for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 7309 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (196 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (105 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (310 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (202 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (245 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (149 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (106 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (137 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (35 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (162 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (117 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (141 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (138 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (90 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (59 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (1826 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (293 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (177 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (352 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (120 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (145 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (73 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (98 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (243 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (140 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (740 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (180 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (92 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (63 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (68 journals)
    - SURGERY (350 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (132 journals)

DENTISTRY (245 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 245 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ação Odonto     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia Odontologica Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Angle Orthodontist     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access  
Balkan Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Dental Research & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BDJ Open     Open Access  
Brazilian Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Dental Science     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie et Odontologie     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical and Laboratorial Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Cadmos     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)     Open Access  
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dentistry 3000     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription  
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Endodontology     Open Access  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Evidence-Based Endodontics     Open Access  
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Future Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Giornale Italiano di Endodonzia     Open Access  
Implant Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Contemporary Dental and Medical Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Science and Research     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access  
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Open Access  
JDR Clinical & Translational Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Academy of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry for Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Indian Academy of Dental Specialist Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Oral Health     Open Access  
Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Isfahan Dental School     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Istanbul University Faculty of Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Oral Biosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral Implantology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Oral Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Orthodontic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pierre Fauchard Academy (India Section)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public Health Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Restorative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the International Clinical Dental Research Organization     Open Access  
Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontists     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kieferorthopädie     Full-text available via subscription  
King Saud University Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
L'Orthodontie Française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Médecine Buccale Chirurgie Buccale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicina Oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal     Open Access  
Nigerian Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nowa Stomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
OA Dentistry     Open Access  
Odonto     Open Access  
ODONTO Dental Journal     Open Access  
Odontoestomatología     Open Access  
Odontología     Open Access  
Odontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Odovtos - International Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Dentistry and Oral Medicine     Open Access  
Open Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Operative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Oral Biology and Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oral Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Oral Science International     Hybrid Journal  
Orthodontic Journal of Nepal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Journal Cover Saudi Dental Journal
  [SJR: 0.297]   [H-I: 6]   [3 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1013-9052 - ISSN (Online) 1658-3558
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3118 journals]
  • The application of parameters for comprehensive smile esthetics by digital
           smile design programs: A review of literature

    • Authors: Doya Omar; Carolina Duarte
      Pages: 7 - 12
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal, Volume 30, Issue 1
      Author(s): Doya Omar, Carolina Duarte
      Cosmetic dentistry is increasingly becoming an issue of concern to patients who hope to improve their smile. A systematic and comprehensive dentofacial analysis must be performed before commencing esthetic treatment. Several computer software programs have been developed for digital smile design (DSD) to assist clinicians in this process. This article compares DSD programs commonly used in cosmetic dentistry and their ability to assess esthetic parameters. A literature review was performed of current dentofacial aesthetic parameters and clinical applications of computer technology to assess facial, dentogingival and dental esthetics. Eight DSD programs (Photoshop CS6, Keynote, Planmeca Romexis Smile Design, Cerec SW 4.2, Aesthetic Digital Smile Design, Smile Designer Pro, DSD App and VisagiSMile) were compared. Photoshop, Keynote and Aesthetic Digital Smile Design included the largest number of esthetic analysis parameters. Other studied DSD programs presented deficiencies in their ability to analyze facial esthetic parameters but included comprehensive dentogingival and dental esthetic functions. The DSD App, Planmeca Romexis Smile Design, and Cerec SW 4.2 were able to perform 3D analysis; furthermore, Cerec SW 4.2 and PRSD could be used jointly with CAD/CAM. The DSD App and Smile Designer Pro are available as mobile phone applications. It can be concluded that despite the fact that they were not specifically designed for dental diagnosis, Photoshop CS6 and Keynote provide a more comprehensive smile analysis than most specialized DSD programs. However, other program functions should also be considered when deciding which DSD program is applicable to individual clinical setups.

      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.09.001
       
  • Accomplishments and challenges in tobacco control endeavors – Report
           from the Gulf Cooperation Council countries

    • Authors: Kamran Habib Awan; Quratul Ann Hussain; Shahrukh Khan; Syed Wali Peeran; Magdy Khaled Hamam; Emad Al Hadlaq; Hamad Al Bagieh
      Pages: 13 - 18
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal, Volume 30, Issue 1
      Author(s): Kamran Habib Awan, Quratul Ann Hussain, Shahrukh Khan, Syed Wali Peeran, Magdy Khaled Hamam, Emad Al Hadlaq, Hamad Al Bagieh
      Objectives To review the tobacco governance and national responsibility for control, and existing countering measures to reduce the tobacco use among the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states. Methods We reviewed the data in regards to tobacco control efforts and difficulties encountered during implementation of the policies for all the GCC member states from the respective country profile in the WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic. Also, we utilized the measures outlined in the FCTC’s MPOWER package to not only assess the degree of national commitment, but also compare it against the level of significance that the legislatures give to this matter. Results We observed that there have been genuine advancements towards tobacco control in the GCC member states over the past few years. All the countries except Bahrain have national offices committed to tobacco control and 5 nations (excluding Oman) have dedicated support services for smoking cessation accessible to the general public. Similarly, majority of the member states have implemented a national-level ban on tobacco advertisement through national media cells as well as free dissemination of marketing material. Conclusion Application and implementation of measures outline in the MPOWER package, formulation and enforcement of sturdy laws on tobacco control, and development of infrastructure and trained workforce are fundamental to manage and reinforce tobacco control measures in the GCC region.

      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.08.003
       
  • Attitudes of dental professional staff and auxiliaries in Riyadh, Saudi
           Arabia, toward disclosure of medical errors

    • Authors: Nora S. Al-Nomay; Abdulghani Ashi; Aljohara Al-Hargan; Abdulaziz Alshalhoub; Emad Masuadi
      Pages: 59 - 65
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal, Volume 29, Issue 2
      Author(s): Nora S. Al-Nomay, Abdulghani Ashi, Aljohara Al-Hargan, Abdulaziz Alshalhoub, Emad Masuadi
      Aim To collect empirical data on the attitudes of dental professionals and dental auxiliaries in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, regarding the disclosure of medical errors. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted, involving the administration of a questionnaire to a sample of 586 participants recruited from over 10 government and private dental institutions in Riyadh between August 2015 and January 2016. The questionnaire collected information regarding participant opinions on (a) personal beliefs, norms, and practices regarding medical errors, (b) the nature of errors that should be disclosed, and (c) who should disclose errors. Results Most (94.4%) participants preferred that medical errors should be disclosed. However, personal preferences, perceptions of the norm and current practices with respect to which type (seriousness) of error should be disclosed were inconsistent. Only 17.9% of participants perceived that it was the current practice to disclose errors resulting in “Major harm”. Over 68% of respondents reported a personal belief, a perception of the norm and a perception of current practice that errors should be disclosed by the erring dentist. Participants at government institutions were more likely to disclose errors than those at private institutions. There were also significant differences in the responses with respect to gender, age, and nationality. The implications for the development of guidelines to help Saudi dentists adopt ethical courses of action for the disclosure of errors are considered. Conclusions (1) The majority of participants personally believed that errors should be disclosed, (2) there was little agreement between participant personal beliefs and perceptions of the norm and practice with respect to which type of errors should be disclosed, (3) there was strong agreement that the erring dentist is responsible for reporting errors, and (4) the attitudes of the participants varied with respect to type of institution, age, gender, and nationality.

