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NURSES AND NURSING (362 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 362 Journals sorted alphabetically
A&A Case Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
ACORN : The Journal of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Acta Paulista de Enfermagem     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advanced Healthcare Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Family Practice Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Advancing Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
American Journal of Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 214)
American Nurse Today     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Anadolu Hemşirelik ve Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access  
Annual Review of Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AORN Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Aporia : The Nursing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Applied Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Aquichán     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Nursing Practice and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Nursing Research     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australasian Journal of Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian Journal of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Nursing and Midwifery Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Nursing Journal : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Avances en Enfermería     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bariatric Surgical Practice and Patient Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Belitung Nursing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Uttaradit Journal     Open Access  
British Journal of Anaesthetic and Recovery Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
British Journal of Cardiac Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
British Journal of Community Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
British Journal of Mental Health Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
British Journal of Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 91)
British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
British Journal of Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 274)
British Journal of School Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal / Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cancer Nursing Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
CANNT Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Caring Nursing Journal (CNJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Enfermeria - Revista Iberoamericana de Investigacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Lactation     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nurse Specialist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Clinical Nursing Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Scholars Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Simulation in Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Collegian: Journal of the Royal College of Nursing Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Nurse : A Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
COPING (Community of Publishing in Nursing)     Open Access  
Creative Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Critical Care Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Critical Care Nursing Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Critical, Medical and Surgical Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Cultura de los cuidados     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cumhuriyet Hemşirelik Dergisi     Open Access  
Curationis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Dental Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Dermatological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EAU Heritage Journal Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ege Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Ege University Nursing Faculty     Open Access  
Egyptian Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Ene : Revista de Enfermería     Open Access  
Enfermagem Revista     Open Access  
Enfermería : Cuidados Humanizados     Open Access  
Enfermería Clínica (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Enfermería Global     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Enfermería Intensiva     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfermería Universitaria     Open Access  
Escola Anna Nery     Open Access  
Estima : Brazilian Journal of Enterestomal Therapy     Open Access  
European Diabetes Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Evidence-Based Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Fisioterapia e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Fisioterapia em Movimento     Open Access  
Florence Nightingale Journal of Nursing     Open Access  
Frontiers of Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fundamental and Management Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Gastroenterology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Surgery Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Qualitative Nursing Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Green Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Hacettepe Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Hayat : Journal of Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
HIV Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Holistic Nursing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Idea Nursing Journal     Open Access  
Independent Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Indonesian Journal of Nursing Practices     Open Access  
Intensive and Critical Care Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Diabetes Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Emergency Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Advanced Nursing Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Care Scholars     Open Access  
International Journal of Childbirth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health Sciences Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Immunological Nursing     Open Access  
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Neurological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Nurse Practitioner Educators     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Nursing Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Nursing Knowledge     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nursing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nursing Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Nursing Science Practice and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Nursing Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nursing Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Obstetrics, Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Older People Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Palliative Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Pediatric Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Physiotherapy and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
International Journal of Urological Nursing     Hybrid Journal  
International Nursing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Investigacion en Enfermeria: Imagen y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Investigación y Educación en Enfermería     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Issues in Mental Health Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Japan Journal of Nursing Science     Hybrid Journal  
JMIR Nursing     Open Access  
Journal for Nurse Practitioners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal for Nurses in Professional Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Aesthetic Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Hermeneutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Bangkok     Open Access  
Journal of Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Surin     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Caring Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Christian Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Community Health Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Compassionate Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Emergency Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Evidence-based Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Family Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Gerontological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health Science Boromarajonani College of Nursing Sunpasitthiprasong     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Visiting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Holistic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Holistic Nursing Science     Open Access  
Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Human Lactation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Infusion Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Midwifery     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproduction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Neonatal Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Neuroscience Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nursing & Interprofessional Leadership in Quality & Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nursing Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Nursing and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Nursing Care Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Nursing Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Nursing Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nursing Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Nursing Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Nursing Regulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Australasian Emergency Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.614
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2588-994X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3204 journals]
  • Neuromuscular monitoring during modified rapid sequence induction: A
           comparison of TOF-Cuff® and TOF-Scan®
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Ivan Chau, Katja Horn, Alexander Dullenkopf
       
  • Instructions to Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Australasian Emergency Care, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Peripheral intravenous cannula insertion and use in a tertiary hospital
           emergency department: A cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Clare E Thomas, C.J. Cabilan, Amy N.B. Johnston
       
