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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6677 journals)
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DENTISTRY (216 journals)                  1 2 3     

Ação Odonto     Open Access  
Acta Biomaterialia Odontologica Scandinavica     Open Access  
Acta Odontológica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Odontológica Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Actualités Odonto-Stomatologiques     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Angle Orthodontist     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access  
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Dental Research & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access  
Brazilian Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Dental Science     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie et Odontologie     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Dental Hygiene     Full-text available via subscription  
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cleft Palate–Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clínica e Pesquisa em Odontologia - UNITAU     Open Access  
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access  
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Dental Cadmos     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics     Open Access  
Dental Protection Annual Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dentistry     Open Access  
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access  
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Prosthodontics     Open Access  
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Implant Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dental Science and Research     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3     

  Journal of Conservative Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.343]   [H-I: 4]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0972-0707 - ISSN (Online) 0974-5203
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [296 journals]
  • The comparison between two irrigation regimens on the dentine wettability
           for an epoxy resin based sealer by measuring its contact angle formed to
           the irrigated dentine

    • Authors: Rayapudi Phani Mohan, Annappa Raghavendra Vivekananda Pai
      Pages: 275 - 278
      Abstract: Rayapudi Phani Mohan, Annappa Raghavendra Vivekananda Pai

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):275-278

      Aim: The aim was to assess the influence of two irrigation regimens having ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid with cetrimide (EDTAC) as final irrigants, respectively, on the dentine wettability for AH Plus sealer by comparing its contact angle formed to the irrigated dentine. Materials and Methods: Study samples were divided into two groups (n = 10). The groups were irrigated with 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution followed by either 17% EDTA or 17% EDTAC solution. AH Plus was mixed, and controlled volume droplet (0.1 mL) of the sealer was placed on the dried samples. The contact angle was measured using a Dynamic Contact Angle Analyzer and results were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 and 2 sample t-test. Results: There was a significant difference in the contact angle of AH Plus formed to the dentine irrigated with the above two regimens. AH Plus showed significantly lower contact angle with the regimen having EDTAC as a final irrigant than the one with EDTA (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An irrigation regimen consisting of NaOCl with either EDTA or EDTAC solution as a final irrigant influences the dentine wettability and contact angle of a sealer. EDTAC as a final irrigant facilitates better dentin wettability than EDTA for AH Plus to promote its better flow and adhesion.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):275-278
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159717
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • An in vitro comparison of effect on fracture strength, pH and calcium ion
           diffusion from various biomimetic materials when used for repair of
           simulated root resorption defects

    • Authors: Chetna Dudeja, Sonali Taneja, Manju Kumari, Nahar Singh
      Pages: 279 - 283
      Abstract: Chetna Dudeja, Sonali Taneja, Manju Kumari, Nahar Singh

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):279-283

      Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effect on fracture strength, pH and calcium ion diffusion from mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Fillapex, iRoot SP, and Ultracal when used for repair of simulated root resorption defects. Materials and Methods: Three sets of 40 teeth each were used, and biomechanical preparation was done. Resorption cavity was made at 5 mm from the apex. Teeth were filled with different experimental materials. In control group, saline was used. Samples of fracture resistance were stored in an incubator for 3 months and then subjected to the universal testing machine. To evaluate the pH and calcium ion release were checked at 1 day and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks intervals. Data were recorded and statistical analysis done by one-way analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Tukey test. Results: Highest fracture resistance was seen in MTA Fillapex followed by iRoot SP, control, and then Ultracal group. Teeth filled with iRoot SP showed highest pH and calcium ion release followed by MTA Fillapex and Ultracal group. Conclusion: Bioceramic sealers showed high pH, calcium ion release, and good root reinforcement potential. Initial dressing of calcium hydroxide followed by obturation with Gutta-percha and bioceramic sealer may be considered as an alternative treatment modality for inflammatory resorption.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):279-283
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159720
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Evaluation of tooth preparations for Class II cavities using magnification
           loupes among dental interns and final year BDS students in preclinical
           laboratory

