Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8697 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (220 journals)
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ANAESTHESIOLOGY (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 121 of 121 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ain-Shams Journal of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ain-Shams Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambulatory Anesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 242)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 72)
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Anaesthesia Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Anaesthesia, Pain & Intensive Care     Open Access  
Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Anestesia Analgesia Reanimación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anestesia en México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesia & Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 276)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anesthesia Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 233)
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
BDJ Team     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Anaesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BJA : British Journal of Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 245)
BJA Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
BMC Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (Edicion en espanol)     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Pain (BrJP)     Open Access  
British Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology : Revista Colombiana de Anestesiología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Anaesthesia & Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Current Anesthesiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Current Pain and Headache Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Der Anaesthesist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Der Schmerz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Der Schmerzpatient     Hybrid Journal  
Douleur et Analgésie     Hybrid Journal  
Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
EMC - Anestesia-Reanimación     Hybrid Journal  
EMC - Anestesia-Rianimazione     Hybrid Journal  
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
European Journal of Anaesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
European Journal of Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
European Journal of Pain Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Headache The Journal of Head and Face Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Indian Journal of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Anesthesiology Clinics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Clinical Anesthesia and Research     Open Access  
Itch & Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
JA Clinical Reports     Open Access  
Journal Club Schmerzmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Anesthesia & Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Anesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Anesthesia History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Anesthesiology and Clinical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cellular and Molecular Anesthesia     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Anesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Headache and Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Obstetric Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Pain Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Palliative Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Society of Anesthesiologists of Nepal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Bangladesh Society of Anaesthesiologists     Open Access  
Jurnal Anestesi Perioperatif     Open Access  
Jurnal Anestesiologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Karnataka Anaesthesia Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Le Praticien en Anesthésie Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Local and Regional Anesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Medical Gas Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medycyna Paliatywna w Praktyce     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
OA Anaesthetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Anesthesia Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Pain Clinic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Pain Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Pain Research and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Pain Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pain Studies and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chilena de Anestesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Anestesiología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Anestesiología y Reanimación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista da Sociedade Portuguesa de Anestesiologia     Open Access  
Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Romanian Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Scandinavian Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sri Lankan Journal of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Survey of Anesthesiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Techniques in Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Topics in Pain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2348-0548 - ISSN (Online) 2348-926X
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [242 journals]
  • Contributing Reviewers in 2019
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 7: i-i
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1679101



      Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. A-12, Second Floor, Sector -2, NOIDA -201301, India

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 7: i-i2020-03-27T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 01 (2020)
       
  • Artificial Intelligence in Neurointensive Care Unit: A Cautious Leap into
           Future
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 7: 01-02
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701955



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 7: 01-022020-03-25T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 01 (2020)
       
  • Artificial Intelligence in Neuroanesthesiology and Neurocritical Care

    • Authors: Rajagopalan; Vanitha, Kulkarni, Dilip K.
      Pages: 11 - 18
      Abstract: Artificial intelligence (AI) already influences almost every sector of our daily life, including the rapidly evolving technologies and datasets of healthcare delivery. The applications in medicine have significantly evolved over the past few decades and have shown promising results. Despite constant efforts to incorporate AI into the field of anesthesiology since its inception, it is still not commonplace. Neuroanesthesiology and neurocritical care is a discipline of medicine that deals with patients having disorders of the nervous system comprising a complex combination of both medical and surgical disease conditions. AI can be used for better monitoring, treatment, and outcome prediction, thereby reducing healthcare costs, minimizing delays in patient management, and avoiding medical errors. In this review, we have discussed the applications of AI and its potential in aiding the clinician’s judgment in several aspects of neuroanesthesiology and neurocritical care, some of the barriers to its implementation, and the future trends in improving education in this field, all of which will require further work to understand its exact scope.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 7: 11-18
      PubDate: 2020-03-25T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701954
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 01 (2020)
       
  • Patient Positioning during Neurosurgery: A Relevant Skill for
           Neuroanesthesiologist in a Multidisciplinary Team Work
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 049-051
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712082



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 049-0512020-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 07, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • Advancing Neuroanesthesia and Neurocritical Care during the COVID-19
           
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 052-053
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713018



      Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. A-12, Second Floor, Sector -2, NOIDA -201301, India

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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 052-0532020-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 07, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • Clinical Management of Critical COVID-19 Patients: Insights from the
           Literature and “On the Field” Experience

