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SPORTS MEDICINE (81 journals)

Showing 1 - 81 of 81 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 215)
American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Apunts. Medicina de l'Esport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Sports Medicine and Physiotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biomedical Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
British Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Case Studies in Sport Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Clinics in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Current Sports Medicine Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Sport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
International Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Athletic Enhancement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Education, Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology     Open Access  
Journal of Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of ISAKOS     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery Open     Open Access  
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Sport & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sports Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Knie Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Motor Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
OA Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physical Therapy in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte     Open Access  
Revista del Pie y Tobillo     Open Access  
Saudi Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Science & Motricité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Science & Sports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Science and Medicine in Football     Hybrid Journal  
South African Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Spor Hekimliği Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access  
Spor ve Performans Araştırmaları Dergisi / Ondokuz Mayıs University Journal of Sports and Performance Researches     Open Access  
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sport, Education and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport, Ethics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Sport- und Präventivmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sportphysio     Hybrid Journal  
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Sports Medicine - Open     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sports Medicine and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sports Medicine International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Sportverletzung · Sportschaden     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sri Lankan Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine     Open Access  
Translational Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.217
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0172-4622 - ISSN (Online) 1439-3964
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [241 journals]
  • Strength Training Induces Greater Increase in Handgrip Strength than
           Wrestling Training per se
    • Authors: Karatrantou; Konstantina, Katsoula, Christina, Tsiakaras, Nikos, Ioakimidis, Panagiotis, Gerodimos, Vassilis
      Abstract: This study investigated the effectiveness of a specialized strength training program on maximal handgrip strength in young wrestlers. 72 young wrestlers (36 children: 8–10 years-old and 36 adolescents:13–15 years-old) participated in the present study. Both age-categories were assigned into a training group (18 children and 18 adolescents) and a control group (18 children and 18 adolescents). The training groups, in conjunction with the wrestling training performed a 4-month (2 sessions/week) specialized handgrip training program. Maximal handgrip strength was evaluated pre, at the intermediate (2 months) and at the completion of the program (4 months). Maximal handgrip strength values increased during the intermediate and post-training measurements compared to pre-training measurement in training and control groups (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1128-7166
       
  • Correction: Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Female Athletes: A
           Randomized Controlled Pilot Study
    • Int J Sports Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1114-8196



      © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Int J Sports Med ; : -2020-03-18T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Validity of Caloric Expenditure Measured From a Wheelchair User Smartwatch
    • Authors: Moreno; Daniel, Glasheen, Evan, Domingo, Antoinette, Panaligan, Van Brian, Penaflor, Taylor, Rioveros, Andrew, Kressler, Jochen
      Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of measured caloric expenditure from a fitness smartwatch designed to measured values in wheelchair users against criterion values from a portable metabolic system. 15 wheelchair users and 15 able-bodied participants completed multiple tasks; wheelchair treadmill routine at 30, 45, and 60 strokes per minute, arm cycle ergometry at 45, 60, and 80 revolutions per minute, and arm cycle ergometry VO2Peak test. There were no interactions for device or task and group (wheelchair users vs. able bodied, p=0.375-0.944) therefore results were pooled across groups for all measures. The smartwatch exhibited poor to moderate caloric expenditure association during wheelchair treadmill routine (ICC
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-03-16T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1088-5629
       
  • Reproducibility of Heart Rate Variability Indices at Post-Maximal Exercise
    • Authors: Araújo; Jaqueline Alves, Peçanha, Tiago, Novelli, Fabiula Isoton, Mello, César Siqueira Aleixes, Mello-Gonçalves, Daniel, Arsa, Gisela, Cambri, Lucieli Teresa
      Abstract: To analyze whether heart rate variability is reproducible after maximal exercise, 11 men (22.1±3.2 years) performed four incremental exercise tests followed by passive or active recovery. There was high reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation: 0.72–0.96) and fair-to-excellent agreement (coefficient of variation: 7.81–22.09%) in passive recovery, as well as moderate-to-high reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation: 0.50–0.87) and good agreement (coefficient of variation: 11.08–20.89%) in active recovery for LnRMSSD index. There was moderate-to-high reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation: 0.51–0.81) and good agreement (coefficient of variation: 10.41–18.87%) in most of the analyzed time points, in both recovery types for LnSDNN. In both types of recovery, the time domain heart rate variability 5–10 min indices (passive: intraclass coefficient correlation : 0.87–0.88; coefficient of variation: 7.67–13.44%; active: intraclass coefficient correlation 0.59–0.80; coefficient of variation: 14.62–16.26%) presented higher intraclass coefficient correlation and lower coefficient of variation than the spectral heart rate variability indices (passive: intraclass coefficient correlation: 0.71–0.87; coefficient of variation: 12.33–34.21%; active: intraclass coefficient correlation: 0.46–0.77; coefficient of variation: 24.41–105.12%). The LnRMSSD and LnSDNN indices analyzed in 30 s segments and the heart rate variability 5–10 min indices after maximal exercise in untrained healthy men showed satisfactory reproducibility, regardless of the type of recovery, with the time-domain indices showing higher reproducibility than the frequency-domain indices.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-03-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1114-6297
       
  • Validity and Reliability of the Isometric Prone Bench Pull Test
    • Authors: Lum; Danny, Aziz, Luqman
      Abstract: Isometric strength tests are gaining popularity in recent years. However, no study has validated any isometric strength tests to assess upper body pulling ability. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of isometric prone bench pull. Twenty-three resistance trained athletes (age: 26±4 years, height: 1.75±0.07 m, body mass: 78.6±11.5 kg) were required to perform prone bench pull 1 repetition maximum and isometric prone bench pull tests during the familiarization and actual testing sessions. Isometric prone bench pull was performed at 90° and 120° elbow angles. Peak force and rate of force development measures were highly reliable with intra-correlation coefficient between 0.881–0.987. Peak force obtained from isometric prone bench pull at both elbow angles showed large correlations to prone bench pull 1 repetition maximum (r=0.833–0.858, p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1103-2173
       
  • The Effect of Transition Period on Performance Parameters in Elite Female
           Soccer Players
    • Authors: Parpa; Koulla Parpa, Michaelides, Marcos A.
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 4-week off-season period (transition period) on the anthropometric and performance parameters in elite female soccer players who participated in the UEFA women’s Champions league. Eighteen female players (age 23.6±4.3 years) underwent testing at the end of the competitive period and right after the transition period. An incremental cardiopulmonary testing, body composition assessment and isokinetic testing at 60 °/sec were performed on both occasions. The cardiopulmonary exercise testing revealed that VO2max (p=0.001) and time on the treadmill (p=0.000) were significantly reduced after the transition period that included a 2 times/week exercise regimen. Furthermore, the quadriceps torque production at 60 °/s was significantly reduced for both the right (p=0.013) and left quadriceps (p=0.004) following the transition period. Finally, body weight (p=0.001) and body fat (p=0.000) significantly increased after 4 weeks of significantly reduced training volume. It is concluded that the transition period negatively affected the anthropometric and performance parameters of the female players. These data maybe informative for coaches and trainers as they demonstrate that despite the efforts to keep the players physically active the performance parameters decreased significantly.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1103-2038
       
  • Injury Incidence and Workloads during congested Schedules in Football
    • Int J Sports Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1083-5998



      © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Int J Sports Med ; : -2020-01-05T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Correction: The Effect of Divided Attention with Bounce Drop Jump on
           Dynamic Postural Stability
    • Int J Sports Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1205-6731



      © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Int J Sports Med ; : -2020-07-02T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Intense Cycling Exercise Improves Acute Cognitive Responses
    • Authors: Kunzler; Marcos Roberto, Carpes, Felipe P.
