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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6987 journals)
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    - DENTISTRY (238 journals)
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DENTISTRY (238 journals)                  1 2     

Showing 1 - 0 of 0 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ação Odonto     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Biomaterialia Odontologica Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Odontológica Colombiana     Open Access  
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acta Odontologica Turcica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal  
Angle Orthodontist     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access  
Balkan Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Dental Research & Education     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Brazilian Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Dental Science     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie et Odontologie     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Laboratorial Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Dental Cadmos     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Forum     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)     Open Access  
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dental Protection Annual Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dentistry     Open Access  
Dentistry 3000     Open Access  
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription  
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Forum Ortodontyczne     Open Access  
Future Dental Journal     Open Access  
Giornale Italiano di Endodonzia     Open Access  
Implant Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Science and Research     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Open Access  
Journal of Academy of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Biomaterials     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dental, Oral and Craniofacial Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry for Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Indian Academy of Dental Specialist Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Isfahan Dental School     Open Access  
Journal of Istanbul University Faculty of Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Oral Biosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral Health and Oral Epidemiology     Open Access  
Journal of Oral Implantology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oral Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research     Open Access  
Journal of Oral Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Orthodontic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pierre Fauchard Academy (India Section)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public Health Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Medical and Dental Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Restorative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Stomatology (Czasopismo Stomatologiczne)     Open Access  
Journal of the American Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the International Clinical Dental Research Organization     Open Access  
Journal of Theory and Practice of Dental Public Health     Open Access  
Kieferorthopädie     Full-text available via subscription  
King Saud University Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
L'Orthodontie Française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Médecine Buccale Chirurgie Buccale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicina Oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal     Open Access  
Nigerian Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nowa Stomatologia     Open Access  
Odontoestomatología     Open Access  
Odontología     Open Access  
Odontology     Hybrid Journal  
Odovtos - International Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Dentistry and Oral Medicine     Open Access  
Open Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Operative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Oral Biology and Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oral Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Orthodontic Journal of Nepal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthodontic Waves     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Orthodontics & Craniofacial Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Parodontologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Pediatric Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Pediatric Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Periodontology 2000     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Pesquisa Brasileira em Odontopediatria e Clinica Integrada     Open Access  
Pesquisa Odontológica Brasileira     Open Access  
Prevenzione & Assistenza Dentale     Full-text available via subscription  
Primary Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2     

Journal Cover Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
  [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1532-3382
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2969 journals]
  • Evidence of dietary calcium and vitamin D inadequacies in a population of
           dental patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 July 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Daniel J. Pehowich, Enid D. Pehowich
      Objectives To determine the dietary calcium and vitamin D intake of a cohort of dental patients identified as being at risk of inadequacy based on a 24 hour food recall. Methods A retrospective chart analysis was carried out on 5 day food record and nutrient analysyes of 670 dental patients ages 18 to 82 obtained over a ten year period. All patients had scored poorly on a 24 hour food recall survey during their initial examination. Results The overall mean and median calcium and vitamin D intakes of the patients were significantly lower than the current estimated needs for the general population. While calcium intake did not change over the 10 year period, vitamin D consumption decreased. The greatest dietary intake inadequacies for both calcium and vitamin D were seen in both male and female patients over age 50 years. Conclusions A 24 hour food recall questionnaire may be an effective means for the oral health professional to screen patients for calcium and vitamin D, and other nutrient inadequacies. Clinical Significance Screening for potential dietary inadequacies of calcium and vitamin D may identify patients potentially at risk for poor bone health. Our results indicate the dental health professional can obtain evidence necessary to change patient dietary behavior, and thus contribute to successful treatment outcomes.


      PubDate: 2016-08-01T10:10:15Z
       
  • Reply to Sequence Generation and Allocation Concealment
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2
      Author(s): Clovis Mariano Faggion



      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Sequence Generation and Allocation Concealment
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2
      Author(s): Vance W. Berger



      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Valuing the Clinical Effectiveness of Therapeutics
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2
      Author(s): Stefan Listl, Clovis Mariano Faggion
      Objective This second article of a series of four is aimed to inform dental practitioners about the relevance to provide more formal analysis of economic resources when helping patients make clinical decisions. Methods The following methods of health economic evaluation are described: Cost-effectiveness-analysis (CEA), cost-utility-analysis (CUA) and cost-benefit-analysis (CBA). CEA compares the effectiveness of different interventions usually based on specific clinical outcome measures, for example pocket depth reduction. CUA evaluates the effectiveness of therapies by taking into account more generic health outcome measures such as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-benefit-analysis (CBA) is based on measuring patients' actual willingness to pay. Cost-benefit-analysis (CBA) is based on measuring patients' actual willingness to pay, and it offers a method of economic evaluation that values all benefits against all costs. In other words, the total costs of a specific intervention are subtracted from the value of benefits related to that intervention. Results This article reported common methods of health economic evaluation that could be taken into account throughout clinical decision-making. Decision makers (patients, practitioners, health policy) should be adequately informed about costs and health outcomes associated with the various therapeutic alternatives in order to act responsibly within scenarios of resource scarcity. Economic evaluations can be informative with respect to whether or not the health outcomes outweigh the costs of an intervention, and hence provide a decision-making tool for decision makers considering treatment alternatives. Conclusions The information provided here may help decision makers (patients, practitioners, health policy) to understand economic considerations as an essential component of the decision-making process. Carefulness is advised with regard to interpreting the results from economic evaluation studies.


