Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8529 journals)
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    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (231 journals)
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    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (164 journals)
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DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (164 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 164 of 164 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Dermato-Venereologica     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Acta Dermatovenerologica Croatica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Skin & Wound Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
African Journal of AIDS Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
AIDS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
AIDS Care: Psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AIDS Patient Care and STDs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aktuelle Dermatologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Allergo Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Dermatopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anaplastology     Open Access  
Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Archives de Pédiatrie     Full-text available via subscription  
Archives de sciences sociales des religions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux - Pratique     Hybrid Journal  
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Medical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Journal of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Berkala Ilmu Kesehatan Kulit dan Kelamin / Periodical of Dermatology and Venereology     Open Access  
Biomedical Dermatology     Open Access  
BMC Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Experimental Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Skin Cancer     Full-text available via subscription  
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinics in Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Contact Dermatitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cosmetics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Current Dermatology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Fungal Infection Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current HIV Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current HIV/AIDS Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Sexual Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Der Hautarzt     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dermatitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dermato-Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dermatología Venezolana     Open Access  
Dermatologic Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dermatologic Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Dermatologic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Dermatologic Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dermatologica Sinica     Open Access  
Dermatological Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Dermatology and Cosmetic     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dermatology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dermatology Online Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dermatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dermatology Times     Free  
Dermatopathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Journal of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Cosmetologia Medica e Medicina degli Inestetismi Cutanei     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Dermatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Experimental Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Expert Review of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Forum Dermatologicum     Hybrid Journal  
Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Güncel Dermatoloji Dergisi     Open Access  
HautinForm     Full-text available via subscription  
hautnah     Hybrid Journal  
hautnah dermatologie     Hybrid Journal  
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
HIV Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
HIV Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Dermatology Online Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Archives of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Dermatology and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of STD & AIDS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Women's Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International STD Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JAAD Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JAIDS : Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
JAMA Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
JMIR Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Clinical and Investigative Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cutaneous Immunology and Allergy     Open Access  
Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dermatological Research     Open Access  
Journal of Dermatological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dermatological Science Supplement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dermatological Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dermatology & Dermatologic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of General-Procedural Dermatology & Venereology Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Investigative Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sexual Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Skin and Stem Cell     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Skin Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Surgical Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Egyptian Women’s Dermatologic Society     Partially Free  
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the International AIDS Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the Saudi Society of Dermatology & Dermatologic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karger Kompass Dermatologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Karger Kompass Pneumologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Medical and Surgical Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nepal Journal of Dermatology, Venereology & Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neurobehavioral HIV Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
OA Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open AIDS Journal     Open Access  
Open Dermatology Journal     Open Access  
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pigment International     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psoriasis : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Internacional de Ciencias Podológicas     Open Access  
SAHARA : Journal of Social Aspects of HIV / AIDS Research Alliance     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scars, Burns & Healing     Open Access  
Serbian Journal of Dermatology and Venereology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexually Transmitted Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Sexually Transmitted Infections     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Skin Appendage Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Skin Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sri Lanka Journal of Sexual Health and HIV Medicine     Open Access  
Studies in Gender and Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Surgical & Cosmetic Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Vestnik dermatologii i venerologii     Open Access  
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.652
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1877-5756 - ISSN (Online) 1877-5764
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3204 journals]
  • Prevalence of fear of childbirth in a sample of gravida women in Kenya
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): David Onchonga, Vahideh MoghaddamHosseini, Margaret Keraka, Ákos Várnagy
       
  • Birth outcome in a caseload study conducted in a rural area of Sweden-a
           register based study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Ingegerd Hildingsson, Annika Karlström, Christine Rubertsson, Birgitta Larsson
       
  • Sub-optimal use of ultrasound examinations may result in underperformance
           of Vietnamese maternity care - A qualitative study of midwives’
           experiences and views
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Sophia Holmlund, Pham Thi Lan, Kristina Edvardsson, Joseph Ntaganira, Sophie Graner, Rhonda Small, Ingrid Mogren
       