    • Authors: Alessandri; Francesco, Bilotta, Federico, Ceccarelli, Giancarlo, Ruberto, Franco, Araimo, Fabio, Imperiale, Carmela, Pugliese, Francesco
      Pages: 054 - 061
      Abstract: The recent outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a health emergency all over the world. Several health care professionals are currently putting their best efforts to deal with this situation. The aim of this review is to report insights from the literature and “on the field” experience in clinical management of critical COVID-19 patients. Respiratory support varies from high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) to noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation, often associated with nitric oxide, prone position, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Experienced specialists have to manage the airways minimizing any contamination and virus spread. The hemodynamic management of critical COVID-19 patients requires not only an accurate fluid strategy, but also an appropriate use of vasopressors and inotropes. Various adjuvant treatments have been proposed: antiviral drugs, immunomodulators, anticoagulants, antibiotics, and nutrition.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 054-061
      PubDate: 2020-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713016
      Issue No: Vol. 07, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • Spectrum of Neurologic Complications in COVID-19: An Evidence-Based Review

    • Authors: Sarkar; Soumya, Khanna, Puneet, Dube, Surya K.
      Pages: 062 - 066
      Abstract: The world is facing an unprecedented crisis due to the pandemic of current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Coronavirus (CoVs) infections not only are always involving the respiratory tract but also possess significant neuroinvasive potential. The literature regarding neuropathogenic potential of human CoVs is sparse. Thus, the number of COVID-19–related neurologic complications is likely to be underestimated. Awareness regarding the possible spectrum of neurologic complications is essential for therapeutic decision-making and individualized treatment and thereby limiting the COVID-19–related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to address the neurologic manifestations of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2).
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 062-066
      PubDate: 2020-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713017
      Issue No: Vol. 07, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19 and Neurosurgery: Time for Triage
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 067-069
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712816



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care 2020; 07: 067-0692020-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 07, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • Sedation and Anesthesia for Magnetic Resonance Imaging during the COVID-19
           Pandemic: Perspective
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1718972



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-10-25T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Using Smartphone Application to Guide the Angulation of Head End of
           Patient Bed
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1717831



      Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. A-12, Second Floor, Sector -2, NOIDA -201301, India

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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-10-16T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Conduct of Neuroanesthesiology and Neurocritical Care Final Examination
           during COVID-19: Challenges and Experience!
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1717832



      Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. A-12, Second Floor, Sector -2, NOIDA -201301, India

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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-10-16T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Convalescent Plasma Therapy for COVID-19: Current Status and Future
           Directions

    • Authors: Seshan; Jayanth, Dube, Surya K., Rajagopalan, Vanitha, Panda, Pragyan S., Rath, Girija P.
      Abstract: The ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has triggered a global health crisis probably due to a lack of a reliable cure till date. Several clinical trials are ongoing, but initial results have not been overly promising. Convalescent plasma (CP), which refers to plasma collected from individuals recovered from an illness and developed antibodies against the pathogen, is also being proposed as a therapeutic option for COVID-19 treatment in severe cases to achieve short-term immunity against the virus. Use of CP is not new, and it has been used in various outbreaks over the past century, ranging from the Spanish influenza outbreak in 1918 to the recent Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). However, data available on its use in COVID-19 patients is limited. Use of CP so far is restricted to a “rescue therapy” and needs further trials to assess its possible use in other situations (prevention, postexposure prophylaxis) and patient populations (considering age and comorbid illnesses). In this review, we will try to summarize the current status of use of CP for COVID-19 and ongoing trials in India and elsewhere and will discuss the possible avenues for its use in future.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-10-16T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1716594
       
  • Safe Operation Theatre and Intensive Care Unit during COVID-19 Pandemic:
           An Innovative Way to Widen the Safety Net
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1716427



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-09-22T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Acute Sialadenitis and Threatened Airway following Posterior Fossa Surgery
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1716424



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-09-17T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Comparison of Dexmedetomidine Infusion versus Scalp Block with 0.5%
           Ropivacaine to Attenuate Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Insertion in
           Craniotomy: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial

    • Authors: Singh, Georgene, Arimanikam, Ganesamoorthi, Lionel, Karen R., V; Smita, Yadav, Bijesh, Arulvelan, Appavoo, Sethuraman, Manikandan
      Abstract: Background The insertion of the skull pin head holder to stabilize the head during neurosurgery causes significant periosteal stimulation, resulting in hemodynamic responses, which may lead to brain edema, intracranial hypertension, and hemorrhage in patients with intracranial space-occupying lesions and intracranial aneurysms. We compared the efficacy of dexmedetomidine infusion and 0.5% ropivacaine scalp block in attenuating the hemodynamic response to the skull pin application.Methods A total of 65 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I and II patients aged between 18 and 65 years with a preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 undergoing elective craniotomy were randomized to receive either a bolus of 1mcg/kg of dexmedetomidine followed by an infusion of 1 mcg/kg/hour (group D) or a scalp block with 0.5% ropivacaine (group S) in a single-blinded comparator study. Patients were monitored for the following hemodynamic changes following skull pin insertion: heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), the requirement of additional analgesia/anesthesia, and adverse events.Results HR and MAP were comparable between the groups at baseline, before induction, and before pin insertion. HR and MAP at 1, 2, and 3 minutes after skull pin insertion were significantly higher in group D as compared with group S (p < 0.05) and were comparable between the groups at 5 minutes. The groups were comparable with respect to the requirement of additional analgesia, anesthesia, and incidence of adverse events.Conclusion Scalp block with 0.5% ropivacaine is effective and superior to dexmedetomidine in attenuating the hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion in ASA I and II neurosurgical patients undergoing craniotomy. However, the hemodynamic effects achieved with dexmedetomidine were within the permissible limits.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715710
       
  • COVID-19 Pandemic and Electroconvulsive Therapy
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714916



      Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. A-12, Second Floor, Sector -2, NOIDA -201301, India

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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-09-07T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • An Indigenous Cost Effective Design for Aerosol Prevention during Airway
           Manipulation
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715920



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-09-07T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Prone Positioning Methods on
           Blood Loss and Intra-Abdominal Pressure in Obese Patients Undergoing
           Spinal Surgery

    • Authors: Kundra; Sandeep, Bansal, Hanish, Gupta, Vishnu, Gupta, Rekha, Kaushal, Sandeep, Grewal, Anju, Chaudhary, Ashwani K.
      Abstract: Background Improper prone positioning of obese patients for spine surgery can increase the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), resulting in increased bleeding from epidural venous plexus. The choice of prone positioning frame can be an important determinant of the IAP.Materials and Methods This prospective, randomized study was performed on obese patients (body mass index ≥ 30) scheduled for lumbar laminectomy. After administration of general anesthesia, patients were positioned prone either on Wilson’s frame (group W), or on horizontal bolsters (group H). IAP was recorded at three intervals: (1) in supine position, (2) 10 minutes after prone positioning, and (3) in prone position at the end of surgery. Intraoperative blood loss was measured quantitatively and assessed subjectively by the surgeon.Results A total of 60 patients were enrolled with 30 patients in each group. IAP in supine position was similar in both groups. However, IAP 10 minutes after prone positioning was significantly higher at 11.44 ± 1.61 mm Hg in group W as compared to 9.56 ± 1.92 mm Hg in group H (p = 0.001). Similarly, IAP of 12.24 ± 1.45 mm Hg in group W, measured on completion of surgery was significantly higher than 9.96 ± 2.35 mm Hg in group H (p = 0.001). Mean total blood loss of 440.40 ± 176.98 mL in group W was significantly higher than 317.20 ± 91.04 mL in group H (p = 0.003).Conclusion Obese patients positioned prone on Wilson’s frame had significantly higher IAP and blood loss compared to patients positioned on horizontal bolsters.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-09-07T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715709
       
  • Tracheostomy during COVID-19 Pandemic: Viewpoint
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1716428



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-09-02T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Perioperative Challenges during Emergency Spine Surgery in a Patient with
           Right Atrial Thrombus
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715921



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-09-02T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Dry Spinal Tap
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715358



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-08-26T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Management of a Difficult Airway Scenario in a Case of Hurler’s Syndrome
           with a D-Blade Video Laryngoscope

    • Authors: Thakkar; Keta D., Hrishi, Ajay P., Sethuraman, Manikandan, Vimala, Smita
      Abstract: Hurler’s syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. It is associated with progressive craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiac involvement, which increases the risk of anesthesia. Patients with Hurler’s syndrome could present as the worst airway management problem an anesthesiologist could deal with due to abnormal upper airway anatomy and limited neck manipulation, owing to the atlantoaxial instability. We report a case of difficult airway scenario of a child with Hurler’s syndrome, leading to an apparent cannot ventilate cannot intubate scenario, which was managed successfully with the help of a C-MAC video laryngoscope with unique D-blade. In Hurler’s syndrome, C-MAC with D-blade is an excellent tool in establishing an airway in a pediatric difficult airway scenario. Moreover, D-blade C-MAC could be considered as the primary tool for establishing an airway in pediatric patients with Hurler’s syndrome.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-08-10T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714451
       
