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DENTISTRY (245 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 245 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ação Odonto     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia Odontologica Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Angle Orthodontist     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access  
Balkan Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Dental Research & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BDJ Open     Open Access  
Brazilian Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie et Odontologie     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical and Laboratorial Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Cadmos     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)     Open Access  
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dentistry 3000     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription  
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Endodontology     Open Access  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Evidence-Based Endodontics     Open Access  
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Future Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Giornale Italiano di Endodonzia     Open Access  
Implant Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Insisiva Dental Journal     Open Access  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Contemporary Dental and Medical Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Science and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Open Access  
JDR Clinical & Translational Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Academy of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry for Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Indian Academy of Dental Specialist Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Oral Health     Open Access  
Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Isfahan Dental School     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Istanbul University Faculty of Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Oral Biosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral Implantology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Oral Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Orthodontic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pierre Fauchard Academy (India Section)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public Health Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Restorative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the International Clinical Dental Research Organization     Open Access  
Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontists     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kieferorthopädie     Full-text available via subscription  
King Saud University Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
L'Orthodontie Française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Médecine Buccale Chirurgie Buccale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicina Oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal     Open Access  
Nigerian Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nowa Stomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
OA Dentistry     Open Access  
Odonto     Open Access  
ODONTO Dental Journal     Open Access  
Odontoestomatología     Open Access  
Odontología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Odontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Odovtos - International Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Dentistry and Oral Medicine     Open Access  
Open Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Operative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Oral Biology and Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oral Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Oral Science International     Hybrid Journal  
Orthodontic Journal of Nepal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Journal Cover Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
  [SJR: 0.563]   [H-I: 15]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1532-3382
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3175 journals]
  • Gaps in Knowledge About the Association Between Maternal Periodontitis and
           Adverse Obstetric Outcomes: An Umbrella Review
    • Authors: Annie M. Vivares-Builes; Leidy Johana Rangel-Rincón; Javier Enrique Botero; Andrés A. Agudelo-Suárez
      Pages: 1 - 27
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Annie M. Vivares-Builes, Leidy Johana Rangel-Rincón, Javier Enrique Botero, Andrés A. Agudelo-Suárez
      Objectives Scientific literature has established that the periodontal condition during pregnancy could be associated with obstetric/neonatal morbidity, and these effects have an important relationship with problems during childhood and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. This umbrella review aimed to summarize the results about the association between maternal periodontitis and obstetric complications (low birth weight, preterm delivery, and preeclampsia) and identify the gaps in the scientific literature. Methods An umbrella review of systematic reviews with or without meta-analysis was performed. Quality evaluation and descriptive analysis of the characteristics of the included studies were conducted. Results Nineteen systematic reviews/meta-analyses were considered. In total, the systematic reviews included 99 observational studies. Most of the reviews established an association between maternal periodontitis and a higher risk of low birth weight, preterm delivery, and preeclampsia. The magnitude and statistical significance of this relationship are influenced by the context in which the studies have been conducted. Gaps were identified in the definition/evaluation of periodontal disease, criteria of gestational age for study purposes, and potential confounders, among others. Conclusions Although scientific literature has established an association among the analyzed pathologies, conceptual and methodological gaps were identified, and they should be considered as integral components when this association is investigated.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.07.006
       
  • Clinical Factors Affecting the Accuracy of Guided Implant Surgery—A
           Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    • Authors: Wenjuan Zhou; Zhonghao Liu; Liansheng Song; Chia-ling Kuo; David M. Shafer
      Pages: 28 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Wenjuan Zhou, Zhonghao Liu, Liansheng Song, Chia-ling Kuo, David M. Shafer
      Objectives To systematically review the current dental literature regarding clinical accuracy of guided implant surgery and to analyze the involved clinical factors. Material and Methods PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. Meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis were performed. Clinical studies with the following outcome measurements were included: (1) angle deviation, (2) deviation at the entry point, and (3) deviation at the apex. The involved clinical factors were further evaluated. Results Fourteen clinical studies from 1951 articles initially identified met the inclusion criteria. Meta-regression analysis revealed a mean deviation at the entry point of 1.25 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.29), 1.57 mm (95% CI: 1.53-1.62) at the apex, and 4.1° in angle (95% CI: 3.97-4.23). A statistically significant difference (P < .001) was observed in angular deviations between the maxilla and mandible. Partially guided surgery showed a statistically significant greater deviation in angle (P < .001), at the entry point (P < .001), and at the apex (P < .001) compared with totally guided surgery. The outcome of guided surgery with flapless approach indicated significantly more accuracy in angle (P < .001), at the entry point (P < .001), and at apex (P < .001). Significant differences were observed in angular deviation based on the use of fixation screw (P < .001). Conclusions The position of guide, guide fixation, type of guide, and flap approach could influence the accuracy of computer-aided implant surgery. A totally guided system using fixation screws with a flapless protocol demonstrated the greatest accuracy. Future clinical research should use a standardized measurement technique for improved accuracy.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.07.007
       
  • Skeletal and Dental Effectiveness of Treatment of Class II Malocclusion
           With Headgear: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    • Authors: Riccardo Nucera; Angela Militi; Antonino Lo Giudice; Vanessa Longo; Rosamaria Fastuca; Alberto Caprioglio; Giancarlo Cordasco; Moschos A. Papadopoulos
      Pages: 41 - 58
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Riccardo Nucera, Angela Militi, Antonino Lo Giudice, Vanessa Longo, Rosamaria Fastuca, Alberto Caprioglio, Giancarlo Cordasco, Moschos A. Papadopoulos
      Objective To evaluate the skeletal and dental effects of headgear treatment by systematically reviewing the best available scientific evidence. Materials and Methods A survey of articles published up to February 2017 investigating the effects of headgear in the treatment of patients with class II malocclusion was performed using 19 electronic databases. Only randomized clinical trials and prospective controlled clinical trials investigating growing patients with class II malocclusion treated with headgear were included. Two authors performed independently study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. All pooled data analyses were performed using the random-effect model. Statistical heterogeneity was evaluated. Results In total, 6 trials were included (4 randomized clinical trials and 2 prospective controlled clinical trials), grouping data from 337 patients (170 treated patients and 167 untreated controls). The ages of the patients varied across the studies, but the majority of the trials had a sample with an age range between 8 and 9 years. The times of daily wear of the appliance varied across studies from 8 to 14 h/d. The significant mean differences in treatment effects compared with the untreated controls were −1.41° per year for SNA angle cephalometric parameter (95% confidence interval [CI]: −2.25° to −0.56°), −0.57 mm/y for anterior maxillary displacement (95% CI: −0.75 to −0.40 mm), −1.42° per year for ANB angle cephalometric parameter (95% CI: −2.12° to −0.72°), and −1.31 mm/y for the overjet cephalometric parameter (95% CI: −2.34 to −0.29 mm). Conclusion Headgear treatment is effective in restricting sagittal maxillary growth and reducing the overjet in the short term.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.07.008
       
