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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6820 journals)
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GASTROENTEROLOGY (148 journals)                  1 2     

Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Gastroenterologica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Hepatology     Open Access  
AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Symposium Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Gastroenterology Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Gastroenterology, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Arab Journal of Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arquivos de Gastroenterologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access  
Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
BMC Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
BMJ Open Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access  
Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinics in Liver Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Colon & Rectum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
coloproctology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Colorectal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Colorectal Cancer Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Current Gastroenterology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hepatitis Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Der Gastroenterologe     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 255)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access  
Digestion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Digestive and Liver Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Digestive Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Digestive Diseases and Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Digestive Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Diseases of the Colon & Rectum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Diseases of the Esophagus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dysphagia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endoscopy International Open     Open Access  
Endoskopie heute     Hybrid Journal  
Esophagus     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Evidence-Based Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Frontline Gastroenterology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Gastric Cancer     Hybrid Journal  
Gastroenterología y Hepatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Gastroenterología y Hepatología Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Gastroenterologie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 109)
Gastroenterology and Hepatology from bed to bench     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gastroenterology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Gastroenterology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gastroenterology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gastrointestinal Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Gastrointestinal Intervention     Full-text available via subscription  
GE-Portuguese Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access  
Gut     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 136)
Gut Microbes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gut Pathogens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hepatic Medicine: Evidence and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hepatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Hepatology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
HPB: The official journal of the International Hepato Pancreato Biliary Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Celiac Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Colorectal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
Journal Africain d'Hépato-Gastroentérologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)

        1 2     

Journal Cover Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
  [SJR: 1.142]   [H-I: 62]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0889-8553
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2801 journals]
  • Index
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2016-01-18T09:46:06Z
       
  • Index
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-01-18T09:46:06Z
       
  • Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2016
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Gyanprakash A. Ketwaroo, Koenraad J. Mortele, Mandeep S. Sawhney

      Teaser The incidence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is rising, in part from detection through the increasing use of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging techniques. Initial diagnosis is generally based on imaging characteristics identified on computed tomography and/or MRI. Endoscopic ultrasound provides further imaging characterization and also enables fluid aspiration and analysis to additionally aid differentiation. The general approach to these lesions includes surgical intervention and/or surveillance imaging. Taking into account diverse presentations, varying malignant potential, and the uncertain natural history of some of these lesions, an evidence-based approach is limited. This article discusses recent updates in the diagnosis and management of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

      PubDate: 2016-01-13T08:33:04Z
       
  • Islet Cell Tumors of the Pancreas
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2016
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Sunil Amin, Michelle Kang Kim

      Teaser Islet cell tumors of the pancreas, also known as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, constitute less than 5% of pancreatic tumors, and 7% of all neuroendocrine tumors. Most are non-functional, and patients often present with metastatic disease. Functional tumors present with distinct clinical syndromes. Accurate staging is critical as surgery is both the cornerstone of treatment, and the only hope for cure. Medical management involves treating the manifestations of hormonal excess, and using somatastatin analogues when appropriate. Systemic chemotherapy, targeted molecular therapy, and peptide receptor radiotherapy may be used for refractory disease in lieu of or as an adjunct to surgery.

      PubDate: 2016-01-13T08:33:04Z
       
  • Advances in Management of Pancreatic Diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2016
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Nuzhat A. Ahmad



      PubDate: 2016-01-13T08:33:04Z
       
  • Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2016
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Robert R. Redfield, Michael R. Rickels, Ali Naji, Jon S. Odorico

      Teaser The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

      PubDate: 2016-01-13T08:33:04Z
       
  • Screening for Pancreatic Cancer in High-risk Populations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2016
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Shilpa Grover, Kunal Jajoo

      Teaser Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death. Few patients are candidates for curative resection due to the late stage at diagnosis. While most pancreatic adenocarcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% have an underlying hereditary basis. Known genetic syndromes account for only 20% of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer cases. The majority are due to non-syndromic aggregation of pancreatic cancer cases or familial pancreatic cancer. Screening aims to identify high-risk lesions amenable to surgical resection. However, the optimal interval for screening and the management of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions detected on imaging are controversial.

      PubDate: 2016-01-13T08:33:04Z
       
  • Pancreatic Pseudocysts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2016
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Phillip S. Ge, Mikhayla Weizmann, Rabindra R. Watson

      Teaser Endoscopic drainage is the first-line therapy in the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Before endoscopic drainage, clinicians should exclude the presence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and avoid drainage of immature peripancreatic fluid collections or pseudoaneurysms. The indication for endoscopic drainage is not dependent on absolute cyst size alone, but on the presence of attributable signs or symptoms. Endoscopic management should be performed as part of a multidisciplinary approach in close cooperation with surgeons and interventional radiologists. Drainage may be performed either via a transpapillary approach or a transmural approach; additionally, endoscopic necrosectomy may be performed for patients with walled-off necrosis.

