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NURSES AND NURSING (362 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 362 Journals sorted alphabetically
A&A Case Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
ACORN : The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Acta Paulista de Enfermagem     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advanced Healthcare Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Family Practice Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Advancing Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
American Journal of Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 214)
American Nurse Today     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Anadolu Hemşirelik ve Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access  
Annual Review of Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AORN Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Aporia : The Nursing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Applied Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Aquichán     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Nursing Practice and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Nursing Research     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australasian Journal of Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian Journal of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Nursing and Midwifery Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Nursing Journal : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Avances en Enfermería     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bariatric Surgical Practice and Patient Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Belitung Nursing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Uttaradit Journal     Open Access  
British Journal of Anaesthetic and Recovery Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
British Journal of Cardiac Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
British Journal of Community Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
British Journal of Mental Health Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
British Journal of Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 91)
British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
British Journal of Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 274)
British Journal of School Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal / Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cancer Nursing Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
CANNT Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Caring Nursing Journal (CNJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Enfermeria - Revista Iberoamericana de Investigacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Lactation     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nurse Specialist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Clinical Nursing Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Scholars Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Simulation in Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Collegian: Journal of the Royal College of Nursing Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Nurse : A Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
COPING (Community of Publishing in Nursing)     Open Access  
Creative Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Critical Care Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Critical Care Nursing Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Critical, Medical and Surgical Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Cultura de los cuidados     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cumhuriyet Hemşirelik Dergisi     Open Access  
Curationis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Dental Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Dermatological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EAU Heritage Journal Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ege Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Ege University Nursing Faculty     Open Access  
Egyptian Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Ene : Revista de Enfermería     Open Access  
Enfermagem Revista     Open Access  
Enfermería : Cuidados Humanizados     Open Access  
Enfermería Clínica (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Enfermería Global     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Enfermería Intensiva     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfermería Universitaria     Open Access  
Escola Anna Nery     Open Access  
Estima : Brazilian Journal of Enterestomal Therapy     Open Access  
European Diabetes Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Evidence-Based Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Fisioterapia e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Fisioterapia em Movimento     Open Access  
Florence Nightingale Journal of Nursing     Open Access  
Frontiers of Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fundamental and Management Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Gastroenterology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Surgery Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Qualitative Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Green Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Hacettepe Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Hayat : Journal of Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
HIV Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Holistic Nursing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Idea Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Independent Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Indonesian Journal of Nursing Practices     Open Access  
Intensive and Critical Care Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Diabetes Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Emergency Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Advanced Nursing Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Care Scholars     Open Access  
International Journal of Childbirth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health Sciences Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Immunological Nursing     Open Access  
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Neurological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Nurse Practitioner Educators     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Nursing Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Nursing Knowledge     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nursing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nursing Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Nursing Science Practice and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Nursing Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nursing Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Obstetrics, Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Older People Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Palliative Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Pediatric Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Physiotherapy and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
International Journal of Urological Nursing     Hybrid Journal  
International Nursing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Investigacion en Enfermeria: Imagen y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Investigación y Educación en Enfermería     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Issues in Mental Health Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Japan Journal of Nursing Science     Hybrid Journal  
JMIR Nursing     Open Access  
Journal for Nurse Practitioners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal for Nurses in Professional Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Aesthetic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Hermeneutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Bangkok     Open Access  
Journal of Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Surin     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Caring Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Christian Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Community Health Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Compassionate Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Emergency Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Evidence-based Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Family Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Gerontological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health Science Boromarajonani College of Nursing Sunpasitthiprasong     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Visiting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Holistic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Holistic Nursing Science     Open Access  
Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Human Lactation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Infusion Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Midwifery     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproduction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Neonatal Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Neuroscience Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nursing & Interprofessional Leadership in Quality & Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nursing Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Nursing and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Nursing Care Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Nursing Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Nursing Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nursing Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Nursing Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Nursing Regulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Human Lactation
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.694
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0890-3344 - ISSN (Online) 1552-5732
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1088 journals]
  • JHL News
    • Pages: 19 - 20
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 19-20, February 2020.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-02-11T09:37:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419887958
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • LEAARC News Brief: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review
           Committee News
    • Authors: Laura Sieckmann
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-04-03T05:42:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420916138
       
  • Safe Handling of Containers of Expressed Human Milk in all Settings During
           the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Pandemic
    • Authors: Kathleen A. Marinelli, Robert M Lawrence
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-04-03T01:53:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420919083
       
  • COVID19 and Breastfeeding: Not That Simple
    • Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-04-01T03:53:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420917102
       
  • International Perspectives Concerning Donor Milk Banking During the
           SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Pandemic
    • Authors: Kathleen A. Marinelli
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T02:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420917661
       
  • Appropriate Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices in an Emergency for
           Non-Breastfed Infants Under Six Months: The Rohingya Experience
    • Authors: Alice Burrell, Anne M. Kueter, Sujan Ariful, Habibur Rahaman, Alessandro Iellamo, Golam Mothabbir
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Since 25 August, 2017 over 693,000 Rohingya have been forced from Myanmar due to mass violence, seeking refuge in neighboring Bangladesh. Nutritional surveys during 2017 revealed worrying levels of malnutrition and poor infant feeding practices, including high numbers of infants not exclusively breastfeeding. Infants under 6 months who are not exclusively breastfed are particularly vulnerable to morbidity and mortality and require specialized feeding support, especially in emergency contexts.Research Aim:To describe Save the Children International’s experiences supporting wet nursing, relactation, and artificial feeding for non-breastfed infants under 6 months in the Rohingya Response, Bangladesh.Methods:A retrospective analysis was conducted of routine program data and documentation from Save the Children International’s infant and young child feeding in emergencies interventions for the Rohingya Response, Bangladesh, from November 2017 to April 2018. The study population were infants under 6 months identified as not breastfed during the initial assessment (N = 15).Results:Although wet nursing was attempted with all infants, it was successful with 6 (40%) of the infants. Additionally, 1 (6.7%) infant’s mother was able to successfully relactate. The remaining infants ended up requiring feeding with human milk substitutes.Conclusion:Gaps exist in operational guidance to support non-breastfed infants with wet nursing and relactation in emergency settings, as well as on how to operationalize safe human milk substitute programming in line with national policies and regulations. There is an urgent need to address this gap to protect the lives of non-breastfed infants in emergencies worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-13T06:41:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420906838
       
  • Sampling Methods
    • Authors: Andrea E. Berndt
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Knowledge of sampling methods is essential to design quality research. Critical questions are provided to help researchers choose a sampling method. This article reviews probability and non-probability sampling methods, lists and defines specific sampling techniques, and provides pros and cons for consideration. In addition, issues related to sampling methods are described to highlight potential problems.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-10T06:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420906850
       
  • Biological Nurturing: Instinctual Breastfeeding
    • Authors: Audrey K. Thompson
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-06T12:51:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420906839
       
  • Back to the Breast: An Historical Overview of the Perceived Connections
           Between Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Breastfeeding
    • Authors: Brittany Cowgill
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      In the late 19th century, physicians in the United States and Europe grew concerned about an increasingly visible subset of infant mortality: sudden infant death. Over the next 100 years, physicians worked variably to combat the problem, modifying and refining their conceptions of sudden infant mortality many times over the process. Physicians’ overlapping revisions of sudden infant mortality ultimately helped to produce the categorization of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), and their ensuing, fluctuating efforts to resolve this problem shed light on social and medical perceptions of the roles that biology, the environment, and infant care practices played in sudden infant death. SIDS’s official medical classification was a watershed; not only did the formal medical label establish its “authenticity” as a medical phenomenon, but the label also asserted the inexplicability of (at least some) sudden infant death episodes while simultaneously conveying that affected parents were deserving victims of a tragic loss. In the modern history of sudden infant death in the United States, breastfeeding, in particular, was understood variably as a possible cause for unnecessary infant mortality in the decades surrounding 1900; inconsequential to the occurrence of SIDS in the mid 1900s; and finally as an important and healthful way to reduce the risk for SIDS beginning in the late 1900s.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-06T07:04:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420906837
       
