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DENTISTRY (251 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 251 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ação Odonto     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Biomaterialia Odontologica Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Odontologica Turcica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Angle Orthodontist     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access  
Balkan Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Dental Research & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Brazilian Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Dental Science     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie et Odontologie     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription  
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical and Laboratorial Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Cadmos     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)     Open Access  
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dental Protection Annual Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry 3000     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription  
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Endodontology     Open Access  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Evidence-Based Endodontics     Open Access  
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Future Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Giornale Italiano di Endodonzia     Open Access  
Implant Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access  
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Open Access  
JDR Clinical & Translational Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Academy of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Biomaterials     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dental, Oral and Craniofacial Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry for Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Indian Academy of Dental Specialist Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Oral Health     Open Access  
Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Isfahan Dental School     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Istanbul University Faculty of Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oral Biosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral Health and Oral Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Implantology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Oral Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Orthodontic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Pierre Fauchard Academy (India Section)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public Health Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Restorative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Stomatology (Czasopismo Stomatologiczne)     Open Access  
Journal of the American Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the International Clinical Dental Research Organization     Open Access  
Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontists     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Theory and Practice of Dental Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
Kieferorthopädie     Full-text available via subscription  
King Saud University Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
L'Orthodontie Française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Médecine Buccale Chirurgie Buccale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicina Oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal     Open Access  
Nigerian Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nowa Stomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
OA Dentistry     Open Access  
Odonto     Open Access  
Odontoestomatología     Open Access  
Odontología     Open Access  
Odontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Odovtos - International Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Dentistry and Oral Medicine     Open Access  
Open Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Operative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Oral Biology and Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 | Last

Journal Cover Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
  [SJR: 0.563]   [H-I: 15]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1532-3382
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Preliminary Evidence for the Complete Digital Esthetic Rehabilitation
           Treatment: Case Report and 1-Year Follow-up
    • Authors: Pablo J. Atria; Camila S. Sampaio; Ronaldo Hirata; Gilbert Jorquera
      Pages: 76 - 82
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 2
      Author(s): Pablo J. Atria, Camila S. Sampaio, Ronaldo Hirata, Gilbert Jorquera
      Purpose To show through computer-aided design and manufacturing technology combined with novel digital acquisition images and the right restorative material that the technology can provide an easier and predictable workflow for general practitioners. Basic Procedure This case report presents a fully digital treatment of a 59-year-old patient with tooth-supported crowns and provides a detailed step-by-step digital technique to obtain a successful result. Conclusion By avoiding traditional impression and fixed prosthetic techniques, excellent clinical results can be obtained, minimizing the required steps and simplifying the overall procedure. This adds information to the current literature, allowing general practitioners to choose the best treatment option. The function and esthetics remained unaltered over a 1-year follow-up period. No fracture or decementation was observed.

      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2016.10.004
       
  • A novel evidence-based periodontal prognosis model
    • Authors: Troy McGowan; Kelly McGowan; Saso Ivanovski
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Troy McGowan, Kelly McGowan, Saso Ivanovski
      Objective Patients with periodontal disease and the dental professionals responsible for their care want to know which teeth are expected to respond favorably to periodontal treatment and which teeth are likely to be lost in the short and long term. A number of different periodontal prognosis systems have been previously proposed but do not consider important patient level factors, such as smoking and diabetic control, in the calculation of the expected outcome and often use subjective measures that introduce potential inaccuracies. The aim of this report is to translate the best available evidence on periodontal prognosis into a clinical model to facilitate decision-making and improve patient outcomes. Methods Criteria for an ideal prognostic system were proposed and used to assess the previously reported models. With an emphasis on the inclusion of patient-level modifiers and the exclusive use of objective parameters, a new evidence-based model was developed. Results This report proposes a new tooth-level prognosis model that uses nine evidence-based quantifiable parameters to provide a prognosis of good, doubtful, poor or irrational to treat. Six tooth level risk predictors (bone loss:age, pocket depth, furcation involvement, infrabony defects, anatomical factors and mobility) and three patient level modifiers (smoking, diabetes, and bleeding on probing) are used to determine the expected course of disease with specific reference to the suitability of the tooth for future dental treatment. Conclusions Patient-level modifiers must be considered when determining the prognosis of a tooth with periodontal disease. The model proposed in this report is based on the best available evidence for factors affecting tooth survival, and has been designed to be as simple and objective as possible to facilitate its adoption in clinical practice. It will be retrospectively and prospectively validated to determine its ability to accurately predict the course of disease.

      PubDate: 2017-05-24T15:49:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.006
       
  • Gap Analysis of Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Receiving Non-Surgical
           Periodontal Therapy
    • Authors: E. Obadan-Udoh; S. Jordan; O. Mudah; W. Borgnakke; M. Tavares
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): E. Obadan-Udoh, S. Jordan, O. Mudah, W. Borgnakke, M. Tavares
      Background Twenty percent of the elderly US population is diagnosed with diabetes. The elderly are at a higher risk of developing serious complications from diabetes. Regular professional dental care may help control blood glucose levels and thereby diabetes complications. Despite these potential benefits, there is conflicting evidence on systemic effects of periodontal care in seniors with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods Electronic databases were searched for periodontal intervention studies using modified search terms from previous systematic reviews. The final search date was October 31, 2016. Results: Twenty-five publications (22 studies) were included in our final review. They varied in study design, duration, therapeutic interventions, and systemic outcomes measured. No study restricted its participants to seniors and therefore a mean age of 55 years or more was used. Fourteen studies showed significant reductions in serum HbA1c levels but eight studies showed non-significant changes. Conclusion The evidence suggests a beneficial effect of receiving periodontal care on serum HbA1c and systemic biomarker levels in older persons with T2DM. Such care would be considered a novel, safe, and acceptable adjunct to current medical management of T2DM in older individuals. The dearth of studies restricted to the elderly represents a gap in knowledge that needs to be addressed in the US.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T14:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.005
       
