selected vitamins and minerals requires elevated doses to compensate for defects in absorptive mechanisms or signaling pathways. This article describes some aspects of vitamin and mineral deficiencies in IBD and summarizes results of supplementation.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.011
       
  • Herbs and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Gregory M. Sebepos-Rogers; David S. Rampton
      Pages: 809 - 824
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Gregory M. Sebepos-Rogers, David S. Rampton
      Teaser Although herbal preparations are widely used by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), evidence for their efficacy is limited and they may not always be safe. Mainly small studies of varying quality have suggested that several herbal preparations could be of benefit in IBD, but larger better-designed trials are needed to establish their place in inducing and maintaining remission. Patients and health care workers need to be made more aware of the limitations and risks of using herbal products for IBD.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.009
       
  • Fecal Transplant in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Alexander S. Browne; Colleen R. Kelly
      Pages: 825 - 837
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Alexander S. Browne, Colleen R. Kelly
      Teaser Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have differences in their gastrointestinal microbiome compared with healthy individuals, although it is unclear whether this is a cause or consequence of chronic inflammation. There is hope that manipulation of the gut microbiome through fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), commonly used to treat patients with Clostridium difficile infection, may also be an effective therapy in IBD. This article reviews the evidence supporting FMT in IBD, including case reports, case series, and randomized controlled trials. The article also focuses on questions of safety and speculates on the future of this therapy.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.005
       
  • The Brain-Gut Axis and Stress in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Charles N. Bernstein
      Pages: 839 - 846
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Charles N. Bernstein
      Teaser The brain-gut axis serves as a circuit that incorporates the human experience, the state of mind, the gut microbiome, and the immune response that ultimately drives the phenotypic expression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There are several biological pathways through which stress can play a deleterious role, including through increasing intestinal permeability, which can facilitate intestinal translocation of bacteria. Stress has an impact on symptoms in IBD; however, there is limited evidence that stress triggers increased intestinal inflammation. Although attention to stress and psychiatric comorbidity is important in the management of IBD, there are few clinical trials to direct management.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.006
       
  • Psychological Considerations and Interventions in Inflammatory Bowel
           Disease Patient Care
    • Authors: Tiffany H. Taft; Sarah Ballou; Alyse Bedell; Devin Lincenberg
      Pages: 847 - 858
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Tiffany H. Taft, Sarah Ballou, Alyse Bedell, Devin Lincenberg
      Teaser The presence of psychological comorbidities, specifically anxiety and depression, is well documented in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The drivers of these conditions typically reflect 4 areas of concern: disease impact, treatment concerns, intimacy, and stigma. Various demographic and disease characteristics increase risk for psychological distress. However, the risk for anxiety and depression is consistent throughout IBD course and is independent of disease activity. Early intervention before psychological distress becomes uncontrolled is ideal, but mental health often is unaddressed during patient visits. Understanding available psychological treatments and establishing referral resources is an important part of the evolution of IBD patient care.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.007
       
  • Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Megan M. Hood; Sharon Jedel
      Pages: 859 - 874
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Megan M. Hood, Sharon Jedel
      Teaser Mindfulness-based interventions may be beneficial psychosocial treatments for improving the health and well-being of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. This article reviews eight studies, assessing seven psychosocial interventions, which include mindfulness and/or meditation components. Strongest effects of the interventions were found in quality of life and anxiety/depression, with inconsistent or minimal changes in other psychosocial areas, such as perceived stress and in disease-related outcomes and other physiologic functioning. Mindfulness interventions for patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be a supplemental treatment option to improve quality of life and distress in this population, although results are preliminary and interventions require additional testing.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.008
       
  • Massage Acupuncture, Moxibustion, and Other Forms of Complementary and
           Alternative Medicine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Daniel J. Stein
      Pages: 875 - 880
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Daniel J. Stein
      Teaser Complementary and alternative medicine is frequently used by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients; most common are massage, acupuncture, and moxibustion therapy. Massage therapy is poorly studied in IBD patients; therefore, its benefits remain unknown. Acupuncture and moxibustion therapy have been shown to improve inflammation and symptoms in animal and human studies. However, current clinical trials of acupuncture and moxibustion are of insufficient quality to recommend them as alternative therapy. Nonetheless, because these therapies seem generally to be safe, they may have a role as complementary to conventional therapy.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T06:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.015
       
  • Sleep and Circadian Hygiene and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Garth R. Swanson; Helen J. Burgess
      Pages: 881 - 893
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Garth R. Swanson, Helen J. Burgess
      Teaser There is increasing evidence that sleep and circadian disruption can worsen the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Sleep and circadian disruption are prevalent in society and are associated with worse outcomes in IBD. Emerging research suggests sleep and circadian disruption can impact key components in IBD disease flares, including intestinal permeability, translocation of bacterial endotoxins, intestinal dysbiosis, and proinflammatory cytokines. Much of this research has been conducted in animal models. There is a clear need for large randomized controlled trials in human patients with IBD, where the potential for chronotherapeutic strategies to improve disease course can be tested.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.014
       