      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.01.003
       
  • A survey of pediatric dentists' caries-related treatment decisions and
           restorative modalities – A web-based survey

    • Authors: Hassan S. Halawany; Fouad Salama; Vimal Jacob; Nimmi Biju Abraham; Tarfa Nasser Bin Moharib; Abdulfatah Samih Alazmah; Jawaher Abdulaziz Al Harbi
      Pages: 66 - 73
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal, Volume 29, Issue 2
      Author(s): Hassan S. Halawany, Fouad Salama, Vimal Jacob, Nimmi Biju Abraham, Tarfa Nasser Bin Moharib, Abdulfatah Samih Alazmah, Jawaher Abdulaziz Al Harbi
      Objective To identify current practices and the preferred caries-related treatment decisions and restorative modalities of primary teeth among pediatric dental practitioners in Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods This was a web-based cross-sectional survey conducted among licensed pediatric dental practitioners in Saudi Arabia. Following the retrieval of the email addresses from the Saudi Dental Council, an email explaining the purpose of the study and a link to SurveyMonkey electronic survey consisting of 23 questions was sent to all the members registered under the pediatric dentistry practitioners, starting in September till December 2013. The data obtained was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi square with and without tabulation processes. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. Results A total of 108 [54 (50%) male and 54 (50%) female] pediatric dental practitioners responded to the survey out of 308 targeted individuals for an overall response rate of 35.1%. About 65% of the respondents reported that they have never considered pre-veneered or Zirconia crowns as a restorative option for carious vital anterior primary teeth. About 40% reported doing pulpectomy and restored with composite strip crowns at all times. About 86% of the respondents reported doing pulpotomy and stainless steel crown for restoring carious vital posterior primary teeth whereas 73.8% reported restoring with composite resin. However, 83.1% of the respondents reported that they never used pre-veneered or Zirconia crowns after pulpotomy for restoring carious vital posterior primary teeth. A significantly higher number of male participants reported that they used esthetic pediatric crowns in their practice compared to female participants (p <0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of use of composite resin to restore primary teeth was higher compared to glass ionomer cements and amalgam whereas a limited use of esthetic pediatric crowns was found among the sample surveyed. Esthetic pediatric crowns were more utilized by male compared to female participants.

      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.03.001
       
  • Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis; a retrospective cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Naji Ziad Arandi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2018
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Naji Ziad Arandi
      Objective This study aims to estimate the prevalence of congenitally missing lateral incisors in a sample of 2662 dental patients in Palestine. Methods A total of 2662 digital panoramic radiographs were retrospectively examined for the presence of congenitally missing permanent lateral incisors. The radiographs were obtained from the archival records of patients attending a local dental center at the city of Nablus in Palestine. Results The prevalence of missing lateral incisors among the examined population (n = 2662) was found to be 1.91%. Unilateral agenesis accounted for 66.6% of the total cases that showed at least one missing lateral incisor. Around 79% of the unilateral cases were on the left side while 21% were on the right side. Bilateral agenesis accounted for 33.3% of 34 cases that had at least one congenitally missing permanent maxillary lateral incisor. Conclusion The prevalence of missing maxillary lateral incisors in this study population was 1.91%) which was within the range reported in different populations.

      PubDate: 2018-01-14T17:28:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.12.006
       
  • In vitro study of white spot lesion: Maxilla and mandibular teeth

    • Authors: Alizae Marny Mohamed; Wong Kiong Hung; Lee Wan Jen; Murshida Marizan Nor; Haizal Mohd Hussaini; Tanti Irawati Rosli
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2018
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Alizae Marny Mohamed, Wong Kiong Hung, Lee Wan Jen, Murshida Marizan Nor, Haizal Mohd Hussaini, Tanti Irawati Rosli
      Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of resin infiltration on colour changes and surface roughness of artificial white spot lesions (WSLs) on maxillary and mandibular premolar teeth. Materials and Methods This study was conducted for a period of 8 weeks to evaluate the effect of resin infiltration on colour changes and surface roughness of artificial WSLs on maxillary (Mx) and mandibular (Mn) teeth. Fourty (40) extracted sound Mx and Mn premolars teeth were randomly divided into group of test and control. Another 5 teeth were included for each group for the SEM images analysis purposes in four stages. Artificial WSLs were produced on buccal surface and were immersed in artificial saliva for 24 hours. Colour components (L∗ a∗ b∗) and surface roughness (Sa∗) were assessed using colour difference meter RD-100 and Alicona® Infinite Focus profilometer respectively. The measurements were done at baseline (T1) and directly after artificial WSLs (T2), immediately after 24 hours immersed in saliva and application of resin (T3) and immersion in artificial saliva for 1(T4), 2(T5), 4(T6), 6(T7) and 8(T8) weeks. Results The values of L∗, b∗ and Sa∗ are gradually reduced to the baseline value. Whereas, the value of a∗ gradually increased with distinct treatment time to achieve the baseline value. The higher value of L∗ and Sa∗, the whiter the lesion suggesting higher degree of enamel demineralization and surface roughness. Lower L∗ values suggest a masking colour effect. Conclusion This study shows that the material produced favorable esthetics on colour and the surface roughness of teeth with distint treatment times. However, it will reduce gradually.

      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.12.001
       
  • Thank you reviewers!

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal, Volume 30, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
       
  • Chilean Dentistry students, levels of empathy and empathic erosion:
           Necessary evaluation before a planned intervention

    • Authors: Víctor Patricio Díaz-Narváez; Ana Cristina Amezaga-Avitia; Pablo Alexander Sarabia-Alvarez; Macarena Lagos-Elgueta; Monserrat Saavedra-Madrid; Pablo Silva-Reyes; Mariela Padilla; María Paz Rodríguez-Hopp
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Víctor Patricio Díaz-Narváez, Ana Cristina Amezaga-Avitia, Pablo Alexander Sarabia-Alvarez, Macarena Lagos-Elgueta, Monserrat Saavedra-Madrid, Pablo Silva-Reyes, Mariela Padilla, María Paz Rodríguez-Hopp
      Objectives To estimate the general empathy levels and the potential for empathic growth in Dentistry students and demonstrate that the empathic erosion model is not med. Material and methods Exploratory and cross-sectional study. Population: First- to fifth-year Dentistry students at Universidad San Sebastián, Santiago Campus (Chile). The total student population (N) was 800. The participants completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy in its Spanish version for medical students, validated and adapted in Chile. A two-factor analysis of variance (model III) was applied to find differences in the means between academic years, between genders, and in the interaction between these two factors. The data were described using simple arithmetic graphs and then processed with SPSS 22.0. The total growth potential was estimated. Results The Sample (n) consisted of 534 students (66.88% of the population studied, 2016). Differences were found between academic years and genders in general empathy and some of its components. Conclusion The behavior of empathy levels is not in line with the concept of empathic erosion. This suggests that empathic erosion is a particular and not a general phenomenon. There exists a considerable growth potential for empathy and its components.

      PubDate: 2018-01-04T14:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.11.004
       
  • Setting Up Dental Sedation Services for Special Care and Medically
           Compromised Patients

    • Authors: Hassan Abed; Aza Rahman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Hassan Abed, Aza Rahman


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T13:09:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.12.002
       
  • Calcification of the stylohyoid complex in Libyans

    • Authors: Galal Omami
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Galal Omami
      Objective To investigate the prevalence and pattern of calcification of the stylohyoid complex in Libyan population. Materials and methods Archived digital panoramic radiographs of 3343 patients were collected; 181 images were excluded for underage or poor image quality. Thus, the images of 3162 patients (1081 men, 2081 women; women-to-men ratio, 2:1; age range, 16–68 years; mean age, 36.7 years) retrieved and assigned to one of four morphological patterns of the stylohyoid complex: regular, elongated, calcified, and undetected. Data were analyzed with the Χ2 test using SPSS (Chicago, IL, USA); P values lower than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Out of 3162 images studied, the styloid process was demonstrated to be regular in 1935 (61.2%), elongated in 541 (17.2%), calcified in 565 (17.8%), and undetected in 121 (3.8%). Symmetric patterns were demonstrated on 2580 (81.6%) images. An elongated stylohyoid complex was significantly more common in women than in men (P = .0404). Conclusion The anatomical patterns of the stylohyoid complex in Libyans were highly variable. Dental clinicians should recognize the various morphological patterns of the stylohyoid complex on panoramic radiographs. Computed tomography studies are recommended for further morphometric analysis of the stylohyoid complex.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T13:09:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.12.003
       