  • Erbium Laser Technology Versus Traditional Drilling for Caries Removal: A
           Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis
    • Authors: Siying Tao; Lan Li; He Yuan; Sibei Tao; Yiming Cheng; Libang He; Jiyao Li
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Siying Tao, Lan Li, He Yuan, Sibei Tao, Yiming Cheng, Libang He, Jiyao Li
      Background With the concepts of minimally invasive treatment and preventive dentistry gaining more and more recognition by dentists, there are many published clinical trials comparing the use of the erbium laser with traditional drilling for caries removal. However, the efficacy of the erbium laser is still controversial. Objective The study aimed to assess the efficacy of erbium laser technology compared with traditional drilling for caries removal. Data sources A systematic search was conducted through Medline via PubMed, Embase, Cochrane databases, CNKI up to December 2016. Study selection Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) with data comparing the efficacy of erbium laser technology versus traditional drilling for caries removal were included. Results Fourteen studies were selected in our meta-analysis. Erbium laser technology showed an increased time when removing caries compared with drilling (mean difference [MD]=3.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [1.90, 5.06], P<0.0001). However, erbium laser technology reduced the requirement for local anaesthesia (RR=0.28, 95% CI: [0.13, 0.62], P=0.002). Erbium laser technology was also not significantly different to traditional drilling with regard to restoration loss, pulpal vitality, and postoperative sensitivity. Conclusions Erbium laser technology showed an increased time for cavity preparation compared with traditional drilling. However, erbium laser technology reduced the requirement for local anaesthesia. There was no significant difference between erbium laser technology and traditional drilling regarding restoration loss, pulpal vitality, and postoperative sensitivity.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T14:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.004
       
  • Outcomes of dental implant therapy in patients with Down syndrome: A
           systematic review
    • Authors: Shariq Najeeb; Zohaib Khurshid; Fahad Siddiqui; Sana Zohaib; Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Shariq Najeeb, Zohaib Khurshid, Fahad Siddiqui, Sana Zohaib, Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      Objectives Patients with Down’s syndrome (DS) require an earlier and more frequent tooth replacement than rest of the population. The objective of this systematic review is to critically analyze and summarize studies to ascertain the outcomes and survival of dental implants placed in jaws of DS patients. Methods Using the key words ‘dental implants’, ‘Down syndrome’ and ‘prosthodontics’, an electronic search was conducted via PubMED/Medline, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, Embase and Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases by two authors, SN and ZK independently. Retrieved studies were screened against the predefined exclusion and inclusion criteria. In order to estimate the risk of bias, quality assessment of included studies was carried using the Methodological Index For Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). Results Primary search resulted in 156 studies. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria and reporting a total of 81 dental implants placed in 36 DS patients. Type of implant loading ranged from immediate to a delay of 1 year after placement of implant. Range of implant diameter ranged from 3.3 to 4.5 mm and height ranged between 8.5 and 18 mm. The follow up ranged between 1 to 6 years. Out of 81 implants placed, 21 implants (26%) were reported as failed. Conclusions Patients with Down’s syndrome have a higher risk of implant failure. However, the reason for the failure is not very well understood. Although, case reports and series suggest that implant survival is diminished in DS patients, large scale randomized controlled trials are required to determine the exact mechanism associated with risks of implant failure.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T14:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.003
       
  • Issue Summary Matrix
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
       
  • Statement of Purpose/Levels of Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
       
  • Levels of Evidence—Grading System∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
       
  • Pre and Post-Doctoral Education on Cone Beam CT
    • Authors: Allison Buchanan; Karan Thachil; Chris Haggard; Sajitha Kalathingal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Allison Buchanan, Karan Thachil, Chris Haggard, Sajitha Kalathingal
      Background As the use of CBCT in dentistry continues to grow questions related to appropriate radiation safety, training, and interpretation arise. Recognizing this need, the ADA published an advisory statement for the safe use of CBCT in dentistry and recommended that guidelines for appropriate training be established. The purpose of this study was to assess radiation safety concerns related to CBCT and identify voids in current education on CBCT for the pre-doctoral dental curriculum and continuing dental education. Methods A survey was mailed to general practitioners (GP), oral surgeons (OS), and periodontists (P) in the Georgia Dental Association (GDA) (n =415). Results 121 surveys were received for a response rate of 29%. Sixty-eight percent of practitioners reported using CBCT with 89% having used it for over two years. Few (12.4%) had experience with CBCT in dental school. Interest in continuing dental education (CDE) on CBCT was reported at 59.8% and 43.6% for current users and non-users of CBCT, respectively. Approximately 50% reported using precautionary radiation safety measures and the methods used were varied. Conclusions Although a higher survey return rate would allow for stronger evidence, this project identified some areas of education voids including: radiation safety and the factors that contribute to patient dose; CBCT basics including instruction on the limitations of CBCT; CBCT anatomy and pathology with additional time dedicated to the paranasal sinuses; and interpretation.