  • Academic and professional characteristics of Australian graduate emergency
           nursing programs: A national study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 February 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Tamsin Jones, Kate Curtis, Ramon Z. Shaban
       
  • Gaining perspective into the term ‘safety culture’; how emergency
           nurses view its meaning in their everyday practice: a focus group study in
           an Australian setting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Kellie M Kaczorowski, Nicola A Drayton, Mitchell R Grimston
       
  • Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: The important role of bystander
           interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Tan N. Doan, Brendan V. Schultz, Stephen Rashford, Emma Bosley
       
  • The epidemiology of emergency presentations for falls across Western
           Victoria, Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: Australasian Emergency Care, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Kara L. Holloway-Kew, Tim R. Baker, Muhammad A. Sajjad, Mark A. Kotowicz, Patricia M. Livingston, Mustafa Khasraw, Sharon Hakkennes, Trisha L. Dunning, Susan Brumby, Richard S. Page, Alasdair Sutherland, Svetha Venkatesh, Sharon L. Brennan-Olsen, Lana J. Williams, Julie A. Pasco
       
  • Crystal methamphetamine's impact on frontline emergency services in
           Victoria, Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: Australasian Emergency Care, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Rikki Jones, Kim Usher, Cindy Woods
       
  • Determining the priorities for change in paediatric trauma care delivery
           in NSW, Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Kate Curtis, Belinda Kennedy, Andrew J.A. Holland, Rebecca J. Mitchell, Gary Tall, Holly Smith, Soundappan S.V. Soundappan, Allan Loudfoot, Brian Burns, Michael Dinh
       
  • The epidemiology of emergency presentations for falls from height across
           Western Victoria, Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Kara L. Holloway-Kew, Tim R. Baker, Muhammad A. Sajjad, Mark A. Kotowicz, Patricia M. Livingston, Mustafa Khasraw, Sharon Hakkennes, Trisha L. Dunning, Susan Brumby, Richard S. Page, Alasdair G. Sutherland, Sharon L. Brennan-Olsen, Lana J. Williams, Julie A. Pasco
       
  • Mind the gaps: identifying opportunities in mental health assessment and
           mental health certificate completion in rural and remote NSW, Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 October 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Martin Davis, Rodney Juratowitch, Scott Lamont, Scott Brunero
       
  • Nurse-to-nurse communication about multidisciplinary care delivered in the
           emergency department: An observation study of nurse-to-nurse handover to
           transfer patient care to general medical wards
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Darcy T. O’Connor, Helen Rawson, Bernice RedleyAbstractBackgroundLittle is known about how Australian national safety standards for communicating multidisciplinary care are operationalised during high-risk care transitions. We examined transfer of care for complex patients from the emergency department (ED) to medical wards to explore nurse-to-nurse communication about multidisciplinary care provided in the ED.MethodsUsing naturalistic, mixed-methods design, observation, audit and interview data were collected from a convenience sample of 38 nurses during transfer of care for 19 complex patients from the ED to medical wards at a tertiary hospital. A focus group with 19 clinicians from multiple disciplines explored explanations for findings and recommendations. Quantitative data were analysed using frequencies and descriptive statistics; the Connect, Observe, Listen, Delegate (COLD) framework informed qualitative content analysis.ResultsNurses seldom communicated multidisciplinary care at patient transfer. Most handovers included Connect and Observe (63–95%) and Listen (90%); Delegate (42%) behaviours were infrequent. Behaviours consistent with good practice recommendations (90%) and known to increase communication risk (53%) were observed. Tensions between policies and clinical processes, and information quality negatively impacted transfers.ConclusionsThis study revealed gaps in nurse-to-nurse communication about patients’ multidisciplinary care. Complex factors negatively impact nurses’ handover communication necessitating workarounds, and highlighting nurses’ role as patient safety advocates.
       