  • David Clark: Defender of Human Rights and Breastfeeding
    • Authors: Laurence M. Grummer-Strawn, David Lawson Clark
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      On September 10, I had the pleasure of interviewing my friend and colleague David Lawson Clark, the legal advisor for infant and young child nutrition and expert on the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes at UNICEF. A native of Scotland, David began his career as an attorney with the Scottish Development Agency and subsequently worked for the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute in Rome, Italy. Since 1995, David has assisted more than 60 countries in drafting legislation to implement the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and has been instrumental in bringing a human rights-based approach to the protection, promotion, and support of breastfeeding. He has contributed to the development of international policy guidelines in the area of HIV and infant feeding and infant feeding in emergencies, and has provided guidance on issues around international trade agreements and intellectual property rights. David has written and contributed to many articles and publications on health and nutrition policy, developed courses and training materials on the implementation of the International Code and maternity protection, and has facilitated numerous workshops on the issue. (LGS refers to Dr. Laurence Grummer-Strawn and DC are the verbatim responses of David Clark)
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-04T04:24:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420902685
       
  • WABA News Brief: Human Milk Banking
    • Authors: Nisha Kumaravel
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T05:04:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420902686
       
  • LEAARC News Brief: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review
           Committee News
    • Authors: Laura Sieckmann
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T05:04:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420904698
       
  • Analysis of Disialyllacto-N-Tetraose (DSLNT) Content in Milk From Mothers
           of Preterm Infants
    • Authors: Denise Hassinger, Dana M. Clausen, Sarah Nitka, Aimee Herdt, Ian Griffin
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) have been recognized for the protective effects they may elicit among high risk infants. One HMO, disialyllacto-N-tetraose (DSLNT), has been shown to reduce the risk for developing necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants.Research aims:To measure DSLNT content in the human milk from mothers of preterm infants, and (1) assess variability; (2) establish correlations between maternal factors and/or an infant’s risk for developing necrotizing enterocolitis; and (3) determine the effect of pasteurization.Methods:DSLNT was measured in 84 samples of preterm milk, in human donor milk, and in Holder and flash pasteurized samples. Preterm infant outcomes were assessed by medical record review.Results:DSLNT content of mother’s own milk was highly variable and decreased significantly with increasing postnatal age. Four preterm infants (6.7%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (Bell stage II or greater), 4 (6.7%) developed spontaneous intestinal perforation, and 1 developed both. DSLNT z-score was below the age-specific M within 8 (89%) of the 9 milk samples from mothers whose babies developed necrotizing enterocolitis (p = 0.039), but the DSLNT content did not differ between infants with necrotizing enterocolitis, spontaneous intestinal perforation, or neither condition (p> 0.1). DSLNT levels were significantly reduced in samples of donor milk compared to mothers’ own milk (p = 0.0051). Pasteurization did not significantly reduce DSLNT content.Conclusions:DSLNT content of human milk is variable and may be lower in milk from mothers whose infants developed necrotizing enterocolitis. DSLNT content is unaffected by flash or Holder pasteurization.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-02-28T09:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420904041
       
  • Breastfeeding Duration in a Low-Income Sample Is Associated With Child
           Diet Quality at Age Three
    • Authors: Nancy S. Weinfield, Christine Borger, Alice Ann Gola
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Little research has focused on breastfeeding and diet quality, particularly in low-income populations at risk for shorter breastfeeding duration and poorer diet quality.Research Aim:The aim of this study was to examine the association between breastfeeding duration and later diet quality in a low-income population.Methods:For this longitudinal prospective cohort study we conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study-2, a national study of infant feeding practices and child outcomes. Study infants were enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children by 2.5 months of age and followed until 36 months (N = 1,223). We examined the association between breastfeeding duration until 13 months of age, and child diet quality derived from a 24-hour dietary recall with a usual intake adjustment at child age 36 months. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the association of breastfeeding duration with overall diet quality, as measured by the Heathy Eating Index 2015, and with consumption of specific food groups.Results:Longer breastfeeding duration during infancy was associated with better diet quality at child age 36 months after controlling for key socio-demographic variables. In follow-up analyses, the origin of the association was narrowed to greater consumption of mature/dried beans and peas.Conclusions:Longer breastfeeding duration in infancy was associated with better diet quality at 36 months, in a population at risk for shorter breastfeeding duration and poorer diet quality. Breastfeeding was particularly associated with children’s consumption of mature/dried beans and peas.Clinical Trial Registration:This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as Feeding My Baby—A National WIC Study, NCT02031978
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T06:57:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334420903029
       
  • Human Milk Feeding Status of Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care
           Units in China
    • Authors: Wenjing Peng, Siyuan Jiang, Shujuan Li, Shiwen Xia, Shushu Chen, Yi Yang, Shoo K. Lee, Yun Cao
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Previous low human milk feeding rates in Chinese neonatal intensive care units of preterm infants were reported. There are no nationwide data on these.Research Aims:To investigate the current status of human milk feeding for preterm infants in Chinese units and provide baseline data for future research.Methods:A secondary data analysis was conducted from a previously established clinical database including 25 Chinese neonatal intensive care units. All infants born
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-02-20T10:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419901265
       
  • Breastfeeding Protection, Promotion, and Support in Humanitarian
           Emergencies: A Systematic Review of Literature
    • Authors: Immacolata Dall’Oglio, Francesca Marchetti, Rachele Mascolo, Patrizia Amadio, Orsola Gawronski, Maria Clemente, Andrea Dotta, Federico Ferro, Antonio Garofalo, Guglielmo Salvatori, Antonella Tarantino, Emanuela Tiozzo, Angela Giusti
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Infants, young children, and their mothers are vulnerable in humanitarian emergencies. The health benefits of optimal breastfeeding practices in emergency settings have been demonstrated by many researchers. Infant and Young Children Feeding in Emergency guidelines illustrate a series of interventions to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding, but unfortunately, these recommendations are still scarcely applied.Research Aims:(1) To review the literature describing the effectiveness of breastfeeding protection, promotion, and support interventions in humanitarian emergency contexts; (2) to describe the influence of interventions on breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration; and (3) to evaluate relevant mother and infant/child outcomes available in the literature.Methods:PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Psychology Database, JSTOR, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Ovid were searched for articles that examined breastfeeding protection, promotion, or support interventions and the resulting outcomes without any time limits (N = 10). Articles that did not include the interventions and related outcomes were excluded (n = 1,391).Results:Improved breastfeeding outcomes were reported in four (40%) papers, and three (30%) highlighted a behavioral change in infant and young child feeding practices following the implementation of the interventions. Increased knowledge about appropriate infant and young child feeding practices among mothers and humanitarian/health staff was reported in eight (80%) papers. However, outcomes were sometimes only generically reported, and some of the included papers had a low strength of evidence.Conclusion:In the literature, there is a great dearth of studies evaluating the influence of interventions aimed at improving breastfeeding in emergency settings. More evidence is urgently needed to encourage and implement optimal breastfeeding practices.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-02-07T11:47:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419900151
       
  • Cost Analysis of Operating a Human Milk Bank in China
    • Authors: Cun Daili, Zhang Kunkun, Yu Guangjun
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Establishing a human milk bank for the benefit of premature newborns who are unable to receive their mothers’ milk for various reasons is a common initiative. To date, 19 human milk banks have been established in China; however, data associated with human milk banks are lacking, including information on the operational costs, guidelines, and regulatory systems for human milk banks in China.Research Aim:Our study aim was to conduct a cost analysis for the human milk bank at Shanghai Children’s Hospital.Methods:A management accounting approach, based on the activity-based costing method, was used to develop a cost model for donor human milk. The data were collected retrospectively and included budget plans, financial and expenditure reports, databases, and interviews with the staff and managers at the Shanghai Children’s Hospital Human Milk Bank in 2017.Results:In 2017, the total volume of qualified donor human milk was 933.70 L, of which 842.71 L (90%) was frozen and 90.99 L (10%) was freshly donated on site. The total annual cost to provide milk for 212 high-risk infants in 2017 was US$156,923, and the unit cost was US$168/L.Conclusions:The operating costs of human milk banks in China are similar to those in other countries internationally, but these costs are so large that they require government and society support for funding and milk donation. Therefore, ongoing breastfeeding support for mothers and measures to reduce the operating costs of human milk banks should be advocated.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T09:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419894551
       
