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SPORTS MEDICINE (78 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199)
American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Apunts. Medicina de l'Esport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biomedical Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
British Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Studies in Sport Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Clinics in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Current Sports Medicine Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Sport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
International Journal of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Athletic Enhancement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Education, Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology     Open Access  
Journal of Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of ISAKOS     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery Open     Open Access  
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Sport & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sports Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 58)
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Motor Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
OA Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physical Therapy in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte     Open Access  
Revista del Pie y Tobillo     Open Access  
Saudi Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Science & Motricité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Science & Sports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Science and Medicine in Football     Hybrid Journal  
South African Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Spor Hekimliği Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access  
Spor ve Performans Araştırmaları Dergisi / Ondokuz Mayıs University Journal of Sports and Performance Researches     Open Access  
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sport, Education and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport, Ethics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Sport- und Präventivmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sportphysio     Hybrid Journal  
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sports Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Sports Medicine - Open     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sports Medicine and Health Science     Open Access  
Sports Medicine International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Sportverletzung · Sportschaden     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sri Lankan Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine     Open Access  
Translational Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.215
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1060-1872 - ISSN (Online) 1557-9794
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3159 journals]
  • Table of Contents (pick up from previous issue w/updates)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 27, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Editorial Board (pick up from previous issue)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 27, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Arthroscopic Glenoid Bone Grafting: Preserving the Subscapularis- A
           Reproducible Technique
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Daniel Mcneil, Ivan H. WongAbstractThe ideal technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss is a topic of debate. Several techniques have been described by the orthopaedic surgeons including bony reconstruction as well as soft tissue repair. The clinical outcomes and complication rate (recurrent instability, graft failure) of these procedures vary significantly. It is believed that arthroscopic anatomic bony reconstruction might be a suitable option for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with significant glenoid bone loss. We have discussed about the technique of arthroscopic anatomic glenoid reconstruction using distal tibial allograft preserving the subscapularis muscle which seems to be very safe with excellent outcome.
       
  • Arthroscopic allograft procedure for restoring humeral head defects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Jonathan J. Streit, Yousef Shishani, Reuben Gobezie
       
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Mark Getelman, Mark H. Getelman
       
  • The Open Eden-Hybinette Procedure for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder
           Instability with Glenoid Bone Loss
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Joseph W. Galvin, Zachary R. Zimmer, Alexander M. Prete, Jon J.P. WarnerAbstractIn the setting of significant glenoid bone loss, soft tissue stabilization procedures for recurrent anterior shoulder instability have high failure rates. The open or arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure with tricortical iliac crest autograft has been shown to provide good results with low rates of recurrent instability. Indications for this technique include severe glenoid bone loss (>40%), recurrent instability following a Latarjet or distal tibial allograft procedure, or patients with abnormal coracoid morphology. In this technique article, we review the indications, contraindications, surgical technique, postoperative care, outcomes, and complications of the open Eden-Hybinette procedure.
       
  • Arthroscopic Distal Clavicle Glenoid Augmentation: An Ideal Graft Option
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): John M. Tokish, Mayo Clinic ArizonaAbstractRecent work has demonstrated the importance of addressing bone loss in the surgical management of anterior shoulder instability. Multiple options exist for reconstituting the glenoid articular surface to include anatomic versus non-anatomic techniques, and utilizing autograft versus allograft material. An ideal approach would provide an autograft source of osteochondral material that is well-matched to the defect, readily available, cost effective, and with minimal comorbidity. The distal clavicle autograft provides such an option. The graft has a cortical and cancellous side for direct fixation, and is amenable to arthroscopic techniques. Recent work has demonstrated the utility of this graft noting that the distal clavicle graft provides an anatomic restoration of the glenoid radius with an articular cartilage cap comparable in thickness to that of the native glenoid. Along with a summary of the pertinent literature, this review article outlines the rationale, indications, and technical notes for this procedure.
       
