Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8359 journals)
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ANAESTHESIOLOGY (119 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 119 of 119 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ain-Shams Journal of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ain-Shams Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambulatory Anesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 215)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Anaesthesia Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Anaesthesia, Pain & Intensive Care     Open Access  
Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anestesia Analgesia Reanimación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anestesia en México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesia & Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 232)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Anesthesia Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 216)
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
BDJ Team     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Anaesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BJA : British Journal of Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
BJA Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
BMC Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (Edicion en espanol)     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Pain (BrJP)     Open Access  
British Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology : Revista Colombiana de Anestesiología     Hybrid Journal  
Current Anaesthesia & Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Current Anesthesiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Current Pain and Headache Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Der Anaesthesist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Der Schmerz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Der Schmerzpatient     Hybrid Journal  
Douleur et Analgésie     Hybrid Journal  
Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
EMC - Anestesia-Reanimación     Hybrid Journal  
EMC - Anestesia-Rianimazione     Hybrid Journal  
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
European Journal of Anaesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
European Journal of Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Pain Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Headache The Journal of Head and Face Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Indian Journal of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Anesthesiology Clinics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Clinical Anesthesia and Research     Open Access  
Itch & Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
JA Clinical Reports     Open Access  
Journal Club Schmerzmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Anesthesia & Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Anesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Anesthesia History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Anesthesiology and Clinical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cellular and Molecular Anesthesia     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Anesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Headache and Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Obstetric Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Pain Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Society of Anesthesiologists of Nepal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Bangladesh Society of Anaesthesiologists     Open Access  
Jurnal Anestesi Perioperatif     Open Access  
Jurnal Anestesiologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Karnataka Anaesthesia Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Le Praticien en Anesthésie Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Local and Regional Anesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Medical Gas Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medycyna Paliatywna w Praktyce     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
OA Anaesthetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Anesthesia Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Pain Clinic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Pain Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Pain Research and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Pain Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pain Studies and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chilena de Anestesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Anestesiología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Anestesiología y Reanimación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista da Sociedade Portuguesa de Anestesiologia     Open Access  
Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Romanian Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Scandinavian Journal of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sri Lankan Journal of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Survey of Anesthesiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Techniques in Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Topics in Pain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.207
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2210-8440 - ISSN (Online) 2210-8467
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3147 journals]
  • Airtraq® vs. fibreoptic intubation in patients with an unstable cervical
           spine fracture: A neurophysiological study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Patrick Schoettker, Ana Pérez Arias, Etienne Pralong, John Michael Duff, Nicolas Fournier, Istvan BathoryAbstractBackgroundFibreoptic intubation is described as the preferred technique for the non-urgent airway control in patients with an unstable cervical spine injury. Indirect laryngoscopes offer promising advantages, but their safety and impact on cervical spine movement is still discussed.AimWe compared the incidence of significant neurophysiologic modifications associated with tracheal intubation performed randomly by an Airtraq® videolaryngoscope contrasted with asleep fibreoptic intubation in 40 patients with a traumatic unstable cervical spine fracture immobilized by a moulded cervical collar and scheduled for elective surgery.MethodsSomatosensitive evoked potentials (SSEPs) monitoring was performed at four stages: before airway management (baseline), during facemask ventilation, during intubation and after definitive positioning for surgery. Time, ease of intubation, number of attempts and grade view laryngoscopy were also recorded.ResultsSignificant neurophysiological modifications were detected in one patient in each group during intubation. They were also identified during ventilation in 1/40 patients and 13/40 patients after positioning. Intubation times were significantly shorter when performed by an Airtraq® (median [25th;75th] 45 s [41;54]) than by fiberscope (124 [88;152]), (p 
       
  • European Airway Management Society -Corner
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 January 2020Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Michael Seltz Kristensen
       
  • A guide for the guidelines – navigating the airway options
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Amali N. Chandrasena, Brendan A. McGrathAbstractAirway management guidelines are here to stay. They offer an opportunity to address technical and non-technical aspects of avoidable factors associated with complications, and to guide teams and individuals through evidence-based strategies. Different guidance exists from a variety of organisations and countries covering a multitude of scenarios, with a wide range of consensus strategies and literature reviews used for development. Many are applicable both inside and outside of our hospitals and are used by a variety of healthcare professionals and specialities, including non-medically qualified staff. In this article, we review the rationale for airway management guidelines and their effectiveness. We also offer our thoughts on navigating through the available options. The principles of planning ahead, planning to fail, summoning the best available assistance and of providing adequate oxygenation before, during and after attempts to manage the airway should be clear goals any airway management, regardless of which guidance is followed.
       