  • Message from the Editor

    • Authors: Ahmed M.A. Al-Kahtani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 December 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Ahmed M.A. Al-Kahtani


      PubDate: 2017-12-22T11:43:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.12.005
       
  • The use of mouthwash containing essential oils (LISTERINE®) to improve
           oral health: Statement of the Saudi Dental Society

    • Authors: Fahad Ali Alshehri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Fahad Ali Alshehri
      Background Standard recommendations to maintain daily oral hygiene include tooth brushing and interdental cleaning. Evidence from literature indicates that using a mouthrinse as an adjunct provides benefit beyond mechanical methods. The objective of this article was to evaluate the short- and long-term effect of a mouthwash containing essential oils (LISTERINE®) in improving oral health. Methods PubMed (MEDLINE) and bibliographies from the relevant retrieved reviews were searched to identify clinical studies involving the use of LISTERINE mouthrinse. The primary outcome measure was short- and long-term efficacy of mouthrinse containing essential oil (LISTERINE®) in improving oral health. Results Based on our search, 26 studies supported the use of essential-oil-containing mouthrinse (LISTERINE®) as an adjunct to daily oral health regimen. Most studies were conducted in healthy subjects, 2 studies in orthodontic patients, 1 each in xerostomia patients and mentally disabled patients. Of these, 13 studies supported the short-term (<3 months) and 13 studies supported the long-term (3-6 months) efficacy of LISTERINE mouthrinse as an adjunct to mechanical methods. Conclusions This review provides strong evidence of the anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis effects of essential-oil-containing mouthrinse LISTERINE® as an adjunct to daily tooth brushing and interdental cleaning.

      PubDate: 2017-12-22T11:43:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.12.004
       
  • Comparative evaluation of dimensional stability of impression materials
           from developing countries and developed countries after disinfection with
           different immersion disinfectant systems and ultraviolet chamber

    • Authors: Rupandeep Kaur Samra; Shreenivas Vasant Bhide
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Rupandeep Kaur Samra, Shreenivas Vasant Bhide
      Objectives It was to analyse and compare the effect of different disinfectant systems on the dimensional stability of commonly used irreversible hydrocolloid and addition silicone impression materials from developing countries as compared to materials from developed countries. Material and methods Disinfectant systems used were glutaraldehyde, sodium hypochlorite and ultraviolet chamber. The stability after disinfection of commonly used alginate and addition silicone of native origin (Algin-Gum & Ad-Sil) was compared with similar impression materials from developed countries (Vignette and Aquasil) and results compared. A CAD/CAM manufactured stainless steel die simulating maxilla with four metal studs at canine and molar region was used. Impressions were made and disinfected after rinsing and drying and casts poured. The cross arch distance, interabutment distance and the occluso-gingival length of the studs was measured under traveling microscope and observations were recorded and compared. ANOVA test and Bonferroni test was applied. Results An increase in the interabutment and cross arch distance and decrease in occluso-gingival height was seen in the casts obtained. Glutaraldehyde immersion showed variation in the interabutment and cross arch distance for all materials studied. Ultraviolet chamber and sodium hypochlorite produced best results. Dimensional stability of impression materials like Vignette, Algin-Gum & Aquasil was found to within clinically acceptable limits after disinfection while maximum deviation was seen with Algin-Gum. Conclusion Evaluated materials can be safely disinfected with sodium hypochlorite and ultraviolet chamber. Addition silicone of native origin is at par with impression materials from developed countries but same cannot be said about alginate.

      PubDate: 2017-12-22T11:43:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.11.005
       
  • Correlation between Skeletal Maturation and Developmental Stages of
           Canines and Third Molars among Saudi Subjects

    • Authors: Hana O. Al-Balbeesi; Nadia W. Al-Nahas; Laila F. Baidas; Sahar M. Bin Huraib; Roa'a Alhaidari; Ghadeer Alwadai
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Hana O. Al-Balbeesi, Nadia W. Al-Nahas, Laila F. Baidas, Sahar M. Bin Huraib, Roa'a Alhaidari, Ghadeer Alwadai
      Aims The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of using the developmental stages of the canines and third molars to predict the timing of skeletal maturity in the Saudi population. Material and methods The lateral cephalometric radiographs and orthopantograms of 239 Saudi patients, 106 males and 133 females, aged 9 to 21 years, were collected from several dental centers. Orthopantograms were used to assess the developmental stages of the upper and lower canine teeth and third molars using two popular methods: that of Nolla and that of Demirjian. Cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stage was assessed on the lateral cephalometric images according to the method of Baccetti et al. Trained observers with no knowledge of patient age or gender performed assessments. Data were analyzed with Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient at a significance level of P ≤ 0.05. Result Skeletal CVM stages III and IV had a stronger correlation with mandibular left canine developmental stage than with maxillary canine developmental stage in the two methods used (correlation with Nolla stage 10 and Demirjian stage H: root completely formed with apex closed), especially for male patients (r = 0.700, P < 0.001). In contrast, the maxillary third molars at Nolla stages 5 and 7 (crown completed to 1/3 of the root formed) showed an association with CVM stages III and IV (r = 0.540 for females and r = 0.639 for males, P ≤ 0.001 for both) and with Demirjian stages D, E, and F. Males had slightly higher correlation values than females (r = 0.578 and 0.5010, respectively; P ≤ 0.001) at CVM stages III and IV. Interestingly, canine teeth showed a stronger correlation than third molars with skeletal maturation in Saudi children. Conclusion Dental developmental stages were highly correlated with CVM stages III and IV among Saudi subjects.

      PubDate: 2017-12-01T05:38:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.11.003
       
  • An Overview of Periodontal Regenerative Procedures for the General Dental
           Practitioner

    • Authors: M. Siaili; D Chatzopoulou; D.G. Gillam
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): M. Siaili, D Chatzopoulou, D.G. Gillam
      The complete regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease remains an unmet challenge, and has presented clinicians with a remarkably difficult clinical challenge to solve given the extensive research in this area and our current understanding of the biology of the periodontal tissues. In particular as clinicians we look for treatments that will improve the predictability of the procedure, improve the magnitude of the effect of treatment, and perhaps most importantly in the long term would extend the indications for treatment beyond the need for single enclosed bony defects to allow for suprabony regeneration, preferably with beneficial effects on the gingival soft tissues. A rapid development in both innovative methods and products for the correction of periodontal deficiencies have been reported during the last three decades. For example, guided tissue regeneration with or without the use of bone supplements has been a well-proven treatment modality for the reconstruction of bony defects prior to the tissue engineering era. Active biomaterials have been subsequently introduced to the periodontal community with supporting dental literature suggesting that certain factors should be taken into consideration when undertaking periodontal regenerative procedures. These factors as well as a number of other translational research issues will need to be addressed, and ultimately it is vital that we do not extrapolate results from pre-clinical and animal studies without conducting extensive randomized clinical trials to substantiate outcomes from these procedures. Whatever the outcomes, the pursuit of regeneration of the periodontal tissues remains a goal worth pursuing for our patients. The aim of the review, therefore is to update clinicians on the recent advances in both materials and techniques in periodontal regenerative procedures and to highlight the importance of both patient factors and the technical aspects of regenerative procedures.

      PubDate: 2017-11-20T03:18:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.11.001
       
  • Modified closed cap splint: Conservative method for minimally displaced
           pediatric mandibular fracture

    • Authors: Neeraj Kumar; Richa; Krishan Gauba
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Neeraj Kumar, Richa, Krishan Gauba
      Mandibular fracture in younger children is the most common facial fracture among all the facial fracture in the sequence of condyles followed by symphysis/parasymphysis and body of the mandible. Symphysis/ Parasymphysis fracture of mandible can be minimally displaced or severely displaced depending upon the severity of the injury. This case report highlights the simple, reliable method of minimally displaced fracture i.e. modified closed cap splint for stability of the fracture segments in pediatric patients.

