Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8529 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (216 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (120 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (332 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (231 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (292 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (164 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (120 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (150 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (41 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (186 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (136 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (155 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (167 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (99 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2342 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (362 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (207 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (381 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (138 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (167 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (82 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (98 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (273 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (157 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (822 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (192 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (103 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (78 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (81 journals)
    - SURGERY (401 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (153 journals)

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (207 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 207 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Obstétrica e Ginecológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Sexual Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aktuální Gynekologie a Porodnictví     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 276)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Reproductive Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction     Open Access  
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Biology of Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Birth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Birth Defects Research Part B: Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Partially Free   (Followers: 299)
British Journal of Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 91)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clínica e Investigación en Ginecología y Obstetricia     Full-text available via subscription  
Clinical Lactation     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Clinics in Perinatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Contemporary OB GYN - Obstetrics-Gynecology & Women's Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Contraception : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Obstetrics and Gynecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Women's Health Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ecography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
EMC - Ginecología-Obstetricia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Clinics in Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology : X     Open Access  
Expert Review of Obstetrics & Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fertility and Sterility     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Fertility Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Fetal and Maternal Medicine Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Ginekologia i Perinatologia Praktyczna     Hybrid Journal  
Ginekologia Polska     Open Access  
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access  
gynäkologie + geburtshilfe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gynäkologisch-geburtshilfliche Rundschau     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gynakologische Endokrinologie     Hybrid Journal  
Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gynecologic Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Gynecologic Oncology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Gynecologic Oncology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecological Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Gynecological Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gynécologie Obstétrique Fertilité & Sénologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology     Open Access  
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access  
Gynecology Obstetrics & Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Care For Women International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Human Reproduction Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Indian Journal of Gynecologic Oncology     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access  
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Anatomical Variations     Open Access  
International Journal of Childbirth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Gynecological Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Gynecological Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Neonatal Screening     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Obstetrics, Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Reproduction, Contraception, Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Urogynecology Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de Gynécologie Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal für Gynäkologische Endokrinologie / Schweiz     Hybrid Journal  
Journal für Gynäkologische Endokrinologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Breast Health     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Gynecology and Obstetrics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Endometriosis and Pelvic Pain Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Evidence-based Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Gynecologic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gynecological Research and Obstetrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gynecology Obstetrics and Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Lactation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Human Reproductive Sciences (JHRS)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Midwifery     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproduction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Obstetric Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Obstetrics and Women's Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Perinatal Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Reproduction and Contraception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Reproductive Biotechnology and Fertility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Reproductive Health and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Reproductive Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Kebidanan Midwiferia     Open Access  
Jurnal Ners     Open Access  
La Revue Sage-Femme     Full-text available via subscription  
Majalah Obstetri & Ginekologi     Open Access  
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Menopause     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Menopause International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
MHR: Basic science of reproductive medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Middle East Fertility Society Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Midwifery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Midwifery Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Nascer e Crescer : Birth and Growth Medical Journal     Open Access  
Neonatal Network - Journal of Neonatal Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Neonatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Nepal Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
OA Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Obstetric Anesthesia Digest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetric Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Obstetrics & Gynecology     Partially Free   (Followers: 93)
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Obstetrics and Gynecology International     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perinatología y Reproducción Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Placenta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Postgraduate Obstetrics & Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Progresos de Obstetricia y Ginecología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Reprodução & Climatério     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reproductive BioMedicine Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Reproductive Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reproductive Health Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Reproductive Medicine and Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Research and Reports in Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Brasileira de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia / RBGO Gynecology and Obstetrics     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Obstetricia y Ginecología     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Andrología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Peruana de Ginecología y Obstetricia     Open Access  
Revue de médecine périnatale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientific Journal of Hamadan Nursing & Midwifery Faculty     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seksuologia Polska     Full-text available via subscription  
Seminars in Breast Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Seminars in Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Sexes     Open Access  
Siklus : Journal Research Midwifery Politeknik Tegal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Southern African Journal of Gynaecological Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lanka Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teratology Studies     Open Access  
Thai Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access  
The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Practising Midwife     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Trends in Urology Gynaecology & Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology : X
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2590-1613
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • A comparison of neonatal outcomes between adolescent and adult mothers in
           developed countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2020Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Katie Marvin-Dowle, Hora SoltaniABSTRACTEvidence suggests that adolescent pregnancies are at increased risk of adverse neonatal outcomes compared to adult pregnancies; however there are significant inconsistencies in the literature, particularly in studies conducted in developed countries.The primary objective of this review therefore is to systematically assess the current literature with regard to the relationship between adolescent pregnancy and neonatal outcomes.A literature search was conducted in eight relevant electronic databases (AMED, ASSIA, Child Development and Adolescent Studies, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Health Source: Nursing, Maternity and Infant Care, MEDLINE and Scopus. The reference lists of included studies were also hand searched.Studies were included where they were conducted in countries with very high human development according to the United Nations Human Development Index, reported at least one outcome for adolescents (aged 19 or under) and an adult control group (aged 20-34) and published between January 1998 and March 2018.Studies were screened for inclusion and data extracted by one reviewer with a second reviewer independently reviewing a sub-set. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 to compare outcomes among the adolescent group with adult controls. Sub-group analyses of adolescents aged 17 and under and 18-19 were also conducted. Pooled analysis of adjusted odds ratios was also undertaken in order to consider the effect of confounding factors. Meta-analysis effect estimates are reported as risk ratios (RR) and pooled association as adjusted odds ratios (aORs)After removal of duplicates a total of 1,791 articles were identified, of which 20 met the inclusion criteria.The results of the meta-analysis showed adolescents to have increased risk of all primary adverse outcomes investigated. In the sub-group analysis there was an increased risk of perinatal death and low birthweight; 17 and under (perinatal death: RR 1.50, CI 1.32-1.71: low birthweight RR 1.43, CI 1.20-1.70); 18-19 (perinatal death RR 1.21, CI 1.06-1.37: low birthweight RR 1.10, CI 1.08-1.57). Women aged 17 and under were also at increased risk of preterm delivery (RR 1.64, CI 1.54-1.75). Analysis adjusted for confounders showed increased risk of preterm delivery (aOR 1.23, CI 1.09-1.38), very preterm delivery (aOR 1.22, CI 1.03-1.44) and neonatal death (aOR 1.31, CI 1.14-1.52).Findings show that young maternal age is a significant risk factor for adverse neonatal outcomes in developed countries. Adolescent maternal age therefore should be considered as a potential cause for concern in relation to neonatal health and it is recommended that health care professionals respond accordingly with increased support and monitoring.Further research into the mechanisms underlying differences due to maternal age would be advantageous.
       