    • Authors: Khyati Narula, Mala Kundabala, Neetha Shetty, Ramya Shenoy
      Pages: 284 - 287
      Abstract: Khyati Narula, Mala Kundabala, Neetha Shetty, Ramya Shenoy

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):284-287

      Background: With the advances in optical technology, dentistry has been benefitted in varied ways over the ages. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dental magnification loupes on psychomotor skill acquisition during preclinical operative exercise. Methods: 40 Typhodont teeth tooth no. 36 and 46 (Frasaco - U.S.A.) were mounted on the acrylic lower jaw base of Phantom Head. Teeth are prepared for class II (MO) cavity with conservative design using micromotor, mouth mirror and probe. Tooth no.36 was prepared using magnifying loupes while tooth no.46 was prepared without the loupes. Data collected was statistically analyzed using Chi square test. Results: The results revealed that tooth preparations were better under magnifying loupes as compared to those without it with statistically significant difference with Kappa value 0.64 for samples with loupes and 0.76 for without loupes. Moreover, the study samples expressed their difficulty for using the magnifying loupes during the tooth preparation since they were using it for the first time. Conclusions: Magnifying loupes help the dental students to have better vision, thus improved dexterity with hands while preparing the tooth for restoration. However, dental students have to get adapted to the loupes for the ease of using loupes. Using loupes frequently may help them to get adapted to the loupes.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):284-287
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159724
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Comparison of third generation versus fourth generation electronic apex
           locators in detecting apical constriction: An in vivo study

    • Authors: Devarsanahalli Venkataramanaswamy Swapna, Akash Krishna, Anand C Patil, Krishna Rashmi, Veena Suresh Pai, Mandagere Aswathanarayana Ranjini
      Pages: 288 - 291
      Abstract: Devarsanahalli Venkataramanaswamy Swapna, Akash Krishna, Anand C Patil, Krishna Rashmi, Veena Suresh Pai, Mandagere Aswathanarayana Ranjini

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):288-291

      Aim: The aim of this in vivo study was to compare the accuracy of Root ZX and Raypex 5 in detecting minor diameter in human permanent single-rooted teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients with completely formed single-rooted permanent teeth indicated for extraction were selected for the study. Crown was flattened for stable reference point and access cavity prepared. Working length was determined with both apex locators. A 15 K file adjusted to that reading was placed in the root canal and stabilized with cement. The tooth was then extracted atraumatically. Following extraction apical 4 mm of root was shaved. The position of the minor diameter in relation to the anatomic apex was recorded for each tooth under stereomicroscope at &#215;10. The efficiency of two electronic apex locators to determine the minor diameter was statistically analyzed using paired sample t-test. Results: The minor diameter was located within the limits of &#177;0.5 mm in 96.6% of the samples with the Root ZX and 93.2% of the samples with Raypex 5. The paired sample t-test showed no significant difference. Conclusion: On analyzing the results of our study it can be concluded that Raypex 5 was as effective as Root ZX in determining the minor diameter.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):288-291
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159726
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Microstructure of cryogenically treated martensitic shape memory
           nickel-titanium alloy

    • Authors: Thilla Sekar Vinothkumar, Deivanayagam Kandaswamy, Gopalakrishnan Prabhakaran, Arunachalam Rajadurai
      Pages: 292 - 296
      Abstract: Thilla Sekar Vinothkumar, Deivanayagam Kandaswamy, Gopalakrishnan Prabhakaran, Arunachalam Rajadurai