  • The Influence of Donor Milk Supplementation on Duration of Parenteral
           Nutrition in Preterm Infants
    • Authors: Bibiana Chinea Jiménez, Marta Cabrera Lafuente, María L. Couce, Rosario Madero, Maximo Vento, Antonio Villarino Marín, Miguel Saenz de Pipaon
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Data are limited on the association between the use of donor human milk and improvements in feeding tolerance.Objective:To determine the influence of the duration of parenteral nutrition on the growth and morbidity of the breastfed newborn when using donated human milk in the absence of mother’s own milk.Methods:We conducted a retrospective study before and after the intervention that compared two groups of newborns (N = 284; each group n = 142). We used a convenience sample of all newborns ≤32 weeks gestation consecutively admitted in a single unit before (Group 1 between December 2012 and May 2014) or after (Group 2 between October 2014 and December 2016) the availability of donor human milk. In Group 2, donor human milk was administered at least 3 to 4 weeks or until the baby weighed 1,500 g. Weight was recorded daily and length and head circumference weekly. Parenteral nutrition was continued until enteral feeding volume reached 120 ml/kg/day. Additional variables measured were the number of days with a central venous catheter, age that the enteral feeding volume reached 150 ml/kg/day, and duration of stay.Results:The duration of parenteral feeding was the same before and after: 12 (8.23) and 11 (7.19) days (p = .822). The z scores for weight and height of newborns was lower in Group 2 = −1.8 (1.0) and −2.3 (1.1) and Group 1 = −1.2 (1.1) (p < .001) and −1.8 (1.4) (p = .005).Conclusion:We did not find an association between the administration of donor human milk as a supplement to mother’s own milk and reduced number of days of parenteral nutrition.Back translation by Laurence Grummer-Strawn
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-08T08:41:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419892908
       
  • An Evaluation of On-Campus Lactation Spaces for Student-Parents
    • Authors: Catherine Sturtevant, Colleen Huebner, Whitney Waite
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Numerous researchers have evaluated the influence of federal and workplace lactation policies on breastfeeding duration, however few have considered the experiences of breastfeeding people returning to school.Research aim:The aim of this study was to evaluate the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of existing on-campus lactation spaces.Methods:In-depth interviews were conducted with student-parents (N = 18) who had expressed milk on campus. Data collection and thematic analysis were based on the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality framework for evaluating health services from the human rights literature and adapted for this study.Results:For most participants with proximal access to a designated lactation space, room availability was exceptional and quality was marginally adequate. The provision of breast pumps, in-room sinks, and study desks were important aspects of quality discussed by the participants. Not all participants made use of the university’s designated lactation spaces due to either physical or informational inaccessibility. If designated lactation spaces were not convenient, participants found closer alternatives (e.g., bathroom, staff offices, or during the academic session).Conclusion:Breastfeeding parents who return to school experience obstacles similar to those reported by employed parents who return to work. They require convenient access to appropriate spaces and sufficient privacy to express milk for their infants. In order to best support all learners, university leaders must consider the needs of this unique student population.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-02T06:29:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888715
       
  • Induced Lactation in a Mother Through Surrogacy With Complete Androgen
           Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS)
    • Authors: Magdalena LeCain, Gemma Fraterrigo, William M. Drake
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Breastfeeding offers the optimal feeding option for newborns in terms of nutritional content and reinforces mother-infant bonding. As a physiological process intrinsically linked to parturition, breastfeeding is no longer reserved for puerperal mothers. Progress in understanding the intricacies of lactogenesis and breastfeeding has further paved the way for artificially induced lactation in recent years.Main issues:We describe the case of a mother through surrogacy with XY karyotype and complete androgen insensitivity syndrome who wished to breastfeed her child.Management:Through a combination of estrogen therapy, galactagogues, and mechanical breast stimulation she was able to partially breastfeed her child for one month.Conclusion:This case further shifts the concept that breastfeeding is a physiological process confined to only puerperal mothers and offers an opportunity to a wider group of nontraditional mothers to take part in the unique experience of breastfeeding.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-02T06:29:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888752
       
  • Factors Affecting the Behavior and Duration of Breastfeeding Among
           Physician Mothers
    • Authors: Gamze Ersen, Ismail Kasim, Ezgi Agadayi, Aybuke Demir Alsancak, Tijen Sengezer, Adem Ozkara
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Increasing breastfeeding duration may help physician mothers better counsel their patients. To improve the breastfeeding duration of physician mothers, the factors that may influence their breastfeeding duration should be known.Research Aim:To investigate the breastfeeding behavior and duration among physician mothers and to determine the factors that influence breastfeeding practices.Methods:This was an online prospective cross-sectional self-report survey. A 26-item author-created data-collecting tool inquiring sociodemographic and work characteristics, medical history of delivery, and breastfeeding history was sent to female physicians who had infants between 12 and 60 months of age via an online social group, “Physician Mothers,” with 11,632 members. Participants (N = 615) responded, and descriptive statistics were analyzed.Results:Participants’ mean duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 4.8 months (SD = 1.9). The total breastfeeding length was a mean 15.8 months (SD = 7.6). The rate of breastfeeding duration for at least 24 months was 17.8% (n = 75). The most common reason for weaning from breastfeeding was workplace-related conditions (23.6%, n = 145). Participants reported that the mean time of resuming night shifts after delivery was 8.6 months (SD = 4.7). The rate of participants who were unable to use their breastfeeding leave rights partially or completely was 43.6% (n = 268).Conclusion:Although legislation is in place to allow working mothers to breastfeed their infants, these legal rights were not used properly. Physician mothers should be fully supported in using their breastfeeding leave rights, and workplace conditions should be improved to enable physician mothers to breastfeed their infants for extended periods.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-02T06:29:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419892257
       
  • Women Living With HIV in High Income Countries and the Deeper Meaning of
           Breastfeeding Avoidance: A Metasynthesis
    • Authors: Michele K. Griswold, Jesica Pagano-Therrien
      First page: 44
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Recommendations to avoid breastfeeding for women living with HIV in high income countries has resulted in a gap in the literature on how healthcare professionals can provide the highest standard of lactation counseling.Research aims:(1) Describe social and emotional experiences of infant feeding for women living with HIV in high income countries; (2) raise ethical considerations surrounding the clinical recommendation in high income countries to avoid breastfeeding.Methods:A systematic literature search was conducted between January 1, 2008 and June 20, 2019. A total of 900 papers were screened and six met the inclusion criteria: (a) the sample was drawn from a high-income country regardless of the nativity of participants; (b) some or all participants were women living with HIV. Metasynthesis, according to Noblit and Hare (1988), was used to synthesize the experiences of women living with HIV in high-income countries and their experiences in infant feeding decisions.Results:Participants in this sample suffered a substantial emotional burden associated with infant feeding experiences potentially leading to risk of internalized stigma, suggesting that infant feeding considerations may contribute to HIV stigma in unique ways. Four overarching themes were identified expressing the meaning of avoidance of breastfeeding: maternal self-worth, deculturalization, surveillance, and intersectionality.Conclusion:Women in high-income countries living with HIV deserve the highest standard of lactation care and counseling available. Healthcare professionals in high-income countries are ethically obligated to provide evidenced-based lactation care and counseling to women living with HIV.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-02T06:29:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419886565
       
  • Quality in Research: Asking the Right Question
    • Authors: Joan E. Dodgson
      First page: 105
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2020-01-02T06:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419890305
       
  • Ankyloglossia Identification, Diagnosis, and Frenotomy: A Qualitative
           Study of Community Referral Pathways
    • Authors: Crystal Unger, Ellen Chetwynd, Rebecca Costello
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Researchers and practitioners continue to debate the most appropriate assessment, diagnostic, and treatment practices for ankyloglossia (tongue-tie). Health care workers struggle to provide evidence-based care in the absence of consistent standards.Research aim:The aims of this pilot study were to qualitatively (a) evaluate the knowledge of, and attitudes toward tongue-tie and (b) describe how they shaped referral pathways and the establishment of practice patterns of frontline practitioners (pediatric dentists, speech-language pathologists, pediatric chiropractors, and International Board Certified Lactation Consultants).Methods:We recruited clinicians (N = 9) using nonprobability purposive sampling. Participants were interviewed using survey schedules adjusted to reflect their specialty area. Semistructured interviews were transcribed and coded using manual and inductive coding techniques common in grounded theory. Themes were iteratively developed using memoing techniques, in which observations and potential concepts were recorded using the aforementioned codes.Results:Participants were familiar with a variety of protocols and assessment tools, but did not consistently use them. No formal training about the management of tongue-tie was received through their degree programs. Instead they pursued self-guided study. Interprofessional consensus guided opinions about tongue-tie best practices, and referral pathways reflected these consensuses. International Board Certified Lactation Consultants were viewed as pivotal to the care of infants with tongue-tie while primary care physicians—primarily pediatricians—were omitted from referral pathways.Conclusion:Lack of formalized training, professional consensus about best practices, and insufficient resources for assessing and treating tongue-tie led participants to incomplete referral pathways and personal interpretations of the data through the lens of anecdotal evidence.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-14T01:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419887368
       