      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Levels of Evidence—Grading System∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Estimates of Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits due to Dental
           Implant Failures in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2
      Author(s): Satheesh Elangovan, Veerasathpurush Allareddy
      Objective Objective of the current study is to provide nationally representative estimates of hospital based emergency department (ED) visits attributed to dental implant failures in the United States. Methods The Nationwide Emergency Department sample for the years 2008–2010 was used. All ED visits with a diagnosis of “dental implant failures” were selected for analysis. Patient demographics were examined. Outcomes of interest included disposition status following the ED visit and ED charges. Results During the study period, a total of 1200 ED visits were due to dental implant failures. Most ED visits with dental implant failures occurred among those aged <18 years (22.4% of all ED visits) followed by those aged 70 years and above (18.2%). Males comprised 53.7% of all ED visits. Close to 89% did not have any other chronic co-morbid conditions. Osseointegration failure of dental implant occurred in 31.7% of patients while post-osseointegration mechanical failure of dental implant occurred in 30.4% of patients. Following an ED visit, 82.8% were discharged routinely and 13.3% of patients were admitted as in-patients into the same hospital following the ED visit. The mean ED charge per visit was $1167. Conclusions Highest proportions of these ED visits were comprised of those aged <18 years, those aged 70 years and above, and male patients. The inherent limitations of NEDS database and lack of data elements precluded us from establishing an association between patient related factors and risk of ED visits due to implant failures.


      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Statement of Purpose/Levels of Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Issue Summary Matrix
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Short Implants (5 to 8 mm) Versus Longer Implants (&gt; 8 mm) with
           Sinus Lifting in Atrophic Posterior Maxilla: A Meta‐Analysis of RCTs
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Fouad Altaib
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Short Implants (5 to 8 mm) Versus Longer Implants (> 8 mm) with Sinus Lifting in Atrophic Posterior Maxilla: A Meta‐Analysis of RCTs. Fan T, Li Y, Deng WW, Wu T, Zhang W. ‏ Clin Implant Dent Relat Res 2016. [Epub ahead of print] Reviewers Name and Contact Information Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi (corresponding author) Purpose/Question In patients with atrophic posterior maxilla, are the survival and complications rates different between short and long dental implants with sinus lifting' Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B: Inconsistent, limited-quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Old Age Alone May Not Be a Risk Factor for Dental Implant Failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Adnan Abdullah Al-Fahd
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Dental implants in the elderly population: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Srinivasan M, Meyer S, Mombelli A, Müller F. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2016:1-11. Reviewer Adnan Abdullah Al-Fahd BDS, M.Sc., PhD(c) Purpose/Question In elderly patients, are the rates of implant survival, technical complications, or biological complications different for dental implant therapy in partially edentulous jaws compared with completely edentulous jaws' Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data


      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • Clinical Documentation of Dental Care in an era of EHR Use
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Oluwabunmi Tokede, Rachel B. Ramoni, Michael Patton, John D. Da Silva, Elsbeth Kalenderian
      Background Although complete and accurate clinical records do not guarantee the provision of excellent dental care, they do provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of care provided. However, a lack of universally accepted documentation standards, incomplete record-keeping practices, and unfriendly EHR user interfaces are factors that have allowed for persistent poor dental patient record keeping. Methods Using two different methods – a validated survey, and a two round Delphi process – involving two appropriately different sets of participants, we explored what a dental clinical record should contain, and the frequency of update of each clinical entry. Results For both the closed-ended survey questions and the open-ended Delphi process questions, respondents had a significant degree of agreement on the ‘clinical entry’ components of an adequate clinical record. There was however variance on how frequently each of those clinical entries should be updated. Summary Dental providers agree that complete and accurate record keeping is essential and that items such as histories, examination findings, diagnosis, radiographs, treatment plans, consents, and clinic notes should be documented. There, however, does not seem to be universal agreement how frequently such items should be recorded. Clinical Implications As the dental profession moves towards prevalent use of EHRs, the issue of standardization and interoperability becomes ever more pressing. Settling issues of standardization, including record documentation must begin with guideline-creating dental professional bodies who need to clearly define and disseminate what these standards should be, and; everyday dentists who will ultimately ensure that these standards are met and kept.


      PubDate: 2016-07-27T08:47:04Z
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Artificial intelligence expert systems with neural
           network machine learning may assist decision-making for extractions in
           orthodontic treatment planning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Kenji Takada
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information New approach for the diagnosis of extractions with neural network machine learning. Seok-Ki Jung and Tae-Woo Kim. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2016;149:127-33 Reviewer Kenji Takada Purpose/Question The study sought to develop an artificial intelligence expert system that would provide an orthodontic diagnosis of required permanent tooth extraction, and to evaluate the performance and reliability of the proposed neural-network machine learning model used by this system. Source of Funding Not reported Type of Study/Design Mathematical modelling Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade not applicable


      PubDate: 2016-07-21T06:19:05Z
       
  • Evaluating benefits and harm of therapies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 July 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Clovis Mariano Faggion
      Objective This third article in a series of four aims to inform dental practitioners on the importance of weighing benefits and harm when making clinical treatment decisions. Methods This article describes some examples of important consequences to patients’ health when potential side effects of interventions are not taken into consideration in the decision-making process. Some information to help dental practitioners search for data on negative effects of therapies is also presented, and the need to weigh benefits and harm of therapies is discussed. Results Therapeutic interventions in dentistry may cause several side effects, such as nerve damage caused by dental implant placement. Adequate evaluation of potential side effects before performing a procedure and comprehensive communication with the patient about these side effects are sine qua non conditions for any clinical decision. Conclusions The information provided in this article may encourage dental practitioners to obtain more information regarding negative aspects of clinical interventions, to more comprehensively inform patients and improve clinical decision making.