      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.002
       
  • Measuring adherence to evidence-based clinical practice guidelines
    • Authors: Richard Clark; Utsana Tonmukayakul; Yvonne Mangan; Michael Smith; Mark Gussy; David Manton; Denise Bailey; Hanny Calache
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Richard Clark, Utsana Tonmukayakul, Yvonne Mangan, Michael Smith, Mark Gussy, David Manton, Denise Bailey, Hanny Calache
      Background Dental Health Services Victoria publishes evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) to assist public oral health practitioners provide high quality dental care. How well these CPGs are implemented into practice is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to selected CPGs. Methods An electronic auditing tool was developed using clinical indicators derived for 'Stainless Steel Crown (SSC)', 'Restorative Care for Children under General Anaesthetic (GA)', and 'Direct Restorative Materials' CPG. Six trained dentists audited a random sample of 204 dental records of children aged 3-12 years from two major public dental agencies. Results In total, 319 material-based treatments were audited comprising 170 resin composite, 81 glass-ionomer cement, 64 SSC, and 4 amalgam restorations. Adherence to the current guidelines varied from 94% of the SSC to none of the amalgam treatments audited. Almost half (47%) of the resin composite restorations and 5% of glass-ionomer cement restorations were non-adherent to the relevant guideline. Conclusions Average adherence was up to 72% of cases. Clinicians need to consider recording the rationale upon which their professional judgement is based when they decide not to follow an appropriate CPG.

      PubDate: 2017-05-14T13:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.05.001
       
  • Evaluation of the need for antibiotic prophylaxis after routine
           intra-alveolar dental extractions in healthy patients: A randomized double
           blind controlled trial
    • Authors: Sunil Sidana; Yusuf Mistry; Adil Gandevivala; Nitesh Motwani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Sunil Sidana, Yusuf Mistry, Adil Gandevivala, Nitesh Motwani
      Aims The aim of this randomized double blind control trial was to evaluate the role of antibiotics in the peri-operative period of dental extractions in healthy patients. Methods The study population was patients reporting to the out-patient department of our institute. 400 patients were selected and randomly divided into 4 groups and underwent routine dental extraction. Group A: Patients prescribed only anti-inflammatory drugs in the post-operative period. Group B: Patients prescribed antibiotics for 3 days and concomitant anti-inflammatory drugs in the post-operative period only. Group C: Patients prescribed a single dose of antibiotic one hour prior to the extraction procedure and no post-operative antibiotics. Only anti-inflammatory drugs in the post-operative period. Group D: Patients prescribed mouthwash starting 15 minutes prior to the procedure and continuing twice daily for a period of 7 days along with anti-inflammatory drugs in the post-operative period. Patients were asked to follow up on the 7th post-operative day for suture removal and were evaluated for pain, swelling, dry socket and local signs of infection. The study was approved by Internal Ethics Review Committee of the institute. Results There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to pain [χ2 (1, N = 171) = 4.939, p = 0.552], swelling [χ2 (1, N = 171) = 10.048, p = 0.347] or post extraction complications. Conclusions Prophylactic antibiotics are not required during routine dental extractions in a healthy patient. The use of antibiotic therapy without appropriate indications can result in the development of resistant organisms. It is clear that there is a general trend to overprescribe antibiotics as well as medications in general. The current evidence questions the benefits of prophylactic antibiotic therapy which does not appear to provide any benefit to the patient. In our opinion there is no justification for routine antibiotic prophylaxis for dental extractions in healthy patients.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.007
       
  • Methodological quality assessment of systematic reviews on autologous
           platelet concentrates for the treatment of periodontal defects
    • Authors: Massimo Del Fabbro; Alessandra Lolato; Saurav Panda; Stefano Corbella; Anurag Satpathy; Abhaya Chandra Das; Manoj Kumar; Silvio Taschieri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Massimo Del Fabbro, Alessandra Lolato, Saurav Panda, Stefano Corbella, Anurag Satpathy, Abhaya Chandra Das, Manoj Kumar, Silvio Taschieri
      Objectives Evaluation of the methodological quality of Systematic Reviews (SRs) on the effectiveness of Autologous Platelet Concentrates as an adjunct to regenerative procedures for the treatment of periodontal defects. Material and Methods After a literature screening, eligible SRs were qualitatively assessed using two validated instruments: A MeaSurement Tool to Assess systematic Reviews checklist (AMSTAR) and Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ). SRs' characteristics and findings were also reported. Results Ten SRs fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. With AMSTAR tool, SRs displayed a generally satisfying quality. Six SRs satisfied ≥8 items out of 11 (high quality score) and 4 were classified of medium quality (score 4 to 7). Using OQAQ instrument, more than half SRs (N=6) satisfied ≥7 items out of 9, resulting to be of high quality; three were classified as medium quality (4 to 6 criteria met) and only one of low quality (3 items satisfied). A significant correlation between the results of the two questionnaires was found (Spearman r=0.915, p = 0.0005). Conclusions SRs considered had an overall high methodological quality. Though, some areas were not systematically addressed, like a thorough research strategy or publication bias assessment. Standard guidelines for designing, performing and reporting systematic reviews should always be followed. The use of platelet concentrates as an adjunct to periodontal surgery procedures may have beneficial effects for the treatment of periodontal defects.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.006
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Case Selection is Critical for Successful Outcomes
           following Immediate Implant Placement in the Esthetic Zone
    • Authors: Satheesh Elangovan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Satheesh Elangovan
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Immediate versus delayed implant placement after anterior single tooth extraction: the timing randomized controlled clinical trial. Tonetti MS, Cortellini P, Graziani F, Cairo F, Lang NP, Abundo R, Conforti GP, Marquardt S, Rasperini G, Silvestri M, Wallkamm B, Wetzel A. Journal of Clinical Periodontology 2017; 44(2): 215–24 Reviewers Satheesh Elangovan BDS., DSc., DMSc, e-mail: satheesh-elangovan@uiowa.edu, Gustavo Avila-Ortiz DDS., MS., PhD, e-mail: gustavo-avila@uiowa.edu, Department of Periodontics, The University of Iowa College of Dentistry, Iowa City, Iowa - 52242. Purpose/Question To compare immediate and delayed implant placement (>12 weeks post-extraction) in terms of the need for bone augmentation at the time of implant placement (primary outcome), radiographic marginal bone loss, peri-implant parameters (ie, probing depth, bleeding on probing, and buccal keratinized mucosa width), post-surgical complications, surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes, and esthetic outcomes up to 12 months after functional loading. Source of Funding Non-profit, Foundations: European Research Group on Periodontology, Genova, Italy Industry: Thommen Medical AG, Switzerland and Geistlich AG, Switzerland (biomaterials) Type of Study/Design Randomized controlled trial

