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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6049 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (173 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (61 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (247 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (20 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (163 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (182 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (125 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (71 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (104 journals)
    - EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, LABORATORY TECHNIQUE (66 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (24 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY (133 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (99 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (124 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (79 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (60 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (1677 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (231 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (146 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (277 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (100 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (103 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (51 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (87 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (196 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (106 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (610 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (153 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (80 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (53 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (59 journals)
    - SURGERY (271 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (114 journals)

DENTISTRY (182 journals)                  1 2     

Acta Odontológica Colombiana     Open Access  
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Angle Orthodontist     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access  
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Dental Research & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access  
Brazilian Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Dental Science     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie et Odontologie     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription  
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia Odontologica     Open Access  
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cleft Palate–Craniofacial Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Clínica e Pesquisa em Odontologia - UNITAU     Open Access  
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dental Cadmos     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics     Open Access  
Dental Protection Annual Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription  
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access  
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Implant Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
Indian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ISRN Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Education     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

        1 2     

Journal Cover Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
   [5 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1532-3382
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2563 journals]
  • Matrix JEBDP June 2014
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • Erratum to: Buzalaf MA, Cardoso Cde A, Magalhães AC. Low-fluoride
           Toothpastes May Not Lead to Dental Fluorosis But May Not Control Caries
           Development. Standard Fluoride Toothpastes Can Control Caries Development
           But May Lead to Dental Fluorosis. J Evid Based Dent Pract
           2013;13(4):148-50.
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • Statement of Purpose/Levels of Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-06-10T20:44:07Z
       
  • The randomized controlled trial (RCT) published by the Journal of the
           American Medical Association (JAMA) on the impact of periodontal therapy
           on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) has fundamental flaws
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Wenche S. Borgnakke , Iain L.C. Chapple
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information The effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in persons with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial. Engebretson SP, Hyman LG, Michalowicz BS, Schoenfeld ER, Gelato MC, Hou W, et al. (16 authors). JAMA 2013;310(23):2523-2532. Purpose /Question: Does nonsurgical periodontal treatment reduce levels of HbA1c in persons with type 2 diabetes and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis' Source Of Funding: US Government -- National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health: Cooperative agreements ($15.4M): 1) UO1 DE018902 (Dr. Engebretson: $11.1M) and 2) U01 DE018886 (Dr. Hyman: $4.3M) Type Of Study/Design Multi-center RCT. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00997178.


      PubDate: 2014-05-22T16:22:10Z
       
  • How a modified approach to dental coding can benefit personal and
           professional development with improved clinical outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Raymond Lam , Estie Kruger , Marc Tennant
      One disadvantage of the remarkable achievements in dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. This has made the concept of Evidenced Based Dentistry more applicable to modern dental practice. Despite merit in its concept whereby clinical decisions are guided by scientific evidence, there are problems with establishing its scientific base. At the population level, the burden of oral disease remains high despite major advances in clinical dentistry. These problems have prompted new approaches to enhancing research. Dental informatics is an emerging area in health although its application has yet to be fully accepted. This study introduces a novel approach to informatics using existing service codes to provide circumstantial information, which this study postulates to have value potential in dentistry. Although an Australian context is considered, the principles described are relevant internationally, especially with a view to developing a universal coding system. The Australian Schedule of Services and the recent scheme, the Chronic Disease Dental Scheme, form the platform to illustrate these principles . With a clinical focus, the use of case examples and suggested templates, this study attempts to show how a modified approach to dental coding can benefit personal and professional development with improved clinical outcomes.


      PubDate: 2014-04-22T05:30:37Z
       
  • The reporting quality of Randomised Controlled Trials in Orthodontics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Evangelia Lempesi , Despina Koletsi , Padhraig S. Fleming , Nikolaos Pandis
      Objectives Accurate trial reporting facilitates evaluation and better use of study results. The objective of this article is to investigate the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in leading orthodontic journals, and to explore potential predictors of improved reporting. Methods The 50 most recent issues of 4 leading orthodontic journals until November 2013 were electronically searched. Reporting quality assessment was conducted using the modified CONSORT statement checklist. The relationship between potential predictors and the modified CONSORT score was assessed using linear regression modeling. Results 128RCTs were identified with a mean modified CONSORT score of 68.97% (SD=11.09). The Journal of Orthodontics (JO) ranked first in terms of completeness of reporting (modified CONSORT score 76.21%, SD =10.1), followed by American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO) (73.05%, SD=10.1). Journal of publication (AJODO: β=10.08, 95% CI: 5.78, 14.38; JO: β=16.82, 95% CI: 11.70, 21.94; EJO: β=7.21, 95% CI: 2.69, 11.72compared to Angle), year of publication (β=0.98, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.67 for each additional year), region of authorship (Europe: β=5.19, 95% CI: 1.30, 9.09 compared to Asia/other), statistical significance (significant: β=3.10, 95% CI: 0.11, 6.10 compared to non-significant) and methodologist involvement (involvement: β=5.60, 95% CI: 1.66, 9.54 compared to non-involvement) were all significant predictors of improved modified CONSORT scores in the multivariable model. Additionally, median overall Jadad score was 2 (IQR=2) across journals, with JO (median=3, IQR=1) and AJODO (median=3, IQR=2) presenting the highest score values. Conclusion The reporting quality of RCTs published in leading orthodontic journals is considered suboptimal in various CONSORT areas. This may have a bearing in trial result interpretation and use in clinical decision making and evidence- based orthodontic treatment interventions.