  • Duration of labor, delivery mode and maternal and neonatal morbidity after
           remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia compared with epidural analgesia
           

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Anna Thorbiörnson, Paula da Silva Charvalho, Anil Gupta, Ylva Vladic Stjernholm ObjectiveThe objective of this study was to compare duration of active labor, delivery mode, maternal and neonatal morbidity and women´s satisfaction with delivery after intravenous remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or standard epidural analgesia (EDA). Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that women with PCA would have shorter labor.Study DesignAn observational study at a university hospital in Sweden 2009–16. Maternal and neonatal outcomes with PCA (n = 69) and EDA (n = 138) were compared.ResultsWomen with PCA had shorter active labor 5.6 ± 3.3 compared to 8.5 ± 4.4 hours (p 
       
  • The chance of recurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum: A systematic review

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 December 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Caitlin R. Dean, Claartje M. Bruin, Margaret E. O’Hara, Tessa J. Roseboom, Mariska M. Leeflang, René Spijker, Rebecca C. Painter Around 1 % of pregnancies develop Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG), causing high physical and psychological morbidity. Reports on HG recurrence rate in subsequent pregnancies vary widely. An accurate rate of recurrence is needed for informed reproductive decision making. Our objective is to systematically review and aggregate reported rates for HG subsequent to index pregnancies affected by HG. We searched databases from inception as per the protocol registered on PROSPERO. No language restrictions were applied. Inclusion was not restricted based on how HG was defined; reports of severe NVP were included where authors defined the condition as HG. We included descriptive epidemiological, case control and cohort study designs. Eligibility screening was performed in duplo. We extracted data on populations, study methods and outcomes of significance. A panel of patients reviewed the results and provided discussion and feedback. Quality was assessed with the JBI (2017) critical appraisal tool independently by two reviewers. We performed the searches on 1st November 2019. Our search yielded 4454 unique studies, of which five (n = 40,350 HG cases) matched eligibility criteria; One longitudinal and four population-based cohort studies from five countries. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 31 years. Definition of HG and data collection methods in all the studies created heterogeneity. Quality was low; studies lacked valid and reliable exposure, and/or follow-up was insufficient. Meta-analysis was not possible due to clinical and statistical heterogeneity. This systematic review found five heterogeneous studies reporting recurrence rates from 15 to 81%. Defining HG as hospital cases may have introduced detection bias and contribute to clinical heterogeneity. A prospective longitudinal cohort study using an internationally agreed definition of HG and outcomes meaningful to patients is required to establish the true recurrence rate of HG.
       