  • Hemoglobin threshold and clinical predictors for perioperative blood
           transfusion in elective surgery: Systemic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Wubie Birlie Chekol, Muleta Teshome, Yonas Addisu Nigatu, Debas Yaregal MelesseAbstractBackgroundLack of consensus on hemoglobin threshold and transfusion strategies have led to a wide variation in transfusion practices and inappropriate use of blood. This may result in over ordering of blood with minimal utilization or unnecessary allogenic blood transfusion. This may lead to financial crisis due to costs for blood handling, laboratory tests and blood administration. So, saving of blood and resources are required by rationalizing blood transfusion indications based on evidence-based hemoglobin threshold and clinical predictive factors in resource limiting setup.MethodsPreferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol was used to conduct this study. PubMed, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library search engines were used to find evidences that help to draw recommendations and conclusions.DiscussionHalf of clinical specialties used red blood cell transfusion with 7 g/dl threshold and the other half used 8 g/dl to 9 g/dl. Restrictive strategy of blood transfusion is as effective as liberal transfusion strategy in critically ill patients except in patients with cardiovascular diseases.ConclusionsTransfusion is required at hemoglobin levels
       
  • Perioperative implications and prevalence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea risk
           in a surgical population using the updated STOP-Bang questionnaire
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Amr Elkouny, Mohamed AlHarbi, Vassilios Dimitriou, Ali Muzafar, Ali Nawaz, Amel FayedAbstractBackgroundObstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a serious condition that is usually undiagnosed in surgical patients exposing them to complications such as difficult intubation.ObjectivesTo evaluate the updated STOP-Bang questionnaire in detecting OSA risk and its perioperative implications.MethodsPreoperative assessment for OSA risk of 845 adult patients using the updated STOP-Bang questionnaire was conducted. Evaluation of anesthetic events like difficult mask ventilation, Cormack-Lehane score and Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) events were done.ResultsOSA risk was detected in 47.3% of patients, mean age was 40.2 ± 17.8 with male predominance, and higher prevalence of Diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. More than 30% of high risk OSA group were Cormack- Lehane score grade 3 and 4, and 23.4% had difficult mask ventilation. PACU stay significantly increased with the increased risk of OSA (p 
       
  • Difficult obstetric airway training: Current strategies, challenges and
           future innovations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Jason J.I. Chan, Raymond W.L. Goy, Ithnin Farida, Ban Leong SngAbstractManagement of the difficult obstetric airway requires the use of appropriate medical knowledge, as well as timely technical and non-technical skills. In the training of these highly specialised skills, our learners are exposed to the challenges of high stress in optimising maternal and neonatal outcomes. Limitations and challenges persist for training for the difficult obstetric airway, including the decreased number of elective caesareans done under general anaesthesia, the high expectations of safety, the need for more inter-professional education of such scenarios and the modular residency training system resulting in short duration of exposure and lack of familiarity of location and equipment. In this review, we explored how our residents learned under these conditions and review current training strategies used. We used the cognitive load theory and complex skills training model to inform us of the gaps in our current training strategies, and analyse how future innovations could aid in the training.
       
  • Instrumental and randomised clinical comparison between laryngeal mask
           airway Proseal and Supreme in pediatric patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Luisa Santambrogio, Sabrina Righi, Rosa L. Pinciroli, Eugenia Piro, Antonio D'alessio, Aldo MinutoAbstractBackgroundLaryngeal mask airway (LMA) has proven safe and effective for airway management in children during general anesthesia; mostly the second generation LMAs, none of which resulted clearly better despite previous studies.AimProseal-LMA (PLMA) and Supreme-LMA (SLMA) are compared for structural characteristics and oropharyngeal leak pressure as primary aims, and mechanical ventilation, insertion, intra- and post-operative complications as secondary aims.Trial designprospective randomised parallel clinical trial.Methodsinstrumental evaluation: measurements of length, cross section, loading test on free air were performed to assess the resistance during ventilation. Then, 39 children received PLMA and 39 received SLMA for airway management during elective surgery: intraoperative and postoperative data were analyzed.Resultstransversal section area was 35,71 mm2 in PLMA and 59,61 in SLMA, whilst length was 133,67 and 123,07 mm; the loading test on free air confirmed lower resistance of SLMA. Oropharyngeal leak pressure resulted significant lower in SLMA. No significant difference in other clinical parameters and complications.Conclusionsinstrumental measurements highlight that SLMA offers the advantage of less resistance to the airflow, allowing to keep lower oropharyngeal leak pressure during mechanical ventilation. Despite the differences reported, we observed only a few minor complications in both groups.
       