      PubDate: 2014-04-22T05:30:37Z
       
  • Letter to the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf



      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Self-reported measures may be useful in surveillance for periodontitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Mark S. Litaker
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Self-reported measures for surveillance of periodontitis. Eke PI, Dye BA, Wei L, Slade GD, Thornton-Evans GO, Beck JD, Taylor GW, Borgnakke WS, Page RC, Genco RJ.J Dent Res 2013; 92(11):1041-7 Purpose/Question The study aim was to evaluate the predictive performance of eight self-reported items for the prediction of periodontitis against clinically determined periodontitis in a US nationally representative sample of adults. Source Of Funding The study was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an internal project. Type Of Study/Design Cross-sectional study.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • One (small) step closer to public health service in the dental office
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Andrei Barasch
      Article title Screening for diabetes mellitus in dental practices: a field trial. Robert J. Genco, Robert E. Schifferle, Robert G. Dunford, Karen L. Falkner, William C. Hsu, James Balukjian. J Am Dent Assoc 2014;145(1):57-64 Purpose This study assessed the feasibility of screening for diabetes mellitus (DM) or pre-diabetes in community dental practices and compared results between private practice and a community health center. Source of funding Delta Dental Type of study Cohort


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Dental treatment intensity in frail older adults in the last year of life
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Mario A. Brondani
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Dental treatment intensity in frail older adults in the last year of life. Chen X, Chen H, Douglas C, Preisser JS, Shuman SK. JADA 2013;144(11):1234-1242 Purpose/Question Through a retrospective study the authors examined the types of dental treatment provided to a group of long-term care residents in the last year of life. Source of Funding University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill internal funds and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. Study design Retrospective Cohort Study


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Letter to the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): A.P.P. dos Santos



      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Low intake of sugars may reduce risk of dental caries.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Teresa A. Marshall
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Effect on caries of restricting sugars intake: systematic review to inform WHO guidelines. Moynihan PJ, Kelly SA. J Dent Res 2014;93(1):8-18 Purpose/Question To identify the effect of low compared to high free sugars intake on dental caries in children and adults, and to identify the effect of obtaining less than 10% compared to more than 10% of dietary energy from free sugars on dental caries in children and adults for the purpose of guiding WHO dietary guidelines. Source Of Funding The study was funded by Newcastle University’s Centre for Oral Health Research. Type Of Study/Design Systematic review.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Periodontal treatment may reduce levels of systemic inflammation markers
           associated with atherosclerotic profile
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Néstor J. López
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Teeuw WJ, Slot DE, Susanto H, Gerdes VEA, Abbas F, D’Aiuto F, Kastelein JJP, Loos BG. J Clin Periodontol 2014; 41(1):70-9. Purpose/Question The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to answer the following: What is the effect of periodontal therapy on clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) parameters and/or markers related to atherosclerosis and CVD risk in patients with periodontitis' Source Of Funding Grants from University of Amsterdam and Bernouille Foundation of the University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands. Award supported by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration and the Department of Health’s NIHR Biomedical Research Centers funding scheme Type Of Study/Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Treatment of chronic periodontitis may be improved by the adjunctive use
           of systemic metronidazole
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Marcelo Faveri , Luciene Cristina Figueiredo , Magda Feres
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information A randomized, double-masked clinical trial comparing four periodontitis treatment strategies: 1-year clinical results. Preus HR, Gunleiksrud TM, Sandvik L, Gjermo P, Baelum V. J Periodontol 2013;84(8):1075-86. Purpose/Question To compare the clinical outcomes of conventional quadrant scaling and root planing treatment and the full-mouth disinfection protocol, with or without adjunctive metronidazole. Source of Funding This work was financed by the Norwegian Research Council, Oslo, Norway, grant # 185120. Type of Study/Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Level of Evidence Level 2- Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade N/A - Not applicable


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Providing dental care coverage to uninsured older US adults who do not use
           dental care may not result in usage rates similar to those with prior
           coverage and use.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Marko Vujicic
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Dental care coverage and use: modeling limitations and opportunities. Manski RJ, Moeller JF, Chen H. Am J Public Health 2014;104(2):e80-7 Purpose/Question This study sought to explain why the effect of increasing dental care coverage among older US adults who lack coverage and do not use dental care may be less than expected. Source Of Funding Supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health (grant R01DE021678) Type Of Study/Design: Panel study