  • Open Latarjet Reconstruction: Tips for Success
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Brandon J. Manderle, Alexander Beletsky, Joseph N. Liu, Grant H. Garcia, Nikhil N. VermaAbstractThe Latarjet coracoid transfer is a key procedure for reducing anterior shoulder instability in patients with glenoid bone loss. New evidence suggests that subcritical glenoid bone loss, particularly in revision situations, portends an increased risk of recurrent instability. High recurrent instability rates associated with non-operative management and revision soft tissue stabilization make the Latarjet and other bony stability procedures a must in an orthopedic surgeons repertoire of recurrent anterior instability management. The long-term outcomes of the Latarjet surpass revision stabilization by soft tissue correction in those with significant glenoid loss. Despite the promising outcomes of the latarjet, the complication rate remains high. We present a practical guide to the open Latarjet procedure, addressing many of technical challenges to aid the reader in future decision-making regarding indications, approach, exposure, surgical technique and rehabilitation.
       
  • Arthroscopic Latarjet: Tips for success
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Matt Ravenscroft, Saurabh OdakAbstractThe Latarjet procedure remains the most favored technique in dealing with patients with recurrent shoulder instability, instability secondary to bony Bankart lesions, off-track lesions, bipolar lesions and in patients with Humeral avulsion of gleno-humeral ligament (HAGL lesions). Traditionally this procedure has been performed as an open procedure, however the Arthroscopic Latarjet procedure has been described with similar outcomes to that of open technique. This article describes our preferred technique for the Arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.
       
  • The Glenojet Procedure: A Bone Preserving Alternative
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Brett W. McCoy, Anthony MiniaciAbstractBone loss in the setting of shoulder instability increases the likelihood of recurrent instability and increases the failure rate of arthroscopic interventions. Bone loss of the anteroinferior glenoid can be addressed via autograft (coracoid transfer or iliac crest bone graft) or allograft (iliac crest or osteochondral). We describe a technique for managing glenoid bone loss with a pre-shaped allograft.The Glenojet (Arthrosurface Inc.) is an allograft cortical bone augment for the glenoid. It is placed with a standard deltopectoral approach. The graft is pre-drilled and has a disposable targeting guide that fits two 3.5 mm cortical screws. It offers an easy solution for addressing anteroinferior glenoid bone loss that preserves normal patient anatomy. It is particularly appealing for revision procedures of failed coracoid transfers.
       
  • Open Distal Tibial Allograft Augmentation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Taylor M Southworth, Neal B Naveen, R Stephen Otte, Brian J ColeAbstractIsolated soft tissue stabilization procedures for treatment of recurrent shoulder instability are often not appropriate when the patient demonstrates bone loss of greater than 15% and in situations where there is recurrent instability after multiple attempts at arthroscopic stabilization. Current techniques for glenoid reconstruction include autografts with coracoid transfers, both Latarjet and Bristow techniques, autografts from the iliac crest, and allografts. Recent focus is on the use of distal tibial allografts for glenoid reconstruction. Distal tibial allografts provide a nearly identical radius of curvature to the glenoid with the addition of a thick cartilaginous surface that helps to restore the natural arc of the glenoid, ultimately leading to improved contact pressures by increasing the contact area. Additionally, these grafts are readily available and offer exceptional bone strength for fixation with a screw. This article discusses the surgical technique of distal tibial allograft augmentation for recurrent shoulder instability as well as the pre- and post-operative management of these patients.
       
  • Arthroscopic Bankart Reconstruction with Minimal Bone Loss
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Jessica H.J. Ryu, Jason R. Kang, Richard K.N. RyuArthroscopic shoulder stabilization is the most commonly used technique to treat shoulder instability; however, recurrence rates have been shown to be high in our literature. Optimizing treating of glenohumeral instability is crucial to improve patient outcomes. This chapter will provide a basic review of the key steps in the evaluation and management of patients with shoulder instability with minimal bone loss.
       