      PubDate: 2016-07-08T08:13:19Z
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Externally connected zirconia abutments with standard
           platform are successful long-term in anterior regions.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Anja Zembic
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Performance of zirconia abutments for implant-supported single-tooth crowns in esthetic areas: a retrospective study up to 12-year follow-up. Passos SP, Linke B, Larjava H, French D. Clin Oral Implants Res 2016;27(1): 47-54. Reviewer Anja Zembic, DMD Purpose/Question To assess retrospectively the clinical performance of different kinds of zirconia abutments in anterior regions. Source of Funding Information not available Type of Study/Design Retrospective cohort study Level of Evidence Level 2 Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade N/A Not applicable


      PubDate: 2016-06-05T05:39:07Z
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Salivary bacterial levels and clinic attendance
           patterns may be longitudinally associated with caries outcomes in
           established adult dental patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Benjamin W. Chaffee
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in Japanese adult patients. Arino M, Ito A, Fujiki S, Sugiyama S, Mayashi M. J Dent 2015;43(10):1223-8. Reviewer Benjamin W. Chaffee, DDS MPH PhD Purpose/Question Within a population of established adult dental patients who have completed initial restorative and periodontal care, identify clinical measures that define groups of patients at higher or lower risk for subsequent caries outcomes. Source of Funding The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, an independent administrative institution under the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, provided a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (25293387). Type of Study/Design Retrospective cohort (chart review) Level of Evidence Level 2. Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade N/A


      PubDate: 2016-06-05T05:39:07Z
       
  • Declarative Title: No Clear Evidence Regarding the Effect of Osteoporosis
           on Dental Implant failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Iman Abd-Elwahab Radi
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Impact of osteoporosis in dental implants: a systematic review. Giro G, Chambrone L, Goldstein A, Rodrigues JA, Zenóbio E, Feres M, Figueiredo LC, Cassoni A, Shibli JA..World J Orthop 2015; 6(2):311–5. Reviewers Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Iman Abd-Elwahab Radi Purpose/Question To assess the failure and bone-to-implant contact rates of dental implants placed in osteoporotic subjects. Type of Study/Design Systematic review Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B: Inconsistent, limited-quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-06-05T05:39:07Z
       
  • Insufficient evidence to support or refute the association between head
           and neck cancer and marijuana use
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters, Eric Adjei Boakye, Travis Loux, Mark A. Varvares, Mario Schootman
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Head and neck cancer among marijuana users: a meta-analysis of matched case-control studies. de Carvalho MFF, Dourado MR, Fernandes IB, Araújo CTP, Mesquita AT, Ramos-Jorge ML. Arch Oral Biol 2015;60(12):1750-5 Reviewers Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters, BDS, MPH, CHES, Eric Adjei Boakye, MA, Travis Loux, PhD, Mark A. Varvares, MD, FACS, Mario Schootman, PhD Purpose/Question Is marijuana use positively associated with developing head and neck cancer' Source of Funding Information not available Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B: Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-06-05T05:39:07Z
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Periodontitis may be associated with gestational
           diabetes mellitus but not affirmatively
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Hong Jiang, Xu Xiong
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Association Between Periodontitis and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Esteves Lima RP, es Cyrino RM, Dutra BC, da Silveira JO, Martins CC, Cota LOM, Costa FO. J Periodontol 2016; 87(1): 48-57. Reviewers Hong Jiang, MD, PhD, Xu Xiong, MD, DrPH Purpose/Question
      Authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies to examine the association between periodontitis and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Source of Funding The research was supported by the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES, Brazil), the Minas Gerais State Research Foundation (FAPEMIG, Brazil), the National Council of Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq, Brazil), and the Dean of Research from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (PRPq/UFMG, Brazil). Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis Level of Evidence Level 2, Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B, Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-06-05T05:39:07Z
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Although the magnitude varied, income-related
           inequalities in untreated dental caries were consistently found among
           young children in 3 US surveys
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Mark D. Macek
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Trends in income-related inequality in untreated caries among children in the United States: findings from NHANES I, NHANES III, and NHANES 1999-2004. Capurro DA, Iafolla T, Kingman A, Chattopadhyay A, Garcia J. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2015;43(6): 500-10. Reviewer Mark D. Macek, DDS, DrPH Purpose/Question To describe income-related (poverty level) inequalities in untreated dental caries among U.S. children, ages 2-12 years, between 1971 and 2004. Source of Funding Information not available Type of Study/Design (Sequential) cross-sectional study Level of Evidence Level 3 – Other evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Not applicable