  • Modified Prone Positioning during Neurosurgery: Sphinx and Concorde
           Positions Revisited
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715356



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-08-10T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Usefulness of Twitter for the Neurointensivist in the Coronavirus Disease
           2019 Outbreak: The Role of Social Media Platforms in Uncertain Times
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714450



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-08-05T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Transoral Neurosurgery during Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714927



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-08-05T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Postoperative Neurological Complications after a Cranial Surgery: A
           Multicentre Prospective Observational Study

    • Authors: Venkatapura; Ramesh J., Dubey, Surya K., Panda, Nidhi, Chakrabarti, Dhritiman, Venkataramaiah, Sudhir, Rath, Girija P., Kaloria, Narender, Sharma, Deepak, Ganne, Umamaheswara Rao S.
      Abstract: Background  Cranial surgery is associated with multiple postoperative complications varying from simple nausea and vomiting to devastating complications such as stroke and death. This multicentre collaborative effort was envisioned to collect observational data regarding postoperative complications in cranial surgeries among the Indian population. The aim of this study was to describe the postoperative neurological complications occurring within the first 24 hours after surgery and to identify the predictive factors.Methods Data was collected from three participating tertiary care academic institutions. The study was prospective, observational, multicentre design with data collected over a period of two months or 100 cases, whichever is earlier, from each participating institute. A predesigned Microsoft excel sheet was distributed among all three centers to maintain uniformity. All patients aged 18 years and above of both sexes undergoing elective or emergency craniotomies were included in the study. The postoperative neurological complications (within 24 hours) assessed were: (1) Neurological deficit (ND) defined as new focal neurological motor deficit relative to preoperative status. (2) Sensorium deterioration (SD) defined as reduction in Glasgow coma score (GCS) by 2 or more points compared with preoperative GCS. (4) Postoperative seizures (SZs) defined as any seizure activity. All possible variables associated with the above neurological complications were tested using Chi-square/Fisher exact test or Mann–Whitney U test. The predictors, which were statistically significant at p < 0.2, were entered into a multiple logistic regression model. Alpha error of 5% was taken as significant.Results Data from three institutions was collected with a total of 279 cases. In total, there were 53 (19%) neurological complications. There were 28 patients with new postoperative NDs (10.04%), 24 patients had SD (8.6%), and 17 patients had seizures (6.1%). Neurological deficits were significantly less in institution 2. Diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) was associated with very low risk of ND, and vascular pathology was associated with higher chance of a ND. The duration of anesthesia was found to be significantly predictive of SD (OR/CI = 1.01 / 1–1.02). None of the factors were predictive of PS.Conclusion The incidences of postoperative ND, SD and postoperative seizures were 10%, 8.6%, and 6.1%, respectively. Studies with a much larger sample size are required for a better and detailed analysis of these complications.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-08-05T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715355
       
  • The Neurocritical Care Society of India (NCSI) and the Indian Society of
           Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care (ISNACC) Joint Position Statement
           and Advisory on the Practice of Neurocritical Care during the COVID-19
           Pandemic

    • Authors: Vanamoorthy; Ponniah, Singh, Gyaninder P., Bidkar, Prasanna U., Mitra, Ranadhir, Sriganesh, Kamath, Chavali, Siddharth, Muthuchellapan, Radhakrishnan, Keshavan, Venkatesh H., Anand, Saurabh, Goyal, Keshav, Yadav, Rahul, Rath, Girija P., Srivastava, Shashi
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly spread across the world including India. Management of patients complicated with neurological illness requiring neurocritical care is challenging during this time. Patients with neurological disease may develop COVID-19 infection or there could be independent neurological manifestations of COVID-19. Critically ill neurological patients are more vulnerable to contracting SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, neurological patients with comorbidities and multisystem involvement are at increased risk of adverse outcomes. Though SARS-CoV-2 predominantly affects the pulmonary system, it can complicate the assessment and management of neurological patients. With increasing COVID-19 numbers, the hospitalizations of both non-COVID and COVID-19 neurological patients will bring significant strain on the hospital and neurocritical care facilities. Streamlining work pattern, understanding the pathophysiology of COVID-19 and its impact on neurological function, establishing general and specific neurocritical care management strategies, ensuring protection and well-being of health care providers, and implementing effective infection control policies are key elements of efficient neurocritical care management during this pandemic. This joint position statement and advisory on the practice of neurocritical care during the COVID-19 pandemic by the Neurocritical Care Society of India and the Indian Society of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care has been developed to guide clinicians providing care to the critically ill neurological patients in the neurocritical care unit during the current pandemic. As the situation from this novel disease is rapidly evolving, readers must constantly update themselves with newly emerging evidence to provide the best possible care to the critically ill neurological patients.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-07-13T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714648
       