  • Large Stem/Progenitor-Like Cell Subsets can Also be Identified in the
           CD45- and CD45+/High Populations in Early Human Milk
    • Authors: Jacqueline María Valverde-Villegas, Mélusine Durand, Anne-Sophie Bedin, David Rutagwera, Chipepo Kankasa, Edouard Tuaillon, Nicolas Nagot, Philippe Vande Perre, Jean-Pierre Molès
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Stem/progenitor cells have been identified in human milk. However, characterization and percentages of cell subsets in human milk using hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell markers according to the differential expression of CD45, i.e., as CD45dim/+ (mainly hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells) and CD45- (mainly non-hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells), have not been assessed to date.Research aim:To characterize stem/progenitor-like cell phenotypes in human milk and to report the percentages of these cells at two different lactation stages compared to peripheral blood.Methods:Human milk samples paired with peripheral blood samples (N = 10) were analyzed by flow cytometry using CD45, CD34, CD133, CD38, and lineage-negative markers. The percentage of cell subsets was analyzed in colostrum (Day 3 postpartum) and transitional milk (Day 5/6 postpartum) and compared with the peripheral blood counterpart.Results:The percentage of CD45-CD34+ cells was predominant in both colostrum and transitional milk. The percentage of CD45+/highCD133+ cells was high in colostrum while the percentage of CD45-CD133+ cells was high in transitional milk. Furthermore, the median percentages of the CD45-CD34+, CD45-CD133+, and CD45dimCD133+ cell subsets were higher in colostrum than its peripheral blood counterpart (0.11% vs. 0.002%; 0.17% vs. 0.0005%; 0.09% vs. 0.05%, p = .04, respectively); also CD45-CD34-CD133+ and CD45dimCD34-CD133+ cell subsets were higher in colostrum than peripheral blood (1.32% vs. 0.0% and 2.4% vs. 0.06%, p = .04), respectively).Conclusion:Early human milk is an abundant reservoir of hematopoietic stem/progenitor-like cells in the CD45+/high population and non-hematopoietic stem/progenitor-like cells in the CD45- population.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T07:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419885315
       
  • Translation, Validation, and Psychometric Properties of Breastfeeding
           Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form Among Iranian Women
    • Authors: Azadeh Asgarian, Maryam Hashemi, Mansoureh Pournikoo, Tayebe-Sadat Mirazimi, Hadi Zamanian, Mohammadali Amini-Tehrani
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Iranian researchers have investigated breastfeeding self-efficacy and its related factors. However, there is no valid and reliable tool for assessing the breastfeeding self-efficacy of Iranian Farsi-speaking women.Research aim:To examine the validity and reliability of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form among Iranian Farsi-speaking mothers.Methods:We conducted this cross-sectional study at Izadi teaching hospital in Qom, Iran. Using convenience sampling, we recruited 174 mothers, who completed the questionnaire on the first postnatal day. A forward–backward translation method was used to translate the scale. Cronbach’s alpha and item-total characteristics were examined to test reliability. Construct validity was evaluated via principal component analysis (PCA), as well as known-groups validity.Results:The mean (standard deviation) of sample age was 28.33 (5.38). The mean (standard deviation) of breastfeeding self-efficacy score was 54.32 (10.50), ranging from 24–70. Cronbach’s alpha (.92), inter-item correlations (.21–.72), and corrected item-total correlations (.44–.75) indicated the adequate reliability of the scale. PCA yielded one component with an eigenvalue of 6.97, explaining 49.8% of the total variance. There was no significant difference in the self-efficacy scores between primiparous and multiparous women. Breastfeeding self-efficacy was not significantly different between the groups in terms of the demographic characteristics.Conclusion:The Farsi version of the Breastfeeding Self-efficacy Scale—Short Form is a valid and reliable instrument for Iranian Farsi-speaking mothers, with sound psychometric properties per the other studies worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T06:16:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419883572
       
  • “We Just Kind of Had to Figure It Out”: A Qualitative Exploration of
           the Information Needs of Mothers Who Express Human Milk
    • Authors: Marie Dietrich Leurer, Janet McCabe, Jodie Bigalky, April Mackey, Dana Laczko, Virginia Deobald
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Human milk expression, primarily by pump, is practiced by the majority of breastfeeding mothers in affluent countries. Existing literature is focused on determining prevalence and duration rates and the factors behind this trend. There is less research exploring mothers’ perspectives and experiences related to expression.Research aim:To gather the experiential wisdom of mothers with a focus on their information needs and sources related to human milk expression.Methods:Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 35 mothers of infants, aged birth to 24 months, who had expressed milk at least once in western Canada. This study was guided by interpretive description, an applied qualitative research approach.Results:Registered nurses and international board-certified lactation consultants were the most common sources of information, with Internet, friends/family, and other mothers also important. Inconsistent expression advice was confusing for participants, and many reported health care providers did not address all their expression learning needs. Desired topic areas included practical advice on how to express, determining expression frequency/timing/duration, milk storage guidelines, the influence of expression on milk supply, product information, and general support/encouragement.Conclusions:Assessment of expression learning needs should be part of routine lactation support at each encounter. Nonjudgmental, factual guidance will assist mothers in making evidence-informed decisions related to expression practices that are consistent with their unique breastfeeding goals. This should be supplemented by reputable online resources that provide timely and accurate information as well as efforts to connect mothers with peer support groups.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-12T12:07:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419883203
       
  • Exploration of the Factors Influencing Attitudes to Breastfeeding in
           Public
    • Authors: Cecile Morris, Peter Schofield, Craig Hirst
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Negative attitudes toward breastfeeding in public have consistently been identified as a key barrier to breastfeeding continuation. In order to design effective social marketing campaigns to improve public attitude toward breastfeeding in public, it is critical to identify segments of the population who are less likely to support this activity, their underlying reasons, and the medium through which they can be reached.Research aim:The aims were to (a) identify the underlying dimensions that drive acceptance or opposition to breastfeeding in public, (b) test whether specific population segments were more or less likely to support breastfeeding in public, and (c) identify suitable media outlets to reach them.Methods:A cross-sectional survey testing agreement with 60 statements was administered online between May 2016 and May 2017 and was completed by 7190 respondents. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify 12 dimensions driving acceptance or opposition to breastfeeding in public. The influence of demographics and media consumption on attitudes toward breastfeeding in public was tested using Welch’s t tests and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs).Results:Acceptance of breastfeeding in public was found to differ with gender, age, religion, and parental and breastfeeding status, but not household income. Support for breastfeeding in public also varied with media consumption habits.Conclusions:This work lays the foundation to design effective social marketing campaigns aimed at increasing public support for breastfeeding in public.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-11T07:44:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419878119
       