  • “Shorter the Wiser”- to obtain safer medial canthal peribulbar
           block
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Jaichandran V V
       
  • Direct laryngoscopy to predict extubation success following a failed cuff
           leak test in intensive care patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Jack Stannus, Winston Cheung, Mark Kol, Rosalba Cross, Asim Shah, Atul Wagh, Nicola Clayton, Helen Wong
       
  • What's in a number' Communicating risk through real-world examples
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): George ChapmanAbstract“Don't worry, it's more dangerous driving here than having the anaesthetic”. This statement may be reassuring, but it isn't true. Despite its falsehood, it is often quoted as it evokes a visceral response that suggests the procedure is low risk.Communicating risks and probabilities to our patients is an everyday occurrence for clinicians - but are we correctly understood' Are we over-reliant on numerical expressions of risk' Could comparative examples of probabilities aid the understanding of risk'In this article the communication of numerical probability in healthcare is examined and a table of commonly used probabilities aims to improve understanding by converting numerical expressions into more tangible, real-world, examples.To allay a patient's fear of awareness it is perhaps reassuring to know that you are more likely to guess my four-digit bank personal identification number first time than experience awareness during a general anaesthetic. Conversely, and providing much less reassurance, taking ten trips into space with NASA is safer, in terms of 30-day mortality, than an emergency laparotomy in the UK.Clinicians are invited to trial this method for communicating probability, in carefully chosen circumstances, and read the cues and outcomes from the communication that follows.
       
  • Awake fibre-optic intubation in crisis'
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Volume 28Author(s): T. Rees, I. Hodzovic
       
  • Acute pulmonary edema – Is positive pressure ventilation with dry
           air useful'
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Volume 28Author(s): Sheila Nainan Myatra
       
  • Comparison of monitored anaesthesia care and general anaesthesia in
           endobronchial coil treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Gamze Talih, Çiğdem Ünal Kantekin, Bayram Metin, Yavuz Selim İntepe, Hülya TürkanAbstractObjectiveThe aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complications of two different anaesthesia methods in endobronchial coil treatment.MethodsIn this prospective, randomised study, the patients were divided into 2 groups; general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation was performed in 17 patients (group GA), whereas monitored anaesthesia care (MAC) was performed in 15 patients by using a continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil (group MAC). During the procedure, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), transcutaneous partial carbon dioxide pressure (tcPCO2), cerebral oxygen saturation and patient state index were monitored.ResultsRemifentanil consumption was significantly reduced and the recovery duration was shorter in the group MAC compared to GA (p 
       
  • Submental intubation in traumatic maxillofacial surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 September 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Imen Zouche, Sahar Elleuch, Sondes Briki, Rahma derbelAbstractIn the maxillofacial trauma associated with base of skull fracture, nasotracheal intubation is contraindicated. Surgical repair may require intermaxillary fixation which contraindicate orotracheal intubation. The submental intubation is an interesting alternative to tracheotomy.This type of intubation was used in maxillofacial surgery operating unit in 17 patients with mandibular fracture who require an intermaxillary fixation associated with a skull base fracture that contraindicated nasotracheal intubation.Most lesions were Lefort II fractures. The average time of achievement of intubation was 10 minutes (range : 7-15 minutes). The average duration of intubation was 25 hours (range : 6-48 hours). There were no intraoperative complications. Postoperatively, the only complication was an infection at the incision site in one patient.The submental intubation requires some technical abilities. Furthermore, it is quick to perform and avoids tracheotomy in selected patients.
       
