Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8679 journals)
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DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (163 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 163 of 163 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Dermato-Venereologica     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Acta Dermatovenerologica Croatica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Skin & Wound Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African Journal of AIDS Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
AIDS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
AIDS Care: Psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
AIDS Patient Care and STDs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aktuelle Dermatologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Allergo Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Dermatopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anaplastology     Open Access  
Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Archives de Pédiatrie     Full-text available via subscription  
Archives de sciences sociales des religions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux - Pratique     Hybrid Journal  
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Medical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Journal of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Berkala Ilmu Kesehatan Kulit dan Kelamin / Periodical of Dermatology and Venereology     Open Access  
Biomedical Dermatology     Open Access  
BMC Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical and Experimental Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Skin Cancer     Full-text available via subscription  
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinics in Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Contact Dermatitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cosmetics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Current Dermatology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Fungal Infection Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current HIV Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current HIV/AIDS Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Sexual Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Der Hautarzt     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dermatitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dermato-Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dermatología Venezolana     Open Access  
Dermatologic Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dermatologic Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Dermatologic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Dermatologic Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dermatologica Sinica     Open Access  
Dermatological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Dermatology and Cosmetic     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dermatology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dermatology Online Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dermatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dermatopathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Journal of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Cosmetologia Medica e Medicina degli Inestetismi Cutanei     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Dermatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Experimental Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Expert Review of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forum Dermatologicum     Hybrid Journal  
Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Güncel Dermatoloji Dergisi     Open Access  
HautinForm     Full-text available via subscription  
hautnah     Hybrid Journal  
hautnah dermatologie     Hybrid Journal  
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
HIV Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
HIV Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Dermatology Online Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Archives of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Dermatology and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of STD & AIDS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Women's Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International STD Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JAAD Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JAIDS : Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
JAMA Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
JMIR Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Clinical and Investigative Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cutaneous Immunology and Allergy     Open Access  
Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dermatological Research     Open Access  
Journal of Dermatological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dermatological Science Supplement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dermatological Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dermatology & Dermatologic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of General-Procedural Dermatology & Venereology Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Investigative Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sexual Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Skin and Stem Cell     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Skin Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Surgical Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Egyptian Women’s Dermatologic Society     Partially Free  
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the International AIDS Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the Saudi Society of Dermatology & Dermatologic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karger Kompass Dermatologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Karger Kompass Pneumologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Medical and Surgical Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nepal Journal of Dermatology, Venereology & Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neurobehavioral HIV Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
OA Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open AIDS Journal     Open Access  
Open Dermatology Journal     Open Access  
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pigment International     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psoriasis : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Internacional de Ciencias Podológicas     Open Access  
SAHARA : Journal of Social Aspects of HIV / AIDS Research Alliance     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scars, Burns & Healing     Open Access  
Serbian Journal of Dermatology and Venereology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexually Transmitted Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexually Transmitted Infections     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Skin Appendage Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Skin Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sri Lanka Journal of Sexual Health and HIV Medicine     Open Access  
Studies in Gender and Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Surgical & Cosmetic Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Vestnik dermatologii i venerologii     Open Access  
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Women's Dermatology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.213
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2352-6475
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3200 journals]
  • Malignant Acanthosis Nigricans as a Paraneoplastic Manifestation of
           Metastatic Breast Cancer

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Javier Arellano, Pamela Iglesias, Claudia Suarez, Yamile Corredoira, Katty SchnettlerAbstractMalignant acanthosis nigricans is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome, usually associated with a gastric adenocarcinoma and less frequently with other neoplasms. In general, its appearance indicates a poor prognosis with a survival of less than 2 years. We describe the case of a 40-year-old patient who presented with generalized cutaneous thickening that had a velvety appearance, that was rapidly progressing, and with right axillary adenopathy. A skin and nipple biopsy that was consistant with acanthosis nigricans, was performed, as was a palpable adenopathy biopsy that was compatible with a mammary adenocarcinoma HER2 (+), and negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors, without a detectable primary tumor. This case of malignant acanthosis nigricans is presented because of the importance of its early recognition as a paraneoplastic syndrome and its relation with a mammary adenocarcinoma, an association little reported in the literature.
       
  • Art of Prevention: A Piercing Article About Nickel

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Kory Markel, Nan Silverberg, Janice L. Pelletier, Kalman L. Watsky, Sharon E. Jacob
       
  • Estrogen-deficient skin: The role of topical therapy

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): A.K. Rzepecki, J.E. Murase, R. Juran, S.G. Fabi, B.N. McLellanAbstractMenopause is a major turning point in a woman’s life that is characterized by declining ovarian function and decreased serum estrogen levels. The resulting hormonal changes particularly affect the skin, with postmenopausal symptoms such as loss of structural architecture and increased propensity to damage becoming rapidly noticeable. Interestingly, studies have shown that estrogen deprivation in postmenopausal conditions accelerates many skin changes, including dryness, atrophy, fine wrinkling, and poor wound healing. Thus, the effects of low estrogen on the skin are an important endogenous cause of aging skin in women, yet topical treatment strategies that target cutaneous symptoms are limited. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of the role of estrogen in the skin and changes associated with estrogen deficiency, as well as review alternatives to systemic estrogen therapy and describe the effects of these interventions on cutaneous aging in postmenopausal skin. Specifically, clinical studies that utilize topical estrogens and topical isoflavones, which are soy-derived compounds that interact with estrogen receptors, are discussed.
       