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):292-296

      Context: Recent introduction of shape memory (SM) nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy into endodontics is a major breakthrough. Although the flexibility of these instruments was enhanced, fracture of rotary endodontic instruments during instrumentation is an important challenge for the operator. Implementation of supplementary manufacturing methods that would improve the fatigue life of the instrument is desirable. Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of dry cryogenic treatment (CT) conditions on the microstructure of martensitic SM NiTi alloy. Materials and Methods: Experiments were conducted on Ni-51 wt% Ti-49 wt% SM alloy. Five cylindrical specimens and five sheet specimens were subjected to different CT conditions: Deep CT (DCT) 24 group: &#8722;185&#176;C; 24 h, DCT 6 group: &#8722;185&#176;C; 6 h, shallow CT (SCT) 24 group: &#8722;80&#176;C, 24 h, SCT 6 group: &#8722;80&#176;C, 6 h and control group. Microstructure of surface was observed on cylindrical specimens with an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope at different magnifications. Subsurface structure was analyzed on sheet specimens using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results: Microstructures of all SM NiTi specimens had equiaxed grains (approximately 25 &#956;m) with well-defined boundaries and precipitates. XRD patterns of cryogenically treated specimens revealed accentuation of austenite and martensite peaks. The volume of martensite and its crystallite size was relatively more in DCT 24 specimen. Conclusions: DCT with 24 h soaking period increases the martensite content of the SM NiTi alloy without altering the grain size.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):292-296
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159727
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Effect of post space preparation on the sealing ability of mineral
           trioxide aggregate and Gutta-percha: A bacterial leakage study

    • Authors: Sandeep S Metgud, Harsh H Shah, Hemalatha T Hiremath, Deepali Agarwal, Kartik Reddy
      Pages: 297 - 301
      Abstract: Sandeep S Metgud, Harsh H Shah, Hemalatha T Hiremath, Deepali Agarwal, Kartik Reddy

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):297-301

      Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of post space preparation on the sealing ability of teeth obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Gutta-percha. Materials and Methods: Fifty intact human mandibular premolars, after decoronation and biomechanical preparation, were randomly divided into three experimental groups. In Group A (n = 10), the canals were obturated with Gutta-percha using cold lateral compaction technique, followed by immediate post space preparation. In Group B (n = 10), the canals were obturated with 8 mm of MTA and in Group C (n = 10), sectional obturation with 4 mm of MTA was done, followed by delayed post space preparation. All specimens were subjected to bacterial leakage analysis, and the occurrence of turbidity was checked. Results: All specimens in the lateral compaction group leaked. The mean number of days at which leakage was observed in Groups A, B and C were 18.5 days, 93.6 days and 95.5 days. Conclusions: MTA can be considered as an alternative to Gutta-percha as an apical third restorative material for teeth indicated for post and core, as it demonstrates better-sealing ability compared with Gutta-percha. Further, the removal of set MTA for post space preparation does not disrupt the integrity of the remaining apical MTA.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):297-301
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159729
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Comparison of dentinal damage induced by different nickel-titanium rotary
           instruments during canal preparation: An in vitro study

    • Authors: Shiwani Garg, Pardeep Mahajan, Deepa Thaman, Prashant Monga
      Pages: 302 - 305
      Abstract: Shiwani Garg, Pardeep Mahajan, Deepa Thaman, Prashant Monga

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):302-305

      Aim: To compare dentinal damage caused by hand and rotary nickel-titanium instruments using ProTaper, K3 Endo, and Easy RaCe systems after root canal preparation. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty freshly extracted mandibular premolars were randomly divided into five experimental groups of 30 teeth each and biomechanical preparation was done: Group 1 with unprepared teeth; Group 2 were prepared with hand files; Group 3 with ProTaper rotary instruments; Group 4 with K3 rotary; Group 5 with Easy RaCe rotary instruments. Then, roots were cut horizontally at 3, 6, and 9 mm from apex and were viewed under stereomicroscope. The presence of dentinal defects was noted. Statistical analysis: Groups were analyzed with the Chi-square test. Results: Significant difference was seen between groups. No defects were found in unprepared roots and those prepared with hand files. ProTaper, K3 rotary, and Easy RaCe preparations resulted in dentinal defects in 23.3%, 10%, and 16.7% of teeth, respectively. More defects were shown in coronal and middle sections, and no defect was seen in apical third. Conclusion: The present study revealed that use of rotary instruments could result in an increased chance for dentinal defects as compared to hand instrumentation.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):302-305
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159730
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in curved root canals after various
           sizes and tapers of canal preparation

    • Authors: Amir Abbas Moshari, Nahid Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid Rahimifard, Soheila Darmiani
      Pages: 306 - 309
      Abstract: Amir Abbas Moshari, Nahid Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid Rahimifard, Soheila Darmiani