  • Comparison the effects of intravenous lidocaine and transtracheal
           lidocaine on hemodynamic changes in patients with hypertension following
           tracheal intubation: A double blind clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 September 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Pooya Derakhshan, Seyed Hamid Reza Faiz, Masood Mohseni, Azita YazdiAbstractBackgroundHemodynamic changes following intubation can be reduced by lidocaine at the time of induction of anesthesia and during laryngoscopy to prevent complications such as myocardial ischemia, infarction and brain damage. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intravenous lidocaine and transtracheal lidocaine on hemodynamic changes in patients with hypertension under medical treatment following tracheal intubation.Materials and methodsIn this prospective double-blind randomized clinical study, patients aged 40–70 years with hypertension who were candidates for general anesthetic surgery were randomly divided into three groups: A (intravenous lidocaine), B (transtracheal lidocaine) and C (placebo). Blood pressure and heart rate were record at 30 s after induction of anesthesia, 30 s after intubation and 3, 6 and 9 min after intubation.ResultsThe results showed that the mean systolic blood pressure varied significantly between 3 groups at 30 s after induction (group A: 127.08 ± 10.08, group B: 134 ± 9.77 and group C: 123 ± 1.55 mmHg) (P = 0.007) and 30 s after intubation (group A: 154.42 ± 15.75, group B: 142.58 ± 8.63, group C: 158 ± 17.37 mmHg) (P = 0.001). The mean diastolic blood pressure was significantly different between 3 groups in 30 s after intubation (group A: 93.23 ± 13.7, group B: 87.92 ± 4.22 and group C: 98.09 ± 9.29 mmHg) (P = 0.003). The mean heart rate was significantly different between 3 groups in 30 s after intubation (group A: 81.65 ± 8.06, group B: 74.65 ± 6.22 and group C: 82.5 ± 7.16 bit/minutes) (P 
       
  • Videolaryngoscopy utilisation: Facts and opinions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Nia W. Wylie, Emma C. Phillips, Julia K. Harrington, Alistair F. McNarryAbstractBackgroundVideolaryngoscopy is used in routine and predicted difficult tracheal intubation. McGrath MAC videolaryngoscopes (VLs) are now widely available in our hospitals. We investigated current utilisation of VLs and opinions of anaesthetists regarding VL use.MethodsA snapshot of airway management strategies was collected from theatres across all three adult sites in our region. A questionnaire was then distributed to anaesthetists working in these sites to explore their opinions regarding videolaryngoscopy.ResultsThe McGrath MAC VL was used in 15.1% of intubations (range from 7.4 to 32.5% across the three sites). One hundred and eight anaesthetists returned the survey (47.8% response rate); 15.7% stated videolaryngoscopy should be a standard of care. The top reasons for VL use were failed direct laryngoscopy, previously documented difficult intubation, and reduced neck extension. Perceived barriers included risk of de-skilling in direct laryngoscopy, cost, and no perceived benefit from videolaryngoscopy.ConclusionWe found less than expected VL use despite good evidence for its benefit. The barriers to use in this group are consistent with existing literature. These perceived barriers must be addressed through education and training to deliver the benefit of regular VL use.
       
  • Opinion article: Blogs and podcasts in medical education
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 August 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Florian Sacherer, Philipp Zoidl, Michael Eichinger, Gabriel Honnef, Stefan HeschlAbstractWithin the last years new online resources such as blogs and podcasts are making their way into medical education. With the introduction of the internet in the last decades, the field of medical education and training has also changed. Consumption of information independent of time and location through blogs and podcast is now a part of everyday life. The FOAM (“Free Open Access Medical Education”) community in particular is playing a pioneering role here. We discuss the roles of blogs and podcasts in medical education and possible applications such as the “flipped classroom” concept. We explain the many advantages, like their function as a filter against information overload or their role in the so called “knowledge translation gap” but we also highlight points such as a cult of personality that should be viewed critically. Last but not least, we describe the reasons why we run a blog ourselves and the challenges we face.
       
  • Influence of operating table height on laryngeal view during direct
           laryngoscopy: A randomized prospective crossover trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 August 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Sandesh Udupi, Kriti Puri, Kailasnath Shenoy, Anitha ShenoyAbstractBackgroundOperating table height/patient level in relation to anaesthesiologist influences mask ventilation, laryngoscopy, intubation and task performance of anaesthesiologist in terms of physical and mental workload. The same was evaluated in this study.MethodsTwenty five specialist anaesthesiologists performed mask ventilation and laryngoscopy for three times and intubation once on six patients each, [n = 150] at three different table levels (Level X: patient at level of xiphisternum of anaesthesiologist, level A: 5 cms above; level B: 5 cms below xiphisternum). Primary variable was quality of laryngoscopic view obtained. Secondary variables were anaesthesiologist's comfort, ease of performing these tasks and movements at various joints in anaesthesiologist assessed in subjective and objective ways.ResultsLaryngoscopic view was best at levels X and A when compared to B (p = 0.0004). Mask ventilation was most comfortable at level B and least at level A (p 
       