      Abstract: Intense exercise promotes long-term gains in cognitive functions. On the other hand, intense exercise may result in acute effects not clearly determined for cognitive performance. A condition of stochastic intensity ranging from moderate to maximal efforts is part of sports like cycling, in which cognitive integrity is also important for fast decision making and information processing especially during high-speed performances. In this study we investigate the acute effect of cycling at intensities corresponding to 60%, 80% and 95% of the maximal power output (MP) on selective attention, reaction time and short-term memory in amateur trained cyclists. In this cross sectional study 20 male cyclists performed maximal and submaximal cycling tests under different exercise intensities. Cognitive measures were conducted before and after exercise. We found that short duration high intensity cycling (95%) improves selective attention but increases variability in simple reaction time responses, without significant effects on short-term memory. The high intensity exercise improves ability to manage more complex cognitive task especially when the variability in the task does not increase.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1114-6170
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Concurrent Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors with
           Cancer-related Fatigue
    • Authors: Pagola; Itiziar, Morales, Javier S., Alejo, Lidia B., Barcelo, Olga, Montil, Marta, Oliván, Jesús, Álvarez-Bustos, Alejandro, Cantos, Blanca, Maximiano, Constanza, Hidalgo, Francisco, Valenzuela, Pedro L., Fiuza-Luces, Carmen, Lucia, Alejandro, Ruiz-Casado, Ana
      Abstract: This study compared the effects of two supervised concurrent training interventions in breast cancer survivors with cancer-related fatigue at baseline. Twenty-three female breast cancer survivors (50±8 years) were randomized to a high- (n=13) or a moderate-intensity (n=10) training program. Both interventions lasted 16 weeks and included the same resistance exercises, but the aerobic component was supervised and more intense in the former (i.e., rating of perceived exertion of 7–8 vs. 6 on a 1–10 scale for the high and moderate-intensity intervention, respectively). The primary endpoint was fatigue perception. Endpoints were assessed at baseline and after 16 weeks. The p-value for statistical significance was set at 0.004 after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The high-intensity training program increased lower-limb muscle strength significantly (p=0.002) and tended to improve fatigue perception (p=0.006), waist circumference (p=0.013), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p=0.028) and some quality of life items (p=0.011). Although the moderate-intensity training program did not provide such benefits in general (i.e., higher p-values for pre vs post-intervention comparisons), no significant differences were found between interventions (all p>0.004). Further research is needed to elucidate if the benefits provided by high-intensity concurrent training are superior to those elicited by moderate-intensity training in breast cancer survivors.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1147-1513
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Acute Hemodynamic Responses to Combined Exercise and Sauna
    • Authors: Rissanen; Joonas Antero, Häkkinen, Keijo, Laukkanen, Jari Antero, Häkkinen, Arja
      Abstract: This study investigated acute hemodynamic, plasma volume and immunological responses to four loading protocols: sauna only, and sauna after endurance, strength or combined endurance and strength exercise. Twenty-seven healthy, slightly prehypertensive men (age 32.7±6.9 years) were measured at PRE, MID (after exercise), POST, POST30min and POST24h. The measurements consisted systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature and concentrations of high-sensitive C-reactive protein, white blood cells and plasma volume measurements. Endurance+sauna showed significant decreases in systolic blood pressure at POST (–8.9 mmHg), POST30min (–11.0 mmHg) and POST24h (–4.6 mmHg). At POST30min, significant decreases were also observed in sauna (–4.3 mmHg) and combined+sauna (–7.5 mmHg). Diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly from -5.4 to –3.9 mmHg at POST in all loadings. Plasma volume decreased significantly at MID in all exercise loadings and at POST in endurance+sauna and strength+sauna. Plasma volume increased significantly (p < 0.01) in endurance+sauna and combined+sauna at POST24h. White blood cells increased following all exercise+sauna loadings at MID, POST and POST30min, whereas high sensitive C-reactive protein showed no changes at any measurement point. The combination of endurance exercise and sauna showed the greatest positive effects on blood pressure. Both loadings including endurance exercise increased plasma volume on the next day.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1186-1716
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Meta-Analysis: Resistance Training Improves Cognition in Mild Cognitive
           Impairment
    • Authors: Zhang; Lulu, Li, Bin, Yang, Jingjing, Wang, Fengling, Tang, Qianyun, Wang, Shuhong
      Abstract: This study investigated the benefits of resistance training on cognition in patients with mild cognitive impairment. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases, and seven randomized controlled trials were reviewed. We evaluated the risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration’s bias assessment tool. Standard mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for statistical analysis. This meta-analysis assessed three variables: general cognitive function, executive function and working memory. The results indicate that general cognitive function improved significantly (standardized mean difference: 0.53, P=0.04), and further subgroup analyses on frequency and duration per session showed that the subgroups ‘twice a week’ (P=0.01) and ‘duration per session >60 min’ (P=0.0006) exhibited better performance than the subgroups ‘three time a week’ (P=0.47) and ‘duration per session
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1186-1272
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • The Effects of Performing Mental Exertion during Cycling Exercise on
           Fatigue Indices
    • Authors: Barzegarpoor; Hamidreza, Amoozi, Hamid, Rajabi, Hamid, Button, Duane, Fayazmilani, Rana
      Abstract: This study investigated the effect of performing prolonged mental exertion during submaximal cycling exercise on exercise tolerance and fatigue. Participants performed 5 experimental sessions. Session 1: determination of cycling peak power output. Sessions 2 and 3: cycling to exhaustion at 65% peak power output with mental exertion or watching a movie. Sessions 4 and 5: cycling for 45 min at 65% peak power output with mental exertion or while watching a movie. During sessions 2–5, rate of perceived exertion and heart rate were recorded while cycling and cortisol and prolactin concentrations, psychomotor vigilance task performance, and maximal voluntary contraction were measured pre-and post-sessions. During sessions 2 and 3, time to exhaustion was reduced (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1179-8326
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Epidemiology of Injuries in Elite Female Futsal Players: A Prospective
           Cohort Study
    • Authors: Lago-Fuentes; Carlos, Jiménez-Loaisa, Alejandro, Padrón-Cabo, Alexis, Calvo, Marcos Mecías, García-Pinillos, Felipe, Rey, Ezequiel
      Abstract: Injuries are one of the worst case scenarios for an athlete and a team. The aim of this study was to analyze the injury incidence, characteristics and burden among a cohort of elite female futsal players. A prospective cohort study was designed over a season. Eighty-nine players from seven elite female futsal teams were monitored during the whole season. Eight different variables were recorded when an injury happened, as well as exposure time. A total of 90 injuries were recorded so that 54 out of 89 players (60.6%) sustained an injury. The overall injury incidence was 5 injuries per 1000 h of futsal play exposure. Moderate injuries were the most frequent (1.7 injuries per 1000 h of futsal play exposure). The quadriceps and ankle were the regions where most injuries occurred. Contact injuries were more common during matches than training, and usually happened at the end of the season. Elite female futsal players are exposed to a substantial injury risk, especially on ankle and quadriceps with moderate severity, occurring at the end of the sessions, especially during matches. These results highlight the need of new preventive strategies to reduce the high injury incidence in female futsal players.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1179-6280
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Is Pre-operative Quadriceps Strength a Predictive Factor for the Outcomes
           of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions
    • Authors: Qiu; Jihong, He, Xin, Fu, Sai-Chuen, Ong, Michael Tim-Yun, Teng Leong, Hio, Shu-Hang Yung, Patrick
      Abstract: Persistent quadriceps weakness prevents patients from returning to sports after ACL reconstruction. Pre-operative quadriceps strength was indicated as an important factor for the outcomes of ACL reconstruction. However, the existing evidence is controversial. Therefore, this systematic review was conducted to summarize and evaluate the relationship between pre-operative quadriceps strength and the outcomes following ACL reconstruction, and to summarize the predictive value of pre-operative quadriceps strength for satisfactory post-operative outcomes. Pubmed, WOS, Embase, CINAHL and SportDiscus were searched to identify eligible studies according to PRISMA guidelines. Relevant data was extracted regarding quadriceps strength assessment methods, pre-operative quadriceps strength, participants treatment protocols, post-operative outcomes, follow-up time points and the relevant results of each individual study. Twelve cohort studies (Coleman methodology score: 62±10.4; from 44–78) with 1773 participants included. Follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 2 years. Moderate evidence supports the positive association between pre-operative quadriceps strength and post-operative quadriceps strength; weak evidence supports the positive association between pre-operative quadriceps strength and post-operative functional outcomes. By now, there is no consensus on the predictive value of pre-operative quadriceps strength for achieving satisfactory quadriceps strength after ACLR. To conclude, pre-operative quadriceps strength should be taken into consideration when predict patient recovery of ACLR.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1144-3111