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):306-309

      Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reduction of Enterococcus faecalis in curved root canals after various sizes and tapers of the canal preparation. Materials and Methods: Mandibular first molars (n = 103) with curved mesiobuccal canals were divided into one control (n = 5) and 7 experimental (n = 14) groups, were inoculated with E. faecalis (ATTC 29212) and prepared with the following RaCe files (FKG Dentaire) as master apical file: Groups: 25.04‚ 25.06‚ 30.04‚ 30.06‚ 35.04, 35.06 and 40.06. All the experimental groups were irrigated with 2 mL of 1% sodium hypochlorite during instrumentation and finally rinsed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (2 mL) followed by 5.25% NaOCl (2 mL) and sterile distilled water. Colony counting was performed after incubation. Statistical Analysis Used: Resulting data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, (P < 0.05). Results and Conclusions: All the experimental groups showed significant bacterial reduction (P < 0.001). Although the greater the size/taper or both led to more decreased amount of bacteria, differences between the groups with the identical size and different tapers, and among the groups with the same taper and different sizes were not significant. Based on this study, 25.04 along with using 2 mL of 1% NaOCl during instrumentation, and using 17% EDTA and 5.25% NaOCl as final rinse successively after the termination of preparation, can effectively reduce intra-canal bacteria and preserve root structure.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):306-309
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159733
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • A comparative evaluation of the canal centering ability of three rotary
           nickel-titanium retreatment systems in the mesio-buccal canals of
           mandibular first molars using computed tomography

    • Authors: Deenadhayalan Gogulnath, Rajendran Mathan Rajan, Ganesh Arathy, Deivanayagam Kandaswamy
      Pages: 310 - 314
      Abstract: Deenadhayalan Gogulnath, Rajendran Mathan Rajan, Ganesh Arathy, Deivanayagam Kandaswamy

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):310-314

      Background: During endodontic retreatment, relative difficulty exists in removing the filling material and maintaining the canal anatomy. Usage of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary retreatment instruments is widely accepted, but there is a lack of adequate literature evidence about their canal centering ability. Aim: To compare the canal centering ability of rotary NiTi retreatment systems. Materials and Methods: Mandibular first molars with mesiobuccal canals with canal access angle of 20-40&#176; were used. Canals prepared until ISO 25, 0.06 taper. Obturated with three different techniques lateral compaction, Thermafil, and Resilon/Epiphany. Retreatment was carried using three different systems ProTaper retreatment, Mtwo R and REndo. Specimens were subjected to computed tomography analysis at coronal, middle, and apical third of the root canal preobturation and postretreatment procedure. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test. Results: No statistically significant difference with three retreatment systems. Variation existed among all the subgroups at the coronal, middle, and apical third of the root canal. Conclusion: All retreatment systems with three obturation techniques showed eccentricity within acceptable limits. REndo, MtwoR showed better canal centering and ProTaper retreatment system showed tendency for eccentric canal preparation, especially in apical third.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):310-314
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159735
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Effects of extracts of Salvadora persica on proliferation and viability of
           human dental pulp stem cells

    • Authors: Fahimeh sadat Tabatabaei, Maryam Moezizadeh, Fateme Javand
      Pages: 315 - 320
      Abstract: Fahimeh sadat Tabatabaei, Maryam Moezizadeh, Fateme Javand

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):315-320

      Objectives: Efficacy of an ideal antimicrobial agent depends on its ability to eliminate microorganisms while causing minimal toxicity to host cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ethanolic and water extracts of Salvadora persica (SP) on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, the effects of seven concentrations of ethanolic and water extracts of SP (ranging from 5.75 mg/ml to 0.08 mg/ml) on hDPSCs were evaluated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Water extract of SP only had cytotoxic effect at 5.75 mg/ml concentration; and caused significant cell proliferation at 1.43-0.08 mg/ml concentrations at 24 h (P < 0.05). At 48 h, only 0.17 and 0.08 mg/ml concentrations caused significant cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Ethanolic extract of SP at 5.75-1.43 mg/ml concentrations showed severe cytotoxic effects at 24 and 48 h. Other concentrations had no significant effects on cells (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The highest concentrations of both water and ethanolic extracts of SP had cytotoxic effects on hDPSCs. Water extract of SP has favorable effects on cell proliferation at specific concentrations in a time-dependent manner.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):315-320
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159740
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Effectiveness of different irrigation techniques on smear layer removal in
           apical thirds of mesial root canals of permanent mandibular first molar: A
           scanning electron microscopic study