  • Cervical epidural anaesthesia an alternative for combined neck and thorax
           surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Amarjeet Kumar, Neeraj Kumar, Abhyuday Kumar, Shagufta Naaz
       
  • Selective bronchial block with Uniblocker ™ in paediatric pulmonary
           sequestration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Neus Fuertes Saez, Francisco Escriba Alepuz, Pilar Argente NavarroAbstractTechnological advances and improvements in surgical equipment have made possible minimally invasive surgical methods, which offer multiple advantages for patients [1]. We can find among them Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS). The indications for VATS in children have increased exponentially [2] [2]. It requires the collaboration of the anesthesiologist, who adapts the anesthetic management to achieve correct one lung ventilation. It allows an adequate surgical field exposure [1], and it prevents hypoxemia. How we can achieve a correct lung isolation technique is one of the hypotheses that the anesthesiologist has to consider, basically in cases involving infants and children, because some techniques we would use in adults are not available. In this case, we use a Uniblocker™ 5 Frames (Fr) bronchial blocker. In the pediatric population, the problem is that bronchial blockers have very small or no working channels. This makes it difficult to aspirate the lung to collapse it. We want to show how to achieve complete lung collapse in a pediatric patient with Uniblocker™ 5 Fr which has no working channel.
       
  • Techniques and complications of awake fibre-optic intubation – A survey
           of Difficult Airway Society members
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): K. Grange, M.C. Mushambi, S. Jaladi, V. AthanassoglouAbstractBackgroundAwake fibre-optic intubation (AFOI) is a recommended option for managing the anticipated difficult intubation; however, there is no recommended standard technique. We investigated current practice of AFOI among Difficult Airway Society members.MethodsA survey was distributed to members of the Difficult Airway Society (DAS). Questions focussed on technique, complications and caseload within the previous 2 years.ResultsOf 588 respondents, most (313; 53%) had performed less than 5 AFOI in the previous 2 years; 61 (10%) had not performed any AFOI and were excluded from further analysis. Of those who had performed AFOI within the preceding 2 years (527), remifentanil was used most commonly for single-agent sedation (237; 45%). Most anaesthetists (253; 48%) combined co-phenylcaine and lidocaine for airway topicalisation. A spray-as–you-go technique for topical anaesthesia was used most frequently (398; 76%). Of respondents, 109 (21%) encountered complications. Of these, the most frequently reported complications were requiring three or more attempts (41) followed by desaturation
       
  • Airway sonography fails to detect difficult laryngoscopy in an adult
           Veteran surgical population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Justin S. Fulkerson, Heather M. Moore, Robert F. Lowe, Tristan S. Anderson, Lisa L. Lucas, Jonathan W. ReedAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate ultrasound's utility to detect difficult laryngoscopy in a preoperative setting.MethodsThis single-site, prospective, cross-sectional, within-subjects study was performed at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center with 144 subjects. The sonographic independent variables included sonographic hyomental distance (HMD) and anterior neck thicknesses at the hyoid bone (HB), thyrohyoid membrane (THM), and vocal cords (VC). Additional independent variables were standard airway indicators of BMI, neck circumference, obstructive sleep apnea, snoring, abnormal upper teeth, jaw mobility, interincisor gap, Mallampati score, thyromental distance and neck range of motion. The outcome variable was the modified Cormack-Lehane Grade (CLG).ResultsThere was no significance found among the four sonographic measurements or their derived ratios in predicting difficult laryngoscopy. Correlation analysis between the sonographic measurements did find significance of the HMD:HB (p = 0.040) and the HB:THM (p = 0.44) ratios. However these ratios had a weak correlation at −0.172 and −0.168 respectively. Standard airway indicators did not demonstrate significance in predicting the difficult airway, sans obese patient with neck circumference (p = 0.016).DiscussionThis study demonstrated ultrasonography in predicting difficult laryngoscopy lacked utility. Ultrasound utilization as an efficacious means of difficult airway assessment requires further research with a larger sample size. Further studies using sonography on those patients with known difficult airways may provide data to determine if ultrasound has utility in predicting difficult laryngoscopy.
       