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be more
           likely to have more severe periodontal disease than individuals without
           COPD.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Frank A. Scannapieco
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Association between periodontal disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A reality or just a dogma' Peter KP, Mute BR, Doiphode SS, Bardapurkar SJ, Borkar MS, Raj DV. J Periodontol 84(12):1717-23, 2013. Purpose/Question Is COPD associated with periodontal disease experience' Source Of Funding No funding source reported Type Of Study/Design Case-control study


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Impacted third molars increase the risk for caries and periodontal
           pathology in neighboring second molars
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ventä Irja
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Retained asymptomatic third molars and risk for second molar pathology. Nunn ME, Fish MD, Garcia RI, Kaye EK, Figueroa R, Gohel A, Ito M, Lee HJ, Williams DE, Miyamoto T. J Dent Res 2013;92(12):1095-9. Purpose /Question: The authors analyzed data collected over 25 years from 416 men to investigate the relationship between third molar status and caries and periodontal pathology of adjacent second molars. Source of Funding The study was supported by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program. It was also supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (K24 DE000419 and R01 DE19656). Type of Study/Design Cohort study Level Of Evidence Level 2 Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of recommendation grade N/A Not applicable


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • A Launching Pad
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Claude Earl Fox



      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Understanding the Effects of Periodontal Therapy plus Azithromycin on
           Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes Remains Elusive
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Thomas W. Oates
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Effects of periodontal nonsurgical therapy plus azithromycin on glycemic control in patients with diabetes: a randomized clinical trial. Botero JE, Yepes FL, Ochoa SP, Hincapie JP, Roldan N, Ospina CA, Castrillon CA, Becerra MA. J Periodont Res 2013;48:706–12. Purpose/Question The study examined the effects of the adjunctive use of azithromycin with non-surgical periodontal therapy on glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c). Source of Funding:Industry and Academic Colgate-Palmolive, Tecnoquımicas (Cali, Colombia), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia) Study Design:Randomized clinical trial; Clinical Trial identifier NCT01271231


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • “Smoking cessation may positively improve clinical periodontal
           parameters”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Leandro Chambrone
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Is there a positive effect of smoking cessation on periodontal health' A systematic review. Fiorini T et al. J Periodontol 85(1):83-91, 2014 Purpose/Question “To assess the effect of smoking cessation on periodontitis incidence, progression, and response to treatment” Source of Funding Information not available Type of Study/Design Systematic review Level of Evidence Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength of Recommendation Grade Grade C: Consensus, disease-oriented evidence, usual practice, expert opinion, or case series


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Dental caries is associated with central and peripheral, but not general,
           adiposity in children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Lisa Chung
      Article Title And Bibliographic Information Association between dental caries and adiposity status (general, central, and peripheral adiposity) in 12-year-old children. Peng SM et al. Caries Res 48(1):32-38, 2013 Purpose /Question: Is there a relationship between dental caries experience and different types of adiposity (central, peripheral, and general) among 12-year-old children in Hong Kong, SAR, China' Source Of Funding: Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (project No. 782811) Type Of Study/Design: Cross-sectional study


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Child Temperament is as Strongly Associated with Early Childhood Caries
           (ECC) as Poor Feeding Practices: Positive Temperament Appears Protective,
           Negative Temperament May Increase ECC Risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Robert G. Santos , Rocio Quinonez
      Article title and bibliographic information Can child temperament be related to ECC' Aminabadi NA, Ghoreishizadeh A, Ghoreishizadeh M, Oskouei SG, Ghojazadeh M. Caries Res 2014;48:3-12. Purpose/Question To investigate the relationship of ECC and different traits of child temperament, directly and indirectly through nutritional and oral hygiene habits. Source of Funding Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Type of Study/Design: Cross-sectional study


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • Elder’s Oral Health Crisis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Janet A. Yellowitz
      Dentistry must prepare to meet the challenges of providing oral health services to the increasing numbers of medically compromised and cognitively impaired older adults whose care is often complicated by functional, behavioral, and situational factors. BackgroundWith the unprecedented aging of the population, oral health care providers will be treating a greater number of older adults than in the past. There will also be a larger frail and vulnerable cohort with physical and/or cognitive conditions, disabilities and limited financial resources. The elderly suffer disproportionately from oral disease and limited access to oral health care. Many older adults are either unwilling or unable to receive routine care, putting them at greater risk for general and oral complications. Some present with extensive oral disease, the cumulative effects of disease throughout their lifetime, an even more complicated situation when frail elders are homebound or in long-term care institutions. To care optimally for this aging cohort, oral health professionals need to be knowledgeable about the many conditions, disabilities and age-related changes associated with aging. MethodsLiterature review and discussion of the key research studies describing demographic and societal changes leading to the current multifactorial oral healthcare crisis impacting older adults. The authors draw upon the evidence and their experience in geriatric patient care to provide information relevant to today’s oral healthcare practitioners treating older adults. ConclusionOral health services are an essential component of primary geriatric healthcare. The growing population of older and impaired adults requires practitioners who are sensitive to the myriad of functional, behavioral and situational factors that impact this aged cohort. Adequate access to quality oral healthcare for the aged is a salient public health issue that will require political and psychobiomedical interprofessional collaboration to adequately address.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T19:34:16Z
       