      PubDate: 2017-11-20T03:18:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.11.002
       
  • Analyzing private dental clinics in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Fahd Alsalleeh; Mashari Alohali; Marshed Alzeer; Meshal Aloseimi; Nassr AlMuflehi; Sattam Alshiha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Fahd Alsalleeh, Mashari Alohali, Marshed Alzeer, Meshal Aloseimi, Nassr AlMuflehi, Sattam Alshiha
      Aim To survey private dental clinics and analyze its clinicians in Riyadh city Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods Private dental clinics that had been registered with the Ministry of Health (MOH), Health Affairs System and accepted to participate were included. All clinics were visited to collect data. Number of practicing dentists, nationality, and their specialty classification were recorded. The location and year of establishment of each dental center were also collected. Results Out of 236 private dental clinics registered in MOH, 162 clinics accepted to participate. The total number of dentists in these clinics was 877. The majority of dentists were males (63.97%). The percentage of non-Saudi dentists were 86.66%, and Syrians dentists being the highest group (40.25%). The primary specialty of dentists was general dentistry (70.5%). The location of private dental clinics was found to be concentrated in some areas and not evenly distributed in Riyadh city. There were 49 clinics in Olaya, followed by 45 clinics in Rawdha municipality. Conclusion Private dental clinics in Riyadh city are operated mainly by Non-Saudi dentists. Moreover, there is still a need for more female dentists and dental specialists. There are areas in Riyadh city that lack private dental clinics.

      PubDate: 2017-11-11T12:39:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.008
       
  • Efficacy of Acacia arabica gum as an adjunct to scaling and root planing
           in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A randomized controlled
           clinical trial

    • Authors: Rameshwari Singhal; Vivek Agarwal; Pavitra Rastogi; Richa Khanna; Shuchi Tripathi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Rameshwari Singhal, Vivek Agarwal, Pavitra Rastogi, Richa Khanna, Shuchi Tripathi
      Aim The aim of the present study was to explore the adjunctive use of Acacia arabica gel in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods Single centre, randomised, triple blind, controlled trial on mild to moderate chronic periodontitis patients; Group I (SRP + Acacia arabica, n = 40) and Group II (SRP + placebo, n = 40); were analysed for clinical improvements in periodontal pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment levels (CAL) at baseline, 15 and 90 days on application of gels. Gingival index and plaque index were assessed as secondary parameters. Results Statistically significant PPD reduction (p < 0.05) and CAL gain (p < 0.05) was observed with use of Acacia arabica gel. The reduction in sites with moderate PPD was observed more among Group I than Group II and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001).Secondary outcome variables; Plaque Index and Gingival Index showed better resolution with Acacia arabica gel. Conclusion Acacia arabica leads to better clinical outcomes in patients with mild to moderate chronic periodontitis with effective antiplaque and anti-gingivitis action. It may be recommended adjunct to SRP for maintenance in patients with mild to moderate chronic periodontitis.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.006
       
  • Comparing ProFile Vortex to ProTaper Next for the Efficacy of Removal of
           Root Filling Material: An Ex Vivo Micro-Computed Tomography Study

    • Authors: Emad AlShwaimi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Emad AlShwaimi
      Aim This study compared the efficacy of ProFile Vortex (PV) with that of ProTaper Next (PTN) for the removal of root canal filling material. Materials and methods Twenty-six mesial canals of extracted mandibular first molars were instrumented, obturated with gutta-percha and sealant, and randomly allocated to a PTN (X3, X2, or X1) or PV group. The percentage of remaining material, amount of dentin removed, and extent of transportation were assessed using micro-computed tomography. The total time required for removal of material was calculated. Results Both systems were effective for material removal (p ≤ 0.001). Less time was required to remove material using PV (256.43 ± 108.95 s) than using PTN (333.31 ± 81.63 s; p ≤ 0.05). PV and PTN files removed approximately 84% and 78% of the filling material, respectively (p > 0.05). There was no significant canal transportation in either group. PV and PTN files removed 1.32 ± 0.48 mm3 and 1.63 ± 0.67 mm3 of the dentin, respectively (p = 0.18). Conclusion Our findings suggest that PV is as effective as PTN for removal of root canal filling material. Therefore, PV can be considered for use in endodontic retreatment, although more effective files or techniques are still required.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.007
       
  • Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: An enigma

    • Authors: Singla Neha; Mali Santosh; Makne Ganpat Sachin; Shingare R Poonam; Simranjeet; Khan Ahad Abdul
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Singla Neha, Mali Santosh, Makne Ganpat Sachin, Shingare R Poonam, Simranjeet, Khan Ahad Abdul
      Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is an uncommon, hamartomatous, benign epitheial lesion of odontogenic origin.The current World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of odontogenic tumors defines AOT as being composed of the odontogenic epithelium in a variety of histoarchitectural patterns, embedded in mature connective tissue stroma, and characterized by slow, but progressive growth. The aim of this paper is to present three rare case of intraosseous AOTs with varied clinical and radiographic features imposing the fact that AOT should be included in differential diagnosis of routine odontogenic cysts and tumours.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.005
       
  • Comparison of popular sagittal cephalometric analyses for validity and
           reliability

    • Authors: Irfan Qamaruddin; Mohammad Khursheed Alam; Fazal Shahid; Sadaf Tanveer; Marvee Umer; Erum Amin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Irfan Qamaruddin, Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Fazal Shahid, Sadaf Tanveer, Marvee Umer, Erum Amin
      Background The analysis of skeletal relationships of jaws in the sagittal plane is of utmost importance in orthodontic diagnosis for which numerous lateral cephalometric analyses have emerged. None of the analyses is without flaws. Current study compares ANB, Wits appraisal, Beta angle, Yen angle and W angle for their validity and reliability in diagnosis of skeletal classes. Methods Pretreatment cephalograph of 209 orthodontic patients comprised of 92 males and 117 females were selected from orthodontic archives. Radiographs were traced for ANB, Wits appraisal, Beta angle, W angle and Yen angle measurements. Patients were divided into three skeletal classes i.e. class I, II and III based on measurements and incisor classification and profile recorded from their files. ANOVA was applied to check the validity of performed analyses and Cramer’s correlation was performed to find out the correlation between analyses and skeletal classes. Results All performed analyses showed statistically significant difference in the values for all three skeletal classes p<.05. All measured analyses were found equally reliable in diagnosis of skeletal discrepancies. Conclusion All five-skeletal cephalometric sagittal analyses are reliable and can be used in orthodontic diagnosis as alternative to each other.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.002
       
  • Management of the flabby ridge using a modified window technique and
           polyvinylsiloxane impression material

    • Authors: Nawaf Labban
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Nawaf Labban
      Flabby ridge is a common clinical finding affecting the alveolar ridges of the mandibular or maxillary arches. The anterior region of maxilla is the most affected area in edentulous patients. Dentures on flabby ridges have compromised stability, support, and retention unless adequate measures for its management are employed. Methods applied for flabby ridge management, include surgical removal and augmentation, special impression techniques, balanced distribution of occlusal loads and implant therapy. Special impressions often involve window technique for static impression of flabby area, which present multiple challenges. The purpose of this technique report is to present a modified window technique for the impression of anterior maxillary flabby tissues for improved and controlled application of polyvinylsiloxane impression material that are routinely available in dental practice.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.004
       
  • Knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS among dental students of Jazan
           University, Kingdom Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Santhosh Kumar; Jyothi Tadakamadla; Ahmed Yahya Bin Hassan Areeshi; Hamza Abdul Wahab Mohammed Tobaigy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Santhosh Kumar, Jyothi Tadakamadla, Ahmed Yahya Bin Hassan Areeshi, Hamza Abdul Wahab Mohammed Tobaigy
      Objectives To evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of dental students at Jazan University, Saudi Arabia; compare the differences in HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes between the genders and years of study. Methods This cross-sectional survey was conducted among dental students of Jazan University (N = 208; Response rate = 88.1%). Results Most of the students (93%) knew “HIV/AIDS patients can infect dental workers” and 14% were unaware of the fact that HIV/AIDS patients can be diagnosed with oral manifestations. Less than half the subjects (47.6%) were confident on their ability to safely treat HIV/AIDS patients and only 28.8% of the study population believed that their knowledge about infection control is enough to treat HIV/AIDS patients. Males and 4th year students had significantly greater HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes than their comparative counterparts. Conclusions HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes in dental students of Jazan University are comparable to other studies from Saudi but are poor when compared to other countries.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.003
       
  • Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by eluates from orthodontic glass
           ionomer cements in vitro

    • Authors: Fernanda Angelieri; Yuri Slusarenko da Silva; Daniel Araki Ribeiro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Fernanda Angelieri, Yuri Slusarenko da Silva, Daniel Araki Ribeiro
      The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of some orthodontic glass ionomer cements commercially available by means of the single cell gel (comet) assay. For this purpose, five commercial orthodontic glass ionomer cements (Vidrion C®, Meron®, Optiband®, Multicure® and Ultra Band Lok®) were tested in murine fibroblasts in vitro. For this purpose, eluates from each cement were prepared according manufactures instructions at 0, 2, 4, 8, 18, 32 and 64 days of immersion in artificial saliva at 37 °C. All orthodontic glass ionomer cements failed to induce cytotoxicity to murine fibroblasts for all periods evaluated in this study. However, Vidrion C® was able to induce genotoxicity after 64 days of exposure to eluates. Meron® also demonstrated genotoxicity as depicted by increasing DNA damage on 2nd day. Multicure® demonstrated genotoxicity on 32nd day and Ultra band Lok on 18th, 32nd days of exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrated that orthodontic cements derived from resin-modified glass ionomer composite (Multicure®) and compomer (Ultra Band Lok®) cause genetic damage in mammalian cells in vitro.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T11:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.10.001
       
  • Management of extensive maxillofacial injury related to a Tyre Blast: A
           rare case report

    • Authors: Sanjay S. Rao; Sridhar D. Baliga; Abhinav Bhatnagar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Sanjay S. Rao, Sridhar D Baliga, Abhinav Bhatnagar
      Background Severe blast injuries of large tyres are similar to those resulting from explosions with neither thermal nor chemical effects. The literature related to the destructive nature of these blasts is very sparse. This case aims to report the clinical management of a patient involved in large tyre blasts who presented with a severe soft tissue injury, comminuted mandible and associated multiple facial fractures due to a tyre blast injury. Results Excellent results were obtained following reduction and fixation of fractures with primary suturing, as these types of injuries are prone to infection secondarily. Conclusion Due to the etiology and severity of injury, these injuries are challenging to operate and are more prone to infection following surgery. These require careful management skills.

      PubDate: 2017-09-24T00:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.08.002
       
  • Management of dental trauma in a child with xeroderma pigmentosa

    • Authors: Nidhi Agarwal; Dipanshu Kumar; Aakansha Sharma; Ashish Anand
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Nidhi Agarwal, Dipanshu Kumar, Aakansha Sharma, Ashish Anand
      Xeroderma pigmentosa is a rare dermatological autosomal recessive disorder that manifests itself early in life as severe sunburn usually after a short exposure to sunlight. The prime characteristic features include photosensitivity, hyperpigmentation and ichthyosis in sun exposed areas, and an increase in the risk of basocellular and squamous cell carcinomas and melanomas of the skin and eyes. The case report highlights the preventive treatment options along with all necessary precautions that should be taken to protect the patient from any iatrogenic inadvertent exposures that may be deleterious to his present state. The purpose of the report is also to discuss the important role of dental professionals when dealing with debilitating medical conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-09-24T00:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.09.002
       
  • Oral manifestations of thrombocytopaenia

    • Authors: R.A.G. Khammissa; J. Fourie; A. Masilana; S. Lawrence; J. Lemmer; L. Feller
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Khammissa RAG, J. Fourie, A. Masilana, S. Lawrence, J. Lemmer, L. Feller
      The appearance in the mouth of haemorrhagic petechiae, ecchymoses or blood blisters with spontaneous bleeding is suggestive of a haemorrhagic disorder that may be caused either by functional impairment of platelets or of blood vessel walls, by an abnormal decrease in the number of circulating platelets (thrombocytopaenia), or by defects in the blood clotting mechanism. Thrombocytopaenia from decreased production or increased destruction of platelets may be caused by multiple factors including immune mediated mechanisms, drugs or infections. A diagnosis of thrombocytopaenic purpura can be made when any other disease entity that might be causing the purpura is excluded on the basis of the medical history, the physical examination, a complete blood count and a peripheral blood smear. In this paper, we outline the clinical features of oral thrombocytopaenic purpura and briefly discuss some aspects of its aetiopathogenesis and treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-09-24T00:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.08.004
       
  • Fracture Resistance of Different Primary Anterior Esthetic Crowns

    • Authors: Manar Zaki Al Shobber; Thamer A. Al Khadra
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Manar Zaki Al Shobber, Thamer A. Al Khadra
      Purpose Investigate and compare fracture resistance of four commercially available esthetic crowns. Methods Sixty-four anterior crowns were used: NuSmile Primary crowns (NuSmile, Houston, Tex. USA) (16); Preveneered Cheng Crowns, (Orthodontic Technologies Inc., Houston, TX) (16); NuSmile ZR (NuSmile, Houston, Tex. USA); and Cheng Crowns zirconia (Orthodontic Technologies Inc., Houston, TX). Crowns were mounted and cemented on a negative replica and placed under servo hydraulic mechanical universal testing machine. Force was applied at 90° with crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until they fractured. Maximum breaking loads were recorded. Data was then analyzed using software that measured the fracture resistance of the crowns.One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to find the differences between the groups and Scheffe post-hoctest was used for intergroup comparisons. The level of significance was set as p ≤ 0.05 Results Mean maximum loads were as follows: NuSmile ZR crowns (937.36 + 131.68 N), Cheng Zirconia Crowns (751.43 + 102.103N), NuSmile Primary crowns (482.37 + 76.92), and Preveneered Cheng Crowns (415.57 + 12.28). Zirconia crowns the had highest fracture resistance compared to preveneered crowns (p<0.05).No significant difference between NuSmile ZR Zirconia and Cheng Crowns zirconia nor between NuSmile primary Preveenered and Preveneered Cheng Crowns). Conclusion Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture resistance with NuSmile zirconia crowns to being able to resist fracture even under intense pressure of load compared to Cheng Crowns zirconia.