  • Sophie Spitz: A Woman Ahead of Her Time

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Kathleen Spitz, Melissa Piliang, Eliot N. Mostow
       
  • Vaginal rejuvenation: From scalpel to wands

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Sejal A. Desai, George Kroumpouzos, Neil SadickAbstractVaginal rejuvenation procedures are increasing in popularity in terms of types of treatment offered, number of patients undergoing them, clinical studies, and in the controversy surrounding them. Both non-invasive and invasive solutions are being developed by pharmaceutical and technological companies. Radiofrequency devices and lasers are spearheading the energy-based device space, and fillers and platelet-rich plasma are used to address several concerns surrounding vaginal health. In this review, an overview of the growing field of vaginal rejuvenation is presented, as well as the authors’ personal view and analysis of this clinical space.
       
  • Treatment of moist desquamation for patients undergoing radiotherapy

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): R. Suresh, J. Raffi, F. Yuen, J.E. MuraseAbstractMoist desquamation occurs in approximately 36% of patients who receive radiation therapy and is associated with severe opioid-resistant pain and discomfort. Moist desquamation is typically at its worst within 1 to 3 weeks after treatment conclusion and resolves over a period of 6 weeks. Herein, we present a therapeutic pearl for the treatment of moist desquamation based on methods from the burn literature, with the goal of helping patients who undergo radiation therapy for breast cancer and other indications.
       
  • Art of Prevention: The Importance of Proper Diapering Practices

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Erin Wesner, Janna M. Vassantachart, Sharon E. Jacob
       
  • Serum homocysteine level, vitamin B12 levels, and erythrocyte folate in
           psoriasis: A case-control study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): R. Abedini, A. Goodarzi, V. Saeidi, S.H. Hosseini, A. Jadidnuri, M. Salehi Taleghani, V. LajevardiAbstractBackgroundOne of the most important organ involvements in psoriasis is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine is known to have atherogenic properties, but some inconsistency exists in the literature about its probable role as a risk factor of cardiovascular disorder in patients with psoriasis.ObjectiveBecause of some controversies, we compared homocysteine levels and related parameters of metabolic cycles in patients with psoriasis and healthy individuals.MethodsThis case-control study was conducted on 50 patients with psoriasis and 50 healthy individuals as the controls. Serum homocysteine, vitamin B12 levels, and erythrocyte folate concentrations were checked in all participants.ResultsMean serum homocysteine, erythrocyte folate, and vitamin B12 levels did not show any significant difference between the two groups (p> .05), but interestingly, in patients with psoriasis, men had a significantly higher incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia and lower levels of erythrocyte folate (p = .14). Overall, there is no significant difference in serum levels of homocysteine and metabolic-related parameters between the case and control group. There was no significant relationship between the severity of psoriasis and the body mass index of patients (p> .05).ConclusionPatients with psoriasis had a higher body mass index and higher levels of homocysteine in men. Hyperhomocysteinemia could be a predisposing factor of cardiovascular events, but more evaluations as a part of metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis are needed.
       
  • Art of Prevention: The Importance of Bath Time and Avoiding Extended
           Exposure to Irritating and Allergenic Chemicals

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Tracy Novosel, Chandler W. Rundle, JiaDe Yu, Sharon E. Jacob
       
  • Keratinocytic epidermal nevus with ipsilateral breast hypoplasia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): E. Chen, A.J. Chiaravalloti, J. FinchAbstractBreast hypoplasia has been reported in some epidermal nevus syndromes, but not with a keratinocytic epidermal nevus. Herein, we describe the first case of breast hypoplasia associated with a keratinocytic epidermal nevus. Keratinocytic epidermal nevi have been shown to be associated with somatic mutations in FGFR3, PIK3CA, and HRAS. We hypothesize that hypoplasia may be due to a local mutation in the FGFR3 gene or increased androgen receptors in affected breast tissue. The patient was treated with CO2 laser with good cosmetic outcome.
       
  • Successful management of bullous pemphigoid with dimethyl fumarate
           therapy: a case report

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): A. Bilgic Temel, S. Das, DF. MurrellAbstractA 69-year-old woman affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) for 35 years was diagnosed as bullous pemphigoid (BP) and treated successfully with dimethyl fumarate (DMF) at a dose of 120 mg/bd for 7 days and then increased to 240 mg/bd after first-line therapies of BP. DMF is now under evaluation with an investigator-initiated prospective controlled trial in patients with BP to determine the efficacy and safety of adjuvant DMF. To our knowledge, this is the first case of BP successfully treated with DMF in the literature.
       
  • Cutaneous leishmaniasis: A neglected disfiguring disease for women

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): A. Bilgic-Temel, D.F. Murrell, S. UzunAbstractLeishmaniasis is one of eight neglected tropical diseases currently endemic in 102 countries/areas around the world. In recent years, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) has been increasingly observed among migrants, travelers, ecotourists, and military personnel. Because of its great capacity to mimic other dermatoses, CL is one of the great imitators and can mislead practitioners, which can result in untreated lesions that cause scars. CL is a disfiguring disease, especially for women, and often leaves scars on visible body sites, causing psychological, social, and economic problems. CS is a challenge, especially in nonendemic regions, such as Australia, because experience with diagnosis and management of the disease is limited.
       