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.005
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Systemic propolis (adjuvant to non-surgical periodontal
           treatment) improves glycemic control and periodontal health in type 2
           diabetes of long duration
    • Authors: Wenche S. Borgnakke
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Wenche S. Borgnakke
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Propolis improves periodontal status and glycemic control in patients with type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis: A randomized clinical trial. El‐Sharkawy HM, Anees MM, Van Dyke TE. J Periodontol 2016;87:1418‐1426. Reviewer Name and Contact Information Wenche S. Borgnakke DDS MPH PhD, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry , 1011 North University Avenue Rm# G049, Ann Arbor MI 48109-1078 USA, Phone: +1-734-478-1233 E-mail: wsb@umich.edu Purpose/Question Does systemic propolis supplementation enhance benefits of non-surgical periodontal treatment in people with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis? Source of Funding Information not available Type of Study/Design Randomized controlled trial (RCT)

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.004
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: The Use of Mini Implant-retained Complete Overdenture
           Is an Alternative for Selected Patients
    • Authors: Yongjeong Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Yongjeong Kim
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Complete overdentures retained by mini implants: A systematic review. Lemos CAA, Verri FR, de Souza Batista VE, Santiago JF Jr, Mello CC, Pellizzer EP. J Dent 2017;57:4-13 Reviewer Name and Contact Information Yongjeong Kim, DDS, MS, DMD, FACP, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, One Kneeland Street, DHS-1246, Boston, MA 02111, Phone: 617-636-6591 (Administrative Office), Fax: 617-636-0469, Email: yong.kim@tufts.edu Purpose/Question Is the mini implant-retained overdenture an alternative option when standard implant treatment is not feasible? Source of Funding The authors did not report any external sources of fund. Type of Study/Design Systematic review

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.003
       
  • Declarative Title: Taxing Sugary Beverages Reduces Their Purchase,
           Especially Among Poor Households {AU: Reworded to be 1 complete
           sentence—OK? Yes!}
    • Authors: Astha Singhal; Shilpi Joshi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Astha Singhal, Shilpi Joshi
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study. Colchera MA, Popkin BM, Rivera JA, Ng SW. Br Med J 2016;352:h6704 Reviewers Astha Singhal, BDS, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University Asinghal@bu.edu, Shilpi Joshi, BDS, DMD, Associate Dentist, South End Community Health Center, Boston, MA shilpiraturi@gmail.com Purpose/ Question Does tax on sugar-sweetened beverages lead to their lower purchase? Source of Funding Bloomberg Philanthropies, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública and Carolina Population Center Type of Study/ Design Observational study

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.002
       
  • Does evidence support a combined restorative surgical approach for the
           treatment of gingival recessions associated with non-carious cervical
           lesions?
    • Authors: Kevimy Agossa; Guillaume Godel; Marie Dubar; Kadiatou Sy; Pascal Behin; Elisabeth Delcourt-Debruyne
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Kevimy Agossa, Guillaume Godel, Marie Dubar, Kadiatou Sy, Pascal Behin, Elisabeth Delcourt-Debruyne
      Gingival recessions are frequently associated with the loss of hard tissue at the cemento-enamel junction called non-carious cervical lesions. These combined lesions require specific considerations on both aspects of hard and soft tissue defects. A combined restorative surgical approach has been suggested to improve the treatment outcome. This review aimed at analysing the best current evidence on the effect of combined restorative-surgical approaches in the management of gingival recessions associated with non-carious cervical lesions in order to assist the decision-making process.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.04.001
       
  • Limited and non-generalizable evidence shows neighborhood contextual
           factors may be linked to dental treatment but not untreated caries
           prevalence
    • Authors: Gabriela de Almeida Lamarca
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Gabriela de Almeida Lamarca
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Neighbourhood Determinants of Caries Experience in Preschool Children: A Multilevel Study. Priesnitz MC, Celeste RK, Pereira MJ, Pires CA, Feldens CA, Kramer PF. Caries Res 2016;50(5):455-61. Reviewer Gabriela de Almeida Lamarca, DDS, MSc, PhD Purpose/Question Are neighbourhood factors associated with dental caries in the primary dentition in preschool children? Source of Funding None Type of Study/Design Cross-sectional study

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.014
       
  • There is mixed evidence that behavioral interventions reduce dental caries
           in children, but a motivational interviewing approach may be effective
    • Authors: Tracy L. Finlayson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Tracy L. Finlayson
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Preventing childhood caries: a review of recent behavioral research. Albino J, Tiwari T. J Dent Res 2016;95(1):35-42. Reviewer Name and Contact Information Tracy L. Finlayson, PhD Purpose/Question The authors reviewed research published in 2011-2015 on behavioral interventions to reduce caries in children up to age 18 years. Source of Funding Government. NIDCR grants U54DE019259 and 1K99DE024758-01A1 Type of Study/Design Literature review