    • Authors: Pranav Khaord, Aesha Amin, Manish B Shah, Roshan Uthappa, Nirmal Raj, Tejal Kachalia, Hiral Kharod
      Pages: 321 - 325
      Abstract: Pranav Khaord, Aesha Amin, Manish B Shah, Roshan Uthappa, Nirmal Raj, Tejal Kachalia, Hiral Kharod

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):321-325

      Aim: The aim of this study was to compare smear layer removal after final irrigant activation with sonic irrigation (SI), manual dynamic agitation (MDA), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional syringe irrigation (CI). Materials and Methods: Forty mesial canals of mandibular first molars (mesial roots) were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper system to size F1 and sodium hypochlorite 3% and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The specimens were divided into 4 equal groups (n = 10) according to the final irrigation activation technique: Group 1, PUI; group 2, manual dynamic activation (MDA); group 3, SI; and group 4, control group (simple irrigation). Samples were split longitudinally and examined under scanning electron microscope for smear layer presence. Results: Control groups had the highest smear scores, which showed the statistically significant highest mean score at P < 0.05. This was followed by ultrasonic, MDA, and finally sonic, with no significant differences between them. Conclusions: Final irrigant activation with sonic and MDA resulted in the better removal of the smear layer than with CI.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):321-325
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159742
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Sealing ability of three root-end filling materials prepared using an
           erbium: Yttrium aluminium garnet laser and endosonic tip evaluated by
           confocal laser scanning microscopy

    • Authors: A Salin Nanjappa, KC Ponnappa, KK Nanjamma, MC Ponappa, Sabari Girish, Anita Nitin
      Pages: 327 - 330
      Abstract: A Salin Nanjappa, KC Ponnappa, KK Nanjamma, MC Ponappa, Sabari Girish, Anita Nitin

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):327-330

      Aims: (1) To compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and Chitra-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root-end filling, evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope using Rhodamine B dye. (2) To evaluate effect of ultrasonic retroprep tip and an erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser on the integrity of three different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 80 extracted teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha. The apical 3 mm of each tooth was resected and 3 mm root-end preparation was made using ultrasonic tip (n = 30) and Er:YAG laser (n = 30). MTA, Biodentine, and Chitra-CPC were used to restore 10 teeth each. The samples were coated with varnish and after drying, they were immersed in Rhodamine B dye for 24 h. The teeth were then rinsed, sectioned longitudinally, and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Tukey's test at P < 0.05 (R software version 3.1.0). Results: Comparison of microleakage showed maximum peak value of 0.45 mm for Biodentine, 0.85 mm for MTA, and 1.05 mm for Chitra-CPC. The amount of dye penetration was found to be lesser in root ends prepared using Er:YAG laser when compared with ultrasonics, the difference was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Root-end cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and restored with Biodentine showed superior sealing ability compared to those prepared with ultrasonics.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):327-330
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159746
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Bonding efficacy of etch-and-rinse adhesives after dentin biomodification
           using ethanol saturation and collagen cross-linker pretreatment

    • Authors: Pallavi Sharma, Rajni Nagpal, Shashi Prabha Tyagi, Naveen Manuja
      Pages: 331 - 336
      Abstract: Pallavi Sharma, Rajni Nagpal, Shashi Prabha Tyagi, Naveen Manuja