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Monitoring Matches and Small-sided Games in Elite Young Soccer Players
    • Authors: Darbellay; Jonas, Malatesta, Davide, Meylan, César Marius Philippe
      Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare the distances at various intensity in matches and small-sided games in elite-young soccer players using the metabolic power approach and running speed methods through fixed and individual speed zones. The second aim was to investigate the difference in high intensity external workload (% of total distances covered > 16 km/h or > 20 W/kg) between matches and small-sided games. Global positioning system data from 14 elite-youth players were analyzed during 13 matches and two types of small sided-games. Five intensity zones were used to compare the running distances between the metabolic power approach and the classic performance analysis. Metabolic power recorded more distances covered at high intensity than the running speed methods for every playing situations, except for the zone 5 of fixed speed (> 19 km/h) in matches (P
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1165-1916
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Effects of Wearing a Jaw-repositioning Intra-oral Device in Synchronized
           Swimming Athletes
    • Authors: Solana-Tramunt; Monica, Buscà, Bernat, Morales, Jose, Miró, Adrià, Aguilera-Castells, Joan, Arboix-Alió, Jordi
      Abstract: The effects of wearing an intra-oral device on several ventilatory and fatigue markers have been reported for a variety of sports. The quality of the figures performed in synchronized swimming is directly affected by fatigue, and can be monitored during training sessions (TS). The aim of the study was to investigate the acute effects of wearing customized intra-oral devices on heart rate variability, rating of perceived exertion, blood lactate accumulation, and salivary cortisol production during a competitive training session. Twelve highly trained elite female athletes (age: 21.0±3.6 years) participated in the study. Fatigue markers were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the 3rd and 5th afternoon TS for that week, once with and once without an intra-oral device, in random order. Salivary cortisol levels were higher in relation to the baseline in the intra-oral device condition (P
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1179-5806
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: The Effects of Agility Ladders on Performance: A Systematic
           Review
    • Int J Sports Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1187-7560



      © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Int J Sports Med ; : -2020-06-23T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Symptom Presentation After Concussion and Pre-existing Anxiety Among Youth
           Athletes
    • Authors: Kent; Matthew, Brilliant, Anna, Erickson, Kirk, Meehan, William, Howell, David
      Abstract: Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of self-reported pre-injury anxiety diagnosis on persistent symptom development, vestibular symptom severity, and balance control among youth who sustained a concussion. We performed a retrospective study of patients seen at a specialty pediatric concussion clinic. Patients were 18 years of age or younger, examined within 10 days of concussion, and received care until full recovery. A questionnaire was used to assess pre-existing medical and psychiatric conditions, including anxiety. Our main outcomes were prolonged symptom recovery defined as persistent symptoms for > 28 days after concussion) and severity of vestibular symptoms. Patients who reported pre-injury anxiety (n=43; median age=14.9 years; 37% female) were more likely to experience symptoms>28 days post-injury (76 vs. 54%; p=0.04) than those without pre-existing anxiety (n=241; median age=14.9 years; 53% female). After adjusting for sex, history of migraine, depression and ADHD, however, there was no independent association between pre-existing anxiety and prolonged symptom duration (adjusted odds ratio=2.34; 95% CI=0.083–6.63; p=0.11). Pre-existing anxiety was independently associated with self-reported nausea/vomiting severity (β coefficient=0.59, 95% CI=0.07–1.11). A pre-existing anxiety diagnosis does not appear to be associated with persistent symptoms after concussion, although it may be associated with post-injury nausea.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1107-3025
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: Anaerobic and Agility Parameters of Salonists in Laboratory
           and Field Tests
    • Int J Sports Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1185-7374



      © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Int J Sports Med ; : -2020-06-03T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Normative Rugby Data of the SARTS Tests: Comparison of Elite and School
           Players
    • Authors: Olds; Margie, Gadkari, Pradnya, Adams, Thomas
      Abstract: This study aimed to examine the normative data for the SARTS rugby tests in elite and schoolboy rugby players. A second aim was to examine differences between level of sport and position of play in the SARTS rugby tests. Elite (N = 57) and Schoolboy (N = 63) rugby players performed the SARTS tests relevant to rugby players each for 1 min, with 1–2 min rest between each test. A 2×2 factorial ANOVA was used to assess for the main effect of player position and player level of play. Results showed that elite players performed more Ball Abduction External Rotation (BABER) (dominant and non-dominant), Side Hold Rotations (dominant and non-dominant), Ball Taps (dominant and non-dominant), and Overhead Snatch than schoolboy players. Heavier players performed fewer Push-up Claps. Injured rugby players should perform at least the mean value of the repetitions of the SARTS tests before returning to contact training after an injury.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1171-1664
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Curve Sprinting in Soccer: Kinematic and Neuromuscular Analysis
    • Authors: Filter; Alberto, Olivares-Jabalera, Jesús, Santalla, Alfredo, Morente-Sánchez, Jaime, Robles-Rodríguez, Jose, Requena, Bernardo, Loturco, Irineu
      Abstract: Sprinting in curvilinear trajectories is an important soccer ability, corresponding to ~85% of the actions performed at maximum velocity in a soccer league. We compared the neuromuscular behavior and foot contact-time between outside leg and inside leg during curve sprinting to both sides in soccer players. Nine soccer players (age=23±4.12 years) performed: 3×Sprint linear, 3×Sprint right curve, and 3×Sprint left curve. An ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare the differences between inside and outside leg, and Cohen’s d was used to calculate the effect-size. Considering the average data, the performance classification (from best to worst) was as follows: 1. Curve “good” side (2.45±0.11 s), 2. Linear (2.47±0.13 s), and 3. Curve “weak” side (2.56±0.17 s). Comparing linear with curve sprinting, inside leg recorded significant differences (“good” and “weak”; effect size=1.20 and 2, respectively); in contrast, for outside leg, there were no significant differences (“good” and “weak”; effect size=0.30 and 0.49, respectively). Electromyography activity showed significant differences (p≤0.05) during curve sprinting between outside (higher in biceps femoris and gluteus medius) and inside leg (higher activity in semitendinosus and adductor). In summary, inside and outside leg play different roles during curved sprints, but inside leg is more affected by the change from straight to curve sprint.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1144-3175
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Side Differences Regarding the Limb Symmetry Index in Healthy Professional
           Athletes
    • Authors: Lambert; Christophe, Pfeiffer, Thomas, Lambert, Maxime, Brozat, Benedikt, Lachmann, Daniel, Shafizadeh, Sven, Akoto, Ralph
      Abstract: Side differences in the limb symmetry index during hop tests have been rarely investigated in uninjured athletes. Unknown differences can result in false interpretation of hop tests and affect return to sport decision. Hypothesis was that un-injured athletes in Judo and Taekwondo have side differences in hop test and that asymmetries can be predicted based on the athletes fighting display. Differences, risk relationships were analyzed using the chi-squared test and the odds ratio. A two-tailed p value of90. Moreover, 57.4% (n=66) reached longer jumping distance with the standing leg. Ignoring such pre-existent side differences in evaluation of hop tests and not knowing which limb was dominant prior the injury, can lead to premature or delayed return to sports in the rehabilitation process. Therefore, it might be helpful to refer to individual jump lengths for each limb in case of injury by using hop tests in pre-season screening in professional athletes in Judo and Taekwondo.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1171-2548
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Hemodynamic and Pressor Responses to Combination of Yoga and Blood Flow
           Restriction
    • Authors: Wooten; Savannah V., Stray-Gundersen, Sten, Tanaka, Hirofumi
      Abstract: A combination of yoga and blood flow restriction, each of which elicits marked pressor responses, may further increase blood pressure and myocardial oxygen demand. To determine the impact of a combination of yoga and blood flow restriction on hemodynamic responses, twenty young healthy participants performed 20 yoga poses with/without blood flow restriction bands placed on both legs. At baseline, there were no significant differences in any of the variables between the blood flow restriction and non-blood flow restriction conditions. Blood pressure and heart rate increased in response to the various yoga poses (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1171-1620
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Squat Muscle Activation Patterns with Hip Rotations in Subjects with Genu
           Varum Deformity
    • Authors: Hatefi; Mohamadreza, Babakhani, Farideh, Balouchi, Ramin, Letafatkar, Amir, Wallace, Brian J.