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.015
       
  • Patients’ values in clinical decision making
    • Authors: Clovis Mariano Faggion; Thorsten Pachur; Nikolaos Nikitas Giannakopoulos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Clovis Mariano Faggion, Thorsten Pachur, Nikolaos Nikitas Giannakopoulos
      Objective Shared decision making involves the participation of patient and dental practitioner. Well-informed decision making requires that both parties understand important concepts that may influence the decision. This fourth article in a series of four aims to discuss the importance of patients’ values when a clinical decision is made. Methods We report on how to incorporate important concepts for well-informed, shared decision making. Here we present patient values as an important issue, in addition to previously established topics such as the risk of bias of a study, cost-effectiveness of treatment approaches, and a comparison of therapeutic benefit with potential side effects. Results We provide two clinical examples and suggestions for a decision tree, based on the available evidence. Conclusion The information reported in this article may improve the relationship between patient and dental practitioner, resulting in more well-informed clinical decisions.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.011
       
  • Resin Infiltration May Be Considered as a Color-Masking Treatment Option
           for Enamel Development Defects and White Spot Lesions
    • Authors: Abdulraheem Alwafi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Abdulraheem Alwafi
      Article title and bibliographic information Is resin infiltration an effective esthetic treatment for enamel development defects and white spot lesions? A systematic review. Borges AB, Caneppele TMF , Masterson D, Maia LC. J Dent 2017;56:11–8 Reviewer name and contact information Abdulraheem Alwafi, BDS Purpose/Question In patients with enamel developmental defects or white spot lesions, is resin infiltration an efficacious color-masking treatment compared to other treatment modalities? Source of funding Information not available Type of study/design Systematic review

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.013
       
  • Limited evidence suggests there is no difference between the clinical
           longevity of direct versus indirect composite resins in Class I and II
           cavities
    • Authors: Paul S. Farsai
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Paul S. Farsai
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Longevity of direct and indirect resin composite restorations in permanent posterior teeth: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Da Veiga AMA, Cunha AC, Ferreria DMTP, Fidalgo TK, Chianca TK, Reis KR, Maia LC. J Dent 2016;54:1-12. Reviewer Name and Contact Information Paul S. Farsai, D.M.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor Purpose/Question The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of only randomized clinical trial (RCT) study designs with at least 2 years of follow-up to determine if there is a difference in the clinical longevity of direct versus indirect resin composite restorations in Class I and II cavities. Source of Funding Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This study was conducted as part of the master degree for one of the authors under supervision by another author. Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.012
       
  • Cement-retained and screw-retained implant-supported restorations showed
           comparable marginal bone loss and implant survival rate
    • Authors: Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Evaluation of cement-retained versus screw-retained implant-supported restorations for marginal bone loss: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lemos CAA, de Souza Batista VE, de Faria Almeida DA, Júnior JFS, Verri FR, Pellizzer EP. J Prosthet Dent 2016;115(4):419-27 Reviewer’s Name and Contact Information • Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Lecturer, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Ahram Canadian University.Cairo, Egypt; Lecturer, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, IBB University, IBB, Yemen. am01012002@gmail.com Purpose/Question Does a cement-retained implant prosthesis have a different marginal bone loss and survival rate when compared to a screw-retained prosthesis? Type of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.009
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Analysis of orange/red fluorescence for bacterial
           activity in initial carious lesions may provide accurate lesion activity
           assessment for caries progression
    • Authors: Hee-Eun Kim; Baek-Il Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Hee-Eun Kim, Baek-Il Kim
      ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Orange/Red Fluorescence of Active Caries by Retrospective Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence Image Analysis Gomez GF, Eckert GJ, Zandoná AF. Caries Res 2016;50(3):295-302. REVIEWERS’ NAMES and CONTACT INFORMATION Hee-Eun Kim, RDH, Ph.D, Department of Dental Hygiene, Gachon University College of Health Science, 21936 191 Hambangmoe-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, Republic of Korea, Baek-Il Kim, DDS, Ph.D, Department of Preventive Dentistry & Public Oral Health, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 03722 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea, drkbi@yuhs.ac Tel: (82-2) 2228-3070 / Fax: (82-2) 392-2926 PURPOSE/QUESTION Is it possible to predict progression or arrest of the lesion by assessing the intrinsic orange/red fluorescence in early carious lesions? SOURCE OF FUNDING The study was partially supported by a grant from NIH/NIDCR (R01DE017890). TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Retrospective case-control design using the data collected in a longitudinal study

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.010
       
  • In defense of flossing: can we agree it’s premature to claim
           flossing is ineffective?
    • Authors: Lance T. Vernon; Jason D. Seacat
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Lance T. Vernon, Jason D. Seacat
      Current evidence pertaining to the effectiveness of flossing and caries prevention is potentially being misinterpreted by health oversight bodies, which may have significant implications for current and future public flossing guidelines. We identify and discuss several methodological deficiencies including the lack of validated measures of flossing skill, over-reliance on self-reported flossing behavior and the lack of current guidelines on how to interpret and apply evidence-based findings to specific clinical scenarios that are present in the studies of flossing effectiveness included in the Cochran Review. As such, we argue that it is premature for health oversight bodies to conclude that flossing is ineffective in the prevention of dental caries. Our research group, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health, is developing valid and reliable provider-observed measure of tooth brushing and flossing skill that may help promote higher quality flossing evidence in the future.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.008
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Stopping anticoagulation therapy prior to implant and
           bone grafting surgery may not be necessary to prevent bleeding events
    • Authors: Robert M. Eber
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Robert M. Eber
      ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Management of anticoagulated patients in implant therapy: a clinical comparative study. Clemm R, Neukam FW, Rusche B, Bauersachs A, Musazada S, Schmitt CM. Clin Oral Implants Res 2016;27(10):1274-82. REVIEWER NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION Robert M. Eber, DDS, MS., Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan, 1011 N University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 . e-mail: reber@umich.edu PURPOSE/QUESTION The authors planned to answer two questions: (1) In patients having implant or bone grafting surgery, do subjects on anticoagulation therapy (AT) who do not stop AT, compared to non-AT patients, have different incidence and severity of intraoperative and postoperative bleeding events? (2) In patients undergoing implant or bone grafting surgery who are on AT, does the type of AT they are taking affect the incidence and severity of intraoperative and postoperative bleeding events? SOURCE OF FUNDING Information not available. TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Cohort study