  • Treatment for cellulite

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Neil SadickAbstractCellulite is a multifactorial condition that is present in 80% to 90% of postpubertal women and is one of the most intolerable esthetic imperfections. There are several theories on the pathophysiology of cellulite, and a number of different therapeutic regimens have been developed, from topical treatments to mechanical or energy-based devices. In this brief review, we summarize the scientific landscape to determine the clinical evidence with regard to the safety and efficacy of cellulite treatment options. Clinical protocols and the author’s experience using a combination of internal and external procedures are also discussed. Studies using laser and light modalities along with radiofrequency have shown improvements in cellulite and a good safety profile, but acoustic wave therapy, subcision, and the 1440-nm Nd:YAG minimally invasive laser have demonstrated the most beneficial results in cellulite reduction. Although there is paucity of scientific evidence for treatments that improve cellulite, future emerging options and their combination may pave the way to eradicate this primarily cosmetic esthetic concern.
       
  • Cutaneous complications associated with breast augmentation: A review

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): S. Chopra, D. MarucciAbstractBreast augmentation is one of the most popular and safe cosmetic procedures performed by plastic surgeons worldwide. Although breast implants are available in a number of different materials, silicone-filled implants remain the most common type. However, prior to the development of breast implants, various materials were injected into the soft tissues of the breasts to increase breast volume, which caused cutaneous complications and disfigurement. This review details the history of breast augmentation, the current methods used in augmentation surgery, and associated cutaneous complications.
       
  • Platelet-rich plasma for androgenetic alopecia: A review of the literature
           and proposed treatment protocol

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): J. Stevens, S. KhetarpalAbstractAndrogenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common hair loss disorder caused by genetic and hormonal factors that are characterized by androgen-related progressive thinning of scalp hair in a defined pattern. By the age of 60 years, 45% of men and 35% of women develop AGA. Currently, U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for AGA include oral finasteride and topical minoxidil. Due to the limited number of effective therapies for AGA, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has become an effective alternative treatment. PRP is an autologous concentration of platelets in plasma with numerous growth factors that contribute to hair regeneration. The growth factors contained within the alpha granules of platelets act on stem cells in the bulge area of the hair follicles and stimulate the development of new follicles along with neovascularization. PRP has become a promising treatment modality for AGA. Although there have been several studies previously reported, a standard practice for PRP preparation and administration as well as a method to evaluate results have not been established. This literature review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP for AGA and discuss the various treatment protocols that have been proposed.
       
  • Current and emerging treatment strategies for hair loss in women of color

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): U.R. Okereke, A. Simmons, V.D. CallenderAbstractHair loss is common in women of color, and is associated with significant psychosocial complaints. Early clinical recognition and prompt initiation of intervention with medical treatment is critical to halt the disease process. In this article, we review the clinical presentations of nonscarring and scarring alopecias in women of color, use of dermoscopy for early recognition of the disease process, and medical, procedural, and surgical interventions. In conditions that result in scarring alopecia, such as late-stage traction, frontal fibrosing, or central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, patients may benefit from procedural interventions, such as hair transplantation, platelet rich plasma injections, low-level laser therapy, or scalp therapy.
       
  • New oral and topical approaches for the treatment of melasma

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): P.E. Grimes, S. Ijaz, R. Nashawati, D. KwakAbstractMelasma is a common, therapeutically challenging, and universally relapsing disorder of hyperpigmentation that is most often observed in women and individuals with Fitzpatrick Skin Types III through VI. The pathogenesis of melasma is complex and protean. Contributing factors that are often implicated in the etiopathogenesis of this condition include a genetic predisposition, intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, and hormonal influences. Therapeutic interventions for melasma include a multimodality approach incorporating photoprotection agents, topical and oral skin lighteners, and resurfacing procedures. Given our expanding knowledge of the pathogenesis of melasma, new and effective treatments are expanding our therapeutic armamentarium. This article reviews new and emerging oral and topical treatments for melasma.
       
  • An approach to structural facial rejuvenation with fillers in women

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): R. Fitzgerald, J. Carqueville, P.T. YangAbstractNewer understanding of volume loss as a critical component of facial aging and the integration of volume replacement into the surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic algorithm is arguably the most significant recent development in the field of facial rejuvenation. As all structural tissues play a role in the aging face, restoring youthful characteristics (or establishing them where they are congenitally absent) starts from the skeletal framework and builds progressively to the canvas of the face. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction and brief summary of some of the current concepts concerning facial anatomy and the anatomy of facial aging, which serve as the basis for predictable and reproducible results with the use of injectable fillers. This article does not include the various types of fillers or techniques of filler injection, but covers how to decide where to use the filler and why, in different faces, as a result of the recognition and targeted correction of currently recognized specific anatomic deficiencies.
       
  • How to succeed in dermatologic surgery

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): A. Wysong, E. McBurneyAbstractThis article explores the many facets of success within dermatologic surgery. We incorporate advice from both dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons to provide overall advice and strategies for success. In addition, we discuss specific tips for matching and career development.
       