      PubDate: 2016-06-05T05:39:07Z
       
  • Annual Report Series - Colgate Letter
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • If You Want to Go Far, Go Together
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement
      Author(s): Caswell A. Evans



      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Beyond the Operatory and Into Opportunity
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement
      Author(s): Terri Tilliss



      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • The American Dental Hygienists' Association Leads the Profession into 21st
           Century Workforce Opportunities
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement
      Author(s): Ann Battrell, Ann Lynch, Pam Steinbach
      With the dental hygiene profession undergoing tremendous transformation as greater and more diverse workplace opportunities present themselves, the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) is leading the effort to ensure that dental hygienists are prepared to take advantage of these growing opportunities in today's constantly evolving health care landscape. Background and purpose ADHA's vision statement calls for the integration of dental hygienists into the health care delivery system as essential primary care providers to expand access to oral health care. This article discusses changes in dental hygiene curriculum, as well as how changes in the health care environment and legislative outcomes are impacting workplace opportunities for dental hygienists in the 21st century. Method Research from ADHA's Transforming Dental Hygiene Education and the Profession for the 21st Century white paper and other oral health-related literature, ADHA policies, and ADHA survey research describe the evolving dental hygiene workplace environment. The article discusses trends in education, health care, legislative and regulatory practice, and societal need that are creating new workforce opportunities for the dental hygiene profession. Conclusion With rapid change in both the oral and overall health care environments, transformation in dental hygiene curriculum and competencies, and more states allowing the public to have direct access to dental hygienists, dental hygiene professionals are expanding their presence into all aspects of the health care system. ADHA is leading this effort to help dental hygienists provide that care by expanding workforce opportunities and allowing dental hygienists to practice to the full extent of their scope. The dental hygiene profession must be prepared and ready to embrace these opportunities. In doing so, new career pathways will be available for dental hygiene professionals that will also improve the public's access to oral health care.


      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Commentary on an Innovative Interprofessional Dental Practice for 2026
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement
      Author(s): Brad Guyton, Jan LeBeau, Rebecca Sorci, Amy Doneen
      An innovative interprofessional model is described for the delivery of dental care in the year 2026 to optimize efficiency and profitability while enhancing quality of care. Background The dental practice of tomorrow may look different than today. Although not broken, the current system can be improved in efficiency and effectiveness. Although traditional private practices will continue to exist and many will thrive over the next decades, they may not present the optimal model for dental practice. To manage complex patient needs, a more collaborative model of multidisciplinary, interprofessional clinical teams capable of treating patients comprehensively has been suggested by the authors. They explore an alternative model of practice that may be possible in the next 10 years to better serve patients and improve outcomes while honoring the role of practitioners. Methods Landmark publications and reviews are used to examine evidence showing the potential benefits of an innovative interprofessional approach to the delivery of care in the oral health care setting. Conclusions By examining key studies, the authors provide commentary on the potential for enhanced efficiency, profitability, and quality of care in the oral health care setting through a collaborative model of multidisciplinary, interprofessional clinical teams capable of treating patients comprehensively.


      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Collaboration Between Medical Providers and Dental Hygienists in Pediatric
           Health Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement
      Author(s): Patricia A. Braun, Allison Cusick
      Basic preventive oral services for children can be provided within the medical home through the collaborative care of medical providers and dental hygienists to expand access for vulnerable populations. Background Because dental caries is a largely preventable disease, it is untenable that it remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. Leveraging the multiple visits children have with medical providers has potential to expand access to early preventive oral services. Developing interprofessional relationships between dental providers, including dental hygienists, and medical providers is a strategic approach to symbiotically expand access to dental care. Alternative care delivery models that provide dental services in the medical home expand access to these services for vulnerable populations. The purpose of this article is to explore 4 innovative care models aimed to expand access to dental care. Methods Current activities in Colorado and around the nation are described regarding the provision of basic preventive oral health services (eg, fluoride varnish) by medical providers with referral to a dentist (expanded coordinated care), the colocation of dental hygiene services into the medical home (colocated care), the integration of a dental hygienist into the medical care team (integrated care), and the expansion of the dental home into the community setting through telehealth-enabled teams (virtual dental home). Gaps in evidence regarding the impacts of these models are elucidated. Conclusion Bringing preventive and restorative dental services to the patient both in the medical home and in the community has potential to reduce long-standing barriers to receive these services, improve oral health outcomes of vulnerable patients, and decrease oral health disparities.


      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Dental Hygienist–Led Chronic Disease Management System to Control
           Early Childhood Caries
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 16, Supplement
      Author(s): Man Wai Ng, Zameera Fida
      Management of the complex chronic disease of early childhood caries requires a system of coordinated health care interventions which can be led by a dental hygienist and where patient self-care efforts are paramount. Background and purpose Even after receiving costly surgical treatment under general anesthesia in the operating room, many children develop new and recurrent caries after only 6-12 months, a sequela that can be prevented. This article describes the chronic disease management (CDM) of dental caries, a science-based approach that can prevent and control caries. Methods In this article, we (1) introduce the concept of CDM of dental caries, (2) provide evidence that CDM improves oral health outcomes, and (3) propose a dental hygienist–led team-based oral health care approach to CDM. Although we will be describing the CDM approach for early childhood caries, CDM of caries is applicable in children, adolescents, and adults. Conclusions Early childhood caries disease control requires meaningful engagement of patients and parents by the oral health care team to assist them with making behavioral changes in the unique context of their families and communities. The traditional dentist/hygienist/assistant model needs to evolve to a collaborative partnership between care providers and patients/families. This partnership will be focused on systematic risk assessment and behaviorally based management of the disease itself, with sensitivity toward the familial environment. Early pilot study results demonstrate reductions in the rates of new caries, dental pain, and referral to the operating room compared with baseline rates. Dental hygienists are the appropriate team members to lead this approach because of their expertise in behavior change and prevention.