  • BMI is a predictor of periodontal therapy outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Leena Palomo
      Article Title and Bibliographic Information Body mass index as a predictive factor of periodontal therapy outcomes. Suvan J, Petrie A, Moles DR, Nibali L, Patel K, Darbar U, Donos N, Tonetti M, D'Aiuto F. J Dent Res 93(1):49-54, 2014 Purpose/Question Is overweight/obesity a predictor of clinical response following nonsurgical periodontal therapy in patients with severe periodontitis' Source Of Funding Johnson & Johnson Consumer Services EAME Limited funded this project. The study center is partially funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR), the research arm of the Department of Health. The investigator has received a Clinical Senior Lectureship Award supported by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration. Type Of Study/Design This is a post-hoc, secondary analysis of data from 5 randomized clinical trials of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Level Of Evidence Level 2 Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence Strength Of Recommendation Grade N/A Not applicable


      PubDate: 2014-04-12T16:17:44Z
       
  • Periodontal therapy is associated with decreased risk of developing
           end-stage renal disease – a study using the Taiwan National Health
           Insurance Database
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ronald G. Craig
      Article title and bibliographic information Surgical treatment for patients with periodontal disease reduces risk of end-stage renal disease: A nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study. Lee C-F, Lin C-L, Lin M-C, Lin S-Y, Sung F-C, Kao C-H. J Periodontol 85(1):50-6, 2014. Purpose/question This retrospective study used claims data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database to ask whether surgical periodontal therapy, defined as root planing or flap surgery, was associated with a reduced risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) when compared to periodontal disease without surgical periodontal therapy. Source of funding Government: Taiwan Department of Health Clinical Trial and Research Center (DOH102-TD-B-111-004), Taiwan Department of Heath Cancer Research Center (DOH102-TD-C-111-005) and International Research Intensive Centers of Excellence in Taiwan (i-RICE) (NSC101-2911-1-002-303) Type Of Study/Design Retrospective cohort study