      PubDate: 2016-01-13T08:33:04Z
       
  • Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Nigeen H. Janisch, Timothy B. Gardner

      Teaser This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease.

      PubDate: 2015-12-20T11:58:36Z
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus: The Next Epidemic
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4
      Author(s): K. Rajender Reddy



      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Hepatitis C: Unfolding the Challenges
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4
      Author(s): K. Rajender Reddy



      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4
      Author(s): Norah J. Shire, Kenneth E. Sherman

      Teaser The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in the United States and other parts of the world. The epidemiology of the disease is highly variable between and within countries, and strategies to deal with HCV identification and treatment must be tailored to the geographic location and the political and economic environment of the region. Although great strides have been made in improving HCV transmission risk in blood supply products, new challenges related to changing patterns of disease incidence continue to require fresh evaluation and new approaches to disease prevention.

      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4
      Author(s): Tarik Asselah, Marc Bourlière

      Teaser Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease, with more than 170 million infected individuals worldwide. Genotype 4 is the most frequent cause of chronic hepatitis C in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. It has recently spread to southern Europe. The introduction of all-oral, interferon-free regimens that combine direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has significantly advanced HCV treatment. High efficacy rates, short treatment duration, and favorable adverse event profiles have been demonstrated with multiple regimens, both with and without ribavirin. This review discusses management of patients with HCV genotype 4 chronic hepatitis, in the era of DAAs.

      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Copyright-Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-11-21T21:34:10Z
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Gary W. Falk



      PubDate: 2015-10-04T05:08:52Z
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Georg Dultz, Stefan Zeuzem

      Teaser Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health burden in Europe, being one of the leading causes of chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Properties of the HCV disease burden are heterogeneous across the European continent, with differences in incidence, prevalence, diagnosis and treatment rates, transmission routes, and genotype distribution. Recent estimates expect an increase in HCV-related morbidity and mortality in most European countries until 2030 even when current treatment options are taken into account. The European perspective on hepatitis C virus infection is summarized herein.

      PubDate: 2015-10-04T05:08:52Z
       
  • Hepatitis C, an Eastern Perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Yock Young Dan, Seng Gee Lim

      Teaser HCV in the East is a complex scenario with prevalence rates of 0.5% to as high as 4.7%, and variable distributions of genotypes, with a dominance of genotype 1b in East Asia, genotype 3 in South Asia and South East Asia, and genotype 6 in Indochina. Approvals for the new oral directing antiviral agents (DAAs), in the East have been very slow, but ultimately will be achieved by 2019, consequently, pegylated interferon and ribavirin are still widely used. Nonetheless the main issues are the problems of screening and linkage to management, and the considerable barriers to access HCV care.

      PubDate: 2015-09-17T23:35:22Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Copyright Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Helicobacter pylori
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3
      Author(s): Gary W. Falk



      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Natural History of Hepatitis C
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Shilpa Lingala, Marc G. Ghany

      Teaser Hepatitis C infection is a common cause of cirrhosis and indication for liver transplantation in the United States. The incidence of chronic hepatitis C has been declining, but rates of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are projected to increase. The outcome of chronic hepatitis C is variable. It is estimated that 20% to 25% will develop cirrhosis over a 25-year to 30-year period. The rate of disease progression is influenced by many host, viral, and environmental factors. Few can be modified.

      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Management of Helicobacter pylori–Related Diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 3
      Author(s): Akiko Shiotani, David Y. Graham



      PubDate: 2015-08-27T17:19:47Z
       
  • Immunopathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): David E. Kaplan

      Teaser Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus infection remains a major global health issue with 3 to 4 million incident cases and 170 million prevalent chronic infections. Complex, partially understood, host-virus interactions determine whether an acute infection with hepatitis C resolves, as occurs in approximately 30% of cases, or generates a persistent hepatic infection, as occurs in the remainder. Once chronic infection is established, the velocity of hepatocyte injury and resultant fibrosis is significantly modulated by immunologic as well as environmental factors. Immunomodulation has been the backbone of antiviral therapy despite poor understanding of its mechanism of action.