      PubDate: 2016-05-31T03:23:39Z
       
  • Declarative Title: Bisphosphonates, osteoporosis, and osteonecrosis of the
           jaw: A critical review of a large nested case-control study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Athanasios I. Zavras, Jayapriyaa R. Shanmugham
      Article title and bibliographic information A large national cohort study of the association between bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients with osteoporosis: A nested case-control study. Kwon JW, Park EJ, Jung SY, Sohn HS, Ryu H, Suh HS. JDR Clin Res Suppl 2015;94(9) Suppl 2: 213S-219S. Reviewers Athanasios I. Zavras, DMD, DDS, MS, DrMedSc, Jayapriyaa R. Shanmugham, BDS, MPH, DrPH Purpose/question This study investigated the association between bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) among patients with osteoporosis. Source of funding 2014 Pusan National University Research Grant. Type of study/design Nested matched case-control study. Level of evidence Level 2: Prospective cohort study with good follow-up. Strength of recommendation grade Not applicable


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Declarative Title: Amalgam vs. composite restoration, survival and
           secondary caries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Muhanad Alhareky, Mary Tavares
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Amalgam and resin composite longevity of posterior restorations: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Moraschini V, Fai CK, Alto RM, dos Santos GO. J Dent 2015;43(9):1043-50. Reviewers Muhanad Alhareky, BDS, MS, Mary Tavares, DMD, MPH Purpose/Question The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the difference in longevity of occlusal and occlusoproximal amalgam posterior restorations versus composite resin posterior restorations. Source Of Funding Information not available Type Of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data Level Of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality patient-oriented evidence Strength Of The Recommendation Grade Grade B: Limited-quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Declarative Title: Perceived esthetic outcomes, psychological benefits and
           quality of care affect patient or parent satisfaction after orthodontic
           treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Marita R. Inglehart
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Factors associated with patient and parent satisfaction after orthodontic treatment: a systematic review. Pachéco-Pereira C, Pereira R, Dick BD, Perez A, Flores-Mir C. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 148(4):652-59. Reviewer Marita R. Inglehart, Dr. phil. habil. Purpose/Question Which factors are associated with orthodontic treatment satisfaction and dissatisfaction of patients and their caregivers' Source Of Funding No grant or other support funding. Type Of Study/Design Systematic review with qualitative synthesis Level Of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength Of Recommendation Grade Grade B (inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence)


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Declarative Title: High-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to
           confirm the effectiveness of oral appliances in the management of
           obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Thikriat S. Al-Jewair
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information The effectiveness of oral appliances for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a meta-analysis. Zhu Y, Long H, Jian F, Lin J, Zhu J, Gao M, Lai W. J Dent 2015;43:1394-1402. Reviewer Thikriat S. Al-Jewair, BDS, MS, MSc, FRCD(C) Purpose/Question Are oral appliances effective in the management of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)' Source of Funding The review was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, and by the Orthodontic National Key Clinical Specialty Construction Program of China. Type of Study/Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B: Inconsistent or limited quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Declarative Title: DNA-image cytometry and computer-assisted brush biopsy
           have potential as diagnostic tools for clinically suspected oral precancer
           and oral cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Richard Macey
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Meta-analysis of two computer-assisted screening methods for diagnosing oral precancer and cancer. Ye X, Zhang J, Tan Y, Chen G, Zhou G. Oral Oncol 2015;51:966–75 Reviewer Richard Macey, PhD, BSc Purpose/Question When diagnosing oral precancer and cancer, is it possible to use computer-assisted brush biopsy techniques and DNA-image cytology as a replacement for histology obtained by scalpel biopsy' Source Of Funding Grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81170972 and 81371147) Type Of Study/Design Diagnostic Test Accuracy systematic review with meta-analysis Level Of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality patient-oriented evidence Strength Of Recommendation Grade Grade B: Inconsistent or limited quality patient-oriented evidence.