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation during the squat with different hip rotations (neutral, 15, 30, and 45° of internal and external hip rotation) in subjects with and without Genu Varum deformity deformity. Surface electromyography were recorded from 32 men with (n=16) and without (n=16) Genu Varum deformity. In the Genu Varum deformity group, the squats with 30, 45 and 15° of internal rotations of the hip showed significantly greater gluteus medius activation as compared to other positions. Moreover, the tensor fascia lata activity increased with greater external rotation of the hip, and significantly more than hip internal rotations (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1152-5028
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Whole-body Electromyostimulation plus Caloric Restriction in Metabolic
           Syndrome
    • Authors: Bellia; Alfonso, Ruscello, Bruno, Bolognino, Rolando, Briotti, Gianluca, Gabrielli, Paolo Roberto, Silvestri, Adriano, Rosazza, Cristina, Ambruoso, Francesca, Lombardo, Mauro, Bernardini, Andrea, Calabrese, Cosimo, Lauro, Davide, D’Ottavio, Stefano
      Abstract: We investigated early effects of Whole-Body Electromyostimulation added to hypocaloric diet on metabolic syndrome features in sedentary middle-aged individuals. We randomly assigned 25 patients to Whole-Body Electromyostimulation plus caloric restriction or caloric restriction alone for 26 weeks. Anthropometrics, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin, HOMA-IR, glycated hemoglobin, lipids, uric acid, creatinphosphokynase, C-reactive protein were assessed. Body composition was evaluated with direct-segmental, multi-frequency Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis. Both groups lost approximately 10% of weight, with similar effects on waist circumference and fat mass. Change in free-fat mass was significantly different between groups (caloric restriction −1.5±0.2 vs. Whole-Body Electromyostimulation plus caloric restriction +1.1±0.4 kg, p=0.03). Whole-Body Electromyostimulation plus caloric restriction group experienced greater percent reductions in insulin (−45.5±4.4 vs. −28.2±3.6%, p=0.002), HOMA-IR (–51.3±3.2 vs. –25.1±1.8%, p=0.001), triglycerides (−22.5±2.9 vs. −4.1±1.6%, p=0.004) and triglycerides/HDL (p=0.028). Subjects trained with Whole-Body Electromyostimulation had also significant improvement in systolic pressure (138±4 vs. 126±7 mmHg, p=0.038). No discontinuations for adverse events occurred. In middle-aged sedentary subjects with the metabolic syndrome, Whole-Body Electromyostimulation with caloric restriction for 26 weeks can improve insulin-resistance and lipid profile compared to diet alone. Further studies are needed to ascertain long-term efficacy and feasibility of this approach in individuals with the metabolic syndrome.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1171-2003
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Increase in the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio relates to Injury Risk in
           Competitive Runners
    • Authors: Dijkhuis; Talko Bernhard, Otter, Ruby, Aiello, Marco, Velthuijsen, Hugo, Lemmink, Koen
      Abstract: Injuries of runners reduce the ability to train and hinder competing. Literature shows that the relation between potential risk factors and injuries are not definitive, limited, and inconsistent. In team sports, workload derivatives were identified as risk factors. However, there is an absence of literature in running on workload derivatives. This study used the workload derivatives acute workload, chronic workload, and acute: chronic workload ratios to investigate the relation between workload and injury risk in running. Twenty-three competitive runners kept a daily training log for 24 months. The runners reported training duration, training intensity and injuries. One-week (acute) and 4-week (chronic) workloads were calculated as the average of training duration multiplied by training intensity. The acute:chronic workload ratio was determined dividing the acute and chronic workloads. Results show that a fortnightly low increase of the acute:chronic workload ratio (0.10–0.78) led to an increased risk of sustaining an injury (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1171-2331
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Motor Deficits in Youth with Concussion History: Issues with Task Novelty
           or Task Demand'
    • Authors: Dalecki; Marc, Usand, Jessica, Van Gemmert, Arend W. A., Sergio, Lauren E.