      PubDate: 2014-04-12T16:17:44Z
       
  • Under the Influen Informing Oral Healthcare Providers About Substance
           Abuse
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Lynn Riemer , Ronald Holmes
      Declarative Title Treating the drug addicted dental patient is different than treating the non-addicted patient due to differences related to the emotional/behavioral/personality issues of the addict, the addict’s often poor general health and poor nutrition, ongoing problems of oral hygiene and the effects of drugs on the oral mucosa, gingiva and dentition Background Oral health care providers need to be aware of the emerging trends in substance abuse, able to recognize patient’s addicted to drugs and to be knowledgeable about the effects of substance abuse to provide the most efficacious treatment to avoid the consequences of contraindicated dental procedures and therapy This article defines the scope of the problem of drug abuse and provides an overview of commonly abused substances and their effects on health and oral health. Methods A review of the literature combined with the authors extensive experience in the substance abuse field explains parameters of oral healthcare treatment of the drug addicted individual for patient and provider safety. Conclusions The drug culture has evolved and the drug user is different. Oral healthcare providers need to realize that any patient may be an addict in order to identify them, provide appropriate oral care and direct them, if they desire, toward appropriate treatment.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Critical Thinking in Patient Centered Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Shannon H. Mitchell , Jane L. Forrest , Pamela Overman
      Declarative Title Health care providers can enhance their critical thinking skills, essential to providing patient centered care, by use of motivational interviewing and evidence based decision making techniques. Background and Purpose: The need for critical thinking skills to foster optimal patient centered care is being emphasized in educational curricula for health care professions. The theme of this paper is that evidence based decision-making (EBDM) and motivational interviewing (MI) are tools that when taught in health professions educational programs can aid in the development of critical thinking skills. This paper reviews the MI and EBDM literature for evidence regarding these patient-centered care techniques as they relate to improved oral health outcomes. Methods Comparisons between critical thinking and EBDM skills are presented and the EBDM model and the MI technique are briefly described followed by a discussion of the research to date. Conclusions The evidence suggests that EBDM and MI are valuable tools; however, further studies are needed regarding the effectiveness of EBDM and MI and the ways that health care providers can best develop critical thinking skills to facilitate improved patient care outcomes.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Dental Hygiene and Research: Irrevocably Connected
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Deborah M. Lyle
      Declarative Title Although remarkable growth has occurred in the dental hygiene research arena, an increased emphasis on research development will facilitate the designation of dental hygiene as a true discipline. Background Dental hygienists have participated in research for nearly 100 years. Support for research development has increased due to contributions of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association and other grant monies that have funded seminal educational endeavors to elevate the research skills of dental hygienists. Dental hygiene initiated research endeavors, the advent of doctoral degree programs in dental hygiene, expansion of the dental hygiene body of knowledge, and efforts toward interprofessional collaboration continue to elevate the profession of dental hygiene while addressing the oral health needs of the public. Methods The research focus in dental hygiene is reviewed. Landmark events that have supported research endeavors are described and examples of historically important global contributions made by dental are chronicled. Conclusions Further development of a body of dental hygiene research will help position the profession alongside other academically recognized healthcare disciplines. A small, dedicated group of dental hygienists have worked toward advancing the profession in this way, but additional growth is essential if dental hygiene is to be considered a true discipline. One such initiative on the near horizon is the doctoral degree in dental hygiene.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Empowerment Through Mentorship and Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Rebecca S. Wilder , Janet M. Guthmiller
      Declarative Sentence Leadership is vital to future growth and change in the dental hygiene profession. Background and Purpose: As healthcare reform emerges, state practice acts expand and new models of dental hygiene practice are created and implemented, dental hygienists will assume leadership positions that may be quite different from the more traditional leadership roles they assume today. These dental hygienist leaders will envision, creatively design and implement oral health care programs to improve the oral health of the public. Mentoring, a vital component of leadership development, is critical for dental hygienists to acquire knowledge, guidance, and growth. Methods This paper provides a literature-supported overview of leadership and mentoring principles applicable to dental hygienists in their personal and professional lives. Opportunities for dental hygienists to assume leadership roles are also described. Conclusions Dental hygienists are poised to become leaders and vital members of the professional team promoting and integrating oral health care as a part of general health. Consequently, the dental hygienist’s leadership roles are likely to expand and can be strengthened through mentoring relationships and mentoring teams. Ultimately, this can increase professional growth and career satisfaction for the dental hygienist as well as improved oral health care for the public.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Saliva and Biofilm-based Diagnostics: A critical review of the literature
           concerning sialochemistry
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Brian B. Nový
      Declarative title There is some evidence to support the use of salivary diagnostics in dentistry. Background & Purpose: The use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid has the potential to shape the role of oral health care professionals in the health care system. While more than a handful of chairside diagnostic tests are available for use by private practitioners, the evidence supporting their use continues to emerge. Methods An electronic search of the literature indexed on the PubMed electronic database was conducted to identify human clinical trials utilizing commercially available salivary diagnostics. Papers meeting the inclusion criteria, and any applicable references were critically appraised following SORT guidelines. Conclusions While the literature concerning salivary analysis is continuously growing, the limited literature that is available doesn’t focus on patient oriented health outcomes. This ‘infant’ literature is focused on validating metrics and identifying biomarkers with diagnostic potential. As such, the evidence level of the literature is graded as level 3. Despite the lower grade, the research in this area shows consistent results, coherent conclusions, and research identifying new biomarkers will provide additional dimensions to salivary diagnostics.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Risk Management Strategies For Reducing Oral Adverse Drug Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Ann Eshenaur Spolarich