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Declarative Title: There is insufficient evidence that upper airway
           dimension changes after four premolar extraction orthodontic treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Kevin Kurtzner, Thikriat Al-Jewair
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information The effect of teeth extraction for orthodontic treatment on the upper airway: a systematic review. Hu Z, Yin X, Liao J, Zhou C, Yang Z, Zou S. Sleep Breath 2015;19(2):441–51. Reviewers Kevin Kurtzner, Thikriat Al-Jewair, BDS, MS, MSc, FRCD(C), Dipl. ABO Purpose/Question What are the effects of premolar extraction for various orthodontic purposes on the upper airway' Source of Funding The review was supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education in China. Type of Study/Design Systematic review Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B: Inconsistent or limited quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Home Visits and Telephone Contacts for Preventing Early Childhood Caries
           Could be Cost Effective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Susan O. Griffin, Paul M. Griffin
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Relative cost-effectiveness of home visits and telephone contacts in preventing early childhood caries. Koh R, Kularantna S, Gordon LG, Barnett AG, Walsh LJ, Seow WK. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2015;43:560-8. Reviewers Susan O. Griffin, PhD, Paul M. Griffin, PhD Purpose/Question Are dental care instructions provided to parent over phone or instructions and child dental exam during home visit every six months more cost-effective in preventing early childhood caries than no intervention' Source of Funding National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (government) and Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation (nonprofit). Type of Study/Design Markov model and Monte Carlo simulation where parameters obtained from longitudinal intervention study, program data, and published data. Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Not applicable


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T21:13:11Z
       
  • Longevity of Self-Etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives compared to Etch-and-Rinse
           Dentin Bonding Adhesives: A Systematic Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Nader Masarwa, Ahmed Mohamed, Iyad Abou-Rabii, Rawan Abu Zaghlan, Liviu Steier
      Objectives A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to compare longevity of Self-Etch Dentine Bonding Adhesives to Etch-and-Rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives. Material and methods The following databases were searched for PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library complemented by a manual search of the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry. The MESH keywords used were: “etch and rinse”, “total etch”, “self-etch”, “dentine bonding agent”, “bond durability”, and “bond degradation”. Included were in-vitro experimental studies performed on human dental tissues of sound tooth structure origin. The examined Self-Etch Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and One Step Self-Etch Bonds, while Etch-and-Rinse Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and Three Steps. The included studies measured micro tensile bond strength (μTBs) to evaluate bond strength and possible longevity of both types of dental adhesives at different times. The selected studies depended on water storage as the aging technique. Statistical analysis was performed for outcome measurements compared at 24 hours, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months of water storage. Results After 24 hours (p-value = 0.051), 3months (p-value = 0.756), 6 months (p-value = 0.785) and 12 months of water storage self-etch adhesives showed lower μTBs when compared to the etch-and-rinse adhesives, but the comparisons were statistically insignificant. Conclusion In this study, longevity of Dentine Bonds was related to the measured μTBs. Although Etch-and-Rinse bonds showed higher values at all times, the meta-analysis found no difference in longevity of the two types of bonds at the examined aging times.


      PubDate: 2016-04-02T04:36:04Z
       
  • Clinical trials in dentistry: A cross-sectional analysis of World Health
           Organization-International Clinical Trial Registry Platform
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Gowri Sivaramakrishnan., Kannan Sridharan.
      Introduction Clinical trials are the back bone for evidence-based practice (EBP) and recently EBP has been considered the best source of treatment strategies available. Clinical trial registries serve as databases of clinical trials. As regards to dentistry in specific data on the number of clinical trials and their quality is lacking. Hence, the present study was envisaged. Method Clinical trials registered in WHO-ICTRP (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/AdvSearch.aspx) in dental specialties were considered. The details assessed from the collected trials include: Type of sponsors; Health condition; Recruitment status; Study design; randomization, method of randomization and allocation concealment; Single or multi-centric; Retrospective or prospective registration; and Publication status in case of completed studies. Results A total of 197 trials were identified. Maximum trials were from United States (n=30) and United Kingdom (n=38). Seventy six trials were registered in Clinical Trials.gov, 54 from International Standards of Reporting Clinical Trials, 13 each from Australia and New Zealand Trial Register and Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials, 10 from German Clinical Trial Registry, eight each from Brazilian Clinical Trial Registry and Nederland’s Trial Register, seven from Japan Clinical Trial Registry, six from Clinical Trial Registry of India and two from Hong Kong Clinical Trial Registry. A total of 78.7% studies were investigator-initiated and 64% were completed while 3% were terminated. Nearly four-fifths of the registered trials (81.7%) were interventional studies of which randomized were the large majority (94.4%) with 63.2% being open-label, 20.4% using single blinding technique and 16.4% were doubled blinded. Conclusion The number, methodology and the characteristics of clinical trials in dentistry have been noted to be poor especially in terms of being conducted multi-centrically, employing blinding and the method for randomization and allocation concealment. More emphasis has to be laid down on the quality of trials being conducted in order to provide justice in the name of EBP.


      PubDate: 2016-03-28T23:56:05Z
       
  • Periodontal Management by Risk Assessment: A pragmatic approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Joanna M. Mullins, Joshua B. Even, Joel M. White
      Declarative Title An evidence-based periodontal disease risk assessment and diagnosis system has been developed and combined with a clinical decision support and management program to improve treatment and measure outcomes for patients. Background There is little agreement on a universally accepted periodontal risk assessment, periodontal diagnosis and treatment management tool and their incorporation into dental practice to improve patient care. This article highlights the development and use of a practical periodontal management and risk assessment program that can be implemented in dental settings. Methods The approach taken by Willamette Dental Group (WDG) to develop a periodontal disease risk assessment, periodontal diagnosis and treatment management tool is described using evidence-based best practices. With goals of standardized treatment interventions while maintaining personalized care and improved communication, this process is described to facilitate its incorporation into other dental settings. Conclusions Current electronic health records (EHRs) can be leveraged to enhance patient-centered care through the use of risk assessments and standardized guidelines to more effectively assess, diagnose, and treat patients to improve outcomes. Dental hygienists, and other committed providers, with their emphasis on prevention of periodontal disease can be principal drivers in creation and implementation of periodontal risk assessments and personalized treatment planning. WDG believes that such evidence-based tools can advance dentistry to new diagnostic and treatment standards.