  • Beyond the physician’s perspective: A review of patient-reported
           outcomes in dermatologic surgery and cosmetic dermatology

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): S. Mori, E.H. LeeAbstractPatient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are utilized in health care to quantify the patient’s perspective of a health condition or treatment on outcomes, such as health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and patient satisfaction. In dermatology, this is particularly relevant because the patient’s perspective is critical in evaluating the outcome of cosmetic procedures as well as skin cancer treatment. We review seven validated PROMs that have been reported in the dermatologic surgery and cosmetic dermatology literature. For patients undergoing cosmetic procedures, the use of PROMs provides additional valuable outcome data beyond physician assessment. For patients with skin cancer, women experience a unique and often greater impact on HRQoL during treatment, which has been captured through PROMs. The recent development of multi-module instruments, such as the FACE-Q and FACE-Q Skin Cancer, have facilitated comprehensive assessments of treatment that impact multiple domains of HRQoL. The use of PROMs allows for dermatologists to reliably capture important disease- and treatment-related concerns, thus improving the patient experience.
       
  • The female pioneers in Mohs micrographic surgery

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): N. Papac, L. Collins
       
  • Physical activity of early stage melanoma survivors

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): J.K. RobinsonAbstractBackgroundEarly stage melanoma survivors are typically otherwise healthy adults with a median age of 56.5 years for women at the time of diagnosis. Women have a projected lifespan of 20 to 30 additional years during which they should be able to enjoy and benefit from leisure outdoor physical activities while limiting their risk of a second melanoma from unprotected sun exposure.ObjectiveThis study evaluated the physical activity of melanoma survivors before their diagnosis of melanoma as well as 2 to 3 months and 12 months after surgical resection.MethodsParticipants in this observational study were early stage melanoma survivors (Stage 0-1A) who were surgically treated for melanoma within the last 6 months. Participants completed three online surveys (Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire) that estimated their physical activity 2 to 3 months prior to the diagnosis with melanoma as well as 2 to 3 months and 12 months after surgery.ResultsAll 75 participants were non-Hispanic white, and 38 of 75 participants (50.6%) were women. The median age of this urban/suburban Midwest population was 52 years. Prior to their diagnosis, all melanoma survivors were active, and 55% of women reported vigorous leisure physical activity. Two to three months after surgery, 11 of 38 women (30%) were inactive and 31% were inactive at 12 months. At 12 months after surgery, inactivity was positively correlated with older age (61-80 + years; F1050 = 15.38; p < .001) and being a woman (0.05; F1050 = 11.02; p < .01).ConclusionDermatologists are in a position to promote a healthy lifestyle for melanoma survivors, especially older women who can be expected to live many more years and may restrict leisure outdoor physical activity to comply with sun protection recommendations. When considering the overall health of older, female melanoma survivors, dermatologists may recommend they walk with a friend at any time of the day while wearing a hat, protective clothing, and sunscreen on exposed skin.
       
  • &rft.title=International+Journal+of+Women's+Dermatology&rft.issn=2352-6475&rft.date=&rft.volume=">The relationship between menopausal hormone therapy and keratinocyte
           carcinoma: A review

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): R. Suresh, A. Twigg, J.E. MuraseAbstractIntroductionKeratinocyte carcinoma (KC) is the most common malignancy in the United States. The two most common forms of KC are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which account for 80% and 20% of cases, respectively.ObjectiveThere are many well-established risk factors for KC, but a more controversial risk factor for KC development is menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). This review synthesizes existing information on this topic and identifies knowledge gaps for future study.MethodsA systematic review of the literature using the Medical Subject Headings terms “menopausal hormone therapy; skin neoplasms” was conducted in the PubMed database from March 19, 2018 to April 1, 2018. This yielded 168 articles, case reports, and reviews, which were further refined for inclusion during the development of this manuscript. Additional articles were identified from cited references.ResultsFour studies pertaining to this topic were identified. The results were evaluated in the context of these studies’ strengths and weaknesses. MHT contributes to an increased risk of basal cell carcinoma in Caucasian subjects and may make these tumors histologically more aggressive. There is not enough evidence to make a conclusion with regard to a potential relationship between MHT and SCC. However, one study suggested an increased risk of SCC with MHT use and another demonstrated a temporal association with prolonged MHT use and increased risk of SCC development.ConclusionEver users of MHT should be screened more frequently for KC. This issue is of importance to dermatologists because patients who receive earlier diagnoses of KC will have a better opportunity to pursue treatment.
       
  • &rft.title=International+Journal+of+Women's+Dermatology&rft.issn=2352-6475&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Nonmelanoma skin cancer in women

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): H. Heaton, N. LawrenceAbstractMen continue to develop nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) at higher rates than women, but the epidemiologic pattern of NMSC development is evolving. We present a selective, narrative review of the literature showing that there is a trend toward a development of basal cell carcinomas in women at younger ages, and highlight potential causes of this trend. We review evidence that indoor tanning is associated with the development of NMSC and show that young women use indoor tanning more than any other age-sex group. We discuss societal factors that relate to the tanning behavior of young women. Finally, we argue that facial NMSCs may have more of a negative impact on quality of life in women than in men.
       
  • Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Murad Alam
       
  • Autoimmune bullous diseases during pregnancy: Solving common and uncommon
           issues

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): A. Patsatsi, B. Marinovic, D. MurrellAbstractAutoimmune bullous diseases during pregnancy pose a therapeutic challenge for medical dermatologists. There are main concerns with regard to the regimen, dose, route of administration, and potential harm to the fetus. Many therapeutic options may be safe during pregnancy despite official classifications. Furthermore, there are always questions regarding management during the lactation period. Additionally, issues exist about male and female fertility and the time of discontinuation of certain medications before conception. In this article, we present an overview of the literature based on answers to these issues to solve common and uncommon management problems that arise about a spectrum of autoimmune bullous diseases before conception, as well as during pregnancy and the lactation period.
       