  • Factors enhancing resilience among older adults experiencing disaster: A
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Rekha Timalsina, Praneed SongwathanaAbstractBackgroundResilience is important to adapt and deal with difficult situations, particularly in a disaster, yet its related factors among older adults are unknown. This study aimed to synthesize the factors enhancing resilience among older adults experiencing disaster.MethodsA systematic review was conducted using international databases, i.e., CINAHL, ProQuest, JAMA Network, SCOPUS, Ovid, PubMed, and Google Scholar since 2000. The studies were independently appraised by two authors using a quality appraisal tool and the parallel-results convergent synthesis design was adopted for the synthesis.ResultsFive articles related to technological disasters, hurricanes, floods, and typhoons were included for review. Consideration for methodological strengths was limited in some studies. The factors enhancing the resilience of older adults were categorized into (1) demographic, (2) physical, (3) psychological, (4) spiritual, and (5) socio-cultural factors. The studies revealed that previous experience, social support and spirituality were the common factors.ConclusionFive factors related to resilience should be considered by nurses and other health professionals when caring for older adults experiencing disasters. Due to limited robust evidence and the diverse contexts of the selected studies, future research remains important to enhance the older adults’ resilience in long term care.
       
  • A feasibility study on disaster preparedness in regional and rural
           emergency departments in New South Wales: Nurses self-assessment of
           knowledge, skills and preparation for disaster management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Catherine A. Brewer, Alison Hutton, Karen S. Hammad, Sara K. GealeAbstractBackgroundNurses who work in regional and rural hospitals face unique challenges to disaster preparedness and response. Geographical location and isolation, decreased resources and subsequent workforce, along with organizational and financial restraints are some of the hurdles these individuals and communities face [1,2].MethodThe Disaster Preparedness Evaluation Tool was applied a population of Regional and Rural Emergency Nurses in New South Wales.ResultThirty-two nurses participated in this study. Their level of disaster preparedness was at a moderate level for knowledge, skills and preparation for disaster management. Their experiences broadly mirrored those found in earlier research.ConclusionResults highlighted the nature of and delivery of continuing professional development in relation to disaster preparedness; mechanisms to encourage emergency department nurses to develop personal and family preparedness plans (to improved disaster preparedness); increased training in relation to psychological assessment of patients, and identification of biological agent signs and symptoms.
       
  • Understanding sharps use in an Australian Emergency Department: A mixed
           methods organisational case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Chantelle Judge, Michael Sinnott, Rob Eley, Andy Wong, Amy N.B. JohnstonAbstractBackgroundDespite the introduction of a range of safety policies and sharps equipment designed to protect healthcare workers, rates of percutaneous injuries from occupational exposure to sharps remains high. This study examined the availability and use of various types of sharps devices in a tertiary hospital emergency department, to understand clinician choice between non-safety and safety devices; and to document their safe and unsafe use of sharps.MethodsThis mixed methods study consisted of areview of stock levels, a survey of staff usage, and a content analysis of semi-structured interview data to explore factors which impact on staff preferences for different sharps devices.ResultsStaff identified a range of sharps risks, as well as barriers and enablers to the use of safety devices. Availability of, and preference for, familiar devices influenced choice of devices used in clinical practice, despite awareness of associated risks.ConclusionsThis understanding of equipment use and the factors that motivate such use have informed the first stage of the knowledge-to-action cycle. Knowledge translation, should include the development of policies to help reduce the risk of sharps injury. Culture change and ongoing skills development might help to overcome entrenched procedures and increase voluntary engagement with safer sharps.
       
  • Clinical spectrum of intra-abdominal abscesses in patients admitted to the
           emergency department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Keon Kim, Eun Kim, Jae Hee LeeAbstractBackgroundThe mortality of undrained abdominal abscesses may be as high as 35 %. In this study, we analyzed the clinical spectrum of intra-abdominal abscess (IAA) patients in the ED and attempted to identify factors that can predict the severity of IAA.MethodThis study was a retrospective review of adults (≥ 18 years) with IAA admitted to a single ED. IAA were diagnosed by abdominal computed tomography. The differences in clinical variables between patients receiving and not receiving inotropic drugs were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression was performed for assessing predictor variables.Results128 patients presented with IAA. The most common complaint was abdominal pain (60.2 %) and the liver was most common location (39.8 %). Patients who required inotropic drugs had lower serum leukocyte, lymphocyte, and platelet counts and higher serum BUN and CRP levels. The independent factors associated with need for inotropic drugs were serum leukocyte, CRP, and BUN level. The optimal cutoff CRP value for predicting inotropic drug use was 12.06 mg/dL, BUN value was 21 mg/dL.ConclusionsElevated CRP and BUN levels could predict a higher association with requirement of inotrope. Therefore, emergency physicians should consider CRP and BUN levels and aiming for early aggressive treatment.
       