      PubDate: 2016-02-25T01:56:07Z
       
  • Preventing Advanced Carious Lesions with Caries Atraumatic Restorative
           Technique (ART)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Tammi O. Byrd
      Declarative Title An alternative approach to controlling dental caries and preventing the associated pain, called atraumatic restorative technique (ART), is described for populations in need, where dental hygienists restore decayed teeth with glass ionomer restorations without prior removal of all decayed tooth structure. Background and Purpose There are populations whose decay needs are not adequately being met within the current oral healthcare delivery system. These include those in poverty conditions, vulnerable children, and the elderly who are often in long-term care facilities without adequate resources or opportunities for traditional dentistry. ART provides a viable option for controlling caries and relieving the pain of untreated decay. The purpose of this article is to suggest that the evidence surrounding ART be viewed objectively in order to support dental hygienists, who with additional education in this approach, can contribute to relieving the pain of untreated dental decay. Conclusion Evidence suggests that teeth can be effectively restored with ART. Dental hygienists represent an appropriate workforce to provide ART with their current background and education combined plus a brief training program; it is suggested that current dental hygiene educational programs include ART within the curriculum. Along with dental sealants and fluoride varnish application, ART can be an important component of a comprehensive preventive program to address the unmet needs of vulnerable populations.


      PubDate: 2016-02-25T01:56:07Z
       
  • Improving Outcomes for Transplant Patients: Contribution of a Dental
           Hygienist
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): C. Michele E. Lloid
      Declarative Statement A dental hygienist member of an interdisciplinary medical team can contribute to improved outcomes when cancer and transplant patients experience oral sequelae. Background and Purpose: Cancer and transplant patients benefit from care provided by an interdisciplinary team comprised of general and oral healthcare providers. Diagnostic and supportive care including assessment and stabilization of oral health as well as management of treatment and disease sequelae are essential treatment planning components. This article provides support for a dental hygienist team member contributing toward optimal care for this patient population at high risk for infection and other serious complications. Methods A dental hygienist manager of an oral medicine service that provides clinical care for transplant patients describes how her position within a cancer research center has evolved. Using case scenarios, the impact of an interdisciplinary medical transplant team on patient care is discussed. Conclusions A dental hygienist, interested in working with oncology or transplant patients, as part of an interdisciplinary medical team, can contribute toward the well-being of patients and experience a challenging and rewarding career that combines aspects of medicine and dentistry.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T18:40:26Z
       
  • Minnesota Extends Oral Healthcare Delivery to Impact Population Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Colleen M. Brickle, Suzanne M. Beatty, Merry Jo Thoele
      Declarative Title Collaborative leadership and stakeholder engagement have created the concept of dental therapist intraprofessional dental team members who are expanding and extending the reach of oral healthcare to help meet the public need in Minnesota. Background and Purpose: Partially due to inadequate access to affordable oral healthcare, health disparities exist within Minnesota’s population with significant numbers of residents lacking access to basic oral healthcare. Policymakers, advocacy organizations and dental professionals recommended action to address these issues. In 2009, Minnesota became the first state government in the U.S. to license two levels of practitioners, the Dental Therapist and the Advanced Dental Therapist to primarily treat underserved patients. The purpose of this article is to explain the evolution of the dental therapist and guide other constituencies toward innovative dental hygiene-based workforce models. Methods The evolution and educational preparation of the dental therapist and advanced dental therapist is explained in the context of a unique working relationship between educators, legislators, educational institutions and the Minnesota Department of Health. Pivotal societal, public health and legislative issues are described from the initial stages in 2005 until 2014 when early data is emerging regarding the impact of dental therapists. Conclusions Dental therapist oral healthcare providers are working in a variety of settings in Minnesota including community clinics, hospitals and private practices. As of early February 2014, there were 32 licensed dental therapists six of whom also held certifications as advanced dental therapists. Initial public health impacts are positive; research regarding the benefits to the public is in its infancy. Further evaluation of outcomes will ascertain the viability of this new professional.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T18:40:26Z
       
  • The oral healthcare manager in a patient-centered health facility
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Cheryl Westphal Theile, Shiela Strauss, Mary Evelyn Northridge, Shirley Birenz
      Declarative Title The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral healthcare manager Background and Purpose Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral healthcare manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of healthcare settings. Methods Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral healthcare manager who would address both oral healthcare and a patient’s related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral healthcare manager. Conclusion A healthcare provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive healthcare. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral healthcare manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T18:40:26Z
       