  • Lower cumulative live birth rates in cured endometrial tuberculosis
           patients after one ART cycle including all subsequent frozen-thaw cycles:
           A matched-pair study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Ming-Mei Lin, Wan Yang, Xiao-Guo Du, Xue-Ling Song, Jie Qiao, Rong LiABSTRACTObjectiveTo investigate the outcomes of the first ART cycle including all subsequent frozen-thaw cycles from the same oocyte retrieval till first live birth in women with cured endometrial tuberculosis.Study designThis is a 1:4 matched–pair study, 113 cured endometrial tuberculosis patients (TB group) and 452 patients of non-tuberculosis (Non-TB group) matched for age, basal E2, basal FSH and ovulation protocol who underwent first complete ART cycles in our institution during December 2010 and December 2015 were included in the study. The baseline characteristic, clinic data, and IVF treatment outcomes were compared and analyzed between the two groups.ResultsCompared with the Non-TB group, the cumulative clinical pregnancy rates was similar (64.6% vs 65.1%, p = 0.89) but the cumulative live birth rates (40.7% vs 52.7%, p 
       
  • Prognosis of Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes between 20 and 24
           Weeks of Gestation: a retrospective cohort study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Sumire Sorano, Mayumi Fukuoka, Kaori Kawakami, Yoshihito Momohara BackgroundThe previous study on prognosis of preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (pPROM) near the limit of viability showed various survival rate raging from 26 to 57%%. This may be partly due to the fact that treatment of prematurely born babies vary from one country to another, or sometimes within a single country. In Japan, resuscitation efforts are made to newborns of early gestational age, normally from 22 weeks of gestation.ObjectiveTo assess the natural history and short- and long-term prognosis in pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM) near the limit of viability in a hospital in Japan.MethodWe conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study. Cases with diagnosis of pPROM at a gestational age of 20–23 6/7 weeks and delivered in our hospital between April 2007 and December 2017 were examined.Result66 cases were included and of those, 54 (81.1%) newborns survived to discharge. Of the neonates who survived to discharge, 42 (77.8% of survivors) experienced severe morbidity at the time of discharge. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that later gestational age at pPROM and longer latency period were significantly associated with survival with no severe morbidities (per one day increase, adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.37, 95% CI 1.03-1.83, p = 0.033 and per one day increase, adjusted OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.21, p = 0.015). Of 23 cases followed at 36 months, 8 (34.8%) showed developmental delay.ConclusionThe survival rate was significantly higher than the previous studies, yet many of the survivors experienced short-term severe morbidity. Of those who experienced short-term severe morbidity, however, more than half showed normal range development at 36 months.
       
  • MicroRNA-135a promotes proliferation, migration, invasion and induces
           chemoresistance of endometrial cancer cells

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Jiping Wang, Li Zhang, Wenyan Jiang, Rongkui Zhang, Bei Zhang, Aidaeraili Silayiding, Xiumei Duan AimsMicroRNAs play essential roles in tumorigenesis and progression in various cancers including endometrial cancer. Here we assessed the role of miR-135a on proliferation, chemosensitivity, migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells.MethodsWST-1 assay was performed to examine the proliferation of HEC-1-B and ISHIKAWA endometrial cancer cells with altered expression of miR-135a, with or without cisplatin treatment. Transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays were used to assess the migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells. The Caspase-Glo3/7 assay was used to examine the effect of miR-135a on cisplatin-induced apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells. The dual-luciferase reporter assay was conducted to validate the putative binding site.ResultsUpregulation of miR-135a improved the proliferation, and promoted migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells. Furthermore, miR-135a decreased the sensitivity of HEC-1-B and ISHIKAWA cells after cisplatin treatment. The cisplatin-induced apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells was inhibited by miR-135a by regulation of BAX and Bcl-2 expression. Meanwhile, miR-135a could regulate epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) by altering the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, snail and Vimentin in endometrial cancer cells. Further study showed that the expression levels of PTEN and p-AKT in endometrial cancer cells were changed after aberrant expression of miR-135a.ConclusionMiR-135a played important roles in tumorigenesis and disease progression of endometrial cancer by regulating proliferation and chemosensitivy of endometrial cancer cells by targeting AKT signaling pathway. Our study indicates that miR-135a might act as a potential biomarker to predict chemotherapy response and prognosis in endometrial cancer.
       
  • Station of the fetal head at complete cervical dilation impacts duration
           of second stage of labor

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Elisabeth Ludvigsen, Finn Egil SkjeldestadABSTRACTObjectiveTo examine the association between station of the fetal head at complete cervical dilation and duration of second stage of labor, as well as prolonged second stage of labor, without and with the use of analgesia (EA).Study designWe conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of 3311 women with a singleton pregnancy, gestational age ≥ 370 weeks, and cephalic presentation. Station of the fetal head at complete cervical dilation was categorized as at the pelvic floor, beneath the ischial spines, but above the pelvic floor, and at or above the ischial spines. In logistic regression analysis, we defined prolonged second stage of labor as> 2 hours without and> 3 hours with EA in nulliparous women, and> 1 hour and> 2 hours, respectively, in parous women.ResultsSurvival curves demonstrated longer durations of second stage of labor in nulliparous women and women with EA in each category of station of fetal head. The adjusted odds ratio of prolonged second stage of labor was 13.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.5-20.1) times higher when the fetal head was beneath the ischial spines, but above the pelvic floor, and 32.9 (95% CI: 21.5-50.2) times higher when the fetal head was at or above the ischial spines compared to at the pelvic floor.ConclusionStation of the fetal head at complete cervical dilation was significantly associated with duration of second stage of labor.
       