  • The Role of Staphylococcus aureus in Mastitis: A Multidisciplinary Working
           Group Experience
    • Authors: Sara Giordana Rimoldi, Paola Pileri, Martina Ilaria Mazzocco, Francesca Romeri, Giovanna Bestetti, Nunziata Calvagna, Claudia Tonielli, Lorenza Fiori, Anna Gigantiello, Cristina Pagani, Paolo Magistrelli, Alessandra Sartani, Annalisa De Silvestri, Maria Rita Gismondo, Irene Cetin
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Breastfeeding women are at risk of developing mastitis during the lactation period. Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as the community-acquired pathogen responsible for virulence (methicillin resistance and Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin producing).Research aim:The aim was to compare the microorganisms responsible for mastitis and breast abscesses during breastfeeding.Methods:This observational study was conducted with a sample of women (N = 60) admitted to our hospital between 2016 and 2018. Participants affected by mastitis and breast abscess were studied and cared for by a multidisciplinary working group. A diagnostic breast ultrasound identified the pathology.Results:Twenty-six participants (43.3%) were affected by mastitis and 34 (56.7%) by breast abscess. The most common microorganism identified was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus; mastitis, n = 13; abscesses, n = 24). Methicillin resistance was identified in 21 (44.7%) S. aureus strains: 17 (80.9%) cases of abscess and four (19.1%) cases of mastitis. The median number of months of breastfeeding was smaller in the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) cases (median = 3, range = 1–20 months) than in the methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) cases (median = 6.5, range = 3–21 months). The Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin gene was detected in 12 (25.5%) cases (MRSA, n = 8, 66.7%; MSSA, n = 4, 33.3%). Hospitalization was required more frequently in MRSA (n = 8, 38%; five Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive) than in MSSA cases (n = 5, 19%; one Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive). Four women out of the eight MRSA cases (50%) that were Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive stopped breastfeeding during mammary pathologies, three (37.5%) participants continued breastfeeding until the follow-up recall, and one case was lost at follow-up.Conclusion:Clinical severity was probably complicated by the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin, which required hospitalization more frequently.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-08T11:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419876272
       
  • The Patterns and Social Determinants of Breastfeeding in 12 Selected
           Regions in China: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study
    • Authors: Zhe Fang, Yuning Liu, Hanyu Wang, Kun Tang
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:With rapid industrialization and urbanization, there is a growing need for women to enter the workforce, and affluent people are drawn to the infant formula market. The breastfeeding rates in China are below the optimal level. Large scale quantitative research studying breastfeeding practices after 2015 in China are lacking.Research aim:We aimed to (1) explore the latest patterns and (2) identify the determinants of breastfeeding in China.Methods:The study was a population-based, cross-sectional survey. A multi-stage sampling technique was adopted for the selection of participants. We recruited 10,408 mothers with children under 12 months old, in 12 regions of China, and conducted a questionnaire survey about breastfeeding patterns. The associations between social and biophysical determinants and breastfeeding outcomes were analyzed using a logistic regression model.Results:The exclusive breastfeeding rate was 29.32% (n = 3,052) decreasing from 32.71% (n = 3,404) to 15.83% (n = 1,648) among children aged 0–5 months. Cesarean section had a negative association with early breastfeeding initiation (OR = .33, 95% CI [.30, .36]), exclusive breastfeeding (OR = .78, 95% CI [.69, .89]), and predominant breastfeeding (OR = .73, 95% CI [.65, .83]). Compared to participants with an annual household income lower than 40,000 Yuan ($5,817 USD), those with over 100,000 Yuan ($14,542 USD) had an OR of .78 (95% CI [.67, .90]) in exclusive breastfeeding. Compared with illiterate and unemployed groups, middle/high school education and a current work status, respectively, were associated with a lower likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding (OR = .73, 95% CI [.63, .84]; OR = .58, 95% CI [.37, .89]).Conclusions:The prevalence of breastfeeding in 12 selected regions in China was low and interventions focusing on the targeted population should be strengthened.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-09-12T06:21:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419868156
       
  • Do Expectant Mothers’ Breastfeeding Plans Influence Provider Prenatal
           Contraceptive Counseling'
    • Authors: Lydia Furman, Maria Shaker, Kavita Shah Arora
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Breastfeeding and optimal birth spacing are associated with improved maternal and infant health outcomes worldwide. Provision of contraceptive advice that is aligned with recommendations for breastfeeding has potential to maximize maternal and infant health. Although there is broad agreement regarding the breastfeeding compatibility of specific postpartum contraceptive methods, it is not known whether maternal breastfeeding intention influences prenatal provider contraceptive counseling.Research aim:We aimed to determine if maternal feeding intention is considered by prenatal providers during contraceptive counseling.Methods:This was a cross-sectional online author-created survey including all prenatal providers (N = 40) at two academic safety-net institutions in Cleveland, Ohio. Of 100 obstetrics/gynecology faculty members, 40 (40%) completed the survey, which included multiple-choice questions. Nominal and ordinal survey results were reported with percentages and frequencies, and categorical variables were compared using the Fisher exact test.Results:Participants appropriately promoted breastfeeding-compatible postplacental intrauterine device placement, even though maternal feeding intention was specifically considered by just 12 (30%). Endorsed barriers to contraception for breastfeeding mothers included provider medical worries, patient concerns, and colleague resistance. Postplacental levonorgestrel intrauterine devices were recommended for all mothers by 92.5% of participants (n = 37). Recommendations regarding progestin-only and combined oral contraceptive pills were influenced by maternal breastfeeding versus formula-feeding intention.Conclusion:Asking expectant women about their feeding intentions within each contraceptive discussion may create opportunities for shared decision making that can optimize perinatal outcomes for both mother and infant worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-09-12T06:09:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419875944
       
  • Supporting Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Factory Workers and Their
           Unemployed Neighbors: Peer Counseling in Bangladesh
    • Authors: Rukhsana Haider, Virginia Thorley
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Thirty-six percent of females are employed in Bangladesh, many in the readymade garments manufacturing industry. Inadequate access to health information, care, and long working hours makes exclusive breastfeeding particularly challenging for these employed mothers.Research aim:To describe the influence of a breastfeeding education and support program on breastfeeding patterns of mothers working in garment and other factories in Bangladesh.Methods:A descriptive two-group prospective, mixed methods, longitudinal prospective study was conducted from May 2015 to March 2017. Peer counselors were trained to provide home-based counseling from 6 months of pregnancy until infants completed 6 months for pregnant and lactating factory workers and neighboring unemployed women. The total evaluation sample (N = 304) consisted of participants still employed (n = 190) and unemployed (n = 144). Peer counselors recorded socioeconomic information, weights, and infant feeding patterns. Descriptive statistical analyses examined the peer counselors’ influence on breastfeeding practices.Results:Initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hr was high in both groups, 173 (91%) among the employed, and 101 (89%) among the unemployed participants. Exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months was reported by 107 out of 125 (86%) of the employed participants versus 72 out of 76 (95%) of those unemployed.Conclusions:Community-based peer counselors can help to inform, encourage, and support both factory workers and unemployed women with optimal breastfeeding patterns. Factories who have female workers should consider employing outreach peer counselors as part of their community social responsibility, and as a way to contribute to the sustainability of these programs.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T11:37:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419871229
       
  • Discontinuation of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Ghana: A Longitudinal,
           One-Group Observational Study of Postnatal Mothers With Children 0–6
           Months old
    • Authors: John Kuumuori Ganle, Vanessa-Marie Bedwei-Majdoub
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Although exclusive breastfeeding of infants has several benefits, in Ghana only 52% of children under 6 months old are breastfed exclusively. However, researchers have not conducted longitudinal observational studies to examine exclusive breastfeeding discontinuation and determine risk factors.Research aims:(1) To determine exclusive breastfeeding discontinuation, and (2) to examine those factors linked to discontinued exclusive breastfeeding.Methods:A longitudinal, one-group observational study was conducted. A total of 322 mothers who had normal and full-term delivery at a district level referral hospital from January to December 2017 were recruited, followed-up every month, and subsequently interviewed after 6 months postpartum. Data were collected using validated questionnaires. Binary and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were the statistical analytical methods used.Results:Respondents’ mean age was 29.78 years (SD = 5.20). Among the 322 mothers who initiated breastfeeding with human milk at birth, 108 (34%) discontinued exclusive breastfeeding before 6 months postpartum. After controlling for possible covariates, attending antenatal care 4 or less times during pregnancy (aRR = 6.54; 95% CI [1.77–24.22]; p = .005); lack of support from family to breastfeed exclusively (aRR = 2.41; 95% CI [1.23–4.71]; p = .010), outside pressure to provide other food to the baby < 6 months postpartum (aRR = 1.87; 95% CI [1.01–3.46]; p = .045), and living in an urban area (aRR = 2.10; 95% CI [1.17-3.75]; p = .013) significantly increased the risks of discontinuing exclusive breastfeeding.Conclusion:Universal exclusive breastfeeding may not be achieved without tackling the key determinants of discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding. Health facility and community-based exclusive breastfeeding promotion interventions are therefore needed.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-08-29T11:11:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419871012
       
  • Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool—Breastfeeding: Reference Values for
           Infants Less Than 7 Months old
    • Authors: Britt Frisk Pados, Jinhee Park, Suzanne M. Thoyre
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool—Breastfeeding is a valid and reliable 62-item parent-report assessment of symptoms of problematic breastfeeding behavior intended for infants less than 7 months old.Research aim:The aim of this study was to describe the Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool—Breastfeeding total score and subscale scores within a sample of full-term, healthy, typically-developing infants under 7 months old.Methods:Parents of healthy, full-term breastfeeding infants (N = 475) less than 7 months old completed the Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool – Breastfeeding through an online survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the total score and seven subscale scores within each age group: 0–2, 2–4, 4–6, and 6–7 months.Results:Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool—Breastfeeding total scores were highest (i.e., more problematic symptoms) at 0–2 months and decreased in older infant age groups. All subscale scores also had a downward trajectory in symptoms of problematic breastfeeding except the subscale Compelling Symptoms of Problematic Feeding, which was very low across age groups. Scores on the Infant Regulation subscale remained elevated for the first 6 months of life, then declined markedly in the 6–7 month age group.Conclusion:The Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool—Breastfeeding now has reference values to facilitate interpretation of scores and guide decision-making, personalization of interventions, and assessment of response to interventions. For research, the Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool—Breastfeeding can be used to follow longitudinal development of breastfeeding as well as to test efficacy of breastfeeding interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-08-29T11:07:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419869598
       
  • The Influence of Breastfeeding Peer Support on Breastfeeding Satisfaction
           Among Japanese Mothers: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Hiroko Hongo, Joseph Green, Akira Shibanuma, Keiko Nanishi, Masamine Jimba
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Peer support may help mothers to feel satisfied with their breastfeeding and to continue breastfeeding. However, previous researchers have not examined the influence of peer support on the three breastfeeding-satisfaction domains.Research aim:We aimed to examine the influence of telephone-based peer support on the following three domains of breastfeeding satisfaction among Japanese mothers: maternal satisfaction, perceived benefit to the infant, and lifestyle compatibility with breastfeeding.Methods:Breastfeeding mothers were recruited at four maternity hospitals in Japan to participate in a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected 1 month and 4 months postpartum. Among all of the participants (N = 114), those in the intervention group (n = 60) received telephone-based peer support until 4 months postpartum, and participants in the control group (n = 54) received conventional support. Breastfeeding satisfaction was measured using the short version of the revised Japanese Maternal Breastfeeding Evaluation Scale. Generalized estimating equations and effect size analyses were used to examine the influence of the intervention.Results:On the subscale measuring lifestyle compatibility, participants with peer support had a higher score than those without peer support: regression coefficient 1.54 (95% confidence interval [0.03, 3.04]). The effect size was 0.40 standard deviations among participants with low and mid-level scores at baseline.Conclusion:Although peer support did not change maternal satisfaction or perceived benefit to the infant, it did increase lifestyle compatibility with breastfeeding among these Japanese mothers. This is evidence in favor of increasing the use of peer support.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-08-22T11:13:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419869601
       
  • Support for Breastfeeding Employees: Assessing Statewide Worksite
           Lactation Support Recognition Initiatives in the United States
    • Authors: Amanda Reat, Krystin J. Matthews, Alma E. Carver, Cristell A. Perez, Julie Stagg, Courtney E. Byrd-Williams
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Although the reasons for discontinued breastfeeding are multifactorial, an unsupportive work environment is consistently reported as a barrier to continued breastfeeding. In the United States, several state breastfeeding advocates have taken a distinctive approach to promote worksite lactation support by developing statewide recognition initiatives aimed at incentivizing employers to support breastfeeding employees by offering public recognition for the worksites’ efforts.Research aim:To identify and describe statewide worksite lactation support recognition initiatives in the United States.Methods:Between May 2016 and June 2017, semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with breastfeeding experts in each U.S. state (N = 60 participants) for this cross-sectional study. Experts in states with a recognition initiative were asked about the background, structure, and requirements of the initiative.Results:Twenty-six states had a current initiative, and some had requirements for providing a private space (n = 19; 73%) and time (n = 18; 69%) for employees to express human milk, as well as a written worksite lactation support policy (n = 10; 38%).Conclusions:This was the first study in which researchers systematically identified ongoing worksite lactation support recognition initiatives in the United States. The results of this work also served to highlight both the similarities and the variety between initiatives. Future researchers should aim to determine the components of an initiative that increase employer support and, in turn, breastfeeding rates.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-08-22T11:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419865902
       
  • Exploring North Carolina Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers’
           Attitudes Towards Breastfeeding and Infant Feeding Education Practices
    • Authors: Nicola Singletary, L. Suzanne Goodell, April Fogleman
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Kingdom Committee for UNICEF recommend that secondary schools include infant feeding education in the curriculum. However, little attention has been given to the study of educators’ views and practices regarding infant feeding education.Aims:The aims of this research were to (1) explore North Carolina Family and Consumer Sciences teachers’ attitudes towards infant feeding education in secondary schools and (2) describe North Carolina Family and Consumer Sciences teachers’ infant feeding education practices.Methods:Researchers conducted interviews (N = 19) and a survey (N = 137) using a sequential mixed methods design. The constant comparative method was used to analyze interview transcripts. Subsequently, a 33-item survey was developed to assess teachers’ attitudes and practices, and this survey was tested for validity and reliability.Results:The majority of participants supported including infant feeding (n = 119, 86.9%) and breastfeeding (n = 116, 84.7%) education in high school. Approximately half of the participants supported including infant feeding (n = 71, 51.9%) and breastfeeding (n = 64, 46.7%) education in middle school. Participants reported that they taught infant feeding at both levels; topics taught included complementary foods, patterns of infant feeding, and the safe preparation of infant formula. Breastfeeding content was covered primarily in the high school Parenting and Child Development course.Conclusions:North Carolina Family and Consumer Sciences teachers have positive attitudes towards teaching about breastfeeding at the secondary school level. Content about infant nutrition and breastfeeding is currently included in courses that cover child development and human nutrition.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T10:19:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419867104
       
  • Mammary Dysbiosis and Nipple Blebs Treated With Intravenous Daptomycin and
           Dalbavancin
    • Authors: Katrina B. Mitchell, Anne Eglash, Ethan T. Bamberger
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Mammary dysbiosis, also known as subacute mastitis, may be associated with nipple blebs. These overlapping diagnoses represent a challenging clinical scenario during lactation. Little research has been published on etiology, management strategies, and outcomes of these concurrent diagnoses.Main issue:We document the treatment and outcome of a patient who presented with left-breast dysbiosis and nipple blebs and whose milk culture grew multi-drug-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. She was treated safely and effectively with intravenous daptomycin and dalbavancin. This has not been described previously in the lactation literature.Management:The 35-year-old lactating gravida 3, para 3 patient presented at 6 months postpartum to a breast surgery clinic with a 1-week history of worsening deep left-breast pain, blebs, and recurrent plugging. She was afebrile and she had no erythema or induration on her breast exam. A culture of her milk grew multi-drug-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and she was referred to infectious disease for assistance with intravenous antibiotic therapy. She continued to feed expressed milk throughout treatment and demonstrated complete resolution of symptoms 8 weeks later.Conclusions:We report that in patients with a multi-drug-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus–positive human milk culture and a clinical presentation of mammary dysbiosis and nipple blebs, intravenous daptomycin and dalbavancin may be an effective treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-07-16T11:37:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419862214
       