  • Factors associated with contraceptive use in rural Nepal: gender and
           decision-making
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Preeti K. Mahato, Zoe A. Sheppard, Edwin van Teijlingen, Nisa De Souza
       
  • Birth preparedness and Complication Readiness among Antenatal care clients
           in Upper Egypt
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Mirette M Aziz, Randa M Shams El-Deen, Marwa A Allithy
       
  • Midwives experiences of caring for immigrant women at antenatal care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Marie G. Oscarsson, Jean Stevenson-Ågren
       
  • Barriers to the uptake of modern family planning methods among female
           youth of Temeke District in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: A qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, Volume 24Author(s): Stella E. Mushy, Edith A.M. Tarimo, Agnes Fredrick Massae, Shigeko Horiuchi
       
  • Providing quality abortion care: Findings from a study of six states in
           India
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, Volume 24Author(s): Chander Shekhar, Aparna Sundaram, Manoj Alagarajan, Manas R Pradhan, Harihar Sahoo
       
  • Parental experience of bedside handover during childbirth: A qualitative
           interview study
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, Volume 24Author(s): I. Wiklund, Z. Sahar, M. Papadopolou, M. Löfgren
       
  • Multivitamin use and risk of preeclampsia in a high-income population: A
           cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, Volume 24Author(s): Stinne Høgh, Hanne Trap Wolf, My von Euler-Chelpin, Lene Huusom, Anja Pinborg, Ann Tabor, Hanne Kristine Hegaard
       
  • Women's choice of delivery site and the surge in private facility-based
           deliveries in Pakistan: A 28-year trend analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, Volume 23Author(s): Rafi Amir-ud-Din, Faisal Abbas
       
  • “This is the child we were given”: A qualitative study of Danish
           parents’ experiences of a prenatal Down syndrome diagnosis and their
           decision to continue the pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, Volume 23Author(s): Stina Lou, Maja Retpen Lanther, Natascha Hagenstjerne, Olav Bjørn Petersen, Ida Vogel
       
  • A modified caseload midwifery model for women with fear of birth,
           women’s and midwives’ experiences: a qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Birgitta Larsson, Christine Rubertsson, Ingegerd Hildingsson
       
  • Medical and midwifery student attitudes toward moral acceptability and
           legality of abortion, following decriminalization of abortion in Chile
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): C. Finley Baba, Lidia Casas, Alejandra Ramm, Sara Correa, M. Antonia Biggs
       
  • Low-cost self-paced interventions increase birth satisfaction in first
           time fathers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Anne M. Howarth, Nicola R. SwainAbstractObjectiveThis research aims to investigate whether a skills or birth stories intervention for fathers can improve birth satisfaction of fathers.Study Design: One hundred and seventy-four men were recruited and randomly assigned to a skills preparation group, a birth stories group, or a treatment as usual (TAU) group. One hundred sixteen men completed the three questionnaires relevant for this report (67% retention rate). Birth satisfaction was measured soon after birth.Measures: Demographic data and data related to partners pregnancy, birth and preparation were collected. The Mackey Childbirth Satisfaction Rating Scale was the primary outcome measure.ResultsIt was found that men who received either of the birth preparation interventions (skills or birth stories booklet) had significantly higher birth satisfaction scores. An analysis found that, irrespective of intervention, his partner having an induction, a caesarean section, and his not being in full-time employment had a negative effect on birth satisfaction, while his partner having an epidural, his experiencing family life satisfaction before the birth, his finding antenatal classes useful, and having his birth delivery expectations met had a positive impact on birth satisfaction.ConclusionIncreasing the father’s understanding, role expectations, and preparation for his partner’s childbirth, may be important for fathers birth satisfaction. Expectations around childbirth and expectations of himself might be better managed to improve satisfaction. This study found evidence that simple low-cost interventions can improve birth satisfaction for new fathers.
       