  • An array of unusual clinical features in a woman with amlodipine-induced
           linear immunoglobulin A disease

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): P. Ailawadi, I. Narang, V.K. GargAbstractLinear immunoglobulin A disease (LAD) is a rare, autoimmune, vesicular-bullous disease that is either idiopathic or drug-induced, most commonly by vancomycin and in rare instances by amlodipine. In drug-induced LAD, certain uncommon and atypical clinical features can occur. In our patient, a 49-year-old woman with amlodipine-induced LAD, atypical features such as koebnerization and palmo-plantar involvement occurred. She presented with tense, clear fluid-filled vesicles, bullae, and erosions all over her body, especially on the palms and soles, with some lesions showing a string-of-pearls appearance. The lesions were preceded by pruritus, and the patient had changed her anti-hypertensive medication from telmisartan to telmisartan-amlodipine for previous 10 days. Skin biopsy and direct immunofluorescence testing confirmed LAD. During the hospital stay, along with new crops of lesions, a few vesicles were present along the lines where she had scratched and the band of tight elastic sleeves of the sterile gown she wore, which is suggestive of koebnerization. Knowing the atypical manifestations of drug-induced LAD may aid clinicians in determining an early diagnosis, and LAD should be an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of vesiculobullous disease with palmar-plantar involvement. Amlodipine is a commonly used anti-hypertensive drug, so knowledge of its potential to cause this disease is important. Furthermore, knowing the potential for koebnerization, avoidance of trauma and the gentle handling of these patients can lead to early recovery from this self-limiting disease.
       
  • Gender workforce disparities―an ethical imperative

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): A.R. Larson
       
  • Dermatology residents in the era of #MeToo: Ethical considerations of
           appropriate responses to inappropriate patient behavior

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): S. Mattessich, A. Chiaravalloti, A. Y.-Y. Chen
       
  • Frontal fibrosing alopecia: An update on the hypothesis of pathogenesis
           and treatment

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): S. Tavakolpour, H.R. Mahmoudi, R. Abedini, K. Kamyab Hesari, A. Kiani, M. DaneshpazhoohAbstractFrontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a relatively new scarring alopecia that is considered a variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP) with no recognized promising treatments. In this study, we tried to clarify the underlying signaling pathways and their roles in the pathogenesis and progression of FFA. Because of several differences in clinical manifestations, response to treatments, and pathological findings, these two conditions could be differentiated from each other. Taking into account the already discussed signaling pathways and involved players such as T cells, mast cells, and sebaceous glands, different possible therapeutic options could be suggested. In addition to treatments supported by clinical evidence, such as 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, topical calcineurin inhibitors, hydroxychloroquine, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, and oral retinoid agents, various other treatment strategies and drugs, such as phototherapy, Janus kinase inhibitors, dehydroepiandrosterone, sirolimus, cetirizine, and rituximab, could be suggested to mitigate disease progression. Of course, such lines of treatment need further evaluation in clinical trials.
       
  • Knowledge, attitude, and practices toward sun exposure and use of sun
           protection among non-medical, female, university students in Saudi Arabia:
           A cross-sectional study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): Reema R. Almuqati, Ali S. Alamri, Nawal R. AlmuqatiAbstractExcessive unprotected sun exposure is a significant risk factor for skin damage and skin cancers. In recent decades, the incidence of skin cancer has increased dramatically worldwide, reaching epidemic proportions. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer worldwide, and the ninth most common malignancy in Saudi Arabia. Sun protection is a key primary preventive strategy against skin cancer and skin damage induced by sun exposure.Herein, a cross-sectional study was made to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices toward sun exposure, and the use of sun protection among non-medical female students on the Sulaymaniyah campus of the King Abdul-Aziz University. Also, we identified the reasons that prevented the students from using sun protection measures. A special-designed, self-administered questionnaire was applied on a sample size of 501 students. We found that most students were aware of the risks of unprotected sun exposure. Nevertheless, a view of sunscreen as harmful was reported (34.1%). Seeking shade and wearing protective clothing were the most used sun protection methods (58.1% and 43.1%, respectively). Sunscreen users made up only one third of our sample (23.6%). However, the majority of students (64.9%) did not know about the sun protection factor of sunscreen products. Discomfort felt on the skin was the most commonly reported reason for avoiding the use of sunscreen (40.7%). When comparing our study with Western studies, we found a high level of awareness among our sample of students. Significant differences in the attitude toward the application of suntan and sun protection products might be due to differences in cultural background. Our results spotted the need for future health education programs for our society that focus on the significant importance of sunscreen, as well as the correct methods of application.
       
  • Staphylococcus lugdunensis abscess with deep tissue involvement

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): R. Waldman, A. Kelsey
       
  • Atypical blastomycosis in a pregnant woman

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): C.M. DeWitt, K. Shea, L.A. Greene, J.C. PiersonAbstractBlastomycosis is a rare fungal infection that frequently involves the skin. Atypical presentations are important to identify, especially in pregnant patients, to initiate appropriate therapy and prevent complications. Uniquely, we describe a case of atypical blastomycosis that presented with painful cutaneous abscesses in a pregnant patient, with dissemination to the central nervous system. The case was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B transitioned to voriconazole after delivery without complications for the patient or fetus.
       