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):331-336

      Aim: To evaluate whether the application of two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives to biomodified dentin using ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) and collagen cross-linker (CCL) pretreatment improves their sealing ability. Materials and Methods: In 176 extracted human molars, the pulp-chambers were deroofed, and teeth were sectioned horizontally. Samples were randomly divided into eight groups according to four bonding techniques using two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives; Adper Single Bond 2 (ASB) and XP Bond (XPB). The bonding protocols included: (a) Water-wet bonding (WWB); (b) EWB; (c) WWB and CCL application; (d) EWB and CCL application. After composite resin restorations, dye leakage evaluation and scanning electron microscope analysis were done. Leakage scores were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Result: For both ASB and XPB adhesives, least dye leakage was observed in EWB groups (b and d) (P = 0.918 and P = 0.399 respectively) which showed no significant difference, while maximum leakage scores were seen in WWB groups (a and c). Regardless of CCL application and adhesives used, EWB technique depicted (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004) significantly greater sealing ability than WWB. Conclusion: Bonding of ASB and XPB using EWB significantly improved their sealing ability. Biomodification using CCL pretreatment had no significant effect on the sealing ability of adhesives bonded with either WWB or EWB.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):331-336
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159751
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of three resin based
           dual-cure core build-up materials: An In-vitro study

    • Authors: Gaurav Jain, Aditi Narad, Lalit C Boruah, Balakrishnan Rajkumar
      Pages: 337 - 341
      Abstract: Gaurav Jain, Aditi Narad, Lalit C Boruah, Balakrishnan Rajkumar

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):337-341

      Aim: The in-vitro study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three recently introduced dual-cure resin based core build-up materials namely ParaCore, FluoroCore, and MultiCore. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty extracted permanent human mandibular molar teeth were taken and sectioned horizontally beneath the dentinoenamel junction to expose the coronal dentin. The specimens obtained were divided into three main groups based on the materials used and then further divided into four sub-groups based on time interval with ten samples each. The dentin surface was treated with the respective adhesives of the groups and then bulk filled with core build-up materials. The attained samples were than subjected to shear loading in Instron Universal Testing Machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's HSD, and Levene's test. Results: The mean SBS was highest in MultiCore at all time periods as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore and was also higher at 48 h thermocycling in all three groups studied. Conclusion: MultiCore dual-cure resin based core build-up material showed the highest mean SBS as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore. SBS was not negatively affected by thermocycling.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):337-341
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159754
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Management of a maxillary first molar having atypical anatomy of two roots
           diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography

    • Authors: Sarang Sharma, Meenu Mittal, Deepak Passi, Shibani Grover
      Pages: 342 - 345
      Abstract: Sarang Sharma, Meenu Mittal, Deepak Passi, Shibani Grover

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):342-345

      Most often, a clinician working on maxillary first molar when anticipates an aberration thinks of an extra canal but rarely does he preempt fewer canals. Maxillary first molar is a tooth, which has been extensively reviewed with respect to its external and internal morphology. Abundant literature related to its anatomy is available, but reports on incidence of two roots and two root canals in maxillary first molar are very limited. Here, a case of maxillary first molar is presented that had two roots: one palatal root with Type I canal configuration and one bulbous fused buccal root with Type V canal configuration; a unique root and canal configuration not seen in any of the earlier reported cases. Diagnosis of root canal aberrancy and subsequently, accurate management of the tooth was greatly facilitated by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. The relevance of CBCT in improving treatment prognosis is greatly emphasized in this report.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):342-345
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159756
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Mandibular first molar with single root and single root canal

    • Authors: Anil Munavalli, Sharnappa Kambale, Sachhi Ramesh, Nishant Ajgaonkar
      Pages: 346 - 348
      Abstract: Anil Munavalli, Sharnappa Kambale, Sachhi Ramesh, Nishant Ajgaonkar

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):346-348

      Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable anatomic complexities and abnormalities with respect to number of roots and root canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of the existence of a fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal was diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. This case report presents a rare case of successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and root canal.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):346-348
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159757
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an
           immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    • Authors: Marina Fernandes, Ida de Ataide
      Pages: 349 - 353
      Abstract: Marina Fernandes, Ida de Ataide

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):349-353

      Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved.
      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):349-353
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159758
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Sixteenth IACDE PG convention report

    • Authors: Sonali Taneja
      Pages: 354 - 354
      Abstract: Sonali Taneja

      Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):354-354


      Citation: Journal of Conservative Dentistry 2015 18(4):354-354
      PubDate: Wed,1 Jul 2015
      DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.159759
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 4 (2015)
       
 
 
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