  • Using clinical based vignettes to further develop a mass gathering event
           triage tool
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Jamie Ranse, Matt Cannon, Rebecca Roitman, Julia MorphetAbstractBackgroundPreviously published triage tools for use at mass gathering events (MGE) lack real-world validation. Non-health care professionals, such as first aiders, first responders, and advanced responders often undertake a triage role at MGEs. This research aimed to determine consistency in the decision-making of a MGE triage tool.MethodVolunteer members of St John Ambulance Australia were recruited. Surveys included participant demographics and real-world clinical vignettes. Participants determined a triage category based on the vignettes and supplied triage tool. Demographics were analysed using descriptive statistics and responses to vignettes were analysed using Fleiss Kappa [p-bar].ResultsThere were 110 participants, the majority male (60%), having completed a Bachelor or higher degree (53.6%), and were non-health care professionals (70%). Of the vignettes, there was a slightly better than moderate agreement (items: 18, p-bar: 0.55). There was an excellent level of agreeance for the resuscitation category (items: 3, b-par 0.69), and moderate level of agreeance for the urgent (items: 10, b-par 0.52) and minor (items: 5, b-par 0.52) categories.ConclusionsThis research demonstrated similar findings to that of emergency department triage tool validation. Multi-country, multi-site, multi-type, real-world testing at MGEs is the next step to progress the development of this tool.
       
  • Evaluating an ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous cannulation
           training program for emergency clinicians: An Australian perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Amy Archer-Jones, Amy Sweeny, Jessica A Schults, Claire M Rickard, Laura Johnson, Ashleigh Gunter, Stuart WatkinsAbstractObjectiveThe primary objective of this study was to identify the proportion of clinicians using ultrasound guidance (USG) to insert peripheral intravenous cannulas (PIVCs) in the emergency department (ED) following attendance at a hospital-based USG PIVC training program.MethodsOver 12-months, USG cannulation training sessions were offered to nurses and doctors competent in standard PIVC insertion (landmark technique), working in the ED. Surveys pre and post-training captured participants’ self-reported confidence with cannulation and USG cannulation using a 5-point Likert scale. Supplemental data from observation periods before and after the trainings assessed departmental cannulation practices overall. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and associations analysed using chi-square tests.ResultsOverall, 195 participants attended training; 58% completed follow-up surveys. Forty-three percent reported using USG cannulation the following month. The median confidence score amongst workshop participants increased from 1 to 3 (p 
       
  • Perceptions and experience of emergency discharge as reported by nurses
           and medical officers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Leahanna Stevens, Margaret Fry, Michael Jacques, Arthit BarnesAbstractBackgroundEmergency Department (ED) discharge involves the communication of healthcare information to optimise patient safety, selfmanagement, and understanding and compliance with ongoing treatment. However, little is known about the discharge practices or processesn undertaken by emergency clinicians. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the experience and perceptions of managing ED patient discharge by clinicians.MethodsA qualitative descriptive study was conducted in one district Tasmanian hospital. Data collection involved face to face interviews with emergency clinicians.ResultsTwenty-one (36%) (12 medical officers, 6 registered nurses and 3 nurse practitioners) emergency clinicians agreed to participate in the study. From the data, five key themes emerged; (1) managing emergency department discharge; (2) Managing the workload of discharge; (3) Working as a team to support discharge; and (4) Building a safety net for the transition of care and (5) Improving emergency discharge.ConclusionsEmergency discharge can be improved with the availability of a broader range of written patient discharge flyers, family and carer involvement, greater discharge role clarification, integration of electronic medical record and investigation ordering systems, defined nurse led discharge roles particularly after hours (after 4 pm) to improve the safety of patient discharged.
       