      PubDate: 2015-08-15T13:46:05Z
       
  • Hepatitis C
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Christine K. Lee, Maureen M. Jonas

      Teaser Hepatitis C infection is a global health problem. Most infected children have not been identified. Perinatal transmission is the most common mode of acquisition. Liver disease owing to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection progresses slowly in individuals infected early in life. Serious complications rarely affect patients during childhood. Successful treatment of HCV in adults has improved and recommendations have changed. Treatment in children should be deferred until direct-acting antivirals and interferon-free regimens are available to this population. If treatment cannot be deferred, regimens including peginterferon and ribavirin can be given to children with compensated liver disease.

      PubDate: 2015-08-15T13:46:05Z
       
  • Impact of Hepatitis C Virus Infection on Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Danielle M. Tholey, Joseph Ahn

      Teaser Hepatitis C virus (HCV)–associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence in the United States is increasing, partly because of risk factors such as diabetes, fatty liver, hepatitis B virus, and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection. Achieving sustained virologic response (SVR) is the most significant factor in reducing HCV-associated HCC incidence. Improved SVR with the next generation of direct-acting antivirals brings hope for decreased HCC mortality. Nevertheless, surveillance for HCC remains important because HCC can still occur despite SVR, especially in cirrhotics. Individualized risk stratification through increased understanding of HCC pathogenesis and improved surveillance holds the promise for future reduction of HCC incidence.

      PubDate: 2015-08-15T13:46:05Z
       
  • Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Mauro Viganò, Massimo Colombo

      Teaser Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and is also responsible for extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) involving the skin, kidneys, salivary glands, eyes, thyroid, and immune system. Mixed cryoglobulinemia is the prototype EHM related to HCV infection. Although these HCV-related EHMs may contribute to significant rates of morbidity affecting patient's quality of life and survival, most of these complications can reverse after HCV eradication by interferon therapy. This notwithstanding, individual patients may have an irreversible injury in various organs that is not reversed by a cure of the HCV infection.

      PubDate: 2015-08-15T13:46:05Z
       
  • Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C in Special Populations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Chalermrat Bunchorntavakul, Tawesak Tanwandee

      Teaser The management of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in special populations is challenging. The efficacy and safety data of the currently approved all-oral direct-acting antiviral combinations, including sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, daclatasvir, paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir (3D), and ribavirin, is compelling for use in special HCV populations, as has recently been recommended by expert guidelines. The treatment regimens and sustained virological response rates for special populations are nearly similar to those of the general HCV population. Sofosbuvir is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment, and simeprevir and 3D regimen are not recommended for those with decompensated liver disease.

      PubDate: 2015-08-11T13:05:35Z
       
  • Current Treatment Options in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 6
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Nghia H. Nguyen, Mindie H. Nguyen

      Teaser Approximately 3% of the world’s population is chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In some southeast Asian countries the prevalence of HCV (∼6%–7%) far exceeds that seen in the United States (1.8%). The lesser known HCV genotype 6 (HCV-6) is also common in patients from southeast Asia and the surrounding regions. Most data on direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to date have been derived from clinical trials conducted in Western countries, where HCV-6 is rare. The standard of care for patients with HCV-6 is still pegylated interferon and ribavirin. However, data are emerging for several DAA combinations.

      PubDate: 2015-08-11T13:05:35Z
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Javier Ampuero, Manuel Romero-Gómez

      Teaser Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 2 and 3 have previously been classified as easy-to-treat genotypes, because sustained virologic responses (SVRs) up to 80% have been achieved with 24-week peginterferon and ribavirin. More detailed studies have shown differences between HCV genotypes 2 and 3, indicating that genotype 3 has become the most difficult-to-treat genotype. With new drugs, new challenges are emerging regarding relapse rates, the role of ribavirin, and optimal duration of therapy. Sofosbuvir remains the backbone of genotype 3 therapy, whereas this drug is not an option in patients with creatinine clearance lower than 30 mL/min.

      PubDate: 2015-08-11T13:05:35Z
       
  • Current and Evolving Treatments of Genotype 1 Hepatitis C Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Saleh Alqahtani, Mark Sulkowski

      Teaser Development of antiviral agents that target the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved the success and tolerability of treatment, especially for patients with HCV genotype 1 infection. The new treatment options mean that clinicians are better able to prevent complications from chronic HCV infection. The field of direct-acting antiviral therapies for HCV infection continues to advance at a rapid pace, and many more potential treatment regimens are being investigated. This article presents a summary of the current treatments available for patients infected with HCV genotype 1 and looks ahead to those that may play a role in the future.