  • Does gender impact publication opportunities'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): J.M. Grant-Kels
       
  • Medical dermatologic conditions in transgender women

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): S.N. Mundluru, A.R. LarsonAbstractMany previous reviews and studies on transgender dermatology have highlighted the expected dermatologic manifestations of hormone affirmation therapy in transgender patients. Others have highlighted attitudes and practices of both transgender patients and medical professionals taking care of these patients. This review compiles data from other, lesser known aspects of transgender dermatology, including neovaginal concerns, neoplastic concerns (both neovaginal and cutaneous), autoimmune conditions, and the sequelae of injectable substances that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This review, like others, will be a stepping-stone and serve as an impetus for future research in transgender dermatology.
       
  • Female pattern hair loss: A clinical, pathophysiologic, and therapeutic
           review

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): G. Fabbrocini, M. Cantelli, A. Masarà, M.C. Annunziata, C. Marasca, S. CacciapuotiAbstractFemale pattern hair loss (FPHL) is the most common form of alopecia in women. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are desirable because treatments are more effective to avoid the progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Typically, a diagnosis of FPHL can be confirmed by review of a patient's medical history and a physical examination alone. Testing a scalp biopsy is diagnostic but usually not required. In women with signs of hyperandrogenism, an investigation for ovarian or adrenal disorders should be performed. Treatment for FPHL is obscured by myths. The aim of FPHL treatment could be two-fold: Reverse or stabilize the process of hair follicle miniaturization. Mild-to-moderate FPHL in women can be treated with oral antiandrogen therapies (cyproterone acetate and spironolactone) and/or topical minoxidil with good results in many cases. If used correctly, available medical treatments arrest the progression of the disease and reverse miniaturization in most patients with mild-to-moderate FPHL. Hair systems and surgery may be considered for selected cases of severe FPHL.
       
  • An assessment of the relative impact of hidradenitis suppurativa,
           psoriasis, and obesity on quality of life

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): M.A. Storer, M.J. Danesh, M.E. Sandhu, V. Pascoe, A.B. KimballAbstractBackgroundHidradenitis suppurativa (HS) and psoriasis are inflammatory skin diseases associated with obesity. Each disease is likely to impact the quality of life of patients, but the relative impact of each disease is unknown.ObjectivesThis study aimed to determine whether skin disease or obesity is more distressing to obese patients who have either psoriasis or HS.MethodsA cohort of obese patients with psoriasis and HS was surveyed using a time-trade-off utility. T-tests and regression analysis were used to compare differences in impact on quality of life between skin disease and obesity for patients with HS and psoriasis. Further analyses were adjusted for degree of obesity and severity of disease.ResultsA total of 79 subjects completed the survey. Obese patients with HS were heavier than patients with psoriasis (mean body mass index 38.1 kg/m2 vs. 34.9 kg/m2). Obese patients with either HS or psoriasis were both willing to trade a significantly higher proportion of their life to live without skin disease than to live at a normal weight (p = .01). This effect persisted after controlling for disease severity and weight. Patients with HS were willing to trade significantly more years of life to live at a normal weight than obese patients with psoriasis (14 vs. 7; p < .04).LimitationsThis was a small study conducted at an academic institution.ConclusionIn this study population, obesity was more severe in patients with HS than in those with psoriasis. Even after controlling for relative severity, HS was more problematic for subjects in this study than weight when these conditions existed concomitantly.
       
  • &rft.title=International+Journal+of+Women's+Dermatology&rft.issn=2352-6475&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Ethics of esthetic procedures in pregnancy

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): G. Kroumpouzos, L. Bercovitch
       
  • Introduction of the Women's Health Highlight and Patient Page

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • A closer look at the role of the dermatologist in championing total
           women’s health through the dermatology gateway

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): P.E. GrimesAbstractNew data collected by the Women’s Dermatologic Society (WDS) through a membership survey conducted in August 2018 reflect the key role of the dermatologist in championing the overall health of the total woman through the dermatology gateway. These meaningful results provide a first-ever metric glimpse into the myriad systemic/internal diseases, disorders, and conditions that WDS dermatologists detect and diagnose in female dermatology patients and the wide scope of our collaborations with other physician specialists to manage complex, underlying medical conditions. Insightful perspectives from medical and health experts outside of dermatology address the importance of teamwork, reaffirm the unique role that dermatologists play on the medical team, and underscore the vital importance of our proclivity toward collaboration, the latter of which is shown to be significant according to the WDS data.Given an apparent general lack of awareness about the role of the dermatologist in the health journey of the total woman, we have an important opportunity to advance this broadened perspective among our colleagues in and outside of dermatology, our patients, the media, and the public at-large. By raising awareness, we can elevate our specialty in the medical profession and in the public eye, increase the likelihood that people will consult a dermatologist (proactively and reactively), inspire mutual referrals and greater cross-specialty teamwork and communications to benefit patients, and positively affect public health.
       