  • Thai family caregivers’ experiences helping dependent elders during
           medical emergencies: a qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Thassanee Soontorn, Praditporn Pongtriang, Praneed SongwathanaAbstractAimTo describe the experience of family caregivers of dependent elders during medical emergencies in rural settings in Thailand.MethodsThis was a descriptive qualitative research using in-depth interviews of 15 participants. Content analysis was applied to transcribed interviews, including data reduction as well as identification of key words, phrases, and themes.ResultsThe findings described the experience of caregivers of dependent older persons who faced emergency illness. Most of the family caregivers described their roles in unusual situations as practising assessment first and doing something that may relieve the symptoms experienced by the older persons before initiating and calling for help from relatives, neighbors, and, finally, the emergency medical services. The caregivers four main barriers to them feeling competent: (1) lack of home monitoring devices, (2) inexperienced caregivers in assessing warning signs to report during emergency care, (3) lack of information and understanding of patient rights in emergency health services, and (4) delayed arrival of emergency medical services.ConclusionsThere are barriers to the development of competency in caregiving skills, especially in assessing and recognizing warning signs and initiating first aid accurately before the arrival of the emergency health care team.
       
  • Frontline barriers to effective paramedic and emergency nursing STEMI
           management: clinician perspectives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Lorelle K Martin, Virginia J Lewis, David Clark, Maria C Murphy, David Edvardsson, Dion Stub, Omar FarouqueAbstractBackgroundFactors that hinder the pivotal role frontline clinicians play in STEMI management are under-reported. We aimed to explore perceived barriers to effective STEMI management by addressing the following questions:1. What are the most commonly occurring barriers to timely STEMI management for paramedics and emergency nurses'2. Are there differences in barriers experienced by paramedics and emergency nurses'3. Are there differences in barriers experienced by frontline clinicians in rural and metropolitan settings'MethodsA 79-item online survey was offered to paramedics and emergency nurses. Descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis identified the most frequently experienced types of barriers. Professional groups and geographical locations were compared.ResultsThere were 333 respondents. Response rates for paramedics was 10% and 9% for members of an emergency nursing association. Most commonly occurring barriers across all respondents were: 'lack of skills development'; 'lack of feedback'; 'untimely support'; 'distance to scene/hospital facilities'; 'hospital-related delays'. Statistically significant differences were found by professional group and geographical location.ConclusionBarriers to timely management were present, but not frequently experienced. Survey responses indicate a need for improved continuing professional development opportunity, clearer feedback mechanisms, streamlined facilitation of STEMI processes in hospitals, and enhanced access to expert advice/resources for all frontline clinicians.
       
  • Emergency nurses’ experience of adult basic and advanced life support
           workstations as a support strategy for clinical practice in the emergency
           department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Sharyn Ireland, Marc Marquez, Claire Hatherley, Nicole Farmer, Bella Luu, Charlotte Stevens, Eldho Paul, Biswadev MitraAbstractBackgroundStandards endorsed by the Australian Resuscitation Council in 2014 recommend that healthcare providers trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation should have their skills refreshed at least annually and for those who infrequently perform resuscitation, more frequent refresher training is advised. Emergency nurses were given the opportunity to attend workstations to refresh their knowledge and skills essential to resuscitation practice. The aim of this manuscript was to report the perception of the nurses’ experience following attendance at the workstations.MethodsLesson plans were developed for six workstations. Consented participants were invited to complete an on-line evaluation survey of their experience following programme participation and at 6-months following programme attendance. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to report outcomesResultsA total of 143 nurses working in the Emergency Department consented to participate. Following attendance at the workstations, most reported increased knowledge and skills (93.7 %), increased confidence (91.9 %) and that they practiced skills (91.9 %) during workstation participation. At 6-months follow-up the majority of nurses (97.1 %) found the programme to be beneficial and 82 (80.4 %) reported using the knowledge and skills gained from the programme in their clinical practice.ConclusionsEmergency nurses felt more confident in delivering patient care following attendance at the resuscitation workstations. Ongoing education was highly regarded by emergency nurses.
       