  • In Vivo and In Vitro Effectiveness of Rotary Nickel-Titanium vs Manual
           Stainless Steel Instruments for Root Canal Therapy: Systematic Review and
           Meta-analysis
    • Authors: Massimo Del Fabbro; Kelvin Ian Afrashtehfar; Stefano Corbella; Ahmed El-Kabbaney; Isabella Perondi; Silvio Taschieri
      Pages: 59 - 69
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Massimo Del Fabbro, Kelvin Ian Afrashtehfar, Stefano Corbella, Ahmed El-Kabbaney, Isabella Perondi, Silvio Taschieri
      Introduction This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary files compared to stainless-steel (SST) hand files. Methods An electronic search was performed on Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL and Scopus databases up to February 2016. An additional hand searching was performed in 13 journals. The studies were classified according to study type and the outcome variables. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, extracted data, and three reviewers independently assessed the quality of the evidence of each included study according to The Cochrane Collaboration's procedures. A meta-analysis was performed whenever it was possible. Results The electronic and hand search strategies yielded 1155 references of studies after removal of duplicates. Four clinical studies (two prospective and two retrospective studies) and 18 in vitro studies (on extracted teeth) were included for the qualitative synthesis after full-text evaluation of the eligible studies. The overall level of methodological quality of the studies included can be considered inadequate. Only one clinical study was judged at low risk of bias, whereas most non-clinical studies had a low risk of bias. Three meta-analyses, based on a very limited number of studies, could be performed. Each meta-analysis contained two studies. Of these, one meta-analysis was based on clinical studies. Conclusions The results of this systematic review suggested that NiTi rotary instruments were associated with lower canal transportation and apical extrusion when compared to SST hand files, whereas both groups had similar outcomes in terms of success of therapy, amount of residual bacteria, and cleansing ability after treatment. However, due to the limited evidence available, these results should be interpreted with caution. Consequently, more randomized control trials using standardized protocols are needed in order to provide more solid recommendations.

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T11:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.08.001
       
  • Silver Diamine Fluoride Arrests Caries in Primary Teeth
    • Authors: Jaana Gold
      Pages: 88 - 90
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jaana Gold
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Silver Diamine Fluoride Has Efficacy in Controlling Caries Progression in Primary Teeth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Chibinski AC, Wambier LM, Feltrin J, Loguercio AD, Wambier DS, Reis A. Caries Res 2017;51(5):527-41. Source of Funding This study was partially supported by the Brazilian Government Organization–National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq)–under grants 304105/2013-9 and 305588/2014-1 Type of Study/Design Systematic review and meta-analysis

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T11:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.007
       
  • Erbium Laser Technology vs Traditional Drilling for Caries Removal: A
           Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis
    • Authors: Siying Tao; Lan Li; He Yuan; Sibei Tao; Yiming Cheng; Libang He; Jiyao Li
      Pages: 324 - 334
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Siying Tao, Lan Li, He Yuan, Sibei Tao, Yiming Cheng, Libang He, Jiyao Li
      Objective The study aimed to assess the efficacy of erbium laser technology compared with traditional drilling for caries removal. Methods A systematic search was conducted through Medline via PubMed, Embase, Cochrane databases, CNKI till December 2016. Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, or controlled clinical trials with data comparing the efficacy of erbium laser technology versus traditional drilling for caries removal were included. Results Fourteen studies were selected in our meta-analysis. Erbium laser technology showed an increased time when removing caries compared with drilling (mean difference: 3.48, 95% confidence interval: 1.90-5.06, P < .0001). However, erbium laser technology reduced the requirement for local anesthesia (risk ratio: 0.28, 95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.62, P = .002). Erbium laser technology was also not significantly different to traditional drilling with regard to restoration loss, pulpal vitality, and postoperative sensitivity. Conclusions Erbium laser technology showed an increased time for cavity preparation compared with traditional drilling. However, erbium laser technology reduced the requirement for local anesthesia. There was no significant difference between erbium laser technology and traditional drilling regarding restoration loss, pulpal vitality, and postoperative sensitivity.

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T11:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.004
       
  • Gap Analysis of Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Receiving Nonsurgical
           Periodontal Therapy
    • Authors: Enihomo Obadan-Udoh; Samantha Jordan; Olubukola Mudah; Wenche Borgnakke; Mary Tavares
      Pages: 335 - 349
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Enihomo Obadan-Udoh, Samantha Jordan, Olubukola Mudah, Wenche Borgnakke, Mary Tavares
      Objective Twenty percent of the elderly US population is diagnosed with diabetes. The elderly are at a higher risk of developing serious complications from diabetes. Regular professional dental care may help control blood glucose levels and thereby diabetes complications. Since such potential benefits could play a clinically significant role in diabetes management, our aim was to identify and review relevant evidence among the older population. Materials and Methods Electronic databases were searched for periodontal intervention studies using modified search terms from previous systematic reviews. The final search date was October 31, 2016. Results Twenty-five publications (22 studies) were included in our final review. They varied in study design, duration, therapeutic interventions, and systemic outcomes measured. No study restricted its participants to seniors, and therefore, a mean age of 55 years or more was used. Fourteen studies showed significant reductions in serum glycated hemoglobin levels, but 8 studies showed nonsignificant changes. Conclusion The evidence suggests a beneficial effect of receiving periodontal care on serum glycated hemoglobin and systemic biomarker levels in older persons with T2DM. Such care would be considered a novel, safe, and acceptable adjunct to current medical management of T2DM in older individuals. The dearth of studies restricted to the elderly represents a gap in knowledge that needs to be addressed in the United States.