      Declarative title Oral adverse drug effects negatively impact oral health, comfort and function. Background Patients treated in the oral healthcare environment take multiple medications, many of which cause oral complications. Dental professionals are challenged with making recommendations to prevent or minimize drug-induced oral disease risks, while reducing symptoms to improve oral health quality of life. Methods This paper presents a critical analysis of current evidence regarding common oral adverse drug events, and reviews existing clinical practice guidelines based upon findings from published systematic reviews. Results There is a lack of sufficient, high quality evidence to support most recommendations for interventions to relieve signs and symptoms of drug-induced oral adverse events. Existing recommendations are largely based on data obtained from observational studies and case reports, and from randomized controlled clinical trials with significant design flaws and potential reporting bias. Outcome measures, especially those related to symptom relief and long-range benefits, are either insufficient or lacking. Conclusions Oral adverse drug effects are a common problem, and additional data is needed to support best practices for product recommendations to improve oral health in medicated patients. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Level 2 Limited-quality patient-oriented evidence STRENGTH OF RECOMMENDATION GRADE B Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Periodontal Regeneration: Management of Periodontal Osseous Defects by the
           Periodontist-Dental Hygienist Team
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Rachel A. Schallhorn , Pamela K. McClain
      Declarative Title Periodontal health can be restored through assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management of periodontal osseous defects by the periodontist-dental hygienist team. Background & Purpose: Treatment of periodontitis has evolved over time, with regenerative periodontal therapy at the forefront in cutting-edge periodontal care. While the techniques and materials available today are allowing therapists to push the limits of periodontal regeneration and achieve success in increasingly more difficult cases, the principles of successful regeneration remain the same. Case selection, identification and resolution of etiologic and contributing factors, proper surgical technique, follow-up and patient education are keys to obtaining a successful outcome. The impact of the dental hygienist in assessment and maintenance is highlighted. Methods Literature review of the key research studies evaluating the etiology and contributing factors in the development osseous defects, osseous defect and tooth-related characteristics, and principles of successful regenerative therapy. The authors draw upon their experience with patient care and clinical research to synthesize the evidence relevant to today’s dental hygienist. Conclusions Periodontal regeneration is a well-supported and predictable therapy that can be utilized to restore periodontal support and health. The dental hygienist is key in assessing and caring for the periodontal health of patients over time. Identifying who may benefit from regenerative periodontal therapy is an essential skill for today’s practicing dental hygienist.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Management of Peri-Implant Disease: a current appraisal
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Oksana Mishler , Harlan J. Shiau
      Declarative Title While the clinical science of managing peri-implant diseases is progressing, careful monitoring and preventive care of peri-implant tissue health during maintenance is paramount. Background Implants have become a routine treatment option for missing dentition. The biological complications of restored dental implants and associated superstructures share similarities with the biofilm infections of natural dentition. Our existing paradigms of periodontal disease treatment can partially be applied to management of peri-implant disease. Approach A critical analysis of the peri-implant disease literature was conducted, anchored by a search on the MEDLINE database (2005 to present) by way of Ovid Medline®. Search terms peri-implantitis, peri-implant mucositis and peri-implant diseases were utilized. Select references within bibliographies of review articles were sought. Conclusion The dental team must play a critical role in educating patients to control plaque-biofilm associated with peri-implant tissues and associated restorations. Routine assessments at maintenance appointments allow early treatment intervention to prevent escalation of peri-implant disease. Given the infancy of clinical science surrounding peri-implantitis treatment, further, high-quality evidence based studies are expected.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Expanding Oral Care Opportunities: Direct Access Care Provided by Dental
           Hygienists in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Doreen K. Naughton
      Declarative Title Dental hygienists expand access to oral care in the United States. Background Many Americans have access to oral health care in traditional dental offices however millions of Americans have unmet dental needs. For decades dental hygienists have provided opportunities for un-served and under-served Americans to receive preventive services in a variety of alternate delivery sites, and referral to licensed dentists for dental care needs. Methods Publications, state practice acts, state public health departments, the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, and personal interviews of dental hygiene practitioners were accessed for information and statistical data Results Dental hygienists in 36 states can legally provide direct access care. Dental hygienists are providing preventive services in a variety of settings to previously un-served and under-served Americans, with referral to dentists for dental needs. Conclusion Dental hygienists have provided direct access to care in the United States for decades. The exact number of direct access providers in the United States is unknown. Limited research and anecdotal information demonstrate that direct access care has facilitated alternate entry points into the oral health systems for thousands of previously un-served and underserved Americans. Older adults, persons with special needs, children in schools, pregnant women, minority populations, rural populations, and others have benefited from the availability of many services provided by direct access dental hygienists. Legislatures and private groups are becoming increasingly aware of the impact that direct access has made on the delivery of oral health care. Many factors continue to drive the growth of direct access care. Additional research is needed to accumulate qualitative and quantitative outcome data related to direct access care provided by dental hygienists and other mid level providers of oral health services.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Proliferative Verrucous Leukoplakia: An elusive disorder
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Pallavi Parashar
      Declarative title Proliferative Verrucous Leukoplakia (PVL) is a multifocal form of progressive leukoplakia with a high rate of malignant transformation that requires early recognition by oral healthcare providers for proper management. Background and Purpose PVL will frequently appear as an innocuous white lesion or lesions that can easily be overlooked or considered clinically insignificant, yet it has a high rate of malignant transformation. There is limited in-depth knowledge about the pathobiology of PVL. Oral healthcare providers lack familiarity with this lesion; consequently the intent of this article is to increase awareness of the clinical aspects of PVL. Methods Case reports, case series and review articles provide a profile of PVL Conclusion It is essential that healthcare providers performing intraoral examinations are aware that PVL is a distinct and rare form of multifocal oral leukoplakia. PVL commonly affects females above the age of 62. Currently, little is known about its etiopathogenesis, and prognosis. Additionally, no specific treatment modality has proven to be effective in aborting its progression. Because of its high recurrence potential and relentless progression to squamous cell carcinoma, all recurrent and multifocal white lesions of the oral cavity should be viewed with suspicion.