  • Transfer of Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients in Low-Resource Setting
           Hospitals: Are We Doing It Right'
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714184



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-07-06T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Indian Society of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care (ISNACC) Position
           Statement and Advisory for the Practice of Neuroanesthesia during COVID-19
           Pandemic Endorsed by Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists (ISA)

    • Authors: Jangra; Kiran, Manohar, Nitin, Bidkar, Prasanna U., Vanamoorthy, Ponniah, Gupta, Devendra, Rath, Girija P., Monteiro, Joseph, Panda, Nidhi, Sriganesh, Kamath, Hrishi, Ajay P., Das, Bhibukalyani, Yadav, Rahul
      Abstract: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a major health emergency in today’s time. In December 2019, a cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan, China was attributed to a novel coronavirus. The World Health Organization declared it as a pandemic. As the majority of the cases suffering from COVID-19 are mildly symptomatic or asymptomatic, it becomes a great challenge to identify the infected persons in the absence of extensive testing. In the hospital environment, it can infect several other vulnerable patients and healthcare providers, significantly impacting the hospital services. Anesthesiologists are at an increased risk of COVID-19 transmission from the patients, as they are frequently involved in several aerosol-generating procedures. It is not possible to identify asymptomatic COVID-19 patients solely based on history-taking during their first point of contact with the anesthesiologists at the preanesthetic checkup clinic.Most of the neurosurgical conditions are of urgent in nature and cannot be postponed for a longer duration. In view of this, the position statement and practice advisory from the Indian Society of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care (ISNACC) provides guidance to the practice of neuroanesthesia in the present scenario. The advisory has been prepared considering the current disease status of the COVID-19 pandemic, available literature, and consensus from experts in the field of neuroanesthesiology. Since the pandemic is still progressing and the nature of the disease is dynamic, readers are advised to constantly look for updated literature from ISNACC and other neurology and neurosurgical societies.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-07-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1714186
       
  • Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Prone Position: An Anesthetic Challenge

    • Authors: Hooda; Bhavna, Sud, Saurabh, Dwivedi, Deepak, Yadav, Sanjay K.
      Abstract: The anesthetic management of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) for noncardiac surgery is challenging due to associated congestive heart failure, malignant dysrhythmias, sudden cardiac arrest, implanted rhythm devices, and thromboembolism. We report successful conduct of a case of DCM on cardiac resynchronization device with Cauda equina syndrome (CES) under general anesthesia in prone position. The anesthetic concerns specific to the pathophysiology of DCM are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713726
       
  • Intraoperative Lumbar Drain Placement in Endoscopic Neurosurgical
           Procedures: Technical Challenges and Complications—A Prospective
           Observational Study

    • Authors: Koshy; Mridul S., Singh, Georgene, Yadav, Bijesh, Mariappan, Ramamani, Pappachan, Liby G.
      Abstract: Background Perioperative placement of lumbar drain (LD) is being increasingly preferred in the endoscopic base of skull procedures to provide optimal surgical conditions. This study aims to determine the incidence of technical difficulties and complications associated with LD placement.Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients undergoing transnasal transsphenoidal surgery were included in the study after obtaining written informed consent. Intraoperatively, LD was placed using an 18-gauge epidural catheter. Technical difficulties in LD placement were assessed by the number of attempts, levels attempted, difficulty in siting catheter, and obtaining free flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The incidence of complications such as postdural puncture headache (PDPH), meningitis headache, and backache was studied.Results Successful LD placement in the first attempt was obtained in 36% of the patients. Technical difficulties were encountered in 64% of the patients. Despite successful LD placement in 90% of the patients, 32% required manipulations to increase CSF flow. The drain failure rate was 10%. Drainage of>20 to 30 mL of CSF/hour was significantly associated with better surgical conditions (p < 0.05). The incidence of headache was 56% and that of backache was 26%. Headache was significantly related to difficulty in tapping CSF (p = 0.032), and backache was significantly related to the number of attempts (p < 0.001), levels attempted (p = 0.001), and large CSF volume (p = 0.004). There were no incidences of PDPH or meningitis in our series.Conclusion We conclude that the incidence of technical difficulties in LD placement with epidural catheters is high. Use of standard well-functioning LD catheters will assist in improving surgical conditions.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713560
       