      Abstract: The present study expands previous work on eye-hand decoupling deficits in youth with concussion history. It examines whether deficits can be linked to difficulties adapting to new task constraints or meeting ongoing task demands. Data from 59 youth with concussion history (M=11 months post-concussion) and 55 no history controls were analyzed. All 114 participants (M=12.5 yrs.) performed two touchscreen-based eye-hand coordination tasks: A standard task with vision and motor action in alignment, and an eye-hand decoupling task with both spatially decoupled, with twenty trials per task condition. First (trial 1–4), middle (trial 9–12), and last (trial 17–20) trial blocks were analyzed in each condition across groups, as well as first and last blocks only. The latter analysis showed in the first block longer response times in the concussion history group in the eye-hand decoupling condition due to a general slowdown of the reaction times across blocks and a trend for higher movement times. Our findings suggest that youth with concussion history have difficulty to adapt to new task constraints associated with complex skill performance during a short series of trials. These results are relevant for athletic trainers, therapists and coaches who work with youth with concussion history.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1144-3217
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • The Effect of Divided Attention with Bounce Drop Jump on Dynamic Postural
           Stability
    • Authors: Lin; Jian-Zhi, Tai, Wei-Hsun, Chiu, Lan-Yi, Lin, Yu-An, Lee, Heng-Ju
      Abstract: This study determined the effect of divided attention on controlling postural stability during a drop vertical jump task. In total, 30 participants were tested for drop vertical jumps from a 30-cm high platform and landing on a single leg with or without divided attention tasks. Three-dimensional marker trajectories and ground reaction forces were collected simultaneously. Vertical ground reaction force, loading rate, and dynamic postural stability index were analyzed with or without divided attention tasks. The paired sample t test indicated a significantly low knee flexion angle, high vertical ground reaction force, and increased loading rate in the divided attention task. Moreover, participants showed an increased vertical stability index and dynamic postural stability index in the divided attention task than in the nondivided attention task. Thus, results demonstrated that the divided attention task could affect posture control, leading to poor dynamic posture stability and possibly increasing lower extremity injury risk. The influence of the divided attention task on movement quality likely indicates that an athlete can no longer focus his attention on the bounce drop jump maneuver. Therefore, the bounce drop jump combined with dynamic postural stability index could be used in posture stability screening.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1161-9081
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Prevalence of Risk of Eating Disorders and its Association with Obesity
           and Fitness
    • Authors: Parreño-Madrigal; Isabel María, Díez-Fernández, Ana, Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente, Visier-Alfonso, María Eugenia, Garrido-Miguel, Miriam, Sánchez-López, Mairena
      Abstract: The university stage is a critical developmental period for young adults, where lifestyles can determine future health. A cross-sectional study including 481 college students was conducted, with the following objectives: 1) to examine the prevalence of risk of developing eating disorders in college students, 2) to assess differences in obesity and physical fitness in those with and without risk of eating disorders, and 3) to determine whether cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness or fat mass were associated with the risk of eating disorders. We measured fat mass percentage (by densitometry), risk of feeding or eating disorders (by SCOFF questionnaire), cardiorespiratory fitness levels and a muscular fitness index. The prevalence of risk of eating disorders in women (32.4%) was higher than in men (17.4%) (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1152-5064
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Returning to Play after Prolonged Training Restrictions in Professional
           Collision Sports
    • Authors: Stokes; Keith A., Jones, Ben, Bennett, Mark, Close, Graeme L., Gill, Nicholas, Hull, James H., Kasper, Andreas M., Kemp, Simon P.T., Mellalieu, Stephen D., Peirce, Nicholas, Stewart, Bob, Wall, Benjamin T., West, Stephen W., Cross, Matthew
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 has resulted in widespread training disruption in many sports. Some athletes have access to facilities and equipment, while others have limited or no access, severely limiting their training practices. A primary concern is that the maintenance of key physical qualities (e. g. strength, power, high-speed running ability, acceleration, deceleration and change of direction), game-specific contact skills (e. g. tackling) and decision-making ability, are challenged, impacting performance and injury risk on resumption of training and competition. In extended periods of reduced training, without targeted intervention, changes in body composition and function can be profound. However, there are strategies that can dramatically mitigate potential losses, including resistance training to failure with lighter loads, plyometric training, exposure to high-speed running to ensure appropriate hamstring conditioning, and nutritional intervention. Athletes may require psychological support given the challenges associated with isolation and a change in regular training routine. While training restrictions may result in a decrease in some physical and psychological qualities, athletes can return in a positive state following an enforced period of rest and recovery. On return to training, the focus should be on progression of all aspects of training, taking into account the status of individual athletes.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1180-3692
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Role of Basal Hormones on Sweat Rate and Sweat Na+  Loss in Elite
           Women Soccer Players
    • Authors: Castro-Sepulveda; Mauricio, Cancino, Jorge, Jannas-Vela, Sebastian, Jesam, Francisca, Lobos, Casandra, Del Coso, Juan, Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann
      Abstract: We aimed to determine whether basal concentrations of testosterone, cortisol or the ratio testosterone/cortisol were related to sweat Na+ loss, sweat Na+ concentration ([Na+]) and sweat rate during exercise. Twenty-two female elite soccer players participated in the study. Testosterone and cortisol were measured in blood samples before exercise. Sweat samples were collected during a training session (~20°C, ~30% RH, and ~0.55 m/s of wind speed) to measure sweat [Na+]. Sweat rate was determined by considering the difference between post-and pre-body weight, along with the amount of liquid consumed. During exercise, sweat Na+ loss (0.33[0.19] g/h) and sweat rate (0.49[0.20] L/h) were related to basal testosterone concentration (1.4[0.4] pg/mL) (r=0.54; r=0.55, respectively; p0.05). However, when Na+ loss was adjusted to sweat rate, no association was found between Na+ loss and testosterone (p>0.05). In addition, no differences were found between players with high vs. low Na+ loss adjusted to sweat loss in menstrual phase or intensity during exercise (p>0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that in these specific environmental conditions, basal levels of testosterone might increase sweat rate and therefore, the amount of Na+ lost during exercise in elite women soccer players.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1165-2072
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Quantitative Redox Biology of Exercise
    • Authors: Nikolaidis; Michalis G., Margaritelis, Nikos V., Matsakas, Antonios
      Abstract: Biology is rich in claims that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are involved in every biological process and disease. However, many quantitative aspects of redox biology remain elusive. The important quantitative parameters you need to address the feasibility of redox reactions in vivo are: rate of formation and consumption of a reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, half-life, diffusibility and membrane permeability. In the first part, we explain the basic chemical kinetics concepts and algebraic equations required to perform “street fighting” quantitative analysis. In the second part, we provide key numbers to help thinking about sizes, concentrations, rates and other important quantities that describe the major oxidants (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide) and antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione). In the third part, we present the quantitative effect of exercise on superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide concentration in mitochondria and whole muscle and calculate how much hydrogen peroxide concentration needs to increase to transduce signalling. By taking into consideration the quantitative aspects of redox biology we can: i) refine the broad understanding of this research area, ii) design better future studies and facilitate comparisons among studies, and iii) define more efficiently the “borders” between cellular signaling and stress.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1157-9043
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Attributes of Physical Activity and Gut Microbiome in Adults: A Systematic
           Review
    • Authors: Tzemah Shahar; Roy, Koren, Omry, Matarasso, Sarah, Shochat, Tamar, Magzal, Faiga, Agmon, Maayan
      Abstract: Growing evidence shows the contribution of physical activity interventions to the gut microbiome. However, specific physical activity characteristics that can modify the gut microbiome are unknown. This review’s aim was to explore the contribution of physical activity intervention characteristics on human gut microbiome composition, in terms of diversity, specific bacterial groups, and associated gut microbiome metabolites. A literature search in PubMed; Cochrane Library; CINAHL-EBSCO; SCOPUS; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; PROSPERO; and ProQuest. Five studies met the inclusion criteria of a physical activity intervention duration of at least five weeks, with any description of the type or dose used. All included studies reported an endurance training; two studies used endurance and an additional muscle-strengthening training regimen. All studies reported using a dietary intervention control. Reported gut microbiome α-diversity changes were non-significant, β-diversity changes were mixed (three studies reported an increase, two reported non-significant changes). All studies reported significant changes in the abundances of specific bacterial/archaea groups and bacteria-related metabolites following interventions. In conclusion, physical activity (regardless of specific characteristics) has significant contribution to gut microbiome composition and associated metabolites. There are no current recommendations for physical activity to promote gut microbiome composition. Future studies should focus on the contribution of current recommended physical activity dose to gut microbiome composition.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1157-9257