      PubDate: 2015-08-11T13:05:35Z
       
  • Is There a Role for Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori Therapy'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Maria P. Dore, Elisabetta Goni, Francesco Di Mario

      Teaser The role of probiotics in Helicobacter pylori therapy remains unclear. Lactobacilli can be shown to inhibit H pylori in vitro. Some strains of Lactobacilli may exert specific antimicrobial effects. There is no strong evidence of a benefit on eradication rate when probiotics are added to a regimen. Despite promising results obtained using compounds of L reuteri and S boulardii, high-quality trials are needed to define the role of probiotics as adjuvant therapy. Variables that remain to be studied with L reuteri, currently the most promising strain, include dosage, frequency of administration, administration in relation to meals, and duration of therapy.

      PubDate: 2015-07-26T07:14:56Z
       
  • Helicobacter pylori: New Thoughts and Practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Akiko Shiotani, David Y. Graham



      PubDate: 2015-07-26T07:14:56Z
       
  • Molecular Approaches to Identify Helicobacter pylori Antimicrobial
           Resistance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Francis Mégraud, Lucie Bénéjat, Esther Nina Ontsira Ngoyi, Philippe Lehours

      Teaser Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is needed to adapt Helicobacter pylori treatment to obtain the best results. Beside the standard phenotypic methods, molecular methods are increasingly used. The value of these molecular tests is that they are quick, independent of the transport conditions, easy to standardize, and commercial kits are available. In this article, these methods are reviewed, focusing on the determination of H pylori resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones, and mentioning also the methods used for tetracycline and rifampin.

      PubDate: 2015-07-26T07:14:56Z
       
  • Helicobacter pylori Eradication to Eliminate Gastric Cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Masahiro Asaka, Katsuhiro Mabe, Rumiko Matsushima, Momoko Tsuda

      Teaser Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for chronic gastritis achieved world-first coverage by the Japanese national health insurance scheme in 2013, making a dramatic decrease of gastric cancer–related deaths more realistic. Combining H pylori eradication therapy with endoscopic surveillance can prevent the development of gastric cancer. Even if it develops, most patients are likely to be diagnosed at an early stage, possibly resulting in fewer gastric cancer deaths. Success with the elimination of gastric cancer in Japan could lead other countries with a high incidence to consider a similar strategy, suggesting the potential for elimination of gastric cancer around the world.

      PubDate: 2015-07-17T23:54:51Z
       
  • Molecular Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Takahiro Shimizu , Hiroyuki Marusawa , Norihiko Watanabe , Tsutomu Chiba

      Teaser Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in gastric carcinogenesis. H pylori exerts oncogenic effects on gastric mucosa through complex interaction between bacterial virulence factors and host inflammatory responses. On the other hand, gastric cancer develops via stepwise accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Recent comprehensive analyses of gastric cancer genomes indicate a multistep process of genetic alterations as well as possible molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Both genetic processes of gastric cancer development and molecular oncogenic pathways related to H pylori infection are important to completely understand the pathogenesis of H pylori-related gastric cancer.

      PubDate: 2015-07-09T08:12:45Z
       
  • Current Status and Prospects for a Helicobacter pylori Vaccine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Thomas G. Blanchard , Steven J. Czinn

      Teaser Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to a variety of gastric diseases. H pylori-associated gastric cancer is diagnosed in advanced stages, and a vaccine against H pylori is desirable in parts of the world where gastric cancer remains a common form of cancer. Some of the strategies of vaccine development used in animals have been tested in several phase 3 clinical trials; these trials have been largely unsuccessful, although H pylori-specific immune responses have been induced. New insights into promoting immunity and overcoming the immunosuppressive nature of H pylori infection are required to improve the efficacy of an H pylori vaccine.

      PubDate: 2015-07-09T08:12:45Z
       
  • Gastric Cancer Risk in Patients with Helicobacter pylori Infection and
           Following Its Eradication
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 July 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Massimo Rugge

      Teaser As Helicobacter pylori is a first-class carcinogen, eradication of the infection would be expected to be a beneficial measure for the (primary) prevention of gastric cancer. Given the natural history of gastric cancer, it is plausible that eradication before gastric atrophy sets in offers the best chance for cancer risk reduction. The beneficial effects of eradication may, nevertheless, still be achievable in more advanced disease. The reversibility of inflammatory lesions has been supported by undeniable evidence; the regression of mucosal atrophy/metaplasia has also been confirmed by several recent histologic studies.