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T11:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.005
       
  • No Evidence Suggests that the Clinical Effectiveness of Conventional
           Occlusal Splints is Superior to That of Psychosocial Interventions for
           Myofascial Tempromandibular Disorders Pain
    • Authors: Redhwan Saleh Algabri; Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi
      Pages: 399 - 401
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Redhwan Saleh Algabri, Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information A systematic review and meta-analysis of usual treatment versus psychosocial interventions in the treatment of myofascial temporomandibular disorder pain. Fan Roldán-Barraza C, Janko S, Villanueva J, Araya I, Lauer HC. J Oral Facial Pain Headache 2014;28(3):205-22. Source of Funding Self-funding Type of Study/Design Systematic review and meta-analysis

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T11:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.10.003
       
  • Zygomatic Implants Are a Reliable Treatment Option for Patients With
           Atrophic Maxilla
    • Authors: Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi; Afaf Aboalrejal
      Pages: 402 - 404
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Afaf Aboalrejal
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Survival and Complications of Zygomatic Implants: An Updated Systematic Review. Chrcanovic BR, Albrektsson T, Wennerberg A. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016;74(10):1949-64. Source of Funding Self-funding Type of Study/Design Systematic review and meta-analysis

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T11:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.10.004
       
  • Does Restriction of Public Health Care Dental Benefits Affect the Volume,
           Severity, or Cost of Dental-Related Hospital Visits'
    • Authors: Christopher Okunseri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Christopher Okunseri
      Subjects The study participants were patients presenting for the management of dental pain following odontogenic infections to the University of Illinois Hospital from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2013. Materials and Methods The sample consisted of patients diagnosed with dental pain following odontogenic infection or swelling and recorded based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Data were retrieved from electronic health records. The sample was divided into 2 separate consecutive cohorts with visits that spanned a period of 18 months. The cohorts design was based on the passage of the Save Medicaid Access and Resources Together (SMART) Act by the Illinois legislature. Cohort 1 was before the passage of the SMART Act and Cohort 2 was after the passage of SMART Act. Key Exposure/Study Factors The key exposure of this study was the passage of the Save Medicaid Access and Resources Together (SMART) Act by the Illinois legislature. This study compared emergency department (ED) use for dental care before and after the SMART legislation. The conditions selected for the study were diagnosis of dental caries, pulpal or periapical lesions, gingival conditions, periodontal conditions, and mouth cellulitis or abscess. Dental care−related visits were identified based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. Outcome Measures The primary outcomes were the volume of patients with odontogenic pain or infection, severity of the infection, and overall cost of treatment based on hospital cost for each variable analyzed. Main Results Data for 5192 encounters were identified from the database; only 1405 met the inclusion criteria. The difference between the cohorts was not significant for age (P = 28) or gender (P = 0.43). After the passage of the SMART Act, there was an increase in ED visits by 48%, surgical intervention increased by100%, and hospital admission days increased by 128%. There were higher odds for patients receiving oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) consults (odds ratio [OR] = 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-1.81), incision and drainage (OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.13-1.94), and a longer hospital admission. The average cost per encounter increased by 20%, and the total cost of care increased by $1.6 million. Conclusion The study documented that after the legislation of limiting dental benefits in Illinois, there was an increase in the volume and severity of odontogenic infections or swellings and in treatment care costs for patients who presented with dental pain to the urban ED hospital.

      PubDate: 2018-03-19T15:26:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.03.002
       
  • Temporomandibular lavage versus non-surgical treatments for
           temporomandibular disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Huda Fakhry; Iman Abd-Elwahab Radi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Huda Fakhry, Iman Abd-Elwahab Radi
      Study selection MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched up to May 2016 using controlled vocabulary (MeSH, Emtree) with no language restrictions. Additional surveys were done of the International Trials Registry Platform and the reference lists of all included studies as well as previous narrative and systematic reviews. Two reviewers independently assessed papers for eligibility by title and abstract and then by full text. Only randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing temporomandibular lavage (whether arthrocentesis or arthroscopy) with non-surgical treatment were eligible. The primary outcome was pain, while the secondary outcome was mouth opening. Data extraction and synthesis VEligible RCTs were assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Pain and mouth opening were compared between the two groups using standardized mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and meta-analysis was conducted. Main Results The 5 studies included a total of 135 and 173 patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Three studies were considered at a high risk and 2 at a low risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed significant pain reduction after 6 months (–0.63; P < .00001), and after 3 months (–0.47; P = .001) favoring lavage. However, there was no difference after 1 month. For mouth opening, no significant difference between the lavage and control groups was found 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment was completed. Conclusions Considering the relatively small number of patients included in this meta-analysis, the high risk of bias in 3 studies, and the statistical and clinical heterogeneity of the included studies, the use of temporomandibular lavage for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders should be recommended with caution.

      PubDate: 2018-03-19T15:26:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.03.001
       
  • Management of sleep bruxism in adults: a qualitative systematic literature
           review
    • Authors: Ricardo Luiz de Barreto Aranha; Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães De Abreu; Júnia Maria Serra-Negra; Renata Castro Martins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ricardo Luiz de Barreto Aranha, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães De Abreu, Júnia Maria Serra-Negra, Renata Castro Martins
      Selection Criteria This systematic review included peer-reviewed English language papers focused on clinical investigations on humans that assessed the effectiveness of treatment approaches to SB, as diagnosed with polysomnography (PSG) or sleep time electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles. This is an update of the sleep bruxism (SB) management review published by Lobbezoo et al. (2008) and focuses on the most recent literature on SB. Two authors reviewed 2 databases (Medline and Scopus). Any disagreements were resolved by discussion to reach consensus. The search retrieved 1494 citations that were screened for eligibility. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 14 papers were included in the review. Key Study Factor The intervention was therapeutic modalities aiming to diminish SB in adults, evidence of efficacy, and clinical remarks. The approaches included in the final review included oral appliances (OAs), pharmacological approaches (including botulinum toxin, clonazepam, and clonidine), biofeedback (BF), and cognitive behavioral (CB) approaches. Main Outcomes Measures The main outcome of interest was reduction of SB by available therapeutic modalities, as bruxism rates were assessed by PSG with audio-video (AV) recordings, or with any other approach measuring the sleep time masticatory muscle´s activity, viz., PSG without AV recordings or EMG recorded with portable devices, at baseline and after several distinct follow-up periods. These follow-up times ranged from very few protocol days (i.e., 3–5 days) in a short-term crossover investigation to up to 3 months in the uncontrolled before–after study. Main Results The systematic review included 7 papers reporting on OAs and 4 papers reporting on pharmacological management of SB (2 dealing with botulinum toxin and 2 assessing the effectiveness of benzodiazepine clonazepam or the antihypertensive drug clonidine). Two other studies dealt with sleep hygiene and relaxation techniques, and the remaining paper reported an uncontrolled series of 10 patients receiving electrical stimuli to the masseter muscles. Results demonstrate that, despite high variability of topics and designs, (1) almost every type of OA is somehow effective in reducing SB activity, with a potentially higher decrease for devices providing significant mandibular advancement; (2) all tested pharmacological approaches may reduce SB compared to placebo; (3) the potential benefit of BF and CB approaches to SB management is not fully supported; and (4) the only investigation providing an electrical stimulus to the masseter muscle supports its effectiveness in reducing SB. Conclusions The authors conclude that the only treatment modality with enough evidence for limiting bruxism is the use of OA, despite the lack of standardized methodology in available studies and of knowledge about its own mechanism of action. Furthermore, an accurate bruxism diagnostic methodology and consistent protocol for treatment indication is needed. Future studies are recommended.