  • Acute Bony Bankarts: Tips and Tricks for Success
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Joseph P. Burns, Ryan M. VellingaBony Bankart injuries are common after traumatic glenohumeral anterior instability events. Restoration of glenoid bony integrity is critical to minimizing the risk of recurrence, post-traumatic osteoarthritis, and in recreating normal shoulder kinematics. Surgical repair can be very technically challenging as can the preoperative decisions involved in selecting both a surgical approach (open or arthroscopic) and a method of fixation (suture anchors or screws). With a focus on arthroscopy, we present a review of the current preferred techniques in surgical management of bony Bankart injuries.
       
  • Remplissage: Expand the Arthroscopic Repair Spectrum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Brian Cable, Ann Marie Kelly, Elizabeth Mintz, John D. KellyHumeral head defects (Hill-Sachs lesions) are common sequelae of glenohumeral instability and potentiate recurrence. Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions clearly increase risk of recurrent instability when not addressed surgically. Arthroscopic remplissage, in conjunction with Bankart repair, has proven to be a safe and effective means to treat anterior gelnohumeral instability. Remplissage, when executed properly, favorably alters the “glenoid track” and thus lessens the risk of glenohumeral engagement in abduction external rotation. Remplissage is a biologic tissue transfer that confers much less morbidity than glenoid bone grafting procedures (Latarjet), while demonstrating comparable efficacy.
       
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Mark H. Getelman
       
  • The Glenoid Track and How It Can Guide Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Robert U. Hartzler, Patrick J. DenardThe classification and treatment of bone loss in anterior shoulder instability remain as significant challenges to the shoulder surgeon, particularly when bipolar lesions are present. The concept of the glenoid track was developed in order to be able to predict whether engagement of a humeral Hill-Sachs lesion (HSL) would occur in the anterior apprehension position of the shoulder. A rational classification system for HSL as “on-track” (nonengaging) or “off-track” (engaging) flowed out of the biomechanical knowledge of the glenoid track. An “on-track, off-track” treatment paradigm has subsequently been described whereby “off-track” HSL are recommended to be treated by arthroscopic remplissage and Bankart repair to restore shoulder stability and prevent engagement. This article contains a discussion of the history, the biomechanics, and the treatment considerations of Hill-Sachs lesions with a focus on bipolar bone loss as informed by the glenoid track.
       
  • The Biomechanics of the Latarjet Reconstruction: Is It All About the
           Sling'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Nobuyuki Yamamoto, Scott P. SteinmannIt has been clinically believed that the stabilizing mechanism of the Latarjet procedure is the sling effect. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated that there are 3 stabilizing mechanisms of the Latarjet procedure, the main one being the sling effect produced by the subscapularis and conjoint tendons. The other 2 mechanisms are the suturing of the capsular flap at the end-range arm position and reconstruction of the glenoid concavity at the mid-range arm position. All 3 stabilizing mechanisms function at both the mid- and end-range arm positions. After the Latarjet procedure, the shoulder even with a large glenoid defect can have stability increased by 14% compared to the normal shoulder. The acceptable clinical outcomes of the Latarjet procedure are supported by these 3 stabilizing mechanisms.
       
  • Open Bankart Repair: A Reproducible Technique
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Christian A. Merrill, Robert ArcieroShoulder instability is one of the most common complaints seen by orthopaedic surgeons taking care of an athletic patient mix. The management of shoulder instability has varied over the years and significant controversy and debate surrounds the proper management of this pathology. Traditionally, open Bankart surgical repair was the gold standard of care; however, over the past 20 years with the advancement of arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic shoulder stabilization has become more popular. Furthermore, a soft-tissue stabilization procedure versus a bony procedure is another consideration that the treating orthopaedic surgeon must consider when taking care of this pathology. Patient selection, risk factors, and pathology are crucial in making the correct treatment decision. Short- and long-term data regarding open Bankart repair including the indications of open Bankart repair will be discussed. Additionally, a reliable surgical technique for open Bankart repair will be presented.
       