      PubDate: 2014-04-07T16:23:12Z
       
  • Laser Technology to Manage Periodontal Disease: A Valid Concept'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Samuel B. Low , Angie Mott
      Declarative Title Present day dental lasers can create oral environments conducive for periodontal repair. Background and Purpose. With the bacterial etiology of periodontitis and the resulting host inflammatory reaction, clinicians continue to search for therapeutic modalities to assist in the non-surgical management of periodontal disease. Traditional chairside therapies consist of mechanical debridement with manual and/or ultrasonic instrumentation with the objective of removing calculus, biofilm, and endotoxin from tooth root surfaces. Decreasing the microbial stimuli and associated end products decreases the inflammatory reaction and allows the host an opportunity to regenerate tissue through wound healing. The purpose of this article is to examine whether dental lasers, which have been in use for the past 3 decades, may augment traditional non-surgical periodontal therapy. Methods Review of research publications related to lasers and non-surgical periodontics with attention focused on systematic studies. Conclusions Studies utilizing laser technology may demonstrate positive effects on 1) selectively decreasing the biofilm environment 2) removing calculus deposits and neutralizing endotoxin 3) removing sulcular epithelium to assist in reattachment and decreased pocket depth and 4) bio stimulation for enhanced wound healing. Comparisons of studies to determine the difference between lasers and their respective effects on the periodontitium are difficult to assess due to a wide variation of laser protocols


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Obesity and Cumulative Inflammatory Burden: A Valuable Risk Assessment
           Parameter in Caring for Dental Patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Casey Hein , Eraldo Batista
      Declarative title A new model of risk assessment that recognizes the importance of reducing patients’ cumulative inflammatory burden by targeting overweight and obesity, in individuals with periodontal disease, may be a valuable risk assessment parameter in caring for dental patients. Background The growing body of evidence that suggests obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and periodontal disease are interrelated offers an unprecedented opportunity to adopt a new model of risk assessment that has the potential to beneficially influence not only the periodontal health of obese and overweight patients, but simultaneously may also reduce a person's overall risk for developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and perhaps other inflammatory driven disease states. Methods This paper presents an overview of research that builds the case for a new model of risk assessment that focuses on the cumulative inflammatory burden that may be elevated by the presence of periodontal disease in obese patients. In addition, the biological plausibility of the concepts of inflammatory priming and inflammatory loading is discussed, and several simple ideas are suggested for identifying at-risk patients. Conclusions Given the significant rise in obesity and the impact that obesity has on periodontal health and other inflammatory driven, systemic disease states, adoption of a new model of risk assessment is suggested that considers an individual’s cumulative inflammatory burden which may be amplified as a result of coexisting obesity and other components of Metabolic Syndrome and periodontal disease. Knowledge gathered thus far combined with further clinical research must be translated into better ways to treat and maintain obese periodontal patients. These measures may pave the way for prevention of metabolic diseases and obesity with a relevant impact on patients’ periodontal status. Level of Evidence Level 3 Strength of Recommendation Grade C


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Update on Oral Health Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Roopa P. Gandhi , Ulrich Klein
      Declarative Title Dental professionals caring for patients with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will need to provide oral health care based on a family-centered approach that involves a comprehensive understanding of parental concerns and preferences, as well as the unique medical management, behaviors, and needs of the individual patient. Background With the rising prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), oral health providers will find themselves increasingly likely to care for these patients in their daily practice. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive update on the medical and oral health management of patients with autism spectrum disorders. Methods The authors conducted a literature review by searching for relevant articles written in English in the PubMed database pertaining to the medical and oral health management of autism, including caries status, preventive, behavioral, trauma, and restorative considerations. Conclusions A detailed family centered approach based on parental preferences and concerns, the patient’s challenging behaviors, and related comorbidities can serve to improve the treatment planning and oral health management of dental patients with ASD


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • INTRODUCTION: The Moment of Opportunity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Terri Tilliss



      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Are Dental Hygienists Prepared to Work in the Changing Public Health
           Environment'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Beverly A. Isman , Christine M. Farrell
      Declarative Title Healthcare reform, the changing public health environment, and a lack of clarity about what defines a ‘public health professional’ create challenges as well as opportunities for dental hygienists who wish to pursue positions or careers in public health. Background Although many studies have been conducted about dental hygienists in clinical practice, there are few describing dental hygienists working in public health positions, particularly in non-clinical roles, or how well their education and other resources prepared them for these roles. Competency statements and the 10 Essential Public Health Services to Promote Oral Health in the U.S. provide a public health framework to assess what skills will be required for future opportunities that may emerge for dental hygienists Methods Published literature, recent unpublished survey data, selected professional health care reform documents, competency statements, accreditation standards, and the 10 Essential Public Health Services to Promote Oral Health in the U.S. were analyzed. Competencies in public health/dental public health provide an overview of skills needed by dental hygienists who will be seeking public health positions. Health reform statements describe the need for more leadership and workforce models in public health, while the 10 Essential Services can serve as a framework for career preparation/transition. Conclusions The literature does not provide a comprehensive historical review or current profile of dental hygienists who work in various public health positions or their various roles, especially non-clinical roles. More research is needed regarding current positions, degree and experience requirements, and role responsibilities. Additionally, the credentials and public health background of the faculty teaching community/public health courses in dental hygiene programs requires exploration. Follow-up studies of dental hygiene program graduates could help determine how well courses prepare students for public health activities or careers and what resources aid in transitioning from clinical to public health positions. Dental hygienists need more information about education, continuing education and employment opportunities related to pursuing a career in public health.