      PubDate: 2018-03-19T15:26:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.03.003
       
  • Introducing the New Editor-in-Chief
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
       
  • Statement of Purpose/Levels of Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
       
  • Levels of Evidence—Grading System∗∗Originally published in Newman
           MG, Weyant R, Hujoel P: JEBDP improves grading system and adopts strength
           of recommendation taxonomy grading (SORT) for guidelines and systematic
           reviews. J Evid Based Dent Pract 2007;7:147-150.
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 18, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
       
  • The association between periodontitis and sleep duration. Romandini M,
           Gioco G, Perfetti G, Deli G, Staderini E, Lafori A. J Clin Periodontol
           2017;44(5):490-501
    • Authors: Tarek Elmajie
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Tarek Elmajie
      Subjects This population-based cross-sectional study analyzed the data of 5812 participants (2492 males and 3320 females) who were surveyed in 2012 as part of the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V). The KNHANES is a nationwide survey conducted by the Korea Centre for Disease Control and Prevention on an annually representative sample of the total non-institutionalized South Korea population. The sampling strategy in KNHANES follows a complex multi-stage clustered probability design. In the 2012 survey, 192 primary sampling units (PSUs) were selected from approximately 200,000 geographically defined PSUs for the entire country. A PSU consisted of approximately 50–60 households, and 20 final target households were sampled for each PSU using systematic sampling. In the selected households, individuals age 1 year and over were targeted. In this study, only adults age 19 years or older were included. This sample represented approximately 40 million South Korean adults. Key Risk/Study Factor Sleep duration was the key factor and was measured by the answer to the question “How many hours do you usually sleep per day'” Self-reported average of daily sleep duration for each participant was measured by hours in sleep per day (1-24 h/day). Participants were categorized based on sleep hours into five groups: ≤ 5 h/day, 6 h/day, 7 h/day, 8 h/day, and ≥ 9 h/day. Main Outcome Measure Periodontitis was determined through the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Each participant’s periodontal health status was characterized according to CPI criteria with a score from 0 to 4 (0: health periodontal conditions; 1: gingival bleeding on probing; 2: calculus present; 3: periodontal pocket depth (PPD) between 3.5–5.5 mm; and 4: PPD > 5.5 mm). Subjects were considered as having periodontitis when their CPI scores were 3 or greater in at least one sextant. Separate analysis was conducted using CPI = 4 in at least one sextant as a periodontitis case definition. Main Results No significant relationship between sleep duration and periodontitis was found in crude analysis. However, after adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio (OR) of having periodontitis, defined as CPI = 4, among adults sleeping 6 h/day was 2.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20–5.06) compared to the group sleeping 5 h or less. Adults with sleep durations of 7, 8, and 9 h/day or more had higher odds of periodontitis at 2.66 (95% CI: 1.35–5.25), OR = 2.29 (95% CI: 1.13–4.63), and OR = 4.27 (95% CI: 1.83–9.97), respectively. The association between sleep duration and periodontitis was partially mediated by lipid profile alteration, diabetes in CPI ≥ 3 and CPI = 4 case definitions, and serum vitamin D levels and white blood cell count in only CPI = 4 case definition. Conclusions This population-based study revealed a direct and independent association between sleep duration and prevalence of periodontitis. Further prospective studies are needed to better understand the complex interplay between sleep problems and periodontitis.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.02.003
       
  • Effectiveness and safety of phentolamine mesylate in routine dental care.
           Daüblander M, Liebaug F, Niedeggen G, Theobald K, Kürzinger M-L. J Am
           Dent Assoc 2017;148(3):149-56
    • Authors: Mohammad Helmi; Muath AlDosari; Mary Tavares
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Mohammad Helmi, Muath AlDosari, Mary Tavares
      The authors initiated 2 studies--OraVerse Post-Authorization Efficacy Study [ORAPAES] and OraVerse Non-Interventional Study [ORANIS]--to assess the effectiveness of using phentolamine mesylate (PM) to reduce the time to recovery of normal sensation in the lip and tongue and the time to recovery of normal function (eating, drinking, and speaking) after dental procedures that require the use of local anesthesia. They also assessed the safety of administering PM, including any adverse effects (AEs).