  • Unsuspected Paraganglioma—Infratemporal Fossa

    • Authors: Sultana J; Nikhat, Gurrala, Shekhar R., Kommula, Lakshman K., Boola, Gnana R.
      Abstract: Paraganglioma of the infratemporal fossa is exceedingly rare, with no more than a handful of documented cases. Undiagnosed paraganglioma poses a great challenge. We present a 39-year-old hypertensive female, who presented with giddiness and headache for 3 months and four episodes of syncope over 3 months. CT and MRI revealed an enhancing infratemporal region space-occupying mass close proximity to petrous carotid artery. Intraoperatively, the patient had hemodynamic instability (tachycardia and hypertension) when the mass was surgically manipulated. Diagnosis of paraganglioma was suspected, based on hemodynamic instability, which was later confirmed by histopathology. Undiagnosed paraganglioma pose a great challenge to the anesthetic management. Low-threshold of suspicion has to be there to avoid significant morbidity and mortality.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712853
       
  • Selfie Mode: Handy and Practical Tool to Prevent Horseshoe Headrest
           Induced Ocular Injury in Prone Position
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712910



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-06-12T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Inherited Factor XII Deficiency—What Is the Real Concern for
           Neuroanesthesiologist: Bleeding or Clotting

    • Authors: Sundaram; Mouleeswaran, Bansal, Sonia, Surve, Rohini M.
      Abstract: Factor XII deficiency is a rare disorder that can complicate the perioperative management of a patient. Factor XII plays an important role in the activation of intrinsic pathway of coagulation; the deficiency, therefore, results in prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). This aPTT prolongation is expected to cause increased bleeding during surgery. However, on the contrary, in vivo isolated factor XII deficiency is associated with increased risk of thromboembolism (this risk being higher than the risk of bleeding). We report the perioperative management of a patient with factor XII deficiency who underwent cervical vertebral fusion (C1–C2) for atlantoaxial dislocation.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713559
       
  • Bougie through Murphy’s Eye During Airway Exchange: A Near Miss

    • Authors: Sameera; Vattipalli, Biswas, Konish, Rath, Girija P.
      Abstract: Endotracheal tube (ETT) exchange is a common procedure performed in the operating room and intensive care unit for the purpose of changing damaged or soiled ETT with appropriate one. The exchange procedure is performed over an airway exchange catheter or ETT introducer (bougie). We report an event during ETT exchange over bougie wherein the introducer exited through Murphy’s eye. Here, we intend to re-emphasize the safety concerns pertaining to the use of bougie (with coude tip) as airway exchange conduit and enumerate the precautions to be taken during tube exchange.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-07T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710702
       
  • Snippets on Disinfection of Anesthesia Equipment during COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713558



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-06-07T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Intraoperative Awakening from Endotracheal General Anesthesia for Brain
           Mapping with Tracheal Tube In Situ

    • Authors: Bithal; Parmod K., Abdalla, Shahenda S., Jan, Ravees, Ward, Vandan D.
      Abstract: Awake craniotomy (AC) is indicated to excise a lesion close to an eloquent area of the brain. Success of this procedure depends upon the patient’s active participation during the awake phase of the surgery, especially for brain mapping. Occasionally, a patient may refuse to remain awake during the surgical procedure and demand general anesthesia (GA). A 27-year-old male with uncontrolled seizures from recurrent brain tumor near motor area refused to consent for AC citing his past unpleasant experience; so, the decision to administer GA was taken. To avoid straining/coughing on tracheal tube, his airway was anesthetized with transtracheal xylocaine, bilateral superior laryngeal nerve block, and inflation of tracheal tube cuff with xylocaine. GA was maintained with sevoflurane, infusion of fentanyl, and rocuronium. To awaken him, anesthetics were discontinued and rocuronium antagonized with sugammadex. Intravenous lignocaine and midazolam were administered to supress cough reflex and produce amnesia, respectively. He tolerated the entire duration of 30 minutes of brain mapping with electrocorticography and neurological testing comfortably. Upon completion of brain mapping, GA was reintroduced and the lesion excised. The surgical outcome was good with no neurological deficit. When interviewed postoperatively, the patient had no recall of the awake phase.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710409
       
  • Perioperative Coagulopathy in Patients with Normal Preoperative
           Coagulation Screen: A Couple of Coagulopathic Clinical Case Conundrums