  • Fear of Childbirth among Pregnant Women and Their Partners in Turkey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Pınar Serçekuş, Okan Vardar, Sevgi ÖzkanAbstractObjectiveThe aim of this study was to identify and compare the fear of childbirth and associated factors among pregnant women and their partners.MethodsThis was a descriptive and relational study. A total of 564 people, 282 women and their partners, were included in the study. Data were collected using two forms: the Personal Information Form and the Fear of Birth Scale.ResultsThe study found that 82.6% of the women and 54.3% of their partners had a fear of childbirth. Economic status, parity, previous birth experience, and preferred delivery method affected the fear of childbirth among the women (p=0.000, p=0.000, p=0.000, and p=0.030, respectively). Age, parity, education level, economic status, preferred delivery method, and previous birth experience of their partner affected the fear of childbirth among the men (p=0.036, p=0.000, p=0.000, p=0.004, and p=0.000, respectively). A positive, significant, moderate relationship was found between the fear of childbirth among the women and their partners (r=0.602, p=0.000). Fear of childbirth affected both the women’s and their partners’ preferred delivery method (p=0.000 and p=0.005, respectively).ConclusionPartners had a fear of childbirth as well, although the rate of this fear was higher among women. Fear of childbirth caused the couples to prefer cesarean section. There was a relationship between the fear of childbirth among the women and their partners.
       
  • Education and training of health care workers for contraceptive service
           delivery in 21 countries across Europe
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Katarina Sedlecky, Mirjana Rašević, Johannes BitzerAbstractBackgroundIn order to provide women with an informed choice of contraception, responsible health professionals need to be well educated and trained for providing consultation in that area.The objective of the study was to better understand the actual situation regarding education and training of health care providers (HCPs) for contraceptive service delivery.MethodsA specially designed questionnaire was sent to 74 individuals who were either former or current country representatives in the Board, or members of the Expert groups of the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health (ESC). Data were obtained from 27 respondents from 21 countries.ResultsContraceptive services are delivered by different medical professionals and organisational units. Gynaecologists are involved in comprehensive contraceptive care in the majority of countries, general practitioners (GPs) provide hormonal contraception in nine, and midwifes/nurses in six countries. Undergraduate and postgraduate education and training of HCPs pertinent for contraceptive care is at a satisfactory level in less than half of the investigated countries. International educational and training programmes are being underutilized in around half of the countries.ConclusionDifferent models of contraceptive care exist across Europe. Education of relevant HCPs need to be improved and harmonized in the majority of investigated countries.
       
  • Induction of labour in earlier gestational weeks – reflections on
           evidence and clinical practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Rikke Damkjær Maimburg
       
  • Barriers to Reproductive Health Services for Women with Disabilities in
           Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Review of the Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): M. Tara CaseboltAbstractThe aim of this literature review is to determine the existing literature regarding access to reproductive health services for women with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Web of Science, and EBSCOHost Global Health were searched for articles focused on this topic. A total of 16 articles were included in the review. Of these, nine were qualitative, two were mixed-methods, two were literature reviews, one was a policy review, one was a descriptive cross-sectional study, and one was a case-control study. The studies took place in eleven countries in Africa and Asia. Data was extracted from the articles and analyzed using Levesque’s Model of Healthcare Access to determine themes apparent in the articles. Key barriers to access included: negative attitudes of providers and society; lack of trained providers; assumptions and inadequate knowledge amongst providers; communication limitations; inaccessible facilities; lack of transportation; high costs of care; unnecessary referrals; and risk factors like being low-income or experiencing violence. Based on this analysis, policies mandating inclusion of people with disabilities are necessary. Also, providers must receive additional education and training regarding disability. Facilities and transportation should be accessible for people with mobility and sensory limitations. Future research needs to be conducted to determine reproductive health service use and outcomes amongst women with disabilities. Datasets for reproductive health should disaggregated based on disability status to facilitate this research.
       