  • Promising Impact of Platelet Rich Plasma and Carbon Dioxide Laser for
           Stress Urinary Incontinence

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Fariba Behnia-Willison, Tran T.T. Nguyen, Aidan J. Norbury, Behrang Mohamadi, Stefano Salvatore, Alan Lam ObjectivesTo evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of trans-vaginal fractional micro-ablative CO2 laser therapy in combination with platelet rich plasma (PRP) for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women.Study designParticipants with SUI underwent three sessions of transvaginal CO2 laser and PRP treatment, administered at 4-6-week intervals. Outcomes were assessed using the bladder function section of the Australian Pelvic Floor Questionnaire (APFQ). The primary outcome was changes in the participants’ symptoms of SUI. Secondary outcomes were related to general bladder function. Outcome differences from baseline (T1) to 3 months (T2) and 12 months (T3) were analysed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Subjective verbal scales were used to assess the degree of pain associated with PRP injections and laser treatment.ResultsSixty-two women with SUI were enrolled into this study. There were 66% (41/62) of participants who reported improved SUI symptoms from T1 to T2 (p 
       
  • Childbirth Experience Questionnaire 2: Validating its Use in the United
           Kingdom

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Kate F. Walker, Anna Dencker, Jim G. Thornton ObjectiveTo validate the Childbirth Experience Questionnaire 2 (CEQ2) in the UK to see if it is an effective tool for evaluating labour experience.Study DesignThe CEQ2 and part of the Care Quality Commission Maternity Survey (2010) was sent to 475 women one month and six weeks after birth. It was tested for face validity among 25 postnatal mothers. Demographic data and delivery data was used to establish construct validity using the method of known-groups validation. The results of the scored CEQ2 sent out twice were used to measure test-retest reliability by calculating the quadratic weighted index of agreement between the two scores. Criterion validity was measured by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient for the CEQ2 and Maternity Survey scores.ResultsFace validity of the CEQ2 in a UK population was demonstrated with all respondents stating it was easy to understand and complete. A statistically significantly higher CEQ2 score for subgroups of women known to report a better birth outcome demonstrated construct validity. A weighted kappa of 0.55 demonstrated test-retest reliability. A Pearson correlation co-efficient of 0.56 demonstrated a moderate correlation between the results of the CEQ2 and the results of the ‘gold standard’ assessment of childbirth experience in the UK: the Maternity Survey and hence criterion validity.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that the Childbirth Experience Questionnaire version 2 (CEQ2) is a valid and reliable measure of childbirth experience in the UK population.
       
  • ABDOMINAL WALL ENDOMETRIOSIS: AN 11-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL
           COHORT STUDY

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Sandra Marras, Nicola Pluchino, Patrick Petignat, Jean-Marie Wenger, Frédéric Ris, Nicolas C. Buchs, Jean Dubuisson ObjectiveThe objective of this study was to review the records of patients with excised abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE) to determine patient characteristics, diagnostic methods, presence of concurrent pelvic endometriosis and type of surgery.Study designMedical records from an 11-year period were searched to identify histologically confirmed AWE cases. Descriptive data were collected and analyzed. Two subgroups were differentiated: isolated AWE and pelvic endometriosis-associated AWE.ResultsThirty-five women with AWE were included. The most common symptom was cyclic abdominal or parietal pain (68.6%); 17.1% of the women had no symptoms. Twenty-nine women (82.8%) had a history of gynecological or obstetrical surgery, most commonly cesarean section (CS). The mean interval between prior surgery and appearance of symptoms was 5.3 years. Six women (17.1%) had no prior surgery; all six presented with umbilical nodules, nulliparity and confirmed mild to severe pelvic endometriosis. Among all patients, 34.3% had concurrent pelvic endometriosis, 40% presented with isolated AWE and 25.7% had no pelvic exploration. Women with concurrent pelvic endometriosis had significantly lower parity, smaller nodule size and a higher likelihood of umbilical location than those with isolated AWE (p 
       
  • Vaginal endometrial stromal sarcoma: a literature review

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 August 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Hongwen Wu, Yi Luo, Nanlin Yin, Wenwu Gui, Yi CaoABSTRACTVaginal endometrial stromal sarcoma (VESS) is a rare disease. To the best of our knowledge, there have only been a few reported cases in the literature. Therefore, we conducted a literature review to obtain specific knowledge of this disease. Thirteen cases of VESS were found by searching the Medline and EMBASE databases in the English language. The mechanism of VESS may be associated with endometriosis, and its diagnosis largely depends on pathological examination because it has no typical symptoms. Treatment of VESS incorporates surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Some novel drugs targeting its mechanism may become alternative therapies. Its prognostic factors may include tumor stage and the expression of hormonal receptors.
       