    • Authors: Monteiro; Joseph N., Goraksha, Shwetal, Dhokte, Ninad S., Padate, Balkrishna
      Abstract: Perioperative coagulopathy impacts patient outcome by influencing intraoperative hemodynamics and blood loss. We present two cases which despite having normal preoperative coagulation profiles and normotension during the surgery had intraoperative coagulopathy and unusual bleeding. These cases required a multidisciplinary approach to manage them successfully. A thorough knowledge of the coagulation cascade along with a high-degree of suspicion and early recognition of coagulation is required. Abnormalities are critical for a timely intervention. Point-of-care tests like thromboelastography (TEG) as well as platelet function studies helped us arrive at an early diagnosis and initiate prompt treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712855
       
  • Endovascular Coiling in a Patient with Chronic Kidney Disease—A
           Challenge for Anesthesiologist

    • Authors: Samagh; Navneh, Singh, Nidhi, Jangra, Kiran, Kumar, Ajay
      Abstract: A 41-year-old male patient, a known case of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPCKD), presented to our institute with right middle cerebral artery aneurysm for which balloon-assisted endovascular coiling was planned. The major comorbidities were hypertension and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis, twice weekly. Endovascular coiling was performed under general anesthesia, and special precautions were taken with regard to monitoring, fluid management, use of heparin, and contrast agent. The intraoperative and postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 7 days. In this report, various perioperative challenges of patients with chronic renal failure during coiling are discussed along with the measures to prevent the occurrence of contrast-induced nephropathy.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712081
       
  • Isolated Bradycardia During Aneurysmal Clipping: Rebleed or
           Trigeminocardiac Reflex'

    • Authors: Singh; Nidhi, Jangra, Kiran, Regmi, Sabina, Singh, Apinderpreet
      Abstract: The most common cause of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage is the rupture of intracranial aneurysm. After initial bleed, the risk of rebleeding is highest in the early postictal period and this rebleed is strongly associated with poor neurological outcome. The major goal of anesthesia in these surgeries is to prevent the rebleed. If rebleeding occurs prior to the craniotomy, it results in the acute rise of intracranial pressure and usually presents as bradycardia and hypertension (Cushing’s reflex). Here we reported a case where rebleeding presented unusually as isolated bradycardia without associated hypertension and was mistaken as trigeminocardiac reflex. The surgeon was informed about the event and they planned to proceed. After craniotomy, despite all the efforts the brain was persistently tight and surgery could not be completed. Postoperative scan showed rebleeding and the patient died after a few days in ICU.We highlighted in this case report the fact that isolated transient bradycardia may also be the presentation of rebleed with closed cranial vault. It is not always necessary to see all the features of Cushing’s traid in every patient. If bradycardia occurs before the craniotomy, the surgeon should be notified, the severity of bleed should be assessed, and further management should be planned according to the severity of bleed.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710298
       
  • Vasopressor Mephentermine-Induced Anaphylactic Reaction in a Neurosurgical
           Patient
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710297



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • A Diagnostic Dilemma in Combined Central Diabetes Insipidus and Cerebral
           Salt Wasting Syndrome
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712068



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Acute Head Injury for Orthopaedic
           Procedure
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710703



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Associations between Features of External Ventricular Drain Management,
           Disposition, and Shunt Dependence

    • Authors: Engel; Corey, Faulkner, Amanda L., Van Wyck, David W., Zomorodi, Ali R., King, Nicolas Kon Kam, Williamson Taylor, Rachel A., Hailey, Claire E., Umeano, Odera A., McDonagh, David L., Li, Yi-Ju, James, Michael L.
      Abstract: Background In the United States, nearly 25,000 patients annually undergo percutaneous ventriculostomy for the management of increased intracranial pressure with little consensus on extraventricular drain management. To characterize relationships between external ventricular drain management, permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and hospital disposition, we hypothesized that patients requiring extended drainage would have greater association with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and unfavorable disposition. Methods Adult patients admitted to the Duke University Hospital Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit between 2008 and 2010 with extraventricular drains were analyzed. A total of 115 patient encounters were assessed to determine relative impact of age, sex, days of extraventricular placement, weaning attempts, cerebrospinal fluid drainage volumes, Glasgow Coma Scale, and physician’s experience on disposition at discharge and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. Univariate logistic regression was first used to test the effect of each variable on the outcome, followed by backward selection to determine a final multivariable logistic regression. Variables in the final model meeting p < 0.05 were declared as significant factors for the outcome. Results Increased extraventricular drain duration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.17, confidence interval [CI] = 1.05–1.30, p = 0.0049) was associated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, while older age (OR = 1.05, CI = 1.02–1.08, p = 0.0027) and less physician extraventricular drain management experience (OR = 4.04, CI = 1.67–9.79, p = 0.0020) were associated with unfavorable disposition. Conclusion In a small cohort, exploratory analyses demonstrate potentially modifiable factors are associated with important clinical outcomes. These findings warrant further study to refine how such factors affect patient outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1710410
       