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Workload Monitoring in Top-level Soccer Players During Congested Fixture
           Periods
    • Authors: Gualtieri; Antonio, Rampinini, Ermanno, Sassi, Roberto, Beato, Marco
      Abstract: This study assessed the internal and external workload of starters and non-starters in a professional top-level soccer team during a congested fixture period. Twenty Serie A soccer players were monitored in this study during two mesocycles of 21 days each. Starters and non-starters were divided based on the match time played in each mesocycle. The following metrics were recorded: exposure time, total distance, relative total distance, high-speed running distance over 20 km·h−1, very high-speed running distance over 25 km·h−1, individual very high-speed distance over 80% of maximum peak speed, and rating of perceived exertion. Differences between starters and non-starters were found for: exposure time (effect size=large to very large), rating of perceived exertion (large to very large), total distance (large to very large), and individual very high-speed distance over 80% of maximum peak speed (moderate to large). Furthermore, differences for relative total distance, high-speed running distance over 20 km·h−1 and very high-speed running distance over 25 km·h−1 were small to moderate, but not significant. This study reports that during congested fixture periods, starters had higher exposure time, rating of perceived exertion, total distance, and individual very high-speed distance over 80% of maximum peak speed than non-starters.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1171-1865
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • A Clinical Method for Estimation of VO2max Using Seismocardiography
    • Authors: Sørensen; Kasper, Poulsen, Mathias Krogh, Karbing, Dan Stieper, Søgaard, Peter, Struijk, Johannes Jan, Schmidt, Samuel Emil
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the seismocardiogram and cardiorespiratory fitness. Cardiorespiratory fitness can be estimated as VO2max using non-exercise algorithms, but the results can be inaccurate. Healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Seismocardiogram and electrocardiogram were recorded at rest. VO2max was measured during a maximal effort cycle ergometer test. Amplitudes and timing intervals were extracted from the seismocardiogram and used in combination with demographic data in a non-exercise prediction model for VO2max. 26 subjects were included, 17 females. Mean age: 38.3±9.1 years. The amplitude following the aortic valve closure derived from the seismocardiogram had a significant correlation of 0.80 (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1144-3369
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Functional Knee Performance Differences in Handball are Depending on
           Playing Class
    • Authors: Rühlemann; Alina, Mayer, Constantin, Haversath, Marcel, Jäger, Marcus
      Abstract: Handball is one of the most traumatic sports. The knee is the most commonly injured joint. To prevent knee injuries, optimal functional knee stability is of great importance. Nevertheless, there is still no consensus about objective criteria for knee function. Depending on playing class, injury rates seem to differ. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee function in handball depending on playing class and to establish reference data for functional knee stability. 261 handball players (25.1±5.8 years) performed a functional test including two- and one-legged stability assessments, jump tests, speed and agility analysis. Except for balance, differences between playing classes were detected in all tests with superior performance of high-class players (Germany’s 1st (“Oberliga”) and 2nd (“Verbandsliga”) non-elite playing class). High-class players achieved significant better results in jumping height (p≤0.011–0.029), relative power per body weight in the two-legged counter movement jump (p≤0.023) and speed and agility tests (p≤0.001). This study illustrates the relevance of playing class specific screening. Sports and playing class-specific databases will help to identify individual deficits and strengths in order to prevent injury and increase performance. Moreover, objective criteria for return to sports can be established.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1121-7635
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Evolution of Functional Recovery using Hop Test Assessment after ACL
           Reconstruction
    • Authors: Rambaud; Alexandre J.M., Rossi, Jérémy, Neri, Thomas, Samozino, Pierre, Edouard, Pascal
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate improvements in functional performance through the use of the Limb Symmetry Index of Single and Triple Hop tests between 12 and 52 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and to compare these values with usual time-based and performance-based criteria used during the return to sport continuum. Repeated functional assessments using Single and Triple Hop Tests at 12, 16, 22, 26, 39 and 52 postoperative weeks were evaluated. At each session, the median and interquartile range of Limb Symmetry Index of tests were calculated and compared with the usual criteria: return to participation:≥85%, between 12–16 w; return to play:≥90%, between 26–39 w. The results indicate that the median increased over time to 39 postoperative weeks and then stabilized. For Single Hop Test, wide variability was seen at 12 and 16 weeks (interquartile range=20%); this was lower from 22 to 52 weeks (interquartile range=8–6%). At 12 weeks for Single Hop Test, the median was 83.6% and did not meet>85% criteria for return to participation. Hop tests could be interesting functional tests to follow the functional recovery and help decision-making regarding return to participation and return to play.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-12T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1122-8995
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • The Effects of Agility Ladders on Performance: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Afonso; José, da Costa, IsraelTeoldo, Camões, Miguel, Silva, Ana, Lima, RicardoFranco, Milheiro, André, Martins, Alexandre, Laporta, Lorenzo, Nakamura, FábioYuzo, Clemente, Filipe Manuel
      Abstract: The goal of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of exercise programs using agility ladders and to assess the quality of available evidence. Search was conducted in October of 2019 using the following databases: Cochrane Library, PEDro, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. Study eligibility criteria included randomized trials or randomized controlled trials using agility ladders drills. Participants were healthy humans of any health status. The study appraisal and synthesis methods followed the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials (RoB 2) and a qualitative synthesis of the main results of each study were applied. Only five studies met our criteria, lasting between 4 and 8 weeks. Only two studies evaluated the effects of ladder drills on more than one dimension. Lack of description of the specific exercises that were used limits reproducibility of current studies. With one exception, the articles had low risk of bias for most domains. Despite the widespread popularity of agility ladder drills, research is scarce and problematic, with poorly described protocols and mostly unidimensional performance measures. Claims that agility ladders improve agility and other physical skills is premature, given the nature and quality of existing research.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-12T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1157-9078
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Kinesiotaping Diminishes Delayed Muscle Soreness but does not Improve
           Muscular Performance
    • Authors: Camacho; Maria Alejandra, Herrera, Esperanza, Barela, Jose Angelo, Carolina Delgado-Diaz, Diana
      Abstract: This study aimed at determining the effect of kinesio-taping (KT) on muscle performance and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) after exercise induced muscle damaged. Sixty-six healthy men volunteered to participate (age:18–25 y/o), who performed 200 isokinetic lengthening contractions of the dominant quadriceps. Then subjects were randomized to either control (no treatment), sham (no tape tension), or KT (10% tape tension) groups. Muscle performance was assessed by peak torque and muscular work during maximal isometric and concentric isokinetic contractions. DOMS intensity was assessed using a visual analog scale. Measurements were taken pre-exercise (Pre), 48 h and 96 h post-exercise. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for comparisons within group, and ANCOVA for comparisons among groups. Muscle damage was confirmed in all participants by an increase in CK activity level (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-12T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1088-5223
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • A Systematic Review of Active Video Games on Youth’s Body
           Composition and Physical Activity
    • Authors: Gao; Zan, Zeng, Nan, McDonough, Daniel J., Su, Xiwen
      Abstract: In the past decade, active video games (AVGs) have started to find their way into communities, schools, and homes as a possible solution to promote physical activity (PA) and prevent childhood obesity. However, the evidence regarding its effectiveness on body composition and objectively measured PA in youth remains inconclusive. Thus, a systematic review on this topic is needed. This review synthesizes effects of AVGs on body composition and PA in youth. The initial search yielded 260 articles from 10 databases and 18 randomized-controlled trials were included after evaluating against eligibility and removing duplicates. Overall, AVGs showed positive effects in improving body composition and PA in overweight/obese youth as compared to the control conditions with only 2 studies displaying neutral effects on these outcomes as compared to traditional PA or comparison programs. For healthy youth, more than half of the studies (n = 10) demonstrated neutral effects of AVGs on these outcomes whereas only 6 yielded positive effects compared to the control conditions. Further, one study indicated that the control condition observed greater improvement in body composition compared with an AVG intervention in healthy youth. In summary, AVGs are deemed a promising addition to promote PA and health among overweight/obese youth with the goal of fighting childhood obesity.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1152-4959
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Age of First Exposure to Soccer Heading and Sensory Reweighting for
           Upright Stance
    • Authors: Caccese; Jaclyn B., Santos, Fernando V., Yamaguchi, Felipe, Jeka, John J.