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.02.005
       
  • Prosthetic replacement vs space closure for maxillary lateral incisor
           agenesis: A systematic review. Silveira GS, Almeida NV, Pereira DMT,
           Mattos CT, Mucha JN.Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2016;150(2):228-37
    • Authors: Thikriat S. Al-Jewair; Brittany Swiderski
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Thikriat S. Al-Jewair, Brittany Swiderski


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.02.004
       
  • Direct pulp capping: what is the most effective therapy' –
           systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Anabela Baptista Pereira Paula; Mafalda Laranjo; Carlos-Miguel Marto; Siri Paulo; Ana Abrantes; João Casalta-Lopes; Manuel Marques-Ferreira; Maria Filomena Botelho; Eunice Carrilho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Anabela Baptista Pereira Paula, Mafalda Laranjo, Carlos-Miguel Marto, Siri Paulo, Ana Abrantes, João Casalta-Lopes, Manuel Marques-Ferreira, Maria Filomena Botelho, Eunice Carrilho


      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.02.002
       
  • Using Evidence Based Dentistry in the Clinical Management of Combined
           Periodontal Conditions

    • Authors: S. Shaikh; I.F. Dragan; A. Nevius; N. Mehta; N. Karimbux
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): S. Shaikh, I.F. Dragan, A. Nevius, N. Mehta, N. Karimbux
      Objective This report proposes a framework to integrate evidence-based dentistry (EBD) in a systematic approach in the clinical management of a patient diagnosed with drug induced gingival hyperplasia combined with generalized aggressive periodontitis. Background This report illustrates the case of a 37 years-old female who presented to the Department of Periodontology at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine with enlarged, tender, bleeding gums and loose teeth combined with a history of uncontrolled hypertension treated with calcium channel blockers. Methods Incorporating the EBD process, a new 5-steps framework is proposed: ask the clinical question, acquire and appraise the evidence, apply it in the clinical setting and assess the subjective and objective outcomes. Articles on aggressive periodontitis and/or gingival enlargement were sought using the assistance of an expert librarian. The search was conducted on databases PubMed, EMBASE and Scopus. Results Initial literature search lead to a result of 34 publications. Articles were reviewed by two clinicians and 31 relevant articles were selected. 26 of the references matched the levels of evidence initially agreed. Based on the scientific evidence, patient’s chief complaint and clinical expertise, a decision tree highlighting treatment options was compiled. The outcomes of the clinical management, revealed that combined conditions can be successfully treated to an extent with non-surgical therapy, before proceeding with surgical therapy. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, integrating EBD concepts was a reliable method to treat an atypical case, where two severe periodontal conditions were combined: drug induced gingival enlargement and generalized aggressive periodontitis.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.02.001
       
  • Multiple Disconnections/Reconnections of Implant Abutment May Induce
           Recession of Peri-Implant Mucosa
    • Authors: Won-suk
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Won-suk Oh
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Abutment Disconnection/Reconnection Affects Peri-implant Marginal Bone Levels: A Meta-Analysis. Koutouzis T, Gholami F, Reynolds J, Lundgren T, Kotsakis GA. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2017;32(3):575–81 Source of Funding The authors declared no conflict of interest Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2018-01-15T18:11:59Z
       
  • SDF Staining is Acceptable for Posterior Primary Teeth and is Preferred
           Over Advanced Pharmacologic Behavior Management by Many Parents
    • Authors: Nicholas B. Gordon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Nicholas B. Gordon
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Parental perceptions and acceptance of silver diamine fluoride staining. Crystal YO, Janal MN, Hamilton DS, Niederman R. J Am Dent Assoc 2017;148(7): 510-8 Source of Funding Grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), National Institutes of Health; New York University Clinical and Translational Science Award, and National Center for Advancing Translational Science, National Institutes of Health Type of Study/Design Cross sectional

      PubDate: 2018-01-15T18:11:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2018.01.001
       
  • Measuring Adherence to Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines
    • Authors: Richard Clark; Utsana Tonmukayakul; Yvonne Mangan; Michael Smith; Mark Gussy; David Manton; Denise Bailey; Hanny Calache
      Pages: 301 - 309
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Richard Clark, Utsana Tonmukayakul, Yvonne Mangan, Michael Smith, Mark Gussy, David Manton, Denise Bailey, Hanny Calache
      Objectives Dental Health Services Victoria publishes evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to assist public oral health practitioners to provide high-quality dental care. How well these CPGs are implemented into practice is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to selected CPGs. Methods An electronic auditing tool was developed using clinical indicators derived for “stainless steel crown (SSC),” “restorative care for children under general anesthetic (GA),” and “direct restorative materials” CPG. Six trained dentists audited a random sample of 204 dental records of children aged 3-12 years from 2 major public dental agencies. Results In total, 319 material-based treatments were audited, comprising 170 resin composite, 81 glass ionomer cement, 64 SSC, and 4 amalgam restorations. Adherence to the current guidelines varied from 94% of the SSC to none of the amalgam treatments audited. Almost half (47%) of the resin composite restorations and 5% of glass ionomer cement restorations were nonadherent to the relevant guideline. Conclusions Average adherence was up to 72% of cases. Clinicians need to consider recording the rationale upon which their professional judgment is based when they decide not to follow an appropriate CPG.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.001
       
  • Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Education on Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
    • Authors: Allison Buchanan; Karan Thachil; Chris Haggard; Sajitha Kalathingal
      Pages: 310 - 316
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Allison Buchanan, Karan Thachil, Chris Haggard, Sajitha Kalathingal
      Objectives As the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry continues to grow, questions related to appropriate radiation safety, training, and interpretation arise. Recognizing this need, the American Dental Association published an advisory statement for the safe use of CBCT in dentistry and recommended that guidelines for appropriate training be established. The purpose of this study was to assess radiation safety concerns related to CBCT and identify voids in current education on CBCT for the predoctoral dental curriculum and continuing dental education. Methods A survey was mailed to general practitioners, oral surgeons, and periodontists in the Georgia Dental Association (n = 415). Results One hundred twenty-one surveys were received for a response rate of 29%. Sixty-eight percent of practitioners reported using CBCT, with 89% having used it for over 2 years. Few (12.4%) had experience with CBCT in dental school. Interest in continuing dental education on CBCT was reported at 59.8% and 43.6% for current users and nonusers of CBCT, respectively. Approximately 50% reported using precautionary radiation safety measures, and the methods used were varied. Conclusions Although a higher survey return rate would allow for stronger evidence, this project identified some areas of education voids including radiation safety and the factors that contribute to patient dose; CBCT basics including instruction on the limitations of CBCT; CBCT anatomy and pathology with additional time dedicated to the paranasal sinuses; and interpretation.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.002
       