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.006
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: The risk of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw
           after dental extraction is higher for patients on intravenous as compared
           with oral antiresorptive drugs
    • Authors: Elliot Abt
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Elliot Abt
      ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Occurrence and risk indicators of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw after dental extraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.Gaudin E Seidel L, Bacevic M, Rompen E, Lambert F.. J Clin Periodontol 42(10):922-32. REVIEWER NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION Elliot Abt, D.D.S., M.S., M.Sc., Adjunct Associate Professor, Dept. of Oral Medicine, U. of Illinois College of Dentistry, Chicago, Illinois eabt7@sbcglobal.net PURPOSE/QUESTION In patients taking antiresorptive drugs (ARD), what is the risk and what are the risk factors for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) after dental extractions? SOURCE OF FUNDING Internal institutional support TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.007
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Self-ligating brackets may not have clinical advantages
           over conventional brackets for the periodontal health of adolescent
           orthodontic patients.
    • Authors: Kyungsup Shin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Kyungsup Shin
      ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION The effect of bracket ligation on the periodontal status of adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Arnold S, Koletsi D, Patcas R, Eliades T. J Dent 2016;54:13-24. REVIEWER NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION Kyungsup Shin, MS, PhD, DMD, MS PURPOSE/QUESTION The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical studies on the effect of bracket ligation types, such as self-ligating brackets and conventional brackets, on the periodontal status of adolescent orthodontic patients by assessing changes in plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and probing depth (PD). SOURCE OF FUNDING The authors did not report any funding source information for the study. TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Systematic review with meta-analysis of data

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.005
       
  • Concordance Between Clinical Practice and Published Evidence: Findings
           From Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry
    • Authors: Harmeet K. Chiang; Al M. Best; David C. Sarrett
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Harmeet K. Chiang, Al M. Best, David C. Sarrett
      Objectives To evaluate the concordance between clinical practice and published evidence by dental faculty and graduating students of the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry (VCUSOD). Methods A questionnaire previously developed by the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (NDPBRN) with 12 clinical scenarios was administered to VCU faculty and graduating students. Responses were scored as either consistent or inconsistent with published evidence and then analyzed for differences between dental faculty, graduating students and the national results. Results There were 43 dental faculty members with at least half-time student contact who responded to the survey. Faculty concordance ranged from 33% to 100% and general practice faculty had the highest concordance (82%). Eight-five of the graduating class of 98 responded to the survey and student concordance ranged from 18% to 92% and averaged 67%. General practice faculty had higher concordance with published evidence than recently graduated dental students. Conclusions Graduating students and dental faculty demonstrated higher concordance with evidence-based practice than practitioners in the NDPBRN. General practice dental faculty demonstrated adequate concordance but students demonstrated only a medium level concordance. Practical Implications Practitioners involved in teaching dental students are better able to keep up with evolving evidence and are better able to demonstrate evidence based practice.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.004
       
  • Single versus Two Implants on Peri-implant Marginal Bone Level and Implant
           Failures in Mandibular Implant Overdentures. A Systematic Review with
           Meta-analysis
    • Authors: Dina Mohamed Ahmed Elawady; Amal Fathy Kaddah; Mohamed Talaat khalifa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Dina Mohamed Ahmed Elawady, Amal Fathy Kaddah, Mohamed Talaat khalifa
      Background As a consensus, the two-implant supported ODs are considered as the first choice of treatment for the edentulous mandible. In the same context, there is increased evidence supporting the use of single implant overdenture. The aim of any design is to preserve the remaining structures and allow the longevity of the treatment. Objectives To evaluate impact of single versus two implants on peri-implant marginal bone loss (MBL) and number of implant failures in mandibular implant overdentures (MIODs). Methods A literature search of electronic databases (PubMed and Cochrane) was performed up to March 2016 and complemented by hand search. RCTs that evaluated MBL and number of implant failures relative to single implant mandibular overdenture (MOD) were selected. The review and meta-analysis were performed using meta-analytic statistical package and in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Findings Five RCTs met the inclusion criteria for systematic review and qualitative synthesis. The observation period ranged from 12 months to 5 years in the selected RCTs. The comparison included in the meta-analysis is; single implant versus 2 implants MODs. Pooled data revealed that single implant MODs significantly decreased the MBL (MD: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.20, 0.34, P <0.0001, I2 = 0%) and number of implant failures (RR: 3.26, 95% CI: (1.18, 8.97), P = 0.02; I2 = 0%) Conclusions Single implant MOD was found to be better than 2-implants MOD in terms of MBL and number of implant failures. However, this result should be interpreted with caution due to limited number of analyzed studies with different loading protocols and short follow-up period.