  • Assessment of Bone Loss in the Shoulder
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Sports MedicineAuthor(s): Matthew T. Provencher, Liam A. Peebles, Travis J. Dekker, Zachary S. Aman, Mitchell I. KennedyThe accurate identification and quantification of both glenoid bone loss and the presence of a Hill-Sachs lesion is essential in the setting of anterior shoulder instability as it directly dictates patient outcomes. The ability to diagnose and address these potential osseous defects of the glenohumeral joint based on patient history, physical exam, and the findings of various imaging modalities in a clinical setting is fundamental to the overall success of a surgeon's treatment algorithm. Multiple methods exist to quantify bone loss based on diagnostic imaging or arthroscopy, and the surgeon should be mindful of the respective pearls and pitfalls of each imaging modality and their ability to accurately diagnose shoulder bone loss. Pertinent findings in a patient's history such as age, level of activity, enlistment status, and events of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability can help one not only predict the presence of bone loss, but the location and size of the defect as well. Furthermore, symptoms and signs of chronic instability along with accurate quantification of glenoid bone loss are essential in the algorithm of selecting the correct surgical procedure to provide optimal stabilization and maximize clinical outcomes.
       
  • Meniscus Root Repair
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Douglas J. Navasartian, Thomas M. DeBerardinoIt has long been recognized that injuries to the menisci have a significantly detrimental effect on knee kinematics and can cause pathology within the knee joint. The consequences of these tears can lead to progressive degenerative changes of the chondral surfaces in the knee. Because of the deleterious sequelae of meniscal root tears, identification of these tears and a means of potential surgical treatment are paramount. The following is a discussion of meniscal root tears and the surgical techniques that can be utilized in operative treatment.
       
  • Arthroscopic Techniques to Enhance Meniscus Visualization
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Jolene C. Hardy, Robert E. HunterThe first step in achieving a successful meniscal repair is adequate visualization of and access to the meniscus to be repaired. With concomitant pathologies such as anterior cruciate ligament deficiency or a tight varus knee, meniscal regions such as the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can be quite difficult to visualize and access without causing iatrogenic injury to surrounding cartilage. In this chapter, we aim to provide techniques, which can be utilized by the arthroscopic surgeon to enhance meniscus visualization for improved diagnosis and management of meniscal tears.
       
  • The Classification of Knee Meniscal Cartilage Tears
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Timothy J. Mulry, Louis F. McIntyreMeniscal cartilage tears are among the most common orthopaedic pathologic conditions. The incidence of meniscal cartilage tears increases with age and as such will present a growing problem in the United States and other developed countries experiencing aging populations. To properly diagnose and assess treatment of cartilage tears classification systems are necessary to categorize and compare outcomes. There are several traditional methods of classifying tears based on their morphologic characteristics, vascular anatomy, and location. Recently there has been an interest in tear types that may have been known but were not widely recognized. Advances in arthroscopic techniques have facilitated both the diagnosis and treatment of cartilage tears. A solid knowledge of the classification of meniscal tears is essential to their proper treatment.
       
  • Treatment of Horizontal Cleavage Tears – Resection to Repair
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Peter R. KurzweilHorizontal cleavage tears have recently received more attention. Historically they were treated with benign neglect or resection. Recent biomechanical studies show that resecting one of the leaflets may be as detrimental a partial meniscectomy in tears with a more vertical orientation. New instrumentation has facilitated repair with an all-inside vertical compression stitch. Cadaver studies show repairing horizontal cleavage tears in such a manner can restore the biomechanics of the joint close to the intact state. The approach to treating horizontal cleavage tears has changed and is the focus of this article.
       