  • Outcomes of Dental Implant Therapy in Patients With Down Syndrome: A
           Systematic Review
    • Authors: Shariq Najeeb; Zohaib Khurshid; Fahad Siddiqui; Sana Zohaib; Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      Pages: 317 - 323
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Shariq Najeeb, Zohaib Khurshid, Fahad Siddiqui, Sana Zohaib, Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      Objectives Patients with Down syndrome (DS) require an earlier and more frequent tooth replacement than rest of the population. The objective of this systematic review is to critically analyze and summarize studies to ascertain the outcomes and survival of dental implants placed in jaws of DS patients. Methods Using the key words “dental implants,” “Down syndrome,” and “prosthodontics,” an electronic search was conducted via PubMed/MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, Embase, and Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases by 2 authors, S.N. and Z.K., independently. Retrieved studies were screened against the predefined exclusion and inclusion criteria. To estimate the risk of bias, quality assessment of included studies was carried using the ‘Case Reports (CARE) guidelines’. Results Primary search resulted in 156 studies. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria and reporting a total of 81 dental implants placed in 36 DS patients. The type of implant loading ranged from immediate to a delay of 1 year after placement of the implant. Implant diameter ranged from 3.3 to 4.5 mm, and height ranged from 8.5 to 18 mm. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 6 years. Of 81 implants placed, 21 implants (26%) were reported as failed. Conclusions Patients with DS have a higher risk of implant failure. However, the reason for the failure is not very well understood. Although case reports and case series suggest that implant survival is diminished in DS patients, large-scale randomized controlled trials are required to determine the exact mechanism associated with risks of implant failure.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.003
       
  • A Novel Evidence-Based Periodontal Prognosis Model
    • Authors: Troy McGowan; Kelly McGowan; Saso Ivanovski
      Pages: 350 - 360
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Troy McGowan, Kelly McGowan, Saso Ivanovski
      Objective Patients with periodontal disease and the dental professionals responsible for their care want to know which teeth are expected to respond favorably to periodontal treatment and which teeth are likely to be lost in the short and long term. A number of different periodontal prognosis systems have been previously proposed but do not consider important patient-level factors, such as smoking and diabetic control, in the calculation of the expected outcome and often use subjective measures that introduce potential inaccuracies. The aim of this report is to translate the best available evidence on periodontal prognosis into a clinical model to facilitate decision-making and improve patient outcomes. Methods Criteria for an ideal prognostic system were proposed and used to assess the previously reported models. With an emphasis on the inclusion of patient-level modifiers (PLMs) and the exclusive use of objective parameters, a new evidence-based model was developed. Results This report proposes a new tooth-level prognosis model that uses 9 evidence-based quantifiable parameters to provide a prognosis of secure, doubtful, poor, or irrational to treat. Six tooth-level risk predictors (bone loss:age, pocket depth, furcation involvement, infrabony defects, anatomical factors, and mobility) and 3 PLMs (smoking, diabetes, and bleeding on probing) are used to determine the expected course of disease with specific reference to the suitability of the tooth for future dental treatment. Conclusions PLMs must be considered when determining the prognosis of a tooth with periodontal disease. The model proposed in this report is based on the best available evidence for factors affecting tooth survival and has been designed to be as simple and objective as possible to facilitate its adoption in clinical practice. It will be retrospectively and prospectively validated to determine its ability to accurately predict the course of disease.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.006
       
  • Periodontal Diseases and Systemic Disorders: What Do Our Doctors Know'
           A General Practitioner's Survey Conducted in Southern France
    • Authors: Vinel Alexia; Vachon Chloé; Barthet Pierre; Laurencin-Dalicieux Sara
      Pages: 361 - 369
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Vinel Alexia, Vachon Chloé, Barthet Pierre, Laurencin-Dalicieux Sara
      Objectives With 39,359 entries on PubMed, periodontal medicine has a prominent position in periodontal research. Good patient care requires well-advised physicians, and whereas the dental community is informed about the relationships between periodontal diseases (PDs) and an increasing number of systemic pathologies, we wondered whether general practitioners were too. Thus, we aimed to evaluate their knowledge of the links between periodontal and systemic diseases. Methods To this end, we sent an electronic questionnaire to the 2350 general practitioners registered to the URPS (Union régionale des Professionnels de Santé) of Midi-Pyrénées, France. They were asked about their practice, their attitude during a medical examination, and their knowledge about PDs. Results The analysis of 222 properly answered questionnaires showed that while most general practitioners are aware of the relationships between PDs and diabetes or cardiovascular diseases, the majority of them are unaware that obesity and respiratory and joint diseases are also concerned. Indeed, 94% of the questioned subjects consider their insight of PDs to be insufficient. Nevertheless, more than half of the interrogated physicians cared about their patients' oral health and dental care. Conclusions Education regarding relationships between periodontal and systemic diseases must be improved among general practitioners who are in the front line to refer high-risk patients to a periodontist.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.007
       
  • Clinical Outcomes of Comparing Soft Tissue Alternatives to Free Gingival
           Graft: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    • Authors: Irina F. Dragan; Lucrezia Paterno Hotlzman; Nadeem Y. Karimbux; Rebecca A. Morin; Seyed Hossein Bassir
      Pages: 370 - 380.e3
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Irina F. Dragan, Lucrezia Paterno Hotlzman, Nadeem Y. Karimbux, Rebecca A. Morin, Seyed Hossein Bassir
      Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare clinical outcomes and width of keratinized tissue (KT) around teeth, following the soft tissue alter- natives and free gingival graft (FGG) procedures. The specific graft materials that were explored were extracellular matrix membrane, bilayer collagen membrane, living cellular construct, and acellular dermal matrix. Methods Four different databases were queried to identify human controlled clinical trials and randomized controlled clinical trials that fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Relevant studies were identified by 3 independent reviewers, compiling the results of the electronic and handsearches. Studies identified through electronic and handsearches were reviewed by title, abstract, and full text using Covidence Software. Primary outcome in the present study was change in the width of KT. Results of the included studies were pooled to estimate the effect size, expressed as weighted mean differences and 95% confidence interval. A random-effects model was used to perform the meta-analyses. Results Six hundred thirty-eight articles were screened by title, 55 articles were screened by abstracts, and 34 full-text articles were reviewed. Data on quantitative changes in width of KT were provided in 7 studies. Quantitative analyses revealed a significant difference in changes in width of KT between patients treated with soft tissue alternatives and patients treated with FGGs (P < .001). The weighted mean difference of changes in the width of KT was 21.39 (95% confidence interval: 21.82 to 20.96; heterogeneity I 5 70.89%), indicating patients who were treated with soft tissue alternatives gained 1.39 mm less KT width compared with the patients who received free gingival graft. Conclusions Based on the clinical outcomes, the results of this systematic review and meta-analysis showed that soft tissue alternatives result in an increased width of KT. Patients in the soft tissue alternatives group obtained 1.39 mm less KT compared with those in the FGGs group.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.008
       