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T01:33:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.02.002
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Four or more amalgam fillings correlate with higher
           blood mercury levels in pregnant women, but not high enough to be of
           health concern.
    • Authors: Stefanie L. Russell
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Stefanie L. Russell
      ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Golding J, Steer CD, Gregory S, Lowery T, Hibbeln JR, Taylor CM. Dental associations with blood mercury in pregnant women. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2016;44: 216-22. REVIEWER NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION Stefanie L. Russell PURPOSE/QUESTION What is the extent of the contribution of dental amalgam fillings to blood mercury levels in pregnant women? SOURCE OF FUNDING This study was funded by a combination of government (UK Medical Research Council), foundation/nonprofit (the Welcome Trust) and university (University of Bristol, UK) grants. TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Cross-sectional

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T01:33:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.001
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: Limited quality evidence suggests that caries
           experience at age 6 years may predict low oral health−related quality of
           life at age 10 years
    • Authors: Vinodh Bhoopathi; Marisol Tellez; Sungwoo Lim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Vinodh Bhoopathi, Marisol Tellez, Sungwoo Lim
      INFORMATION Early Caries Predicts Low Oral Health-Related Quality of Life at a Later Age. Kragt L, van der Tas JT, Moll HA, Elfrink ME, Jaddoe VW, Wolvius EB, Ongkosuwito EM. Caries Res. 2016;50(5):471-9 REVIEWER NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION Vinodh Bhoopathi, BDS, MPH, DScD, Marisol Tellez, BDS, MPH, Ph.D, Sungwoo Lim, MS, DrPH PURPOSE/QUESTION Is having caries experience at age 6 related to oral health−related quality of life at age 10? SOURCE OF FUNDING This study was funded by (1) The Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Erasmus University, Rotterdam, (2) The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, (3) an unrestricted grant from GABA, Therwil, Switzerland, (4) Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (VIDI 016.136.361), and a (5) Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council (ERC-2014- CoG-64916) TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Prospective Cohort Study

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.002
       
  • DECLARATIVE TITLE: In patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis,
           articaine is 3.5 times more efficacious than lidocaine in achieving
           anesthetic success when used for supplementary infiltration after
           mandibular block anesthesia
    • Authors: Mathilde C. Peters; Tatiana M. Botero
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Mathilde C. Peters, Tatiana M. Botero
      ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Does articaine provide an advantage over lidocaine in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Kung J, McDonagh M, Sedgley CM. J Endod 2015;41(11):1784-94. REVIEWER NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION Mathilde C. Peters, DMD, PhD, Tatiana M. Botero D. DDS, MS PURPOSE/QUESTION The authors studied the comparative efficacy and adverse event incidence of articaine versus lidocaine in reducing pain when used in endodontic treatment of a “hot” tooth in adults. SOURCE OF FUNDING This study was supported by the OHSU Department of Endodontology Les Morgan Endowment Fund and a resident research grant from the American Association of Endodontists Foundation. TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN Systematic review with meta-analysis of data.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.03.003
       
  • Use of Evidence Based Decision Making in Comprehensive Dental Treatment of
           a Patient with Meth Mouth – A Case Report
    • Authors: Saad A. Al Hazzani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Saad A. Al Hazzani
      Objective This case report illustrates the use of evidence based practice in formulating a comprehensive dental treatment plan for a patient who presented himself with signs of oral health debilitation accompanying methamphetamine abuse called “meth mouth” with the goal of providing dental care practitioners in Saudi Arabia with an insight into the global problem of methamphetamine abuse and its impact on oral health. Background This report documents the case of a 22 year old male patient who reported to the clinic with rampant caries caused due to MA abuse exacerbated by poor oral hygiene and smoking habit. Method The treatment plan of this present case was formulated on the lines of the evidence based dentistry approach. A clinical question was composed based on the PICO (Problem, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome) format to identify past studies and case reports on meth mouth. A standard search was conducted on PubMed Central. Standard guidelines on the treatment of meth-mouth were extracted from the website of the American Dental Association. Results A total of 2 systematic reviews, 7 review articles, 4 epidemiological studies, 5 case reports and 1 American Dental Association guidelines were found. Conclusion Accelerated dental decay leading to rampant caries in young and middle aged adults is a characteristic oral finding in methamphetamine abusers. The most important factor that affects the prognosis of dental care is complete cessation of MA use by the patient.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2017.02.003
       
  • Introducing the New Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
       
  • Issue Summary Matrix
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
       
  • Statement of Purpose/Levels of Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
       
  • Levels of Evidence—Grading System∗∗Originally published in Newman
           MG, Weyant R, Hujoel P: JEBDP improves grading system and adopts strength
           of recommendation taxonomy grading (SORT) for guidelines and systematic
           reviews. J Evid Based Dent Pract 2007;7:147-150.
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 17, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:31:25Z
       
  • Emergency Department Utilization related to dental conditions &
           distribution of Dentists, Nebraska 2011-2013
    • Authors: Sankeerth Rampa; Fernando A. Wilson; Rajvi Wani; Veerasathpurush Allareddy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Sankeerth Rampa, Fernando A. Wilson, Rajvi Wani, Veerasathpurush Allareddy
      Purpose This study aims to provide estimates of hospital-based emergency department (ED) visits due to dental conditions in Nebraska and to examine patient-related characteristics associated with ED charges. Additionally, this study provides dental-related ED visits and distribution of dentists by county. Methods For the study we used the State Emergency Department Database for Nebraska for the years 2011 through 2013 and the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Area Health Resource File. All ED visits with dental conditions in Nebraska were selected. The primary outcome variable was hospital-based ED charges. Multivariable linear regression model was used to examine the effects of patient-related factors on ED charges. Results During the study period, a total of 9,943 dental-related ED visits occurred. Of these, 55.5% patients aged between 25 and 44 years. Thirty-nine percent of all dental ED visits had patients who were self-financed or uninsured. Twenty counties in Nebraska do not have a dentist and nine counties had more than 50 ED visits per 10,000 population. Patients residing in urban areas spent significantly higher charges than those living in rural towns, small rural towns or isolated rural areas. The mean and total ED charges attributed to dental conditions for the entire study period were $934 and $9.3 million respectively. Conclusion Patients who are uninsured, aged 25 – 44 years, covered by private insurance and residing in urban areas are identified to be at high-risk. There is a need to develop health policies and programs to improve access to dental care in rural states.