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Robert Hunter
       
  • Table of Contents (pick up from previous issue w/updates)
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • Meniscus Repair Enhancement Options
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Ryan A. Mlynarek, Andreas H. Gomoll, Jack FarrMeniscal tears are one of the most common pathologies of the knee. They can be managed with observation, partial meniscectomy, or repair. The limited vascularity of the meniscus central to the periphery limits the healing potential of meniscal tissue; however, recent development of biologic augments and surgical techniques have expanded the capability for meniscus repair; potentially avoiding partial meniscectomy in selected cases. The procedures and adjuncts include mechanical stimulation of the healing response, fibrin augmentation, bone marrow aspirate concentrate, mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, scaffolds, and others in development used either in isolation or combination. It is important for surgeons to become familiar with evolving biologic augmentation options to improve meniscal repair healing in an attempt to optimize the long-term health of the knee joint.
       
  • Meniscus Repair of the Anterior Third: The Outside-In Option
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Philip Austin Serbin, Justin W. Griffin, Kevin F. BonnerOutside-in meniscal repair is an effective and often most optimal technique for addressing tears involving the anterior one-third of the meniscus. It can be performed without an assistant with standard arthroscopy instrumentation. Although the technique may be used for tears in the anterior two-thirds of both the lateral and medial meniscus, it is most commonly utilized for anterior one-third tears, which are not often accessible with other techniques. Knowledge of the anatomy of the saphenous and peroneal nerves in relation to flexion of the knee is paramount to avoiding iatrogenic injury. The technique involves passing sutures through spinal needles that are placed percutaneously from outside-in across the meniscal tear. There are various modifications of the basic technique that may be performed depending on available instrumentation and surgeon preference. Although repairable anterior one-third tears are not as common as posterior horn tears, proficiency with the outside-in technique can be quite valuable and often ideal in this setting. Multiple authors have reported excellent healing rates. With proper attention to needle placement, complications are rare.
       
  • Inside-Out Meniscal Repair in the Mid One-Third of the Menisci
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Justin Peterson, Nikolaos K. Paschos, John C. RichmondMeniscal repair as an isolated surgical technique developed in the 1970s to treat peripheral longitudinal tears near the meniscosynovial junction. It rapidly evolved into an arthroscopically assisted technique. The development of a myriad of implants has led to evolution to all inside techniques. In the mid one-third of the menisci, classic inside-out meniscal suturing remains widely used due to the relative safety of avoiding important neurovascular structures, the ease of suture retrieval, and its low cost.In recent years, it has been demonstrated that repair of menisci can be extrapolated from just peripheral longitudinal tears to horizontal cleavage tears and deep radial tears. Classic inside-out suturing can be utilized in the mid one-third of the meniscus to repair these varied tear patterns.
       
  • Arthroscopic Management of Meniscus Tears at the Popliteal Hiatus
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Lutul FarrowTears of the lateral meniscus are very common. In comparison to the medial meniscus some tears of the lateral meniscus require special consideration with respect to operative management. Specifically, tears involving the popliteal hiatus offer different challenges when considered for operative repair. Presence of the popliteus tendon, the absence of a peripheral attachment and questionable blood supply make repair of these injuries very challenging. Tips and techniques are presented for the management of lateral meniscus tears involving the popliteal hiatus.
       
  • Meniscus Repair in the Posterior Third: The All-Inside Option
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Ryan Nixon, Spencer M. Stein, Nicholas A. SgaglioneThe benefits of meniscal preservation have been well established in the literature. There is a growing trend toward meniscal repair in recent years. All-inside repair techniques and instrumentation have rapidly evolved and enable the surgeon to manage complex meniscal pathology, often more safely and efficiently and less invasively than classical inside-out repair. The posterior third of the meniscus presents added challenges in regards to proper access to the tears as well as proximity to vital neurovascular structures. This article outlines the senior author's Nicholas A. Sgaglione preferred technique for all-inside repair of posterior third medial and lateral meniscus tears.
       
 
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