  • Halitosis Assessment and Changes in Volatile Sulfur Compounds After
           Chewing Gum: A Study Performed on Dentistry Students
    • Authors: Mayra Schemel-Suárez; Eduardo Chimenos-Küstner; Albert Estrugo-Devesa; Enric Jané-Salas; José López-López
      Pages: 381 - 388
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mayra Schemel-Suárez, Eduardo Chimenos-Küstner, Albert Estrugo-Devesa, Enric Jané-Salas, José López-López
      Objective The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of halitosis (with subjective and objective methods), evaluate the immediate effect of chewing gum on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), assess the perception of halitosis by dentistry students, and estimate the distribution of positive and negative frequencies, when comparing objective and subjective methods for the diagnosis of halitosis. Methods The study was performed on a sample of dentistry students attending the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Barcelona. A questionnaire about halitosis perception was provided and a clinical examination, organoleptic test (OT), and gas chromatography were performed to determine the presence of halitosis. The subjects were also given chewing gum to modify their breath, and gas chromatography was carried out to evaluate possible changes in VSCs. Results The sample comprised 80 individuals. Twenty-seven (33.75%) self-perceived halitosis during the period of evaluation; the OT was positive in 38 subjects (47.5%); and individuals positive for halitosis on gas chromatography were distributed as follows: H2S in 25 (31.25%), CH3SH in 28 (35%), and (CH3)2S in 70 individuals (87.5%). A statistical difference before and after chewing gum (P < .05) was found for each VSC; a difference in frequencies was observed between the variable OT and H2S (P < .05) and between the OT and (CH3)2S (P < .001). There was no significant difference (P > .05) between the positive and negative frequencies retrieved between the variable OT and CH3SH and between the OT and the student's halitosis perception. Conclusion Prevalence of halitosis in the studied sample is high, considering that it comprised healthy individuals. The relationship between the OT and gas chromatography is not completely established. Chewing gum could be considered a therapeutic alternative to decrease or neutralize the amount of VSCs present in oral breath.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.06.001
       
  • A Quality Analysis of Systematic Reviews in Dentistry, Part 1:
           Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials
    • Authors: Mohamed El-Rabbany; Silvia Li; Stephanie Bui; Jeffrey M. Muir; Mohit Bhandari; Amir Azarpazhooh
      Pages: 389 - 398
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mohamed El-Rabbany, Silvia Li, Stephanie Bui, Jeffrey M. Muir, Mohit Bhandari, Amir Azarpazhooh
      Objectives As the volume of publications in dentistry continues to increase, clinicians are becoming increasingly reliant on systematic reviews and meta-analyses as their primary source of evidence. With an increase in the dependence on dental metaanalyses, it is important to ensure that they are being conducted with as little bias as possible. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the quality of therapeutic meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on dental-related topics and to analyze how quality has changed over time. Methods All relevant studies were searched for through MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. Title, abstract, and full-text review, as well as data extraction and quality assessment, were all conducted in duplicate. All reviewers used a pilot-tested extraction form that included the AMSTAR checklist to assess quality of systematic reviews. A logit link function ordinal regression was conducted to evaluate quality improvement trends over time. Results Of the 3832 studies identified, 208 studies were selected for review. Of these, 13% provided an a priori design, 53% screened and extracted data in duplicate, 29% included gray literature, 63% assessed the quality of included studies, and 39% assessed publication bias. As was indicated by the ordinal regression, the quality of meta-analyses, as per the AMSTAR criteria, has increased significantly with time (P < .001). Conclusions This investigation illustrates that although the quality of meta-analyses of RCTs has been increasing since the start of the millennium, there remains substantial room for improvement within all aspects of systematic review reporting and methodology. Therefore, it is critical for clinicians to take caution when reading systematic reviews and meta-analyses, ensuring that the principals of critical appraisal are applied when interpreting meta-analyses of RCTs.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.06.004
       
  • Impact of adenotonsillectomy on the dentofacial development of obstructed
           children: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Qiao Sun; Fang Hua; Hong He
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Qiao Sun, Fang Hua, Hong He
      Selection Criteria An electronic search of 6 databases (PubMed, EMBASE, TRIP, Google Scholar, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Oral Health Group Specialized Register) was performed. The paper version of the primary orthodontic journals and the reference lists of relevant articles were manually searched. Only studies regarding adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy in children (age 3-18 years) were included. No language restriction was applied. A total of 1166 records were initially identified through electronic searches. Supplementary hand searches yielded 30 additional items. After screening of titles/abstracts and full-texts, 16 articles were deemed eligible and included in the review. Key Study Factors All 16 articles described cohort studies comparing a patient group (patients who underwent adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy) and a control group [healthy children (healthy controls) or children with hypertrophic adenoids and/or tonsils (patient controls)]. However, among these, 10 articles originated from 3 unique samples and another 3 articles were reports of the same study. Therefore, only 7 presumed original studies were included, with 190 children in patient groups (mean age, 3-10.2 years) and 271 in control groups (222 healthy controls and 49 patient controls; mean age, 3-13.9 years). The length of follow-up varied from 1 to 5 years. Given the heterogeneity in study design, the authors used a descriptive summary to present the 14 most frequently reported findings in the included studies. They carried out meta-analyses to pool quantitative data regarding the NL-SNL and ML-SNL angles including only 3 studies. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed with eye-ball testing of forest plots and the χ 2 test (P < .1). Means and standard deviations (SDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the summary effect. In addition, they used the Cochrane Risk of Bias (RoB) Tool to assess the RoB of included studies. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcomes of this review were changes in “intra-oral occlusal and extra-oral craniofacial measurements” before and after surgery. Pre-determined intra-oral measures included intercanine width, intermolar width, arch length, arch perimeter, palatal depth, and other occlusal characteristics identified by the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON) and Peer Assessment Rating (PAR). Pre-determined extraoral measures included all outcomes that were associated with craniofacial growth in the vertical, sagittal, and transverse directions. Main Results Results of RoB assessments suggest that the overall RoB was high. Half of the included articles had a high risk of attrition bias. Only 1 article mentioned blinding of outcome assessment. In addition, due to a lack of control for confounding factors, most articles had a high risk of “other bias”. According to a descriptive summary of the 14 most frequently recorded findings, most studies found that after adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy the upper and lower incisors became normal by proclination, the maxillary arch width increased, the prevalence of lateral crossbite decreased, and the mandibular growth pattern became more horizontal. However, there was no consensus with regard to changes in the mandibular arch width, overjet, overbite, gonial angle, and SNB angle. Three studies comparing patients who underwent adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy and healthy control children were included in the meta-analyses. The results showed no significant before-and-after difference in maxillary growth direction (NL-SNL angle) in either the patient group (-0.84, 95% CI: -1.86 to 0.18) or control group (-0.29, 95% CI: -1.39 to 0.80). However, the ML-SNL angle decreased significantly in the patient group (3.80, 95% CI: 2.36 to 5.25), indicating an anti-clockwise mandibular growth after surgery. Conclusions Results of this systematic review suggest that, according to the available literature, surgical treatment of h...
      PubDate: 2017-12-22T19:55:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.002
       