  • Development and validation of a general and easy assessable scoring system
           for laparoscopic skills using a virtual reality simulator

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): JM Goderstad, L Sandvik, E Fosse, M Lieng ObjectivesTo develop and validate a scoring system for laparoscopic skills for five specific tasks on a virtual reality simulator.Study designA longitudinal, experimental, non-randomised study including 30 gynecologists and gynecological trainees at three hospitals. The participants were categorized as inexperienced (Group 1), moderately experienced (Group 2), and experienced (Group 3).The study participants performed ten repetitions of three basic skilltasks, a salpingectomy and a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy on a virtual reality simulator. Assessment of skills was based on time, error parameters and economy of movements measured by the simulator. We used the results (mean and SD for each parameter in all tasks) of the four last repetitions performed by the experienced gynecologists as the basic for the scoring system. Performance equal to, and higher than, this mean score gave 2 points. A decrease of 1 SD from the mean gave 1 point. Every score below gave 0 points. The mean score for the inexperienced, moderately experienced and experienced study participants was compared.ResultsThe mean scores in Task 1 were 3.4 (SD 0.6) in Group 1, 3.4 (SD 0.6) in Group 2 and 5.1 (SD 1.1) in Group 3, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in score between Group 1 and 3 (p = 0.01), and group 2 and 3 (p = 0.01). In Task 2 no statistical significant differences were found. In Task 3, the total mean scores were 1.7 (SD 0.7) in Group 1, 1.9 (SD 0.9) in Group 2 and 2.8 (SD 0.5) in Group 3, respectively. The difference in score between study groups was statistically significant when comparing Group 1 and Group 3 (p 
       
  • Ovarian drilling in polycystic ovary syndrome: long term pregnancy rate

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): E. Debras, H. Fernandez, M-E. Neveu, X. Deffieux, P. Capmas ObjectiveTo report long term pregnancy rate in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) treated by ovarian drilling. To evaluate predictive factors of pregnancy and possibility of a second drilling.DesignRetrospective, observational, multicenter study.SettingGynecologic departments of two teaching’s hospitals.PatientsAll infertile women with PCOS who were treated by ovarian drilling from 2004 to 2013. The Rotterdam criteria were applied to define PCOS.Intervention(s)Surgical ovarian drilling by laparoscopy and trans vaginal hydro laparoscopy.Main Outcome Measure(s)The primary endpoint was pregnancy rate after ovarian drilling. The secondary endpoints were the predictive factors of pregnancy and the possibility of a second ovarian drilling.Results289 women were included in the study. The mean follow-up period was 28.4 months (25.3–31.5). A pregnancy was obtained in at least 137 (47.4%) women after a drilling, and 71 (51.8%) of these pregnancies were spontaneous, 48 (16.6%) women achieved at least two pregnancies after drilling, and 27 (56.3%) of these were spontaneous. The predictive factors for effectiveness were a normal body mass index (BMI), an infertility period of less than three years, an AFC of less than 50, and an age of less than 35. Second drillings were performed on 33 women. Among them, 19 (57.6%) achieved at least one pregnancy, and 10 (52.6%) of these were spontaneous. It appeared that a second drilling was effective either when the first drilling had been successful (pregnancy achieved after drilling) or when it had failed in cases of high AFC (greater than 55).ConclusionOvarian drilling permitted to obtain spontaneous pregnancy for women with PCOS. This surgery could have durably effect permitted to obtain more than one pregnancy.
       
  • Detection of De novo Genetic Variants in
           

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Hong-xin Pan, Guang-nan Luo, Sheng-qing Wan, Cheng-lu Qin, Jie Tang, Meng Zhang, Min Du, Ke-ke Xu, Jin-qiu Shi ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to use whole genome sequencing (WGS) help detect de novo mutations or pathogenic genes of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome type 1(MRKH syndrome type 1).Study designThis was a case-parent trios study. Nine unrelated probands, with MRKH syndrome type 1 and their parents were enrolled. The enrollment, sequencing process, establishment of the de novo mutations detecting procedure and experiment part were performed over a 2-year period.Resultswe detected 632 de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs), 267 de novo small insertions/deletions (indels), 39 de novo structural variations (SVs) and 28 de novo copy number alterations (CNAs). Three novel damaging coding de novo SNVs with three damaging coding de novo genes (PIK3CD, SLC4A10 and TNK2) were revealed. Two SNVs were annotated of the promoter region of gene NBPF10 and 3'UTR of NOTCH2NL, potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of MRKH.ConclusionWe identified five de novo mutations in BAZ2B, KLHL18, PIK3CD, SLC4A10 and TNK2 by performing WGS, the functional involvement of all deleterious mutations in MRKH candidate genes of the trios warrant further study. WGS may complement conventional array to capture the complete landscape of the genome in MRKH.
       