      Abstract: US Soccer eliminated soccer heading for youth players ages 10 years and younger and limited soccer heading for children ages 11–13 years. Limited empirical evidence associates soccer heading during early adolescence with medium-to-long-term behavioral deficits. The purpose of this study was to compare sensory reweighting for upright stance between college-aged soccer players who began soccer heading ages 10 years and younger (AFE ≤ 10) and those who began soccer heading after age 10 (AFE> 10). Thirty soccer players self-reported age of first exposure (AFE) to soccer heading. Sensory reweighting was compared between AFE ≤ 10 and AFE> 10. To evaluate sensory reweighting, we simultaneously perturbed upright stance with visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive stimulation. The visual stimulus was presented at two different amplitudes to measure the change in gain to vision, an intra-modal effect; and change in gain to galvanic vestibular stimulus (GVS) and vibration, both inter-modal effects. There were no differences in gain to vision (p=0.857, η2=0.001), GVS (p=0.971, η2=0.000), or vibration (p=0.974, η2=0.000) between groups. There were no differences in sensory reweighting for upright stance between AFE ≤ 10 and AFE> 10, suggesting that soccer heading during early adolescence is not associated with balance deficits in college-aged soccer players, notwithstanding potential deficits in other markers of neurological function
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1141-3553
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Age-related Changes in Motor Function (I). Mechanical and Neuromuscular
           Factors
    • Authors: Wu; Rui, Vito, Giuseppe De, Delahunt, Eamonn, Ditroilo, Massimiliano
      Abstract: This two-part narrative review aims to provide an insight into the age-related mechanical and neuromuscular factors contributing to: (1) decreased maximal muscle strength and power; (2) decreased force control; and (3) increased fatigability. Structural and functional changes from the macro-level of the muscle-tendon unit to the micro-level of the single muscle fibre have been reviewed and are described. At the muscle-tendon unit level, muscle volume, thickness and cross-sectional area, as well as pennation angle and fascicle length all decrease as part of the natural ageing process. These changes negatively affect muscle quality, muscle and tendon stiffness and Young’s modulus and account for impairment in motor performance. A progressive age-related alteration in neuromuscular function is also well-established, with reduction in number and firing rate of the motor unit, contractile velocity and specific tension of muscle fibres, and stability of neuromuscular junction. These could be the result of structural alterations in the: (i) motor neuron, with number reduced, size and collateral sprouting increased; (ii) neuromuscular junction, with decreased post-synaptic junctional fold and density of active zones and increased pre-synaptic branching and post-synaptic area; and (iii) muscle fibre, with decreased number and size and increased type I and co-expression of myosin heavy chain.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-05-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1144-3408
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Phase Angle is Determined by Body Composition and Cardiorespiratory
           Fitness in Adolescents
    • Authors: Langer; Raquel David, de Fatima Guimarães, Roseane, Gonçalves, Ezequiel Moreira, Guerra-Junior, Gil, de Moraes, Anderson Marques
      Abstract: The phase angle is used to evaluate nutritional status and is an indicator of cellular health. Cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition are strong indicators of health during adolescence. We aimed to evaluate if body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness have an association with phase angle among adolescents. 203 girls and 220 boys (12.8±1.3 years) were evaluated. Peak height velocity, percentage fat mass, fat-free mass, cardiorespiratory fitness, and phase angle measurements were collected. Linear regression adjusted by peak height velocity was used to verify if predictor variables were associated with phase angle among adolescents. Phase angle showed correlation with fat-free mass (girls: r=0.42 and boys: r=0.37); with percent fat mass (girls: r=0.23); and with cardiorespiratory fitness (boys: r=0.19). Linear regression showed that percentage fat mass (in girls) and cardiorespiratory fitness (in boys) had an effect of 11 and 17% in phase angle, respectively, while fat-free mass had an effect of 22 and 26% in phase angle for girls and boys, respectively. Changes in phase angle seem to be more associated with the percentage fat mass in girls, cardiorespiratory fitness in boys, and fat-free mass in both when controlled by peak height velocity.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1152-4865
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • VO2 Steady State at and Just Above Maximum Lactate Steady State Intensity
    • Authors: Bräuer; Elisabeth K., Smekal, Gerhard
      Abstract: Over recent decades the association between metabolic and gas exchange parameters during exercise has become evident. Different “thresholds” (such as lactate thresholds, critical power, EMG thresholds) and intensity domains appear to be linked to an upper limit of oxygen uptake steady state (V̇O2SS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether MLSS is associated with the upper limit for a V̇O2SS. Forty-five subjects underwent one incremental test and 4–6 30-minute MLSS tests on a cycle ergometer. A three-component model was used to describe V̇O2 response at PMLSS and just above PMLSS+1. To evaluate the results, breath-by-breath V̇O2 and lactate (LA) values were analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), increasing (k-) values and the Wilcoxon test. According to the calculated k-values of LA and VO2 at PMLSS and PMLSS+1, no significant increase of VO2 occurred during both intensities (PMLSS and PMLSS+1) from minute 10 to minute 30, confirming the existence of a V̇O2SS. Additionally, the ICC of 0.94 confirmed high accordance of the VO2 kinetics at both intensities (PMLSS and PMLSS+1). This study shows that power output at MLSS workload does not represent an accurate cut for an upper limit of V̇O2SS.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1100-7253
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Regulation of Circulatory Muscle-Specific MicroRNA during 8 km Run
    • Authors: Yin; Xin, Cui, Shufang, Li, Xin, Li, Wei, Lu, Qiu ju, Jiang, Xiao hong, Wang, Hui, Chen, Xi, Ma, Ji zheng
      Abstract: Acute prolonged endurance running has been shown to alter muscle-specific circulating microRNA (miRNA) levels. Here, eighteen participants completed an 8 km run. We assessed the levels of hsa-miR-1–3p, -133a-3p, -133b, and -206 and their correlation with conventional biomarkers following exercise. Compared to before exercise (Pre), 8 km run significantly increased the lactate level immediately after exercise (0 h). Myoglobin (Mb) level increased at 0 h while creatine kinase (CK) level increased 24 h after exercise (24 h). The levels of creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were all elevated at 24 h and within the normal physiological range; The levels of hsa-miR-1–3p, -133a-3p, -133b significantly increased at 0 h but only hsa-miR-133a-3p still elevated at 24 h. Only hsa-miR-206 level decreased at 24 h; Additionally, the changes of hsa-miR-1–3p and hsa-miR-133a-3p were correlated with Mb at 24 h. These findings suggest that muscle-specific miRNA elevation in plasma is likely physiological and that these miRNA may be used as potential biomarkers for load monitoring in individuals.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1145-3595
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Heart Rate Variability in College Football Players throughout Preseason
           Camp in the Heat
    • Authors: Flatt; Andrew A., Allen, Jeff, Bragg, Amy, Keith, Clayton, Earley, Ryan, Esco, Michael R.