      PubDate: 2017-08-15T15:23:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.07.006
       
  • In vitro performance of DIAGNOdent laser fluorescence device for dental
           calculus detection on human tooth root surfaces

    • Authors: Thomas E. Rams; Abdulaziz Y. Alwaqyan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Thomas E. Rams, Abdulaziz Y. Alwaqyan
      Objective This study assessed the reproducibility of a red diode laser device, and its capability to detect dental calculus in vitro on human tooth root surfaces. Material and methods On each of 50 extracted teeth, a calculus-positive and calculus-free root surface was evaluated by two independent examiners with a low-power indium gallium arsenide phosphide diode laser (DIAGNOdent) fitted with a periodontal probe-like sapphire tip and emitting visible red light at 655 nm wavelength. Laser autofluorescence intensity readings of examined root surfaces were scored on a 0-99 scale, with duplicate assessments performed using the laser probe tip directed both perpendicular and parallel to evaluated tooth root surfaces. Pearson correlation coefficients of untransformed measurements, and kappa analysis of data dichotomized with a > 40 autofluorescence intensity threshold, were calculated to assess intra- and inter-examiner reproducibility of the laser device. Mean autofluorescence intensity scores of calculus-positive and calculus-free root surfaces were evaluated with the Student’s t-test. Results Excellent intra- and inter-examiner reproducibility was found for DIAGNOdent laser autofluorescence intensity measurements, with Pearson correlation coefficients above 94%, and kappa values ranging between 0.96 and 1.0, for duplicate readings taken with both laser probe tip orientations. Significantly higher autofluorescence intensity values were measured when the laser probe tip was directed perpendicular, rather than parallel, to tooth root surfaces. However, calculus-positive roots, particularly with calculus in markedly-raised ledges, yielded significantly greater mean DIAGNOdent laser autofluorescence intensity scores than calculus-free surfaces, regardless of probe tip orientation. DIAGNOdent autofluorescence intensity values > 40 exhibited a stronger association with calculus (36.6 odds ratio) then measurements of ≥ 5 (20.1 odds ratio) when the laser probe tip was advanced parallel to root surfaces. Conclusions Excellent intra- and inter-examiner reproducibility of autofluorescence intensity measurements was obtained with the DIAGNOdent laser fluorescence device on human tooth roots. Calculus-positive root surfaces exhibited significantly greater DIAGNOdent laser autofluorescence than calculus-free tooth roots, even with the laser probe tip directed parallel to root surfaces. These findings provide further in vitro validation of the potential utility of a DIAGNOdent laser fluorescence device for identifying dental calculus on human tooth root surfaces.

      PubDate: 2017-08-15T15:23:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.08.001
       
  • Dental Students' Perceptions of an Online Learning

    • Authors: Moshabab A. Asiry
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Moshabab A. Asiry
      Objectives To identify the readiness of students for online learning, to investigate their preference and perception, and to measure the quality of online tutorials. Materials and Methods a 14-statement questionnaire was administered to fourth year undergraduate dental students in male campus at King Saud University who completed preclinical orthodontic course. The students responded to each statement by using Likert scale. Results The results reveal a high agreement of students (27.8% - 31.5% agree and 38.9% - 50% strongly agree) on a possession of necessary computer skills and access to internet. 59.2% and 64.8% of the students replied that online flash lectures and procedural videos were helpful to their learning, respectively. With respect to students' learning preferences, few students preferred online flash lectures (31.5%) and procedural videos (17.1%). Most students (38.9% agree and 31.5% strongly agree) preferred a combination of traditional teaching methods and online learning. Conclusion Overall, student attitudes were positive regarding online learning. The students viewed online learning helpful as a supplement to their learning rather than a replacement for traditional teaching methods.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.03.005
       
  • Mandibular Alveolar Bone Volume in Patients with Different Vertical Facial
           Dimensions

    • Authors: Thamer Alkhadra
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Thamer Alkhadra
      Objective To evaluate if there is any difference in alveolar bone surface area in patients with high vertical facial dimension (long face), average vertical facial dimension (average face), and low vertical facial dimension (square short face). Materials and Methods Forty-five patients who had cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as part of their orthodontic records were chosen according to their facial vertical dimension. Each group consisted of fifteen patients. Mandibular alveolar bone volume was calculated using Dolphin 3D Imaging software as the total surface area of the symphysis at the level of lower right canine to lower left canine and total surface areas for each patient was considered as total bone volume. Comparison was performed between groups using t-test. Results Long face type patients showed higher bone volume (total surface area 3220 +/- 368 mm2), average face patients have average bone volume (total surface area 2059+/-620 mm2) while square short face patients have the lowest total bone volume (total surface area 1877 +/-112 mm2). There was a significant difference between long face and square short face groups (P<0.005) however, there was no significant difference between long face and average face groups. Conclusions Patients with long face type have higher mandibular alveolar bone volume compared to short facial type patients.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.07.002
       
  • Reliability of rubrics in the assessment of orthodontic oral presentation

    • Authors: Naif A. Bindayel
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Naif A. Bindayel
      Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of using rubrics in dental education, specifically for undergraduate students’ assessment in orthodontic oral presentation. Methods A rubric-based case presentation assessment form was introduced to three contributing instructors. In each instructor’s group, the course director, along with the assigned instructor, assessed 8 randomly selected fourth year male dental students utilizing the same assessment form (total of 24 students). The two final scorings made by the assigned instructor and the course director were then gathered for each student. The data of this prospective comparative study then was analyzed using paired t-test to look for any significant differences in the scoring of the course director and each instructor in each group. Results No significant statistical differences were detected in grading variables between the instructors and the course director. Furthermore, the data showed no significant correlations between the students’ final course grade, and their case presentation grades scored by instructors’/course director. Conclusion Despite the elaborate nature of the routine orthodontic case presentation, the use of rubrics was found to be a promising reliable assessment element.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.07.001
       
  • Oral health comprehension in parents of Saudi cerebral palsy children

    • Authors: Amjad H. Wyne; Nouf S. Al-Hammad; Christian H. Splieth
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Amjad H. Wyne, Nouf S. Al-Hammad, Christian H. Splieth
      Objective To determine oral health comprehension among parents of cerebral palsy (CP) children. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was utilized to obtain the required information. The study was conducted in two main centers for disabled children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results Parents of all 157CP children registered in the two centers completed the questionnaire. Mothers mostly (86.6%) completed the questionnaire. Majority (98.7%) of the parents knew the importance of dental health for general health. More than two-third (70%) of the parents thought that teeth should be brushed thrice daily or after each meal. About three in every ten (29.9%) parents were not aware of the beneficial effect of fluoride in preventing dental caries; and very few (9.6%) were aware of water asa source of fluoride. Almost all (98.7%) the parents knew that sugary foods caused dental caries. Three-fourth (75.8%) of the parents were not aware of the possible harmful effects of bottled juices on teeth. There were no significant (p >0.05) associations between the parental age/gender with any of the dependent variables. Conclusion Parents of CP children generally showed satisfactory oral health comprehension. However, they need further oral health education in several areas.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.07.004
       
  • Influence of platelet rich fibrin on post-extraction socket healing: A
           clinical and radiographic study

    • Authors: Ahmed Abdullah Alzahrani; Afraa Murriky; Sami Shafik
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Ahmed Abdullah Alzahrani, Afraa Murriky, Sami Shafik
      Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically, extraction socket healing using autologous platelet rich fibrin (PRF). Materials and methods Twenty-four subjects needing single tooth simple extractions were selected. Twenty-four extraction sockets were divided into test group (PRF, n=12) and control group (blood clot, n=12). PRF was prepared with blood drawn from individuals after extraction using standard technique. PRF was placed in test group sockets followed by pressure application and figure 8 sutures. Sockets in control group were allowed to heal in the presence of blood clot and received a figure 8 suture. Ridge width was assessed using cast analysis with the help of acrylic stent and a pair of calipers. Radiographic analysis of socket surface area was performed using computer graphic software program. The clinical follow up assessments were performed at 1, 4 and 8weeks. Collected data was assessed using ANOVA and multiple comparisons test. Results Subjects were aged between 25 and 50 (mean 37.8) years, including 15 females. The mean horizontal ridge width for sockets in the test group were 11.70±2.37mm, 11.33±2.30mm and 10.97±2.33mm at 1, 4 and 8weeks respectively. Ridge width proportions were significantly higher among test group as compared to control group between baseline to 4 and 8weeks respectively. The mean radiographic bone fill (RBF) percentage in the test group, was 74.05±1.66%, 81.54±3.33% and 88.81±1.53% at 1, 4 and 8weeks respectively. The mean RBF was significantly higher in the test group than control group at all time intervals. Conclusion The study outcomes demonstrate that the use of PRF accelerate socket wound healing after tooth extraction as noticed by increased bone fill and reduced alveolar bone width resorption using clinical and radiographic methods.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.07.003
       