  • Adhesive incisional drapes during cesarean delivery for preventing wound
           infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled
           trials

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Rebecca Eckler, Johanna Quist-Nelson, Gabriele Saccone, Harvey Ward, Vincenzo Berghella ObjectiveTo compare the incidence of wound infection after cesarean delivery in procedures conducted using adhesive incisional drapes verses no adhesive incisional drapes.Study DesignSearches were performed in electronic databases (MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, OVID, EMBASE, and the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews). We included randomized controlled trials comparing adhesive incisional drapes to no adhesive incisional drapes during cesarean delivery. The primary outcome of this meta-analysis was wound infection. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model of DerSimonian and Laird, to produce relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI).Results52 publications were identified through initial search of databases and two randomized controlled trials were eligible and included in the meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis examined a total of 1,943 subjects and showed a statistically significant increase in wound infections in patients in the adhesive incisional drape group when compared to the control group (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.02-1.65). Conclusion: Adhesive incisional drapes may increase the incidence of wound infections after cesarean delivery. Further studies are necessary to explore this relationship in the setting of current postoperative infection prophylaxis, including broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage, skin preparation and vaginal cleansing.
       
  • Influence of current state of executive function and working memory on
           adherence to antimuscarinic therapy in older women with OAB

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 July 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Kirill Vladimirovich Kosilov AimEvaluation of the executive function and working memory influence, as well as the general state of memory, on adherence to treatment with antimuscarinic drugs in elderly women with overactive bladder (OAB).BackgroundAntimuscarinic are effective and safe for the treatment of OAB, but adherence to treatment remains low. Demographic, socioeconomic, and medical factors which influence the medication adherence have been explored; however, the impact of executive function and working memory on adherence has not been evaluated yet.MethodsIn total 417 women from 65 to 88 years old with the diagnosis overactive bladder were selected to participate in the study. They were prescribed AM drugs: trospium 15 mg / day (n = 138), or Solifenacin 5 mg / day (n = 132), or Darifenacin 7.5 mg / day (n = 147). The observation was carried out for 12 weeks. The urodynamic state was investigated using the questionnaire OABq-SF, uroflowmetry was performed at the start and end of the study, voiding diary - during the whole time of observation. The state of mental health was investigated using MMSE and GDS. The assessment of executive function and working memory, as well as general memory estimation, was carried out using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Wechsler Memory Scale subscale, and the California Verbal Learning Test. Hierarchical and simultaneous regressions were calculated to study the effect of executive function and working memory on medication adherence.ResultThe urodynamic state of patients significantly improved after the treatment, the cognitive functions did not change. The analysis of hierarchical and simultaneous regressions made it possible to establish that the predictor variables significantly influencing medication adherence of elderly women with OAB to AM treatment are executive function and working memory composite (β = .39, p 
       
  • Predictive value of the Quantitative fetal fibronectin levels for the
           management of women presenting with threatened preterm labour – A
           revised cut off level: A retrospective cohort study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 July 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Kassam Mahomed, Ibinabo Ibiebele, Christine Fraser, Consuela Brown ObjectiveTo evaluate a new a cut off level of fetal fibronectin as a predictor of birth in women with threatened preterm labour.DesignA retrospective cohort study performed at Ipswich hospital, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia, in women with threatened preterm labour with intact membranes between 23 weeks to 34 + 6 week gestation.Study DesignA quantitative fetal fibronectin (fFN) was performed. Maternal demographics and birth outcome data were extracted from the routinely collected perinatal data held by the hospital. The odds of preterm birth were estimated for each cut off value of fFN (10, 50 and 200 ng/ml) using logistic regression and accounting for multiple presentations by the same woman.ResultsAmong the 447 presentations and 376 pregnancies, rates of preterm birth
       
  • Post-operative complications and recurrence rate after treatment of bowel
           endometriosis: comparison of three techniques