  • Rare malignancies posing a diagnostic challenge: a report of three cases

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Magdalena Żychowska
       
  • Challenges in epidermolysis bullosa: maximizing pre- and perinatal
           outcomes

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Alina Suru, Carmen Salavastru
       
  • The importance of systemic treatment in pediatric linear morphea

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Adelina-Maria Sendrea, Stefana Cretu, Monica Popescu, Alina Suru, Carmen Maria Salavastru
       
  • Melanocyte and melanogenesis features in pigmented and nonpigmented
           variants of basal cell carcinoma

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Karla Martinez-Rosales, Juan Pablo Castanedo-Cazares, Bertha Torres-Alvarez, Diego Cortes-García
       
  • A young woman with frontal firbosing alopecia: a case report and review of
           therapeutic options

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Lauren Kole
       
  • Lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia: report of two cases

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Nilda Eliana Gómez-Bernal
       
  • The use of co2 laser for facial cutaneous neurofibromas in
           neurofibromatosis type 1 – a case report and literature review

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): S. Cretu, M. Popescu, A.M. Sendrea, A. Suru, C.M. Salavastru
       
  • Treating hidradenitis suppurativa during pregnancy

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): CA Luther, EN Pritchett, IH Hamzavi
       
  • Elucidating the role of the skin and gut microbiome in the development and
           pathogenesis of alopecia areata

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Margit Juhász, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska
       
  • Chronicity in clinicopathologic presentation of dry-type cutaneous
           leishmaniasis

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Simin Shamsimeymandi, Shahriar Dabiri
       
  • A new understanding of environmental damage to the skin and prevention
           with topical antioxidant treatments

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Karen E. Burke
       
  • Evaluation of serum levels of zinc and copper in vitiligo and their role
           in its pathogenesis and treatment

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Isha Narang, Krishna Deb Barman, Pramod Lali, Bijaylakshmi Sahoo
       
  • The relationship between menopausal hormone therapy and keratinocyte
           carcinoma

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Raagini Suresh, Amanda Twigg, Jenny E. Murase
       
  • Use of benzathine benzylpenicillin in treatment of delayed breast
           cellulitis after breast-conservation cancer therapy

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Marija Sola, Vera Pluzaric, Marina Vekic Muzevic
       
  • International chapters and membership of WDS are growing

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): Dedee F. Murrell, Maryam Daneshpahzooh, Simin Meymandi, Luitgard G. Wiest
       
  • Cell phone use in the clinic: “Please hang up now, the doctor is
           ready to see you!”

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): M. DeWane, J.M. Grant-Kels
       
  • Academic dermatology leadership in the United States -- Addressing the
           gender gap

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): V.E. Nambudiri, C.R. Shi, R.A. Vleugels, S.M. Olbricht
       
  • Scalp metastasis from occult primary breast carcinoma: A case report and
           review of the literature

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): N. Alizadeh, H. Mirpour, S.Z. AzimiAbstractBackgroundIsolated distant cutaneous metastasis of breast carcinoma is uncommon. Furthermore, isolated metastasis of the scalp seems to be very rare in breast cancer.Case presentationA 44-year-old woman was referred to our dermatology department with concerns of a firm, painless, immobile, hardened, skin-colored mass fixed to the underlying tissues. The lesion measured 2 to 3 cm on the scalp frontalis without regional or distant lymphadenopathy. The patient had a history of benign right breast biopsy test results.Immunohistochemistry test results were positive for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), cytokeratin 7, chromogranin, estrogen receptor, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15; group PR/HER2 were both weakly positive. Cytokeratin 20, thyroid-lung transcription factor, S100 protein, vimentin and thyroglobulin were all negative. Pathology test results showed adenocarcinoma that was consistent with breast primary.ConclusionAlthough cutaneous metastasis of the chest wall due to breast carcinoma is a common condition, scalp metastasis as the first sign of occult breast cancer is an extremely rare condition. We describe an isolated scalp metastasis as the initial presentation of breast cancer in a young woman in this report, which highlights that health care providers should be alert to the possibility that atypical soft tissue masses may represent a neoplasm. Further consideration of the scalp lesions among healthy looking patients is recommended.
       
  • Implementation of a psychodermatology clinic at a major health system in
           Detroit

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): L. Seale, J.V. Gaulding, D. Porto, D. Prabhakar, H. KerrAbstractThe association between psychiatric and dermatologic disorders has been well characterized in the present literature with estimates of up to 40% of dermatology patients having concomitant psychiatric problems that are often related to their skin condition. Here, we present our experience regarding the implementation of a psychodermatology clinic in Detroit, Michigan. The most commonly referred conditions were delusions of parasitosis, neurotic excoriations, and isotretinoin initiation for patients with a history of psychiatric conditions. Seventy-three percent of referred patients were female. By creating a monthly clinic for patients who are diagnosed with skin conditions and associated psychiatric disorders or psychological symptoms, we are able to meet the needs of these patients with a synergistic relationship between health care providers.
       
  • Recalcitrant anal and genital pruritus treated with dupilumab

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 4, Issue 4Author(s): E.J. Yang, J.E. MuraseAbstractChronic anogenital pruritus can significantly impair affected patients’ quality of life by disrupting their sleep, mood, sexual function, and personal relationships. Although a significant portion of these patients can be managed with hygiene measures, topical therapy, oral anti-pruritics, and allergen avoidance after patch testing, guidelines to treat patients who do not respond to standard therapy have yet to be established. We describe the therapeutic response of a case of anogenital pruritus recalcitrant to multiple topical and systemic therapies. Treatment of this patient with dupilumab, an interleukin-4 receptor alpha blocker, resulted in clinical remission at 1 year from the initiation of the therapy, without significant adverse effects.
       