  • Survival rate of delayed implants placed in healed extraction sockets is
           significantly higher than that of immediate implants placed in fresh
           extraction sockets.
    • Authors: Jordan Antetomaso; Satish Kumar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Jordan Antetomaso, Satish Kumar
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets versus delayed implants into healed sockets: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Mello CC, Lemos CAA, Verri FR, Dos Santos DM, Goiato MC, Pellizzer EP. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2017 Sep; 46(9):1162-77. Purpose/Question Do immediately inserted implants perform similarly to implants that are inserted into a healed socket' Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT) Grading Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade B Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence Level of Evidence Level 2 Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Source of Funding None Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T04:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.003
       
  • Alveolar ridge preservation after tooth extraction: a Bayesian Network
           meta-analysis of grafting materials efficacy on prevention of bone height
           and width reduction
    • Authors: Victor Tu; Satish Kumar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Victor Tu, Satish Kumar


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T04:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.006
       
  • Insufficient Evidence to Compare the Efficacy of Treatments for
           Medication-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws
    • Authors: Kelly McGowan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Kelly McGowan
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Effectiveness of treatments for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: A systematic review and meta-analysis. El-Rabbany M, Sgro A, Lam DK, Shah PS, Azarpazhooh A. J Am Dent Assoc 2017; 148(8):584-94. Source of Funding Non-profit: Canadian Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons and the Alpha Omega Foundation of Canada Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T04:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.001
       
  • Limited Longitudinal Evidence Suggests that Socioeconomic Position May
           Influence Periodontal Diseases Over the Course of Life
    • Authors: Luisa N. Borrell; Sharon P. Joseph
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Luisa N. Borrell, Sharon P. Joseph
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Socioeconomic position during life and periodontitis in adulthood: a systematic review. Schuch HS, Peres KG, Singh A, Peres MA, Do LG. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2017; 45(3):201-8. Source of Funding Brazilian Government Agency—CAPES: Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel for the PhD Scholarship (HSS- Process 13374-13-1) Type of Study/Design Systematic review

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T04:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.005
       
  • Limited Evidence Suggests that a History OF Sub-Optimal Breast-Feeding May
           Increase the Risk of Developing Anterior Open Bite, Posterior Crossbite
           and Class II Canine Relationship
    • Authors: Carlos Flores-Mir
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Carlos Flores-Mir
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Malocclusion in young children. Does breast-feeding really reduce the risk' A systematic review and meta-analysis. Doğramacı EJ, Rossi-Fedele G, Dreyer CW. J Am Dent Assoc 2017; 148(8):566-74. Source of Funding Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T04:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.12.004
       
  • Recommendations for the prevention of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis
           of the jaw: a systematic review
    • Authors: Flávia Aparecida Cariolatto; Julia Carelli; Taís de Campos Moreira; Ricardo Pietrobon; Clarissa Rodrigues; Ana Paula Bonilauri Ferreira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Flávia Aparecida Cariolatto, Julia Carelli, Taís de Campos Moreira, Ricardo Pietrobon, Clarissa Rodrigues, Ana Paula Bonilauri Ferreira
      Background The aim of this study was to assess the quality and outline the differences among recommendations of published clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for the management of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, Web of Science and Google website. We selected CPGs supported by a non-governmental organization or nationally provided related to bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw in adults, in English language, dated from January 2008 onwards. The validity of each included CPG was appraised according to two validated appraisal tools for CPG that were independently used by two reviewers. Results We identified 724 articles, of which 13 were retained based on our eligibility criteria. Most CPGs were of good quality based on the appraisal tools for CPG used in this study. Conclusion We did not find consensus on all the recommendations of the evaluated CPGs. Thus, each clinical case must be accessed individually, considering the risks and benefits on the proposed dental treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T04:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.11.002
       
  • Founding Editor-In-Chief retires
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
       
  • Statement of Purpose/Levels of Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
       
  • Levels of Evidence—Grading System∗∗Originally published in Newman
           MG, Weyant R, Hujoel P: JEBDP improves grading system and adopts strength
           of recommendation taxonomy grading (SORT) for guidelines and systematic
           reviews. J Evid Based Dent Pract 2007;7:147-150.
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:08:08Z
       
  • A leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin showed a regenerative potential in
           intra-bony defects and furcation defects, but not in periodontal plastic
           surgery
    • Authors: Zuhair S. Natto; Martyn S. Green
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Zuhair S. Natto, Martyn S. Green


      PubDate: 2017-10-21T17:55:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.10.009
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: High level of disagreement exists concerning the
           prosthetic maintenance of different mandibular implant overdentures
    • Authors: Paul S. Farsai
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Paul S. Farsai
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Prosthetic maintenance of different mandibular implant overdentures: A systematic review. Assaf A, Daas M, Boittin A, Eid N, Postaire M. J Prosthet Dent 2017;118(2):144-52. Reviewer Paul S. Farsai Purpose/Question In clinical studies published since 2004 of adult patients with totally edentulous mandibles treated by implant overdentures (IOD) with various numbers of implants and different designs, what were the maintenance types, frequencies, and complications' SOURCE OF FUNDING Information not available Type of Study/Design Systematic Review

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T17:55:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.10.006
       
 
 
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