  • Contraceptive uptake among post-abortion care-seeking women with unplanned
           or planned pregnancy in western Kenya
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Ulrika Rehnström Loi, Marie Klingberg-Allvin, Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson, Elisabeth Faxelid, Monica Oguttu, Marlene MakenziusAbstractObjectivesTo investigate contraceptive uptake among PAC-seeking women reporting either planned pregnancies (PP) or unplanned pregnancies (UP) and to identify factors associated with UP.Study designThis was a sub-study nested in randomised controlled trial (RCT) on women who sought PAC in a low-resource setting in western Kenya. The analysis was based on 807 women who were followed up at 7–10 days and by 472 women at 3 months.Main outcome measuresDescriptive statistics and a binary logistic regression model with odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used.ResultsOf the 807 women, 375 (46.3%) reported UP, and 432 (53.3%) PP. Most women, regardless of reported pregnancy intention, agreed to start using contraceptive methods: UP 273 (72.8%) and PP 338 (78.2%), respectively, P=0.072. Independent factors associated with UP were young age (14–20 years; OR 1.177; 95% CI, 1.045–2.818; P=0.033), unmarried status (OR 9.149; 95% CI, 5.719–14.638; P
       
  • Left alone with the emotional surge – a qualitative study of midwives’
           and obstetricians’ experiences of severe events on the labour ward
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2019Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Åsa Wahlberg, Ulf Högberg, Maria EmmelinAbstractBackgroundWorking on the labour ward entails being responsible for severe events during which a mother or baby may be injured or may die. Such events might affect decision-making, team-working, capacity for empathy, and patient safety.AimTo explore midwives’ and obstetricians’ experiences, reactions and interpretations of being part of a severe event on the labour ward.DesignA qualitative study using content analysis of in-depth interviews.ParticipantsFourteen Swedish healthcare providers: seven midwives, and seven obstetricians.MethodsQualitative content analysis was used to describe and interpret the manifest and latent meaning of the interview text, while remaining close to participants’ lived experiences.ResultsThe overarching theme “Left alone with the emotional surge” was developed around three subthemes, supported by categories and subcategories. Professionals identified factors that had contributed to the course of events that made them perceive that they had been “acting within an illusory system of control and safety”. When the severity of the situation became clear, “cognitive and emotional discordance was experienced”, and, in the aftermath, the professionals described a “search for internal and external redemption” related to strong emotions of being left alone.ConclusionsFacing severe obstetric events entails exposure to emotionally demanding situations and hence joint vulnerability. Midwives and obstetricians described a sense of loneliness and perceptions of insecurity regarding the organisational system, managers and colleagues, following a complex, severe event with a woman or her baby during childbirth.
       
  • Married women’s experiences of intimate partner violence and utilization
           of antenatal health care in Togo
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2019Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): R. Ragetlie, Y. Sano, R. Antabe, I. LuginaahAbstractObjectivesThe aim of this study is to explore the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and antenatal care use (ANC) in the Togolese context. We explore the associations between three indicators of ANC utilization (i.e., timing and number of ANC visits, and place of delivery) and three types of IPV (i.e., physical, emotional, and sexual violence) among married women.MethodsDrawing data from the 2013-14 Togo Demographic and Health Survey, we employ a series of logistic regression analyses to explore the association between women’s ANC use and experience of IPV.ResultsAt the bivariate level, women who have experienced any form of IPV were less likely to meet the requirement for all the indicators of ANC utilization, except that the relationship between the timing of the first ANC visit and sexual violence was not statistically significant. Some of these associations were attenuated when we controlled for socioeconomic variables such as education and household wealth.ConclusionBased on these findings, we have several policy recommendations. For example, there is a need for interventions targeted towards poorer and less educated women. There is also a need to address patriarchal gender norms with community-level education that target both wives and husbands.
       