  • Mothers’ teething beliefs and treatment practices in Mansoura, Egypt

    • Authors: Abdel-Hady El-Gilany; Fawzia El Sayed Abusaad
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Abdel-Hady El-Gilany, Fawzia El Sayed Abusaad
      Objectives To reveal mothers’ beliefs about signs and symptoms associated with teething and their treatment practices. Population and methods A cross-sectional study done in Mansoura District on 457 mothers and their children with one or more erupted teeth. Mothers were interviewed during vaccination session at 25 chosen health facilities. Mothers were asked whether they agree or disagree about 24 signs and symptoms claimed to be associated with teething. Results Only 1.8% reported no symptoms at the time of teething. Majority had correct knowledge related to bite fingers/objects (70.5%) and drooling (60.0%). Inaccurate knowledge was reported as gum rubbing (42.0%), gum swelling (47.0%), diarrhea (51.0%), fever (83.2%) and weight loss (46.0%). Only 16.8% of mothers have good knowledge about teething problems. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent predictors of good knowledge are higher education (AOR=3.7), urban residence (AOR=2.5) and having a first-born child (AOR=5.5). Only 13.4% of mothers did not give any treatment for teething problems. Antipyretics and antibiotics were the most frequently given treatments (71.3%, and 24.3%; respectively). Conclusions The majorities of mothers had low knowledge about teething problems and gave unnecessary treatments.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.05.003
       
  • Complexity of comprehensive care treatments in undergraduate dental
           programs: The benefits of observing and assisting experienced faculty
           members

    • Authors: Moataz Elgezawi; Khalid Hassan; Adel Alagl; Ahmad M. Al-Thobity; Basel Al-Mutairi; Thamir Al-Houtan; Shazia Sadaf
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Moataz Elgezawi, Khalid Hassan, Adel Alagl, Ahmad M. Al-Thobity, Basel Al-Mutairi, Thamir Al-Houtan, Shazia Sadaf
      Objective To improve the confidence of the final year dental students in completing occlusal and oral rehabilitation of patients, with complexities beyond their scope, based on full analysis of the biomechanical and esthetic considerations of each case. Material & methods Two comprehensive patient situations presenting with special difficulties including extensive, reduced vertical dimension of occlusion, limited interocclusal space and maxillary alveolar bone for implant insertion necessitating bone augmentation and a sinus lift surgery was managed by two students at our institute. Procedures like surgical crown lengthening, sinus lifting, and bone augmentation were performed by senior faculty with the respective two students’ assisting as well as following up at the healing phase and reporting progress of healing and any possible complications to the supervisor. Students’ reported significant improvement in decision making skills; time management; interpersonal skills, management of cases in an evidence –based interdisciplinary approach as well as increase in their confidence in managing complex cases independently. Follow up with both cases showed optimum outcome and patients’ satisfaction. Results Students’ reported significant improvement in decision making skills; time management; interpersonal skills, management of cases in an evidence –based interdisciplinary approach as well as increase in their confidence in managing complex cases independently. Follow up with both cases showed optimum outcome and patients’ satisfaction. Conclusions Exposing students to manage complex oral rehabilitation including procedures like sinus lifting and bone augmentation, through an evidence-based interdisciplinary approach during the undergraduate comprehensive clinical dentistry course enhances their confidence and clinical acumen as an independent practitioner.

      PubDate: 2017-08-05T13:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.07.005
       
  • Estimation of fluoride concentration in drinking water and common
           beverages in United Arab Emirates (UAE)

    • Authors: Tarun Walia; Salem Abu Fanas; Madiha Akbar; Jamal Eddin; Mohamad Adnan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Tarun Walia, Salem Abu Fanas, Madiha Akbar, Jamal Eddin, Mohamad Adnan
      Objective To assess fluoride concentration in drinking water which include tap water of 4 emirates - Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah and Ajman plus bottled water, commonly available soft drinks & juices in United Arab Emirates. Methods Five different samples of tap water collected from each of the four emirates of UAE: Ajman, Sharjah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai; twenty-two brands of bottled water and fifteen brands of popular cold beverages, purchased from different supermarkets in U.A.E were tested using ion selective electrode method and the fluoride concentration was determined. Results The mean fluoride content of tap water samples was 0.14mg F/L with a range of 0.04–0.3mg F/L; with Ajman tap water samples showing the highest mean fluoride content of 0.3mg F/L. The mean fluoride content for both bottled drinking water and beverages was 0.07mg F/L with a range of 0.02–0.50mg F/L and 0.04–0.1mg F/L respectively. Majority (68.2%) of the bottled water are produced locally within U.A.E while a few (31.8%) are imported. Conclusions The tap water, bottled water and beverages available in U.A.E show varying concentrations of fluoride, however none showed the optimal level necessary to prevent dental caries. Dental professionals in U.A.E should be aware of the fluoride concentrations before prescribing fluoride supplements to children.

      PubDate: 2017-06-16T13:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.04.002
       
  • Orthodontic management of a dilacerated central incisor and partially
           impacted canine with unilateral extraction – A case report

    • Authors: A. Sumathi Felicita
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): A. Sumathi Felicita
      Aim To align a dilacerated maxillary central incisor and partially impacted canine with unilateral extraction in a young patient with skeletal deep bite. Materials and methods A 14year old male patient reported to the hospital with skeletal deep bite (basal plane angle-17°), severe horizontal pattern of growth (Go-Gn to Sn -22°), upright maxillary incisors (U1 to NA -26°) and retroclined lower incisors (L1 to NB -11°). The maxillary left central incisor was dilacerated, and the maxillary left canine was partially impacted. Unilateral extraction of the left maxillary premolar and left mandibular central incisor was done. A canine disimpaction spring was used to align the impacted canine. An anterior bite plane was given to open the bite. Results Superimposition of lateral cephalogram (T1, T2) revealed bite opening, normal overjet and overbite. There was backward rotation of the mandible and increase in lower anterior facial height. There was no evidence of root resorption or loss of vitality in the dilacerated tooth. Clinically the canine was well aligned in the arch. Conclusion Orthodontic management of a dilacerated incisor can be done without root resorption or loss of vitality. The partially impacted canine was well aligned in the arch. Unilateral extraction can produce good treatment results.

      PubDate: 2017-06-16T13:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.04.001
       
  • Assessment of the influence of gender and skin color on the preference of
           tooth shade in Saudi population

    • Authors: Nawaf Labban; Hanan Al-Otaibi; Abdulaziz Alayed; Khaled Alshankiti; Mohammad A. Al-Enizy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Nawaf Labban, Hanan Al-Otaibi, Abdulaziz Alayed, Khaled Alshankiti, Mohammad A. Al-Enizy
      Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of gender and skin color on the preference of different teeth shades in general population. Materials and methods Two standardized frontal smile photographs of male and female subjects were manipulated using photoshop to represent 4 skin colors [(type II, III, IV, and V) (Fitzpatrick scale)]. The teeth shades under each skin color were digitally manipulated to represent one of 6 teeth shades (BL1, BL2, BL3, BL4, B1 and A1). A questionnaire assessed demographic characteristics (age, nationality, gender, education level, occupation, and income) along with the satisfaction of their smiles. Male and female set of pictures with combination of skin colors and teeth shades were presented and participants were asked to select the most esthetically pleasing teeth shade with regard to gender and skin color. Cross-tabulations and chi-squared tests were used to perform the statistical analyses (α =0.05). Results Three hundred and thirty-six (60.4% male; 39.6% female) individuals participated in the study. The difference in the preferred teeth shades was significant among the male and female photographs across all skin colors (p <0.05). Lighter teeth shades were preferred among female subjects compared to male subjects with the same skin color. In addition, lighter teeth shades were preferred among subjects with a lighter skin color and vice versa (p <0.05). Conclusion Gender and skin color influences the perception of teeth shades among general population. Therefore, lighter tooth shades (BL1, BL2) for lighter skin color and comparatively darker tooth shades (BL4, B1, A1) for darker skin individuals should be prescribed as these are perceived as natural among Saudi population.