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Confronting Human Papilloma Virus/Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Model for
           Interprofessional Collaboration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): J. Fried
      Declarative Title A collaborative practice model related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancer highlights the role of the dental hygienist in addressing this condition. Background The incidence of HPV associated head and neck cancer is rising. Multiple professionals including the dental hygienist can work collaboratively to confront this growing public health concern. Methods A critical review applies the growth and utilization of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to multi-disciplinary models addressing the human papilloma virus and oropharyngeal cancers. Conclusions A model related to HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer addresses an oral systemic condition that supports the inclusion of a dental hygienist on collaborative teams addressing prevention, detection, treatment and cure of OPC.


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • A Best Practices Approach to Caries Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Michelle Hurlbutt , Douglas A. Young
      BACKGROUND Dental caries is a multifactorial, biofilm and pH mediated disease that affects people of all ages and disproportionally affects certain populations at epidemic proportions. Simply restoring cavitated teeth does nothing to resolve the disease. At the heart of the CAMBRA philiosphy is identifying the patient’s unique risk level for future caries disease. This can be done by completing a caries risk assessment (CRA). Several easy to use CRA questionnaires are available. Once the patient’s unique risk level has been determined, preventive and therapeutic interventions, based on the specific risk level, can then be implemented. METHODS Landmark publications, original research, and systematic reviews are analyzed and reviewed to form the basis for this shift in patient care related to caries disease. CONCLUSIONS Caries management by risk assessment has emerged as the new paradigm in patient care and represents an evidence-based, best practices approach with the potential for significant advantages over traditional methods


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Mechanical self-performed oral hygiene of implant supported restorations:
           A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Anna Louropoulou , Dagmar E. Slot , Fridus Van der Weijden
      Declarative Title A systematic review of self-performed oral hygiene practices for optimal maintenance of dental implant-supported restorations reveals a lack of evidence to support best practices. Background The standard of the patients’ home care is a key factor for long term stability of dental implants and the prevention of biological complications. The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate and summarize the literature with respect to various mechanical oral hygiene modalities around implant-supported restorations. Methods MEDLINE, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to October, 2013 to identify eligible studies. Five studies that met the inclusion criteria were included. Two cohort studies about powered toothbrushes and three (randomized) controlled trials comparing powered to manual toothbrushes were reviewed. All studies showed an improvement in the clinical parameters over time. Powered toothbrushes were found to perform better than manual toothbrushes but no firm conclusions can be made between treatment modalities. Conclusions There is a lack of evidence with respect to effective and optimal self-performed oral hygiene around dental implants. At present, home care recommendations are based on the knowledge that is available with respect to cleaning of natural teeth. It becomes evident that there is an urgent need for academic institutions and industry to initiate and support high quality randomized controlled clinical trials on this topic in the near future.


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Common Risk Factors in the Management of Periodontal and Associated
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Robert J. Genco , Frances Doherty Genco
      Declarative Title There is a role for dentistry in the interprofessional management of chronic diseases by addressing common risk factors Background A critical scientific foundation has developed for management of risk factors common to major diseases including periodontal disease, caries, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to critically review this scientific literature. This will provide the basis for the current and future role of the dental setting in common risk factor identification and modification; with an emphasis on the role of the dental hygienist. Methods of Approach: A systematic review of the literature and analysis of the relevant papers was undertaken to support the recommendations. Conclusions We propose that the appropriate risk factor management procedures be adopted in the dental setting for smoking cessation, reduction of sugar consumption, and weight control in those patients at risk for one or a combination of the following diseases: periodontal disease, caries, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers.


      PubDate: 2014-04-02T11:18:06Z
       
  • Teledentistry: A Key Component in Access to Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice
      Author(s): Susan J. Daniel , Sajeesh Kumar
      Declarative Title Teledentistry has the potential to address the oral care needs of those who have limited access to care. More research is needed to establish the evidence base to support teledentistry practice. Background and Purpose: Enormous potential exists to improve oral health services throughout the world by using information and communication technologies, such as teledentistry to expand access to primary, secondary and tertiary care. Comparison of teledentistry procedures with standard clinical procedures can demonstrate the relative effectiveness and cost of each approach. However, due to insufficient evidence, it is unclear how these strategies compare for improving and maintaining oral health, quality of life, and reducing healthcare costs. This review discusses the merits of teledentistry for the delivery of oral care. Methods This article summarizes the available literature related to the efficacy and effectiveness of teledentistry and presents possible barriers to its broader adoption. Conclusions Teledentistry seems to be a promising path for providing oral health services where there is a shortage of oral healthcare providers. SORT= C and LOE 3


      PubDate: 2014-03-08T01:36:03Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2014
      Source:Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice, Volume 14, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2014-03-03T00:50:12Z
       
 
 
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