      PubDate: 2016-12-16T14:22:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2016.11.007
       
  • Therapies for White Spot Lesions – A systematic review
    • Authors: Anabela Baptista Pereira Paula; Ana Rita Fernandes; Ana Sofia Coelho; Carlos Miguel Marto; Manuel Marques Ferreira; Francisco Caramelo; Francisco do Vale; Eunice Carrilho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Anabela Baptista Pereira Paula, Ana Rita Fernandes, Ana Sofia Coelho, Carlos Miguel Marto, Manuel Marques Ferreira, Francisco Caramelo, Francisco do Vale, Eunice Carrilho


      PubDate: 2016-11-04T23:12:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2016.10.003
       
  • Impact of Periapical Abscess on Infectious Complications in Patients
           Undergoing Extracorporeal Circulation Auxiliary to Open Heart Surgical
           Procedures
    • Authors: Veerasathpurush Allareddy; Sivaraman Prakasam; Sankeerth Rampa; Kyle Stein; Romesh P. Nalliah; Veerajalandhar Allareddy; Shankar Rengasamy Venugopalan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Veerasathpurush Allareddy, Sivaraman Prakasam, Sankeerth Rampa, Kyle Stein, Romesh P. Nalliah, Veerajalandhar Allareddy, Shankar Rengasamy Venugopalan
      Background Extracorporeal circulation auxiliary to open-heart surgeries (ECAOHS) may exert non-physiological stresses on periapical abscessed tissues leading to hematagenous spread of microbes. The aim of this report is to estimate risk of postoperative infectious complications in patients with periapical abscesses and undergoing ECAOHS. Methods A retrospective analysis of Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2009 and 2010) was conducted. All patients (aged 19 to 65 years) who underwent ECAOH were selected. ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify presence of periapical abscess and infectious complications. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between the presence of periapical abscess and occurrence of infectious complications. Results 265,235 patients underwent an ECAOH procedure. Of these, 431 patients had a periapical abscess. Septicemia developed in 16% of those with periapical abscess (compared to 4.2% in those without periapical abscess). Those with periapical abscess had higher rates of any of the infectious complications when compared to those without periapical abscess (30.2% versus 11.6% respectively). Following adjustment for multiple confounders, those with periapical abscess were associated with higher odds for developing septicemia (OR=2.51, 95% CI=1.06–5.91, p=0.04) and any of the infectious complications (OR=2.23, 95% CI=1.08–4.59, p=0.03) when compared to those who did not have periapical abscess. Conclusions Those with periapical abscess are associated with higher odds for infectious complications when compared to those without periapical abscess.

      PubDate: 2016-11-04T23:12:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2016.10.002
       
  • Clinician Attitudes, Skills, Motivations and Experience Following the
           Implementation of Clinical Decision Support Tools in a Large Dental
           Practice
    • Authors: Elizabeth Mertz; Cynthia Wides; Joel White
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Elizabeth Mertz, Cynthia Wides, Joel White
      Purpose This paper assesses dental clinicians’ pre- and post-implementation attitudes, skills and experiences with three clinical decision support (CDS) tools built into the electronic health record (EHR) of a multi-specialty group dental practice. Procedures Electronic surveys designed to examine factors for acceptance of Electronic Health Record (EHR)-based CDS tools including caries management by risk assessment (CAMBRA), periodontal disease management by risk assessment (PEMBRA) and a risk assessment-based Proactive Dental Care Plan (PDCP), were distributed to all Willamette Dental Group (WDG) employees at two time points; 3 months pre-implementation (Fall 2013) and 15 months post-implementation (Winter 2015). The surveys collected demographics, measures of job experience and satisfaction, and attitudes toward each CDS tool. The baseline survey response rate among clinicians was 83.1% (n=567) and follow-up survey response rate was 63.2% (n=508). Among the 344 clinicians who responded to both pre- and post- surveys, 27% were general and specialist dentists, 32% were dental hygienists, and 41% were dental assistants. Principal Findings Adherence to the CDS tools has been sustained at 98%+ since roll-out. Between baseline and follow-up, the change in mean attitude scores regarding CAMBRA reflect statistically significant improvement in formal training, knowing how to use the tools, belief in the science supporting the tools, and the usefulness of the tool to motivate patients. For PEMBRA, statistically significant improvement was found in formal training, knowing how to use the tools, belief in the science supporting the tools, with improvement also found in belief that the format and process worked well. Finally, for the PDCP, significant and positive changes were seen for every attitude and skill item scored. A strong and positive correlation with post-implementation attitudes was found with positive experiences in the work environment, while a negative correlation was found with workload and stress. Clinicians highly ranked a commitment to evidence based care, and sense that the tools were helping to improve patient care, health and experience as motivations to use the tools. Peer pressure, fears about malpractice, and incentive pay were rated the lowest among the motivation factors. Conclusion This study shows that CDS tools built into the EHR can be successfully implemented in a dental practice and widely accepted by the entire clinical team. Achieving a high level of adherence to use of CDS can be done through adequate training, alignment with the mission and purpose of the organization, and is compatible with an improved work environment and clinician satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2016-11-04T23:12:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jebdp.2016.10.001
       
 
 
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