      PubDate: 2017-06-16T13:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.05.001
       
  • Role of community pharmacists in providing oral health advice in the
           Eastern province of Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Hamad Al-Saleh; Thamir Al-Houtan; Khalid Al-Odaill; Basel Al-Mutairi; Mohammed Al-Muaybid; Tameem Al-Falah; Muhammad Ashraf Nazir
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Hamad Al-Saleh, Thamir Al-Houtan, Khalid Al-Odaill, Basel Al-Mutairi, Mohammed Al-Muaybid, Tameem Al-Falah, Muhammad Ashraf Nazir
      Objective To determine the frequency of patients seeking oral health advice and willingness of community pharmacists to provide oral health information in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Methods A Cross-sectional study with sample size (n=332) of randomly selected community pharmacists across the province. The questionnaire comprised of 25 questions divided into 3 sections. Frequency distributions of different categorical variables were calculated and Pearson's chi-square tests performed to compare categoral variables. Statistical significance determined at p-value < 0.05%. SPSS version 22 was used for statistical analyses. Results Of the 332 pharmacists, 279 agreed to participate in the study, yielding a response rate of 84%. About 71% of pharmacists provided less than 30 oral health advices and 29% of them gave ≥30 oral health advices daily. Oral ulcer (64.2%), dental pain (59.5%) and bleeding gums (54.5%) were the three most common oral conditions encountered by the pharmacists. More pharmacists (90%) were approached for advice about tooth whitening products, tooth brush and mouth wash in large cities compared with 66.7% of pharmacists in small cities of the province. Lack of interaction with dental professionals was recognized the most important barrier to providing oral health services to the clients. Almost one third (35.8%) had formal oral health training in their undergraduate program and only 26.5% of them were always confident in providing oral health advices. Majority (93.5%) of respondents recognized their important role in providing oral health advices and 98.2% were enthusiastic to provide oral health information. Conclusions Community pharmacists are approached frequently for oral healthcare advices. Majority of them had no oral health training. Almost all of them were willing to provide oral health information in the community. It is essential to provide continuous oral health education to the pharmacists to better serve oral health needs of the community.

      PubDate: 2017-06-12T12:29:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.03.004
       
  • Quality of Communication between Dentists and Dental Laboratory
           Technicians for Fixed Prosthodontics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Huda Tulbah; Eman AlHamdan; Amal AlQahtani; Asma AlShahrani; Mona AlShaye
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Huda Tulbah, Eman AlHamdan, Amal AlQahtani, Asma AlShahrani, Mona AlShaye
      The fabrication of a clinically acceptable dental prosthesis requires proper communication between the dentist and the dental technician. Prosthodontic educators have been concerned with this interaction and communication. Fixed prosthodontics laboratories revealed that the technicians are often dissatisfied with the information provided in work authorizations. Objective: To evaluate the quality of communication between dentists and laboratory technicians via work authorizations for fixed prosthodontics in both governmental and private dental laboratories in Riyadh area from the technician’s perspective. Methods: A sample of 66 dental laboratories, including all government dental laboratories and a selected number of randomly chosen private dental laboratories from each district of Riyadh (40%), participated in the survey. A questionnaire was developed to include questions related to the following areas of work authorization: clarity and accuracy of instructions, patient information, type of prosthesis, choice of materials, design and shade of the prosthesis and type of porcelain glaze. The questionnaire was answered in a face-to-face interview by technicians who were qualified in fixed prosthetic work. Data were analyzed through parametric tests (T-test and one-way ANOVA) to identify significant values (P<0.05). Results: This survey showed a lack of communication between dentists and dental laboratories regarding the following: marginal design, pontic design, staining diagram, type of porcelain and glaze needed for the prosthesis. Significant differences were observed between the government and private dental laboratories. There was a greater lack of communication between the dentists and government laboratory technicians in Riyadh. There was no statistically significant difference between private labs of different areas in Riyadh city (P<0.05). Conclusion: The quality of communication between dentists and dental technicians in Riyadh can sometimes be inadequate, and governmental laboratories have a lower level of communication.

      PubDate: 2017-06-12T12:29:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.05.002
       
  • Oral Kaposi Sarcoma in HIV-Seronegative Saudi Patient: Literature Review
           and Case Report

    • Authors: Asmaa Faden; Manal AlShiddi; Mohamad AlKindi; Lama Alabdulaaly
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Asmaa Faden, Manal AlShiddi, Mohamad AlKindi, Lama Alabdulaaly
      Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) is an intermediate neoplasm affecting the endothelial cells of mucous membranes and skin. It arises most commonly among HIV-infected individuals. We present an intra-oral KS in an 80-year-old Saudi male patient, who is HIV-seronegative, non-immunosuppressed, and with no history of organ transplantation. The patient was treated with fractionated radiation therapy, and had no recurrence in the 48 months of follow-up. The clinical disease, histologic features, and treatment modality used, as well as the relative literature are presented in this paper.

      PubDate: 2017-05-08T05:35:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.03.003
       
  • Odontogenic Myxoma: A Review with Report of an Uncommon Case with
           Recurrence in the Mandible of a Teenage Male

    • Authors: C. Shivashankara; Madhumati Nidoni; Shrish Patil; K.T. Shashikala
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): C. Shivashankara, Madhumati Nidoni, Shrish Patil, K.T. Shashikala
      We describe a 13-year-old boy with recurrence of an odontogenic myxoma of the mandible. We review extant literature on the lesion, emphasizing the similarities and differences among lesions in the differential diagnosis. Odontogenic myxoma is an uncommon benign tumor that mainly affects the mandible, with a peak incidence in the second to fourth decades of life and predilection for the female sex. Clinical, radiological, and histopathological features should be considered when making a diagnosis. Several of these characteristics overlap with those of other benign and some malignant tumors. Odontogenic myxoma is known for recurrence. The treatment plan should consider the age and sex of the patient and the site and size of the lesion. Reconstructive surgery may be required, but should be delayed until after an adequate follow-up to rule out recurrence.

      PubDate: 2017-03-16T19:18:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.02.003
       
  • From dental science to clinical practice: Knowledge Translation and
           Evidence-based Dentistry principles

    • Authors: Kelvin I. Afrashtehfar; Mansour K. Assery
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Kelvin I. Afrashtehfar, Mansour K. Assery
      It has been claimed that in order to decrease the gap between what we know and what we do, research findings must be translated from knowledge to action. Such practices better enable dentists to make evidence-based decisions instead of personal ideas and judgments. To this end, this literature review aims to revisit the concepts of knowledge translation and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) and depict their role and influence within dental education. It addresses some possible strategies to facilitate KT, encourage dental students to use EBD principles, and to encourage dental educators to create an environment in which students become self-directed learners. It concludes with a call to developed up-to-date and efficient online platforms that could grant dentists better access to EBD sources in order to more efficiently translate research evidence into the clinic.

      PubDate: 2017-03-16T19:18:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.02.002
       
  • Factors affecting Polymerization of Resin-based Composites: A Literature
           Review

    • Authors: Maan M. AlShaafi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Maan M. AlShaafi


      PubDate: 2017-03-09T16:33:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.01.002
       
  • The need for virtual reality simulators in dental education: A review

    • Authors: Elby Roy; Mahmoud M Bakr; Roy George
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:The Saudi Dental Journal
      Author(s): Elby Roy, Mahmoud M. Bakr, Roy George
      Virtual reality simulators are becoming an essential part of modern education. The benefits of Virtual reality in dentistry is constantly being assessed as a method or an adjunct to improve fine motor skills, hand-eye coordination in pre-clinical settings and overcome the monetary and intellectual challenges involved with such training. This article, while providing an overview of the virtual reality dental simulators, also looks at the link between virtual reality simulation and current pedagogical knowledge.

      PubDate: 2017-03-09T16:33:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.sdentj.2017.02.001
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.90.237.148
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016