  • Understanding the Challenges of Induction of Lactation and Relactation for
           Non-Gestating Spanish Mothers
    • Authors: Gemma Cazorla-Ortiz, Paola Galbany-Estragués, Noemí Obregón-Gutiérrez, Josefina Goberna-Tricas
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Induced lactation and relactation are the processes that enable breastfeeding in non-gestating mothers.Research aim:The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the challenges faced by mothers who undergo induced breastfeeding and relactation for adopted infants, infants born via surrogacy, and infants born to same-sex female partners.Methods:A qualitative study was performed using in-depth interviews conducted with Spanish women (N = 9) who had decided to undergo induced lactation or relactation. The data were collected between October 2014 and May 2017. The length of the study was due to the difficulty in locating and recruiting the sample. Interviews were transcribed and coded with the ATLAS.ti v.7.5.7 software. We performed a deductive thematic analysis, creating categories based on the interview questions, which we developed on the basis of previous literature about induced lactation and relactation.Results:Participants described the following challenges: the physical hardships of the process; breastfeeding problems; difficulty with accessing information about induced lactation or relactation; and lack of support from health professionals. Breastfeeding periods lasted from 1.5 months to 4 years. Participants reported that breastfeeding increased the closeness between the mother and child and that this feeling of closeness tended to decrease after breastfeeding cessation.Conclusion:We offer data and analysis that can improve our understanding of the lived experiences of women undergoing the process of relactation or induced lactation and may help guide intervention strategies to support women in this situation.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-06-25T07:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419852939
       
  • Breastfeeding Duration and Infant Sleep Location in a Cohort of Volunteer
           Breastfeeding Counselors
    • Authors: Cate Bailey, Susan Tawia, Elizabeth McGuire
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Debate about mother and infant bed sharing has been polarized between supporters of bed sharing and public health policies that attempt to mitigate the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Differences in group demographics may be an important aspect in co-sleeping acceptability.Research aims:The first aim of this study was to investigate infant sleeping location in a dataset of mothers with strong breastfeeding outcomes. The second aim was to investigate the association between infant sleeping location and breastfeeding (exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months and total breastfeeding duration). Finally, we aimed to investigate predictors of breastfeeding duration.Methods:Participants comprised 174 women who had applied to train as counselors with the Australian Breastfeeding Association. Data were compiled from a survey of the participants’ lactation histories, including questions related to the exclusivity and duration of breastfeeding, concerns about and problems encountered during breastfeeding, type of birth, medications during birth, demographics, and infant sleeping location. The study design was a cross-sectional, one-group survey design.Results:A high proportion of participants in this study bed shared and room shared: At 0–1 month (n = 58), 33% of participants bed-shared, which increased to 58% by 6–12 months (n = 80). Infants who co-slept were more likely to be exclusively breastfed at 6 months (χ2 (2, n = 116) = 4.83, p = .03) and had longer breastfeeding duration (t (62.61) = 3.81, p < .001).Conclusions:Breastfeeding targets have been difficult to achieve globally, and innovative ideas are required to improve breastfeeding outcomes through public health messaging. There was a strong association in the current study between breastfeeding outcomes and degree of closeness of the infant to the mother at night. This finding should be brought into the discourse on breastfeeding and infant sleep arrangements, accompanied by evidence-based advice about safe sleeping and the promotion of breastfeeding.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-06-25T07:08:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419851801
       
  • Main Barriers to Optimal Breastfeeding Practices in Armenia: A Qualitative
           Study
    • Authors: Anahit Demirchyan, Dzovinar Melkom Melkomian
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In 2015, the median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 2.2 months in Armenia, and only 15% of 4–5-month-old children were exclusively breastfed, indicating an issue with breastfeeding knowledge and practices.Research aim:To identify the main barriers to optimal breastfeeding practices in Armenia.Methods:We used qualitative research methods via focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with four groups of providers from different levels of care, and mothers of young children, from Yerevan city and two provinces, Lori and Shirak. Overall, eight in-depth interviews and 13 focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 99 participants. Qualitative content analysis was applied, with elements of both inductive and deductive approaches.Results:We identified two main categories of barriers to optimal breastfeeding—systemic barriers and knowledge deficiencies. The main themes within systemic barriers were lack of skilled breastfeeding support services and low motivation of providers—mainly related to inadequate recognition of their role in breastfeeding counseling and low remuneration. The main knowledge-related barriers were insufficient counseling of mothers, lack of reliable information sources about infant feeding, and misconceptions among both mothers and providers.Conclusion:Optimal breastfeeding is crucial for the best start to an infant’s life; however, there were a number of barriers to optimal breastfeeding practices in Armenia. Our findings and recommendations could help policymakers apply effective strategies for improving breastfeeding rates in Armenia. Considering the similar historical backgrounds of the post-Soviet countries, our findings could also be applicable to other Commonwealth of Independent States countries.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-06-20T04:07:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419858968
       
  • Assessing Application-Based Breastfeeding Education for Physicians and
           Nurses: A Scoping Review
    • Authors: Samantha A. Chuisano, Olivia S. Anderson
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-21T01:23:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419848414
       
  • Self-Resolving Vulvar Breast Tissue Arising in the Post-Partum Setting: A
           Case Report and Review of Literature
    • Authors: Stephanie Larson, Sara Yang, Alexandra Chacko-Stacey, Danielle Mason, Elaine Hart
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-10T09:14:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419849593
       
  • Ethics in Early Life Care and Lactation Practice
    • Authors: Darcia Narvaez, Laura Duckett
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T07:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888454
       
  • Lactation Newsmakers: Protecting Breastfeeding From Conflicts of Interest
    • Authors: Lida Lhotska, Judith Richter, Maryse Arendt
      First page: 22
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      In order to maximize profits from sales of breastmilk substitutes, manufacturers use a whole gamut of strategies to interfere with the effective implementation of policies that protect, promote, and support breastfeeding (e.g., the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes with its subsequent World Health Assembly resolutions and the Global Strategy on Infant and Young Child Feeding). Their strategies create, among other problems, personal and institutional conflicts of interest. Effective Conflict of Interest policies are therefore needed for ensuring that governments, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and health professionals can protect their independence, integrity, and credibility in order to work in the best interests of children. Conflicts of interest are discussed by Dr Lida Lhotska and Dr Judith Richter, who have been actively involved in these issues internationally. Lida Lhotska holds a BSc in Biology and a PhD in Anthropology. Her international work spans over 25 years. She headed the Infant Feeding and Care team for UNICEF and subsequently joined the IBFAN-Geneva Infant Feeding Association team, always focusing on advancing the protection of breastfeeding through legal and other policy measures. Judith Richter has a multidisciplinary background combining knowledge in the humanities with health sciences (PhD Social Sciences; MA Development Studies; MSc Pharmaceutical Sciences). Her work as a freelance researcher for United Nations agencies, governments, and civil society organizations and networks has centered on safeguarding their capacity to hold transnational corporations accountable. In her interview, Judith Richter explains why conflict of interest regulation matters to health professionals working in the field of lactation.(MA = Maryse Arendt; LL = Lida Lhotska; JR = Judith Richter)
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T07:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419885859
       
  • Are Modern Complementary Food Packaging, Devices and Teats Compatible with
           International Guidance on Complementary Feeding'
    • Authors: Melissa A. Theurich
      First page: 29
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T10:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419845643
       
  • Ethical Issues in Use of Medications During Lactation
    • Authors: Lisa H. Amir, Luke E. Grzeskowiak, Renee L. Kam
      First page: 34
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-26T05:52:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888156
       
  • Breastfeeding After Breast Cancer: Feasibility, Safety, and Ethical
           Perspectives
    • Authors: Alma Linkeviciute, Micaela Notarangelo, Barbara Buonomo, Giulia Bellettini, Fedro A. Peccatori
      First page: 40
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T06:18:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419887723
       
  • Supporting Breastfeeding Students: Insights and Ethical Considerations for
           Postsecondary Institutions
    • Authors: Mikaela Robertson, Sarah Keene, Sara J. Benning
      First page: 53
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-12T12:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419885864
       
  • Limitations of Workplace Lactation Support: The Case for DC WIC Recipients
    • Authors: Jennifer Schindler-Ruwisch, Amira Roess, Rebecca C. Robert, Melissa Napolitano
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T07:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419887369
       