  • Enablers of, and barriers to, optimal glove and mask use for routine care
           in the emergency department: an ethnographic study of Australian
           clinicians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Ruth Barratt, Gwendolyn L. Gilbert, Ramon Z. Shaban, Mary Wyer, Su-yin HorAbstractBackgroundThe risk of healthcare-acquired infection increases during outbreaks of novel infectious diseases. Emergency department (ED) clinicians are at high risk of exposure to both these and common communicable diseases. Personal protective equipment (PPE) is recommended to protect clinicians from acquiring, or becoming vectors of, infection, yet compliance is typically sub-optimal. Little is known about factors that influence use of PPE—specifically gloves and masks—during routine care in the ED.MethodsThis was an ethnographic study, incorporating documentation review, field observations and interviews. The theoretical domains framework (TDF) was used to aid thematic analysis and identify relevant enablers of and barriers to optimal PPE use.ResultsThirty-one behavioural themes were identified that influenced participants’ use of masks and gloves. There were significant differences, namely: more reported enablers of glove use vs more barriers to mask use. Reasons included more positive unit culture towards glove use, and lower perception of risk via facial contamination.ConclusionEmerging infectious diseases, spread (among other routes) by respiratory droplets, have caused global outbreaks. Emergency clinicians should ensure that, as with gloves, the use of masks is incorporated into routine cares where appropriate. Further research which examines items of PPE independently is warranted.
       
  • Immunisation status screening in the emergency department: Why are we
           forgetting the elderly'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Helen Zaouk, Jennifer J. Green, Julie LeaskAbstractBackgroundPneumonia is one of the most common reasons patients over the age of 65 years present to the Emergency Department (ED). There is a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV) available under the National Immunisation Program (NIP) with demonstrated 61–71% effectiveness against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD), but only 51% of adults aged over 65 years are vaccinated in Australia.MethodsShort semi-structured interviews were conducted with emergency nurses working across a Local Health District in Sydney New South Wales (n = 9) in order to determine their knowledge, behaviour and attitudes towards immunisation status screening in the elderly who present to the ED with pneumonia. Questions were structured to the COM-B Model (capability, opportunity and motivation to change behaviour), and a thematic analysis was conducted.ResultsThere were three major themes identified: (1) The importance of routinisation, (2) Low knowledge levels and, (3) The ‘vaccination is for children’ heuristic, as well as suggestions for future interventions to improve screening.ConclusionsThese findings clarify how to improve vaccine uptake amongst this vulnerable cohort. They suggest that emergency departments should provide education to nurses. In addition, checklists/tick boxes can prompt nurses whilst conducting routine work, which may lead to increased vaccination uptake.
       
  • Instructions to Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: Australasian Emergency Care, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • The implementation and usability of HIRAID, a structured approach to
           emergency nursing assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Kate Curtis, Belinda Munroe, Connie Van, Tiana-Lee ElphickAbstractBackgroundEmergency nurses are responsible for the initial assessment, management and safety of critically ill patients. HIRAID, an evidence-informed emergency nursing assessment framework, is known to improve emergency nursing patient-assessment in the simulated environment however has not been evaluated in the clinical setting.MethodsA pre-post design was used to assess the usability and impact of HIRAID on emergency nurses self-efficacy in the emergency department (ED). Nursing and medical staff from three Australian EDs were surveyed. Descriptive and optimal pooled sample t-tests statistics were conducted.ResultsOne hundred and two emergency nurses completed the pre-intervention self-efficacy survey and 63 completed the post-intervention self-efficacy and satisfaction survey. Forty-two and 17 medical officers completed the pre- and post-intervention satisfaction surveys, respectively. Nursing staff self-efficacy levels were unchanged pre- and post-HIRAID implementation (Mean (SD): 8.8 (0.21) vs. 8.7 (0.20)) as was medical staff satisfaction (Mean (SD):7.5 (1.43) vs. 7.8 (1.07)), although there was a trend towards improved communication.ConclusionThe HIRAID structured approach to patient assessment is acceptable, feasible, practical and appropriate for use in the clinical environment. Further research will demonstrate the direct effects of HIRAID on clinical performance.
       
  • A comparison of major trauma patient transport destination in metropolitan
           Perth, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Elizabeth Brown, Hideo Tohira, Paul Bailey, Daniel Fatovich, Gavin Pereira, Judith FinnAbstractBackgroundDespite evidence of a lower risk of death, major trauma patients are not always transported to Trauma Centres. This study examines the characteristics and outcomes of major trauma patients between transport destinations.MethodsA retrospective cohort study of major trauma patients (Injury Severity Score>15) transported by ambulance was undertaken. Cases were divided into transport destination groups: (1) Direct, those transported to the Trauma Centre directly from the scene; (2) Indirect, those transported to another hospital prior to Trauma Centre transfer and (3) Non-transfers, those transported to a non-Trauma Centre and never subsequently transferred. Median and interquartile range (IQR) were used to describe the groups and differences were assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test for continuous variables and Pearson chi-square for categorical.ResultsA total of 1625 patients were included. The median age was oldest in the non-transfers cohort (72 years IQR 46–84). This group had the highest proportion of falls from standing and head injuries (n = 298/400, 75%, p 
       