  • Dental Hygienist Providers in Long-Term Care: Meeting the Need
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Elizabeth J. Brown
      Declarative Title Dental hygienists with expertise in the policies, protocols, and practices of long-term care settings can provide oral healthcare services that complement the health complexities of residents. Background Adults in the U.S. are living longer and retaining more teeth, creating an increased demand for oral healthcare within long-term care facilities. Oral health has, in the past, been perceived as less important than other aspects of daily care and focused more on comfort than control of potential pathogens of oral origin. 1 The concept in medicine of a care continuum from cradle to grave has not generally included provisions for oral health since historically few private dental practices have had provisions for continuation of care once an individual is unable to access the private office. This article supports the inclusion of dental hygienist care team members in long-term care settings. Methods The author has provided oral healthcare services in long-term care for many years, modeling this important career path for dental hygienists. Examples of the personal contributions of the dental hygienist author in helping to meet the extreme needs of this population illustrate this viable career option for dental hygienists. Resources utilized include federal and state healthcare publications, data from the American Dental Hygienists’ Association and selected state dental hygiene associations, published literature, and interviews with dental hygiene business owners, as well as the author’s years of expertise. Conclusion Oral health is a significant health concern for elders and others in long-term care settings. Daily oral care practices and optimal oral health are related to the well-being and quality of life that long-term care residents deserve.2 Pathways to providing preventive oral health services will gain momentum as dental hygienists become an integral part of the long-term care setting healthcare team.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T18:40:26Z
       
  • Oral Healthcare Delivery Within the Accountable Care Organization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Christine Blue, Sheila Riggs
      Declarative Statement The accountable care organization (ACO), provides an opportunity to strategically design a comprehensive health system in which oral health works within primary care. A dental hygienist/therapist within the ACO represents value-based healthcare in action. Background Inspired by healthcare reform efforts in Minnesota, a vision of an accountable care organization that integrates oral health into primary health care was developed. Dental hygienists and dental therapists can help accelerate the integration of oral health into primary care, particularly in light of the compelling evidence confirming the cost-effectiveness of care delivered by an allied workforce. Methods A dental insurance CEO and a dental hygiene educator utilized their unique perspectives and experience to describe the potential of an interdisciplinary team-based approach to individual and population health, including oral health, via an accountable care community. Conclusions The principles of the patient-centered medical home and the vision for accountable care communities present a paradigm shift from a curative system of care to a prevention-based system that encompasses the behavioral, social, nutritional, economic, and environmental factors that impact health and well-being. Oral health measures embedded in the spectrum of general healthcare have the potential to ensure a truly comprehensive health care system.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T18:40:26Z
       
  • A New Practice Approach for Oral Health Professionals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Noreen Myers-Wright, Ira B. Lamster
      Declarative Title A New Practice Approach for Oral Health Professionals The oral healthcare paradigm presented here would broaden oral health services to include primary healthcare activities focusing on risk reduction and chronic disease screening. Background and Purpose Changes in our nation’s healthcare delivery system, shifting patient demographics and availability of new health insurance programs have resulted in exploration of new practice models of healthcare delivery. Chronic diseases require coordinated care efforts over decades of a patient’s life. Oral health professionals will be part of that care. Methods The practice model for this article was developed in the context of an academic medical center that promotes oral healthcare professionals as healthcare providers through interprofessional education. The combined experiences of the authors, including a diabetes predictive model for oral health settings, the efficacy and effectiveness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus screening in a dental setting, the feasibility of using a decision support tool for tobacco cessation, and the effectiveness of integrating oral health education with comprehensive health services for people living with HIV, have contributed to this concept. Conclusions Prevention is increasingly recognized as a cost effective means of reducing chronic disease burdens. To be effective health promotion activities that encourage healthy living and early detection need to occur in a variety of healthcare settings. Oral health professionals represent an underutilized group of healthcare providers that can contribute to improved health of populations living with chronic diseases by broadening their scope of practice to include primary health screenings and tailored health promotion activities.


      PubDate: 2016-01-30T06:30:28Z
       
  • Drivers Advancing Oral Health in a Large Group Dental Practice
           Organization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Kristen Simmons, Stephanie Gibson, Joel White
      Declarative Statement Three change drivers are being implemented to high standards of patient-centric and evidence-based oral healthcare within the context of a large multi-specialty dental group practice organization based upon the commitment of the dental hygienist, who is Chief Operating Officer, and her team. Background and Purpose: A recent environmental scan elucidated 6 change drivers that can impact the provision of oral healthcare. Practitioners who can embrace and maximize aspects of these change drivers will move dentistry forward and create future opportunities. This article explains how 3 of these change drivers are being applied in a privately held, accountable-risk bearing entity that provides individualized treatment programs for over 400,000 members. To facilitate integration of the conceptual changes related to the drivers, a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary, highly functioning collaborative work group was formed. Methods and Approach The document Dental Hygiene at a Crossroads for Change, 1 inspired the first author, a dental hygienist in a unique position as Chief Operating Officer of a large group practice, to pursue evidence-based organizational change, to impact the quality of patient care. This was accomplished by implementing technological advances including dental diagnosis terminology in the electronic health record (EHR), clinical decision support, standardized treatment guidelines, quality metrics and patient engagement to improve oral health outcomes at the patient and population levels. The systems and processes utilized to implement 3 change drivers into a large multi-practice dental setting is presented to inform and inspire others to implement change drivers with the potential for advancing oral health. Conclusions Technology, implementing best practices and improving patient engagement are excellent drivers to advance oral health and are effective use of oral healthcare dollars. Improved oral health can be leveraged through technological advances to improve clinical practice.


      PubDate: 2016-01-30T06:30:28Z
       
 
 
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