      PubDate: 2015-07-09T08:12:45Z
       
  • Treatment Strategy for Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Shotaro Nakamura , Takayuki Matsumoto

      Teaser Recent trends and current knowledge on the diagnosis and treatment strategy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma are reviewed. Helicobacter pylori infection plays the causative role in the pathogenesis, and H pylori eradication is the first-line treatment of this disease, which leads to complete remission in 60% to 90% of cases. A Japanese multicenter study confirmed that the long-term outcome of gastric MALT lymphoma after H pylori eradication is excellent. Treatment strategies for patients not responding to H pylori eradication including “watch and wait” strategy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, rituximab immunotherapy, and combination of these should be tailored in consideration of the disease extent in each patient.

      PubDate: 2015-06-26T05:10:47Z
       
  • How to Effectively Use Bismuth Quadruple Therapy The Good, the Bad, and
           the Ugly
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): David Y. Graham , Sun-Young Lee

      Teaser Bismuth triple therapy was the first effective Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. The addition of a proton pump inhibitor helped overcome metronidazole resistance. Its primary indication is penicillin allergy or when clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance are both common. Resistance to the primary first-line therapy have centered on complexity and difficulties with compliance. Understanding regional differences in effectiveness remains unexplained because of the lack of studies including susceptibility testing and adherence data. We discuss regimen variations including substitutions of doxycycline, amoxicillin, and twice a day therapy and provide suggestions regarding what is needed to rationally and effectively use bismuth quadruple therapy.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Screening to Identify and Eradicate Helicobacter pylori Infection in
           Teenagers in Japan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Taiji Akamatsu , Takuma Okamura , Yugo Iwaya , Tomoaki Suga

      Teaser The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence and effect of Helicobacter pylori infection in Japanese teenagers. The study subjects were students ages 16 to 17 from one high school studied between 2007 and 2013. Students who tested positive on this screening examination underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and biopsy samples to determine their H pylori status using culture and histology. Cure of H pylori infections was determined by urea breath test. The low rate of prevalence of H pylori infection in present Japanese teenagers makes it possible and cost effective to perform examinations and carry out treatment of this infection in nationwide health screenings of high school students.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Practical Aspects in Choosing a Helicobacter pylori Therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Javier Molina-Infante , Akiko Shiotani

      Teaser Cure rates greater than 90%-95% should be expected with an antimicrobial therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection. Standard triple therapy does not guarantee these efficacy rates in most settings worldwide anymore. The choice of eradication regimen should be dictated by factors that can predict the outcome: (1) H. pylori susceptibility; (2) patients' history of prior antibiotic therapy; and (3) local data, either resistance patterns or clinical success. Currently, the preferred first-line choices are 14-day bismuth quadruple and 14-day non-bismuth quadruple concomitant therapy. Bismuth quadruple (if not used previously), fluoroquinolone-, furazolidone- and rifabutin-containing regimens might be effective rescue treatments.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • When Is Endoscopic Follow-up Appropriate After Helicobacter pylori
           Eradication Therapy'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Ernst J. Kuipers

      Teaser The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment needs confirmation in patients with persistent symptoms and in those with complicated peptic ulcer. Endoscopic surveillance after eradication is needed in patients with advanced premalignant gastric lesions, previous early gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, and in those with a hereditary gastric cancer risk.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Rationale for a Helicobacter pylori Test and Treatment Strategy in
           Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Nimish Vakil

      Teaser Conflicting data have been published on the effect of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy on the gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori–infected subjects. In this article, the available data are reviewed and a rationale is offered for why infected patients who are about to commence long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy should be offered eradication therapy.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in the Proton Pump Inhibitor
           Era
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
      Author(s): Xavier Calvet

      Teaser Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are a major cause of false-negative Helicobacter pylori test results. Detecting PPI use and stopping it 2 weeks before testing is the preferred approach to improve the reliability of H pylori diagnostic tests. Immunoblot and molecular methods may be useful for the detection of H pylori infection in difficult cases. When conventional tests are negative and eradication is strongly indicated, empirical H pylori treatment should be considered. In this article, an updated critical review of the usefulness of the various invasive and noninvasive tests in the context of extensive PPI use is provided.

      PubDate: 2015-06-21T03:05:03Z
       
  • Barrett’s Esophagus
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2015
      Source:Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Volume 44, Issue 2
      Author(s): Prasad G. Iyer , Navtej S. Buttar



      PubDate: 2015-05-26T16:19:25Z
       
 
 
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