  • Health workforce perspectives of barriers inhibiting the provision of
           quality care in Nepal and Somalia – a qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Malin Bogren, Kerstin Erlandsson, Anders Johansson, Mohamed Kalid, Asad Abdi Igal, Jamal Mohamed, Fatumo Said, Christina Pedersen, Ulrika Byrskog, Fatumo OsmanAbstractObjectiveIn this paper settings from Nepal and Somalia are used to focus on the perspectives of healthcare providers within two fragile health systems. The objective of this study was to describe barriers inhibiting quality healthcare in Nepal and Somalia from a health workforce perspective.MethodsData were collected through 19 semi-structured interviews with healthcare providers working in healthcare facilities. Ten interviews were conducted in Nepal and nine in Somalia.ResultsVarious structural barriers inhibiting the availability, accessibility, and acceptability of the quality care were similar in both countries. Barriers inhibiting the availability of quality care were linked to healthcare providers being overburdened with multiple concurrent jobs. Barriers inhibiting the accessibility to quality healthcare included long distances and the uncertain availability of transportation, and barriers to acceptability of quality healthcare was inhibited by a lack of respect from healthcare providers, characterised by neglect, verbal abuse, and lack of competence.ConclusionsInequality, poverty, traditional and cultural practices plus the heavy burden placed on healthcare providers are described as the underlying causes of the poor provision of quality care and the consequential shortcomings that emerge from it. In order to improve this situation adequate planning and policies that support the deployment and retention of the healthcare providers and its equitable distribution is required. Another important aspect is provision of training to equip healthcare providers with the ability to provide respectful quality care in order for the population to enjoy good standard of healthcare services.
       
  • Which level of risk justifies routine induction of labor for healthy
           women'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2019Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Anna E Seijmonsbergen-Schermers, Lilian L Peters, Bahareh Goodarzi, Monica Bekker, Marianne Prins, Maaike Stapert, Hannah G Dahlen, Soo Downe, Arie Franx, Ank de JongeAbstractAlthough induction of labor can be crucial for preventing morbidity and mortality, more and more women (and their offspring) are being exposed to the disadvantages of this intervention while the benefit is at best small or even uncertain. Characteristics such as an advanced maternal age, a non-native ethnicity, a high Body Mass Index, an artificially assisted conception, and even nulliparity are increasingly considered an indication for induction of labor. Because induction of labor has many disadvantages, a debate is urgently needed on which level of risk justifies routine induction of labor for healthy women, only based on characteristics that are associated with statistically significant small absolute risk differences, compared to others without these characteristics. This commentary contributes to this debate by arguing why induction of labour should not routinely be offered to all women where there is a small increase in absolute risk, and no any other medical risks or complications during pregnancy. To underpin our statement, national data from the Netherlands were used reporting stillbirth rates in groups of women based on their characteristics, for each gestational week from 37 weeks of gestation onwards.
       
  • Perceived barriers to utilization of antenatal care services in northern
           Uganda: a qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2019Source: Sexual & Reproductive HealthcareAuthor(s): Cecilie Skaarup Uldbjerg, Stine Schramm, Felix Ocaka Kaducu, Emilio Ovuga, Morten SodemannAbstractObjectiveAntenatal care (ANC) utilization remains a challenge in efforts to reduce maternal mortality and improve maternal health in Uganda. This study aimed to identify perceived barriers to utilization of ANC services in a rural post-conflict area in northern Uganda.MethodsA qualitative study using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions of seventeen participants (pregnant women, health workers and a traditional birth attendant). The study was informed through a phenomenological approach to capture perceived barriers to utilization of ANC. The study was carried out in post-conflict Awach sub-county, Gulu District, northern Uganda. Data was analyzed using inductive conventional content analysis.ResultsThe main perceived barriers to ANC utilization were identified as: poor quality of care including poor attitude of health workers; socio-cultural practices not being successfully aligned to ANC; and lack of support from the husband including difficulties in encouraging him to attend ANC. Additionally, institutional structures and procedures at the health centers in terms of compulsory HIV testing and material requirements and transportation were perceived to prevent some pregnant women from attending ANC.ConclusionsIdentifying local barriers to ANC utilization are important and should be considered when planning ANC programs. We propose that future efforts should focus on how to ensure a good patient-provider relationship and perceived quality of care, and further how to improve inter-spousal communication and sensitization of husbands for increased involvement in ANC. We recommend more research on how socio-cultural context can meaningfully be aligned to ANC to improve maternal health and reduce maternal mortality.
       
 
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