  • Pediatric melanoma—The whole (conflicts of interest) story

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): K. Rose, J.M. Grant-Kels
       
  • Illness perception of patients with pemphigus vulgaris

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): M. Nasimi, R. Abedini, M. Daneshpazjooh, A. Esmaeilpour, F. Ghaedi, A. Teimourpour, S. AbtahiAbstractObjectiveLittle is known about illness perception in patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We designed a cross-sectional study to clarify the beliefs about PV.MethodsA total of 100 patients with PV (45 men, 55 women) completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised to assess beliefs about seven aspects of illness perception, including chronicity, recurrence, consequences, self and medicine role in controlling illness, coherence, and emotional representation. The relationship between illness perception and clinical and demographic variables was evaluated.ResultsPatients viewed PV as a chronic and cyclical disease with important impression on their life and emotions. Patients had a good understanding of the disease and supposed an acceptable role for themselves and medical treatment. Interestingly, the clinical subtype and severity of the disease did not influence any aspect of illness perception, but some differences on the basis of demographic data were demonstrated.ConclusionOur patients had a relatively good understanding of their illness and a correct perception about chronicity and the cyclical identity of illness. The patients believed that their life and emotions had been strongly influenced by the disease but were hopeful for a cure. Because correction of misconceptions about a disease may improve treatment outcomes, an assessment of patients' illness perception may be useful to try and modify perception.
       
  • Biophysical and ultrasonographic changes in lichen planus compared with
           uninvolved skin

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): T. Yazdanparast, K. Yazdani, P. Humbert, A. Khatami, S. Ahmad Nasrollahi, H. Zartab, L. Izadi Firouzabadi, A. FiroozAbstractBackgroundLichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. Currently, noninvasive techniques are used to evaluate biophysical properties of the skin in vivo.ObjectiveIn this study, we aimed to evaluate skin biophysical properties in patients with LP and make a comparison between involved and uninvolved skin to provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of LP.MethodsThe stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, pH, erythema, melanin, sebum, friction, temperature, elasticity parameters (R0, R2, R5), and thickness and echo-density of the epidermis, dermis, and subepidermal low echogenic band were measured on lesions of classic LP in 21 patients and compared with the average of perilesional and symmetrical uninvolved skin (as control) with a paired t test.ResultsStratum corneum hydration (p = .002), sebum (p = .04), R0 (p = .005), and echo-density of the dermis (p = .005) were significantly lower, but pH (p = .007), melanin content (p < .001), erythema (p < .001), temperature (p = .01), thickness of dermis (p = .02), and subepidermal low echogenic band (p < .001) were significantly higher in LP lesions.ConclusionAn evaluation of its biophysical, biomechanical, and ultrasonographic characteristics showed that the skin is an objective, noninvasive, and quantitative measuring tool that can be used to provide valuable information about skin changes in classic LP.
       
  • Text recycling: Self-plagiarism in scientific writing

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): L.K. Burdine, M.B. de Castro Maymone, N.A. VashiAbstractTo further the progress of scientific research and expand the literature, authors and editors share a common goal of producing and reviewing innovative publications. However, as publication rates increase, so does the amount of detected plagiarism, including self-plagiarism. This concept, also referred to as text recycling, is defined as the repurposing of one’s own previously published work in new publications without referencing the original source. There are advocates both for and against versions of text recycling, but without a universal protocol for authors and editors of what constitutes self-plagiarism, there is no strict standard among journals as to what is unethical. The advent of online text duplication detection software has been increasingly used by journals to assure that all published work is novel, but challenges remain. Converging on standardized guidelines would be beneficial with regard to text recycling and improving author education and the promotion of active communication between journals and authors during the submission process if confusion arises.
       
  • Facial lipogranulomas due to self-injection of vitamin A oil

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): K. Torre, M. Murphy, J. RickettsAbstractLipogranulomas represent foreign body reactions to exogenous lipid or oil-like substances introduced into the skin. These lesions characteristically have round-to-ovoid, vacuole-like cavities of varying sizes in the dermis, which results in a Swiss cheese-like appearance. We present the case of a 51-year-old Hispanic woman with an onset of painful, swollen, subcutaneous nodules on the face, most prominently on the right lower lip and both cheeks, after multiple self-injections of vitamin A oil. Histopathology test results of the lower lip showed a superficial-to-deep, nodular and interstitial, polymorphous inflammatory infiltrate of predominantly histiocytes with necrobiotic-type granulomatous changes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. The cheek revealed deep dermal and subcutaneous small collections of foamy/vacuolated histiocytes, without significant numbers of other inflammatory cells. Given the patient’s history of injecting oil extracted from vitamin A capsules into her skin, the light microscopic features are consistent with lipogranulomatous changes that are secondary to a local injection of foreign material. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the granulomatous immune reaction generated by the injection of unregulated products into the face and other areas of the body.
       
  • The unwavering doctor who unraveled a medical mystery

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2018Source: International Journal of Women's DermatologyAuthor(s): S. Schmitz, E.J. Lowenstein
       
 
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