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 July 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Alicia Hernández Gutiérrez, Emanuela Spagnolo, Ignacio Zapardiel, Rubén Garcia-Abadillo Seivane, Ana López Carrasco, Patricia Salas Bolívar, Isabel Pascual Miguelañez ObjectiveThe aim of the present study was to compare post-operative complications and recurrence of three surgical techniques: segmental resection, discoid excision and nodule shaving.Study DesignFrom January 2014 to December 2017, 143 patients who underwent segmental bowel resections for endometriosis at “La Paz” University Hospital, were enrolled and grouped by different techniques. We compared post-operative complications and recurrence rate in three groups: 76 (53%) patients underwent segmental resection (group I), 20 (14%) patients underwent discoid resection (group II) and 47 (33%) patients underwent rectal shaving (group III)Qualitative data was defined by absolute values and percentages, and quantitative data by mean and standard deviation. Qualitative variables between groups were compared using Chi- squared test. While quantitative data between groups was performed by means of t-test and ANOVA test. For all statistical tests a value of p 
       
  • The role of omentectomy in the surgical treatment of uterine serous
           carcinoma

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Ming Chen, Peng Guo, Jifan Tan, Duo Liu, Shuzhong Yao ObjectiveThe aims of this study were to assess the role of omentectomy in the staging of uterine serous carcinoma (USC) and to evaluate its impact on patient outcomes.Study designPatients diagnosed with USC at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University of China were retrospectively reviewed. The clinicopathological characteristics and survival data of 187 patients were analyzed. Risk factors for omental metastasis were evaluated. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to compare survival status and the presence of omental metastasis.ResultsWe found that 35 of 187 patients (18.7%) had omental metastases. Omental metastasis was significantly associated with adnexal involvement (40.0% vs 19.1%, P = 0.008, OR 2.828, 95% CI 1.286-6.218). Multivariate analysis showed that in addition to lymph node metastases and suboptimal surgery, omental metastasis in USC remained an independent predictor of decreased PFS and OS (PFS, HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.14-4.63, P = 0.024; OS, HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.04-3.60, P = 0.043).ConclusionsThe incidence of omental metastasis is not low in patients with USC. Visual assessment and omental biopsy may be insufficient for recognizing occult metastases. Omentectomy should be part of the staging surgery in USC patients because it provides additional information about survival. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.
       
  • The Mode of Delivery of Grand Multiparous with Post-cesarean Single
           Uterine Scar in Low Resources Settings: a retrospective cohort study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): MVE Koh Valere Salomon The prevalence of post-caesarean scar uterus, the most important risk factor of uterine rupture is increasing globally. Grand multiparity can also increase the risk of uterine rupture. The issue of grand multiparous with single post caesarean scar is poorly investigated.ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to assess the factors associated with the mode of delivery of grand multiparous with post caesarean single uterine scar in low resources settings.Patients and MethodIt was a retrospective cohort study conducted from the 1st January to the 31st of May 2016, in three university teaching hospitals of the university of Yaoundé I in Cameroon. Grand multiparous (GMP) defined as parity ≥5 with single post-caesarean lower segment uterine scar admitted at a gestational age of 37 completed weeks and above were compared to grand multiparous without scar uterus at term. GMP with unknown scar were excluded. The mode of delivery and materno-fetal and neonatal outcome were investigatedResultsWe included 33 GMP with single lower segment uterine scar and 120 GMP without uterine scar. Induction of labor and acute fetal distress were not related to having a scar or not in grand GMP, but augmentation of labor was less likely to be conducted in case of GMP with scar uterus(p = 0.08). The frequency of vaginal delivery was 75.8 and 87.5% in grand multiparous with and without uterine scar respectively (OR 0.17-1.16; P = 0.085), with one case of instrumental delivery in scarless group. However, single scar multiparity status increased by 2.42 folds the risk of delivery by caesarian section (P = 0.066). Cephalo-pelvic disproportion increased the indication of caesarian section by 12-fold in the GMP with scar group (p = 0.031), but mechanical dystocia related indications (CPD, macrosomia,) were present in only 4 cases out of 8 caesarian sections in the exposed group. The Apgar score at the fifth minute was better in the GMP with scar group. (p = 0.037)ConclusionGrand multiparous with single post-cesarean uterine scar should be given a chance of vaginal delivery in the absence added feto-maternal morbidity.
       
  • Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Oocyte Donors and Women
           Treated for Infertility: An Observational Laboratory-Based Study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Hana Jaworek, Blazena Zborilova, Vladimira Koudelakova, Jana Brezinova, Jana Vrbkova, Ivana Oborna, Marian Hajduch ObjectiveThe aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women treated for infertility and oocyte donors, and to investigate the possible influence of HPV infection on reproductive outcomes.Study designIn this observational laboratory-based study, cervical swabs were collected from oocyte donors (n = 207), and women treated for infertility (n = 945) and analysed for the presence of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) genotypes using the cobas®4800 HPV Test and PapilloCheck®HPV-Screening. Associations between hrHPV positive status and fertility outcome or socio-behavioral and health characteristics were evaluated using R statistical software.ResultsHrHPV prevalence was significantly higher in oocyte donors than in women treated for infertility (28.0% vs. 16.1%, P 
       