  • Awareness of diagnosis and follow up care after discharge from the
           Emergency Department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Kelly Leamy, John Thompson, Biswadev MitraAbstractBackgroundPatients currently receive discharge summaries including investigation results, medical assessment and follow up requirements with health professionals on discharge from the emergency department (ED). This study aimed to evaluate if a simplified discharge information card in addition to current care improved patients’ awareness of their discharge diagnosis and requirements for follow-up appointment.MethodsA prospective pre-post design interventional study was conducted. The pre-intervention phase collected data from patients who did not receive the discharge card. The post-intervention phase occurred after implementing the discharge card. Participants underwent brief interviews to assess awareness of diagnosis and follow-up appointment requirements after discharge. Responses were compared to the plan in the medical notes and concordance determined.ResultsThere were 112 patients in the pre-intervention group and 117 in the post-intervention group. Awareness of discharge diagnosis improved from 73.2% (95% CI: 64.3–80.5) of pre-interventions participants to 89.7% (95% CI: 82.9–94.0) for participants receiving the discharge card (p 
       
  • The role of cognitive impairment in pain care in the emergency department
           for patients from residential aged care facilities: a retrospective,
           case-control study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Minyan Chen, James A. HughesAbstractBackgroundPatients with cognitive impairment are at risk of substantial delays to analgesic medication when presenting to the emergency department in pain.AimTo identify if patients from residential aged care facilities with cognitive impairment experience the same delays to analgesic medication are reported in the general emergency department population.MethodsThis study is a retrospective case-control review of patients presenting to one emergency department with pain as a presenting complaint from residential aged care, with and without cognitive impairment.ResultsPatients without cognitive impairment experience delays in time to first analgesic medication (175 min vs 98 min, p = 0.006) compared to cognitively impaired patients from residential aged care facilities. Both cohorts of patients waited more than three times the national benchmark for analgesic medication and 66% of all patients in this study did not have pain assessment completed.ConclusionPatients presenting from residential caged care facilities in this study without cogitative impairment wait longer for analgesia then patients who present with cogitative impairment, contrary to previously described relationships. Pain assessment and treatment are open to cogitative bias, and in the absence of pain assessment cogitative bias may prevail leading to poor pain care and discrepancies between patients with and without cogitative impairment.
       
  • Assessing and responding to anxiety and panic in the Emergency Department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 September 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Kate Derrick, Tim Green, Timothy WandAbstractAnxiety and panic symptoms are widespread in the general population. The physical manifestations of anxiety and panic commonly account for people presenting to Emergency Departments (EDs). It is therefore important for ED clinicians to be informed of the numerous causes of anxiety and panic and equipped to respond effectively. This paper describes the underlying pathophysiology of the physical symptoms of anxiety and panic and differential diagnoses to consider. Organic conditions that are associated with symptoms of anxiety and panic are highlighted. Brief interventions are tabled for ED clinicians to use when explaining symptoms, and to promote individual self-management.
       
  • An evaluation of the use of management care plans for people who
           frequently attend the emergency department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Marie Frances Gerdtz, Suzanne Kapp, Elaine Michael, Roshani Prematunga, Elizabeth Virtue, Jonathan KnottAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the use of management plans for people who frequently attend the emergency department (ED).BackgroundManagement plans are used to decrease ED utilisation by people who frequently attend. There is limited evidence regarding the use management plans for this population and the perspectives of staff who use them has previously not been considered.DesignA descriptive observational design including before and after measures of attendance (November 2010 to September 2014) and survey of staff perceptions (July to November 2014). The setting was a major metropolitan hospital ED in Australia.MethodsThe date for commencement of each plan was determined. Data were extracted regarding ED attendance 12 months before and after implementation. Staff perspectives were obtained via an online survey.ResultsFifty-seven patients made 1482 ED attendances. Of these 830 occurred in the 12 months before the management plan was implemented and 652 during the 12 months after. The number of attendances per patient decreased from a median of 11 to 4. Staff considered management plans to be beneficial to care planning practices and individual patient outcomes.ConclusionsManagement plans were acceptable to staff, and implementation of management plans was associated with a decrease in ED attendance.
       