  • Role of Ultrasound in Neurocritical Care

    • Authors: Bhatt; Rashmi, Khanna, Puneet
      Abstract: Bedside point of care ultrasound has acquired an extremely significant role in diagnosis and management of neurocritical care, just as it has in other specialties. Easy availability and increasing expertise have allowed the intensivists to use it in a wide array of situations, such as confirming clinical findings as well as for interventional and prognostic purposes. At present, the clinical applications of ultrasonography (USG) in a neurosurgical patient include estimation of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), assessment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and velocities, diagnosis of intracranial mass lesion and midline shifts, and examination of pupils, apart from the systemic applications. Transcranial sonography has also found use in the diagnosis of the cerebral circulatory arrest. An increasing number of clinicians are now relying on the use of ultrasound in the neurointensive care unit for neurological as well as non-neurological indications. These uses include the diagnosis of shock, respiratory failure, deep vein thrombosis and performing bedside procedures.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712069
       
  • Fatal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage due to Intravascular Adrenaline Absorption

    • Authors: Bansal; Sonia, Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara, Syeda, Seham, Surve, Rohini M.
      Abstract: Vasoconstrictors are commonly administered with local anesthetics (LAs) to decrease intraoperative bleeding. However, inadvertent systemic absorption of adrenaline is not uncommon and is associated with significant hemodynamic consequences and arrhythmias, which are usually inconsequential. We report a case of suspected intravascular adrenaline absorption in a 1-year-old girl with craniosynostosis, which led to subarachnoid hemorrhage, herniation, and death.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-13T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708564
       
  • Airway Adventures of Airtraq: Use of Airtraq Optical Laryngoscope with
           Adaptor in Infants with Obstructive Hydrocephalus Posted for Endoscopic
           Third Ventriculostomy

    • Authors: Ali; Shahna, Rashid, Hassan, Siddiqui, Obaid A., Athar, Manazir
      Abstract: The pediatric airway is a challenge for the anesthetist due to difficulty in adequate assessment, scarcity of management algorithms, lack of precise knowledge regarding incidence, as well as limitations of the various devices, instruments, and video laryngoscopes. We present a case series of infants with obstructive Hydrocephalus with anticipated difficult intubation posted for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) in whom the airway was successfully secured using Airtraq optical laryngoscope with adaptor. Although this device has not been widely studied in pediatrics age group, there are different sizes available for use among children. The ease of use, short learning curve, low cost, single use, and successful approach to difficult airway have made it to being the main rescue technique when the initial approach has failed.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-03-14T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701800
       
  • Clipping of Cerebral Aneurysm in a Patient with Coarctation of Aorta:
           Anesthetic Management
    • Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701801



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      Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -2020-03-14T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Incidence, Predictors, and Adverse Outcomes of Extubation Failure in Young
           Children with Isolated Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Observational
           Study

    • Authors: Hazarika; Amarjyoti, Gupta, Aakriti, Jain, Kajal, Kajal, Kamal
      Abstract: Background Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving mainstay of therapy in pediatric patients with isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI). Because of the numerous complications and side effects associated with tracheal intubation, it is prudent to remove it as early as possible. Extubation failure and reintubation, however, are also associated with significant risks. Till date, there has been no comprehensive study on extubation failure in pediatric patients less than 5 years with iTBI.Materials and Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in the trauma intensive care unit (TICU) of a tertiary care center. All the children with iTBI, aged 0 to 5 years, on mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours, admitted to the TICU were included. Extubation failure was defined as the need for reintubation occurring within 24 hours of extubation. Only the first attempt at extubation was included in the analysis.Results Pre-extubation paO2/FiO2 ratio < 310 mm Hg is a predictor for extubation failure. Mean base deficit postextubation were found to be 2 ± 0.9 and –0.2 ± 1 (p = 0.00) between success and failure groups, respectively. Similarly, postextubation systolic blood pressure was also high in the failure group than in the success group (113.8 ± 10.4 vs. 100.5 ± 7.4; p = 0.00).Conclusions The incidence of first attempt extubation failure was 62.5%. Lower values of pre-extubation paO2/FiO2 ratio (ratio < 310 mm Hg) are a predictor for extubation failure. Developing predictive tools and optimizing extubation decisions lead to timely identification of patients at elevated risk of extubation failure.
      Citation: Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-02-23T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701799
       
 
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