  • Disparities in Breastfeeding Among Military Veterans
    • Authors: Shimrit Keddem, Phyllis Solomon, Steve C. Marcus, Marilyn M. Schapira, Kristin M. Mattocks
      First page: 64
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Although breastfeeding is a major public health priority and provides numerous benefits, women veterans encounter many barriers to initiating and sustaining breastfeeding. Women veterans are a growing population with unique health care needs related to exposures and injuries experienced during military service. These military experiences are linked to health diagnoses known to impact postpartum health behaviors, such as breastfeeding.Research aim:The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with breastfeeding at 4 weeks postpartum among women veterans.Methods:We used 2016-to-2018 survey data from women veterans (N = 420), interviewed before and after delivery, who were enrolled in maternity care coordination at a national sample of Veterans Health Administration facilities. Using the social ecological model, logistic regression was employed to explore the relationship between breastfeeding at least 4 weeks and postpartum and maternal/infant characteristics, interpersonal dynamics, community influences, and system factors.Results:The rate of breastfeeding at 4 weeks postpartum was 78.6% among this sample of veterans. Self-employed participants were 2.8 times more likely to breastfeed than those who were employed outside the home. Participants who had been deployed at any point in their military career were twice as likely to breastfeed compared with those who never deployed. In this study sample, race independently predicted lower rates of breastfeeding, with African American participants being 48% less likely to breastfeed as compared with white participants.Conclusion:Our analysis suggests significant racial disparities in breastfeeding within veteran populations utilizing Veterans Health Administration, despite access to multiple sources of support from both the Veterans Health Administration and the community.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-26T05:52:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888200
       
  • Disparities in Donor Human Milk Supplementation Among Well Newborns
    • Authors: Laura R. Kair, Nichole L. Nidey, Jessie E. Marks, Kirsten Hanrahan, Lorraine Femino, Erik Fernandez y Garcia, Kelli Ryckman, Kelly E. Wood
      First page: 74
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Donor human milk supplementation for healthy newborns has increased. Racial-ethnic disparities in supplementation have been described in the neonatal intensive care unit but not in the well newborn setting.Research aim:The aim of this study was to identify maternal characteristics associated with donor human milk versus formula supplementation in the well newborn unit.Methods:This retrospective cohort study includes dyads of well newborns and their mothers (N = 678) who breastfed and supplemented with formula (n = 372) or donor human milk (n = 306) during the birth hospitalization at a single hospital in the midwestern United States. Maternal characteristics and infant feeding type were extracted from medical records. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to examine associations between maternal characteristics and feeding type.Results:Nonwhite women were less likely to use donor human milk. Compared to non-Hispanic white women, the largest disparity was with Hispanic (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.28, 95% CI [0.12, 0.65]), then non-Hispanic black (adjusted OR = 0.32, 95% CI [0.13, 0.76]) and Asian women (adjusted OR = 0.34, 95% CI [0.16, 0.74]). Lower donor human milk use was associated with primary language other than English and public versus private insurance.Conclusion:The goal of improving public health through breastfeeding promotion may be inhibited without targeting donor human milk programs to these groups. Identifying the drivers of these disparities is necessary to inform person-centered interventions that address the needs of women with diverse backgrounds.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-26T05:53:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888163
       
  • Milking the System: A Case Study of Donor Milk for a Child in Foster Care
    • Authors: Rebecca Mannel, Christina Juris Bennett
      First page: 81
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Use of pasteurized donor milk is recommended in many situations when own mother’s milk is not available. One existing knowledge gap is access to donor milk for infants in government custody (foster care).Main issue:The focus of this case study is an infant born at 41 weeks who was discharged from the hospital into foster care. The infant soon developed failure to thrive due to formula intolerance.Management:After trying multiple formulas, which included elemental formulas, and hospitalization, the infant began pasteurized donor milk. Within 24 hr, the infant began gaining weight. Medicaid denied two authorization requests for payment, and the state’s Department of Human Services ultimately agreed to cover the discounted donor milk fees until the infant reached 1 year of age.Conclusion:This foster child suffered through months of failure to thrive and hospitalization before receiving human milk feedings. This care violated ethical principles of beneficence, autonomy, and justice. State officials should review their policies and regulations for providing human milk to children in their care and facilitate access to that milk when needed.
      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T06:19:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888218
       
  • A Call for Medicaid Coverage of Pasteurized Donor Milk for Foster Children
    • Authors: Christina Juris Bennett, Rebecca Mannel
      First page: 86
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-08T11:42:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419876607
       
  • The Boycott Book
    • Authors: Laura Duckett
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T07:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888497
       
  • Book Review: Governments Push Infant Formula
    • Authors: Julie P. Smith
      First page: 102
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T06:17:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419886569
       
  • Prenatal Provider Support for Breastfeeding: Changes in Attitudes,
           Practices and Recommendations Over 22 Years
    • Authors: Casey Rosen-Carole, Katherine Allen, Julissa Thompson, Hayley Martin, Nicolas Goldstein, Ruth A. Lawrence
      First page: 109
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-03-06T08:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419830996
       
  • Lactation-Specific Certifications: A Comparison of Independently
           Accredited Credentials
    • Authors: Joan E. Dodgson
      First page: 119
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T07:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419888217
       
  • Factors Associated With Breastfeeding Among Women With Gestational
           Diabetes
    • Authors: Shaline Modena Reinheimer, Maria Inês Schmidt, Bruce Bartholow Duncan, Michele Drehmer
      First page: 126
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T10:25:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419845871
       
  • Oxytocin, Vasopressin and Prolactin in New Breastfeeding Mothers:
           Relationship to Clinical Characteristics and Infant Weight Loss
    • Authors: Elise N. Erickson, C. Sue Carter, Cathy L. Emeis
      First page: 136
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-04-29T03:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419838225
       
  • Risk Factors for Delayed Onset of Lactogenesis II Among Primiparous
           Mothers from a Brazilian Baby-Friendly Hospital
    • Authors: Beatriz de Oliveira Rocha, Marcia Penido Machado, Livia Lima Bastos, Livia Barbosa Silva, Ana Paula Santos, Luana Caroline Santos, Maria Candida Ferrarez Bouzada
      First page: 146
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-03-22T06:07:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419835174
       
  • Positive Emotions During Infant Feeding and Breastfeeding Outcomes
    • Authors: Kathryn Wouk, Christine Tucker, Brian W. Pence, Samantha Meltzer-Brody, Bharathi Zvara, Karen Grewen, Alison M. Stuebe
      First page: 157
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-06T10:34:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419845646
       
  • Maternal Dairy Consumption and Hematochezia in Exclusively Breastfed
           Infants
    • Authors: Farrah B. Lazare, Donald A. Brand, Melissa J. Fazzari, Asif Noor, Fredric Daum
      First page: 168
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-04-23T07:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419838476
       
  • Where’s the Mother: Stories from a Transgender Dad
    • Authors: Ethan Bamberger
      First page: 173
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T06:17:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419887367
       
  • Compliance of a Baby-Friendly Designated Hospital in Ghana With the
           WHO/UNICEF Baby and Mother-Friendly Care Practices
    • Authors: Faith Agbozo, Doris Ocansey, Prosper Atitto, Albrecht Jahn
      First page: 175
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-21T01:25:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419848728
       
  • Challenges and Outcomes of Using the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding
           in the Mother–Baby Friendly Institute Program in Taiwan
    • Authors: Chao-Huei Chen, Ran-Chou Chen, Miauh-Shin Chen, Li-Chuan Chen, Hsing-Yu Wei
      First page: 187
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T10:33:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419839366
       
  • BFHI Association News
    • Authors: Trish MacEnroe
      First page: 192
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-12T12:09:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419885105
       
  • ILCA News Brief: #ILCA2020 Provides SUPPORT to YOU
    • Authors: Jessica Lytle
      First page: 192
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-24T08:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419884301
       
  • LEAARC Association News
    • Authors: Laura Sieckmann
      First page: 193
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-12T12:08:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419883574
       
  • World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) News
    • Authors: Nisha Kumaravel
      First page: 193
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-11-07T02:02:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419883573
       
  • Letter to the Editor
    • Authors: Frank J. Nice
      First page: 195
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-09T05:04:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419879110
       
  • Reply to Letter to the Editor by Frank Nice
    • Authors: Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, Eileen King, Erin Wagner, Sarah Riddle, Laura Ward, Amy Thompson
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-09T05:05:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419879116
       
  • Letter to the Editor
    • Authors: Judith Gutowski, Ellen Chetwynd
      First page: 197
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-03T04:02:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419872458
       
  • Reply to Gutowski and Chetwynd
    • Authors: Sanjay Patel, Shveta Patel
      First page: 199
      Abstract: Journal of Human Lactation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Human Lactation
      PubDate: 2019-10-24T08:06:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890334419884296
       
 
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