  • Exercise and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Jana G. Hashash; David G. Binion
      Pages: 895 - 905
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4
      Author(s): Jana G. Hashash, David G. Binion
      Teaser There is sparse information regarding exercise and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, the importance of regular exercise in the optimal management of IBD has not received attention in guidelines and is often overlooked by practitioners. This article summarizes evidence regarding health benefits of exercise, guidelines regarding exercise in the general population and chronic inflammatory disorder populations, limitations regarding exercise capacity in patients with IBD, the association of lack of exercise with IBD pathogenesis, the role of exercise in beneficially modulating IBD clinical course, and extraintestinal benefits of exercise in patients with IBD.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.gtc.2017.08.010
       
  • Malnutrition in Gastrointestinal Disorders
    • Authors: Lori Jane Curtis; Paule Bernier; Khursheed Jeejeebhoy; Johane Allard; Donald Duerksen; Leah Gramlich; Manon Laporte; Heather H. Keller
      Pages: 1391 - 1396
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Khursheed N. Jeejeebhoy, Donald R. Duerksen
      Teaser All patients with significant gastrointestinal disease should be clinically assessed for protein calorie malnutrition by using the Subjective Global Assessment. Blood tests for anemia, electrolytes, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, ferritin, vitamin B12, and folate should be considered for assessment of major micronutrients. Where malabsorption or inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed, bone mineral density using dual beam x-ray absorptiometry, 25-OH vitamin D levels, and measurement of other vitamins and trace elements should be considered. In addition, in at-risk patients, vitamin and trace element clinical deficiency syndromes should be considered during patient assessment.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.clnu.2016.09.009
       
  • Parenteral Nutrition
    • Authors: Brian Lappas; Dhyanesh Patel Vanessa Kumpf Dawn Wiese Adams Douglas
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Brian M. Lappas, Dhyanesh Patel, Vanessa Kumpf, Dawn Wiese Adams, Douglas L. Seidner
      Teaser Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy in patients with intestinal failure who are unable to tolerate enteral feedings. Patient selection should be based on a thorough assessment to identify those at high nutrition risk based on both disease severity and nutritional status. This article reviews both the acute and chronic indications for PN as well as special formulation consideration in specific disease states, vascular access, and complications of both short-term and long-term PN.

      PubDate: 2017-12-24T18:47:14Z
       
  • Enteral Access and Associated Complications
    • Authors: Mark DeLegge
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Mark H. DeLegge
      Teaser Enteral access is the foundation for feeding in patients unable to meet their nutrition needs orally and have a functional gastrointestinal tract. Enteral feeding requires placement of a feeding tube. Tubes can be placed through an orifice or percutaneously into the stomach or proximal small intestine at the bedside or in specialized areas of the hospital. Bedside tubes can be placed by the nurse or the physician, such as in the intensive care unit. Percutaneous feeding tubes are placed by the gastroenterologist, surgeon, or radiologist. This article reviews the types of enteral access and the associated complications.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis
    • Authors: Enrique Mary; Phillips
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): J. Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, Mary Phillips
      Teaser Malnutrition is a frequent complication in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Maldigestion as a consequence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is the major cause of malnutrition in these patients. Together with that, toxic habits and alterations of the gastroduodenal transit may play a relevant role. Malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis is associated with osteoporosis, sarcopenia, poor quality of life, and increased mortality. An adequate nutritional evaluation including anthropometric, biochemical, and morphologic parameters is recommended in these patients. Nutritional advice and support together with an adequate pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy are indicated.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers
    • Authors: Ronaldo Sousa Oliveira Filho; Priscila Casarin Garla; Raquel Susana Torrinhas; Ricardo Alexandre Garib; Alweyd Tesser; Felipe Garcia Gutierres Aprobato; Erika Midori Tamanaha; Marcia de Souza Antunes; Dan Linetzky Waitzberg
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Priscila Garla, Dan Linetzky Waitzberg, Alweyd Tesser
      Teaser Malnutrition is the most frequent nutritional disorder in patients with gastrointestinal cancer and is associated with cachexia syndrome, worsening of prognosis, and shortened survival rate. Early nutrition screening, assessment, and intervention are able to favorably modify the clinical evolution of affected patients. The adequate provision of nutritional requirements has been associated with improvement of immunologic status, and avoidance of further complications related to poor nutritional status, surgical treatment, and anticancer therapy. In malnourished patients, the supplementation of perioperative immunonutrition might contribute to fewer infectious and noninfectious complications, shorter length of hospitalization, and improved wound healing.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2017.11.021
       
  • Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth
    • Authors: Abimbola Adike; John DiBaise
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Abimbola Adike, John K. DiBaise
      Teaser Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by the presence of excessive bacteria in the small intestine, is typically described as a malabsorptive syndrome occurring in the context of gut stasis syndromes. SIBO is now considered to be a disorder associated with diverse clinical conditions without classic risk factors for SIBO and a cause of several nonspecific gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal symptoms. Because there is currently no gold standard for diagnosing SIBO, its prevalence and role in the pathogenesis of other diseases remain uncertain; as does optimal treatment of patients with relapsing symptoms.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Consideration in Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten
           Sensitivity
    • Authors: Rishi Naik; Douglas Seidner Dawn Adams
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Rishi D. Naik, Douglas L. Seidner, Dawn W. Adams
      Teaser Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder due to the inflammatory response to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It causes an enteropathy associated with several nutritional complications. Strict compliance to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the current primary therapy. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a condition in which gluten ingestion leads to systemic symptoms but is not associated with small bowel atrophy or abnormal celiac serologies. A GFD heals celiac disease enteropathy and improves symptoms in NCGS. However, a long-term GFD can be associated with nutritional deficiencies and requires monitoring and guidance.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Interventions in the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Authors: Berkeley Limketkai; Andrea Wolf Joanna Maryam Tajamal Alyssa Parian
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Berkeley N. Limketkai, Andrea Wolf, Joanna Ye, Maryam Tajamal, Alyssa M. Parian
      Teaser Nutritional strategies have been explored as primary or adjunct therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Exclusive enteral nutrition is effective for the induction of remission in Crohn disease and is recommended as a first-line therapy for children. Dietary strategies focus on adjusting the ratio of consumed nutrients that are proinflammatory or antiinflammatory. Treatments with dietary supplements focus on the antiinflammatory effects of the individual supplements (eg, curcumin, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D) or their positive effects on the intestinal microbiome (eg, prebiotics, probiotics). This article discusses the role of diets and dietary supplements in the treatment of IBD.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • The Role of Prebiotics and Probiotics in Gastrointestinal Disease
    • Authors: Martin Floch
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Martin H. Floch
      Teaser With the advent of the scientific realization that the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract was more than the cells that exist in the body, the full importance of prebiotics and probiotics has come forth. The importance has been stressed and is available in the new textbook entitled, “The Microbiota in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology: Implication for Human Health, Prebiotics, Probiotics and Dysbiosis.” There is enough evidence now published in the literature so that the scientific world now believes that prebiotics and probiotics are important in gastrointestinal disease.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Considerations in Liver Disease
    • Authors: Asim Shuja; Miguel Malespin James Scolapio
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Asim Shuja, Miguel Malespin, James Scolapio
      Teaser Malnutrition occurs in most patients with advanced liver diseases and is associated with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. In this article, the authors discuss the pathophysiology of malnutrition and methods to optimize nutrition status in liver disease and include a brief section on perioperative and postoperative nutrition.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Therapy in Adult Short Bowel Syndrome Patients with Chronic
           Intestinal Failure
    • Authors: Palle Bekker; Jeppesen Kristian Asp Fuglsang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Palle Bekker Jeppesen, Kristian Asp Fuglsang
      Teaser Intestinal failure (IF) is the reduction of gut function below the minimum necessary for the absorption of macronutrients and/or water and electrolytes, such that parenteral support (PS) is required to maintain health and/or growth. This article critically revises the gaps in and evidence for providing general nutritional therapy recommendations in the Short Bowel Syndrome-IF population. It addresses the need for an individualized approach, aiming to reduce or even eliminate the need for PS, and emphasizes a need to focus on effects of dietary interventions on the quality of life of these patients.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Aspects of Acute Pancreatitis
    • Authors: Kristen Roberts; Marcia Nahikian-Nelms Andrew Ukleja Luis Lara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Kristen M. Roberts, Marcia Nahikian-Nelms, Andrew Ukleja, Luis F. Lara
      Teaser The goal of nutritional support in acute pancreatitis is to reduce inflammation, prevent nutritional depletion, correct a negative nitrogen balance, and improve outcomes. Enteral nutrition (EN) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) should be preferred to parenteral nutrition. It maintains the integrity of the gut barrier, decreases intestinal permeability, downregulates the systemic inflammatory response, maintains intestinal microbiota equilibrium, and reduces the complications of the early phase of SAP, improving morbidity and possibly improving mortality, and it is less expensive. Further studies to understand optimal timing of nutrition, route of delivery of EN, and the type of nutrition and nutrients are necessary.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Nutritional Interventions in Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction
    • Authors: Donald Kirby; Sulieman Abdal Raheem Mandy Corrigan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Donald F. Kirby, Sulieman Abdal Raheem, Mandy L. Corrigan
      Teaser Although chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare disorder, it presents a wide spectrum of severity that ranges from abdominal bloating to severe gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the worst cases, patients may become dependent upon artificial nutrition via parenteral nutrition or choose to have an intestinal transplant. However, whatever the severity, a patient’s quality of life can be seriously compromised. This article defines the disorder and discusses the spectrum of disease and challenges to providing adequate nutrition to help improve a patient’s quality of life.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:36:56Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 46, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T08:17:31Z
       
 
 
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