  • Laughter is the best medicine: A novel finding in the treatment of
           supraventricular tachycardia in a paediatric emergency patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Jeremy Pallas, John-Paul SmilesAbstractWe present a novel case of laughter induction that was noted to terminate an episode of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) in a 10 year old girl who presented to a large metropolitan emergency department.In the initial management of this patient’s SVT, traditional vagal maneuvers (including the valsalva maneuver and stimulation of the mammalian divers reflex) were attempted unsuccessfully. While awaiting further treatment, nursing staff presented the patient with an inflated examination glove that had been crafted into the shape of an elephant. This resulted in a fit of laughter that appeared to terminate the child’s arrhythmia.Existing studies identified in the literature help to establish a correlation between the thoracic and cardiovascular physiology of laughter and the mechanics of the traditional Valsalva maneuver. Our patient’s case highlights the potential positive impact of this physiology when applied in the context of the paediatric patient presenting in SVT.In the context of the available evidence, the case of our 10-year-old patient serves as a thought-provoking example of the real world relationship between laughter and the traditional Valsalva maneuver. The utility of laughter in the management of supraventricular tachycardia is an area that warrants further investigation.
       
  • Prehospital and hospital delays for stroke patients treated with
           thrombolysis: access to health care facility – still a bottle neck in
           stroke care in developing nation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 August 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Ajay Kumar Mishra, Ramya Iyadurai
       
  • The “All of Us” study – Non-clinical staff members’ experience of
           performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in acute care settings
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Bradley Chesham, Christopher DawberAbstractBackgroundA multitude of Australian hospitals use non-clinical staff to assist with chest compressions and ancillary duties during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Whilst few studies have focused on psychological implications for non-clinical staff, research into other groups indicates that a lack of attention to psychological support may adversely impact individual wellbeing, team functioning and clinical performance.The aim of this study was to explore how non-clinical workers were psychologically affected during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and factors that might mitigate adverse psychological effects.MethodsThis study utilised a qualitative descriptive methodology involving semi-structured, face to face interviews to investigate the experiences of non-clinical staff involved in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews and a validated Post Traumatic Stress rating scale.ResultsThe study found that all 12 participants had experienced critical incident stress symptoms following their involvement in resuscitation attempts, though only one had ongoing evidence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.Participants felt that they needed more psychological preparation and that post-incident debriefs had been helpful but inconsistently provided and facilitated. Peer support was seen as the most significant factor in mitigating the psychological impact of critical incidents.ConclusionThis study shows that the development and formalisation of peer support networks for non-clinical health staff warrants serious consideration. The study also indicates that non-clinical members of resuscitation teams may benefit from more psychological preparation and support with self-care.
       
  • Nurse experiences and confidence in treating critically ill and injured
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2019Source: Australasian Emergency CareAuthor(s): Audas W. Grant, David J. BuckleyAbstractIntroductionThe geographical vastness of Australia in rural and remote regions provides challenges for hospital nursing staff when a medical officer is not immediately available. Delaying treatment until a medical officer arrives can potentially impact on patient outcomes. Some Registered Nurses in rural and remote New South Wales have received advanced training and credentialing through the First Line Emergency Care Course (FLECC) enabling them to initiate treatment prior to the medical officer's arrival. Despite operating since 1990 the course and subsequent model of care has received limited evaluation.PurposeThe aim of this study was to evaluate whether undertaking the First Line Emergency Care Course (FLECC) improves confidence in rural and remote registered nurses’ (RN) ability to provide and to initiate extended scope of practice for emergency care of critically ill adults in the absence of a medical officer.ProcedureA voluntary electronic cross sectional 19 question multi-centre survey was emailed to all nurses FLECC accredited since 2008 and employed in rural and remote Local Health District in New South Wales.FindingsA response rate of 60% was obtained (225/375). Since credentialing 93.3% nurses had commenced emergency treatments under the approved guidelines. The majority (97.4%) agreed that the course provided the required knowledge. The mean Likert nurse's self-assessed confidence score (1–5) for providing first line response rose significantly (Wilcoxon signed rank test V = 375, p-value 
       
 
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