  • A Comparison of the king vision® and glidescope® video intubation
           systems in patients at risk for difficult intubation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Travis H. Markham, Omonele O. Nwokolo, Sara Guzman-Reyes, Glorimar Medina-Rivera, Sam D. Gumbert, Chunyan Cai, Tyrone Burnett, Tariq A. Syed, Carin A. HagbergABSTRACTBackgroundOne factor that contributes to the difficulty during intubation is poor visualization of the airway anatomy during laryngoscopy.AimTo compare the efficacy and first-pass success rate of the King Vision® Video Laryngoscopes against the GlideScope® Video Laryngoscope in patients with anticipated difficult airways.Methods225 adult patients scheduled for surgery requiring general anesthesia and tracheal intubation that met ≥ 2 of the following inclusion criteria: Mallampati classification (MP) III-IV, inter-incisor distance < 4 cm, neck circumference> 43 cm, and/or thyromental distance < 6 cm were randomized into 3 groups: GlideScope® (GS; n = 75), King Vision® – Channeled (KV-Ch; n = 75), and King Vision® – Non-Channeled (KV-NCh; n = 75). Intubation time and number of intubation attempts were collectively considered as the primary objective, amongst resident anesthesiologists.ResultsThe rate of success of tracheal intubation was 96% for GS, 81.3% for KV-Ch, and 96% for KV-NCh. Furthermore, first-pass success was highest for the KV-NCh at 89.3%, with GS and KV-Ch having a significant difference (P = 0.0083).ConclusionThe GS and KV-NCh performed similarly in facilitating successful tracheal intubation during the first attempt. In contrast, the KV-Ch was less successful overall.
       
  • Coagulation disturbances during major perioperative or traumatic bleeding
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Christian Fenger-Eriksen, Thorsten Haas, Dietmar Fries
       
  • Use of transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange in
           Electroconvulsive therapy, a tool to increase patient safety in a remote
           area: A case series
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 June 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Gabriela M. LandAbstractBackgroundElectroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains a mainstay treatment option in psychiatry. In England, approximately 2240 treatments are administered annually. The anaesthetic requirements for the procedure include the control of haemodynamic changes, related complications, hypoventilation, hypoxia and hypercarbia due to an extended period of apnoea, amnesia and muscle relaxation. Transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilator exchange (THRIVE), may offer a novel method of ventilation/oxygenation in the presence of apnea that makes the procedure safer especially when this is done outside main theatres.MethodsFour sessions of Electroconvulsive therapy were conducted; in total 8 patients for ECT and 15 treatments applied during the period of the case series. All patients received general anaesthesia with an induction agent and muscle relaxant. The patients were oxygenated/ventilated with the use of THRIVE.ResultsNo desaturation was present in any of the 15 treatments during or after the procedure. None of the patients reported any discomfort during the preoxygenation period with THRIVE.ConclusionIntroducin ukg THRIVE to the Electroconvulsive therapy suite as a unique airway technique maintained adequate oxygen saturation airway patency during the period of apnoea in patients paralyzed. THRIVE also gives an alternative for oxygenation in high risk patients in the ECT suite remote to main theatres.
       
  • Dry air positive pressure ventilation in acute pulmonary edema'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Amarjeet Kumar, Neeraj Kumar, Chandni Sinha, Ajeet Kumar
       
  • Difficult intubation in a patient with large vocal cord papillomatosis for
           laser surgery!: Serial dilatation of larynx to the rescue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Kumar Abhyuday, Naaz Shagufta, Bhavana Kranti, Shadab Madiha
       
  • Brainstem anaesthesia following single medial canthal peribulbar block: A
           case report and review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2019Source: Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical CareAuthor(s): Shashi B. Vohra, H. NagiAbstractBrainstem anaesthesia, the most dreaded complication of eye blocks has been reported with all routes except medial canthal blocks. We report the first case of brainstem anaesthesia following a single medial canthal block in a patient scheduled for cataract surgery and explore the factors that set the stage for this serious complication. These include relatively short axial length of globe, needle trajectory, position of the needle tip in relation to the posterior plane of the globe and, the optic nerve. We introduce the concept of ‘Cornea to Canthus distance’ and urge that it is factored in when estimating the depth of needle tip during medial canthal peribulbar approach to avoid inadvertent retrobulbar intraconal injection. This case highlights that ingress of local anaesthetic into subarachnoid space is unpredictable, and may occur without direct neural breach. The case unfortunately was also complicated with a challenging airway. We reiterate the importance of the immediate availability of advanced resuscitative facilities, and, an experienced anaesthetist for all units providing regional ophthalmic anaesthesia.
       
 
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