      Abstract: We aimed to characterize cardiac-autonomic responses to a 13-day preseason camp in the heat among an American college football team. Players were categorized as linemen (n=10) and non-linemen (n=18). RHR, natural logarithm of the root-mean square of successive differences multiplied by twenty (LnRMSSD), and subjective wellbeing (LnWellness) were acquired daily. Effect sizes±90% confidence interval showed that for linemen, LnRMSSD decreased (moderate) on day 2 (71.2±10.4) and increased (moderate) on day 12 (87.1±11.2) relative to day 1 (77.9±11.2) while RHR decreased (small–moderate) on days 6, 7, and 12 (67.7±9.3–70.4±5.5 b∙min-1) relative to day 1 (77.1±10.1 b∙min-1). For non-linemen, LnRMSSD increased (small–large) on days 3–5, 7, 12, and 13 (83.4±6.8–87.6±8.5) relative to day 1 (80.0±6.5) while RHR decreased (small–large) on days 3–9, 12, and 13 (62.1±5.2–67.9±8.1 b∙min-1) relative to day 1 (70.8±6.2 b∙min-1). Decrements in LnWellness were observed on days 4–10 and 13 for linemen (moderate) and on days 6–9, 12, and 13 for non-linemen (small–moderate). Despite reductions in LnWellness, cardiac-autonomic parameters demonstrated responses consistent with heat-acclimation, which possibly attenuated fatigue-related decrements.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1145-3754
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: Reproducibility of Heart Rate Variability Indices at
           Post-maximal Exercise
    • Int J Sports Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1145-8423



      © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Int J Sports Med ; : -2020-04-14T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Is Biceps Femoris Aponeurosis Size an Independent Risk Factor for Strain
           Injury'
    • Authors: Freitas; Sandro R., Abrantes, Filipe, Santos, Francisco, Mascarenhas, Vasco, Oliveira, Raúl, Firmino, Telmo, Mendes, Bruno, Cerda, Mauricio, Vaz, João R.
      Abstract: This study examined whether professional footballers with previous biceps femoris long head (BFLH) injury in the last 3-years present a smaller proximal aponeurosis (Apo-BFLH) size compared to footballers with no previous injury. We examined the Apo-BFLH and BFLH size using magnetic resonance imaging and tested the knee flexor maximal isometric strength in 80 thighs of 40 footballers. Apo-BFLH size parameters were processed using a semi-automated procedure. Outcomes were compared between thighs with (n=9) vs. without (n=71) previous BFLH injury. No differences were observed between injured and non-injured thighs for the Apo-BFLH and BFLH size parameters (p>0.05) except for Apo-BFLH volume, which was higher in the non-injured thighs of athletes with previous injury (3692.1±2638.4 mm3, p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1028-7322
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Effects of Body Weight vs. Lean Body Mass on Wingate Anaerobic Test
           Performance in Endurance Athletes
    • Authors: Galán-Rioja; Miguel Ángel, González-Mohíno, Fernando, Sanders, Dajo, Mellado, Jesús, González-Ravé, José María
      Abstract: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of body weight or lean body mass-based load on Wingate Anaerobic Test performance in male and female endurance trained individuals. Thirty-one participants (22 male cyclists and triathletes and 9 female triathletes) completed two randomized Wingate Anaerobic Test (body weight and lean body mass loads) in stationary start. There were no significant differences in power outputs variables between loads in any group. However, when comparing specific groups within the sample (e. g. cyclists vs cyclists) medium to large effect sizes were observed for Relative Mean Power Output (ES=0.53), Relative Lowest Power (ES=0.99) and Relative Power Muscle Mass (ES=0.54). Regarding gender differences, male cyclists and triathletes displayed higher relative and absolute power outputs (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1114-6206
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Physiological Correlates to In-race Paratriathlon Cycling Performance
    • Authors: Stephenson; Ben Thomas, Shill, Alex, Lenton, John, Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria
      Abstract: The purpose was to determine the physiological correlates to cycling performance within a competitive paratriathlon. Five wheelchair user and ten ambulant paratriathletes undertook laboratory-based testing to determine their: peak rate of oxygen uptake; blood lactate- and ventilatory-derived physiological thresholds; and, their maximal aerobic power. These variables were subsequently expressed in absolute (l∙min −1 or W), relative (ml∙kg−1∙min −1 or W∙kg −1) and scaled relative (or ml∙kg − 0.82 ∙min −1, ml∙kg − 0.32 ∙min −1 or W∙kg −0.32) terms. All athletes undertook a paratriathlon race with 20 km cycle. Pearson’s correlation test and linear regression analyses were produced between laboratory-derived variables and cycle performance to generate correlation coefficients (r), standard error of estimates and 95% confidence intervals. For wheelchair users, performance was most strongly correlated to relative aerobic lactate threshold (W∙kg −1) (r=−0.99; confidence intervals: −0.99 to −0.99; standard error of estimate=22 s). For ambulant paratriathletes, the greatest correlation was with maximal aerobic power (W∙kg −0.32) (r=−0.91; −0.99 to −0.69; standard error of estimate=88 s). Race-category-specificity exits regarding physiological correlates to cycling performance in a paratriathlon race with further differences between optimal scaling factors between paratriathletes. This suggests aerobic lactate threshold and maximal aerobic power are the pertinent variables to infer cycling performance for wheelchair users and ambulant paratriathletes, respectively.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1103-2001
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Addition of Caffeine to a Carbohydrate Feeding Strategy Prior to
           Intermittent Exercise
    • Authors: Hulton; Andrew T., Vitzel, Kaio, Doran, Dominic A., MacLaren, Don P. M.
      Abstract: The ergogenic effect of caffeine is well established, although no investigations providing a high carbohydrate feeding strategy (pre-exercise meal=2 g/kg BM) co-ingested with caffeine exist for soccer. This investigation examines the effect of caffeine in addition to a pre-exercise carbohydrate meal and drink mid-way through a soccer simulation. Eight recreational soccer players completed an 85-minute soccer simulation followed by an exercise capacity test (Yo-yo Intermittent Endurance test level 2) on two occasions. Prior to exercise participants consumed a high carbohydrate meal, with placebo or 5 mg/kg BM-1 caffeine. No significant performance effect was identified (p=0.099) despite a 12.8% (109 m) improvement in exercise capacity following caffeine. Rates of carbohydrate and fat oxidation did not differ between conditions and nor were differences apparent for plasma glucose, fatty acids, glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate (p>0.05). However, an increase in lactate was observed for caffeine (p=0.039). A significant condition effect on rating of perceived exertion was identified (p
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1121-7817
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • The Effects of Resistance Exercise Selection on Muscle Size and Strength
           in Trained Women
    • Authors: Barbalho; Matheus, Souza, Daniel, Coswig, Victor, Steele, James, Fisher, James, Abrahin, Odilon, Paoli, Antonio, Gentil, Paulo
      Abstract: The study compared the effects of resistance training programs composed by multi-joint (MJ), single-joint (SJ) and the combination of multi- and single-joint (MJ+SJ) exercises on muscle strength and hypertrophy in trained women. Thirty participants were divided into groups that performed only MJ exercises, SJ exercises and MJ+SJ exercises for six months. Participants were tested for 1-repetition maximum (RM) and muscle thickness (MT) before and after the intervention. All groups showed significant gains on 1RM tests from pre- to post-training (P
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1121-7736
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Musculoskeletal Regeneration, Rehabilitation, and Plasticity Following
           Traumatic Injury
    • Authors: Greising; Sarah M., Corona, Benjamin T., Call, Jarrod A.
      Abstract: The musculoskeletal system has an integral role throughout life, including structural support to the body, protection, and allowing a range of fine to complex movements for daily living to elite sporting events. At various times, injuries to the musculoskeletal system occur resulting in varying levels of impact to the person both acutely and chronically. Specifically, there is a spectrum of complexity in orthopedic injuries, with some such as common muscle strains, that while burdensome will have no impact on life-long functional ability, and others that can result in long lasting disability. Focusing on extremity injuries, this review highlights: i) the current impact of orthopedicinjuries in sport and daily life; ii) the foundation of bone and skeletal muscle repair and regeneration; and iii) the disruptions in regenerative healing due to traumatic orthopedic injuries. This review seeks to maximize the broad and collective research impact on sport and traumatic orthopedic injuries in search of promoting ongoing innovation for treatment and rehabilitation approaches aimed to improve musculoskeletal health throughout life.
      Citation: Int J Sports Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1128-7128
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
 
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