  • Intrapartum PCR-assay for detection of Group B Streptococci (GBS)

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Rikke B Helmig, Jan B Gertsen ObjectiveWe have recently introduced intrapartum PCR-testing for group B streptococcus (GBS) in women in labor with prolonged rupture of membranes or preterm delivery to offer intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis only for GBS positive women.The goal of the present study is to report our experience and results from the first half year of GBS testing.Study designThis is a retrospective study. Rectovaginal swabs from 321 women presenting in the labor ward with pre-labor rupture of membranes for>14 hour/rupture of membranes during delivery for>14 hours, or labor between gestational weeks 35 0/7 and 36 6/7 from February 7, 2017 to August 6, 2017, were tested.We performed a molecular GBS test (Xpert GBS®, Cepheid Ltd., Sunnyvale, USA).Data from patient files including mode of delivery, use of antibiotics, infection of mother and child are presented in more detail.Data on the PCR results from the first year of testing were also collected.ResultsIn the first half-year of testing a positive GBS test result was found in 58 (18.1%) and a negative test result in 263 women (81.9%). No invalid test result was achieved.The indication for performing PCR testing was PROM > 14 hours or rupture of membranes during labor for>14 hours in 266 women (82.9%) and labor in gestational weeks 35 0/7 to 36 6/7 in 44 women (13.7%). In the remaining 11 women, the PCR test was performed for other reasons.Of the 321 women tested 126 (39%) received antibiotics during labor.Ten women (3.4%) were treated after delivery on suspicion of infection. 25 newborns (7.8%) were treated with antibiotics. In 11 cases, the treatment was stopped after 2-4 days as there were no signs of infection.ConclusionsThe introduction of the intrapartum GBS test in selected groups of women who gave birth in our department has been well accepted by the women, the midwifes and doctors. The result of the test is available within two hours, and as we only offer intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis to GBS-positive women, we have reduced the use of antibiotics to approximately 40% in the groups tested, without an increase of infection in mother or child.
       
  • Status of VEGF in Preeclampsia and its effect on endoplasmic reticulum
           stress in placental trophoblast cells

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Sankat Mochan, Manoj Kumar Dhingra, Sunil Kumar Gupta, Shobhit saxena, Pallavi Arora, Vineeta Yadav, Neerja Rani, Kalpana Luthra, Sadanand Dwivedi, Neerja Bhatla, Renu Dhingra ObjectiveTo explore the role of VEGF in attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress in placental trophoblast cells.Study DesignStudy was divided into following parts: 1. Serum Analysis of GRP78 and VEGF using sandwich ELISA. 2. Expression of VEGF and GRP78 in placentae by immunohistochemistry (IHC). 3. In Vitro experiments. Status of ER stress markers (GRP78, eIF2α, XBP1, ATF6 and CHOP) was assessed at various time points (8 h, 14 h, 24 h) when trophoblast cells were treated with varying concentration(s) of VEGF and also by adding recombinant VEGF at protein (Immunofluorescence, Western blot) and transcript levels (qRT-PCR).ResultsIncreased GRP78 and decreased VEGF protein levels in sera and placentae of preeclamptic pregnant women and reduced expression of various ER stress markers at both transcript and protein levels was observed in trophoblast cells when they were exposed to recombinant VEGF thereby indicating positive role of VEGF in alleviating ER stress.ConclusionsReduced expression of ER stress markers in trophoblast cells against increased VEGF highlighted a new window to explore prospective drugs that can be designed to modulate the activities of various ER stress sensors in order to alleviate ER stress in pregnant women with preeclampsia.
       
  • The association among cervical, anal, and oral HPV infections in high-risk
           and low-risk women

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Borek Sehnal, Michal Zikan, Monika Nipcova, Ladislav Dusek, David Cibula, Jiri Slama ObjectiveThe human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause premalignant and malignant tumors in the anogenital and oropharyngeal regions. The aim of this study was to describe the association in the prevalence of cervical, anal, and oral HPV infections in high-risk patients with biopsy-confirmed high-grade cervical lesion compared to low-risk women.Study DesignA total of 718 immunocompetent women were enrolled in the study. The high-risk (HR) group consisted of 473 patients with biopsy-confirmed high-grade cervical lesion while the low-risk (LR) group consisted of other 245 women. All participants completed an anonymous self-administered questionnaire and were subjected to cervical, anal, and oral HPV genotyping using the Linear array HPV test.ResultsA total of 81.4 % women were infected in the cervix, 43.3 % in the anus, and 2.7 % in the oral cavity in the HR group in comparison with only 26.9 %, 24.5 %, and 1.4 % in the low-risk LR group, respectively. The cervical and anal HPV infections were much more frequent in the HR patients (p 
       
  • Use of Antenatal Fluorinated Corticosteroids in Management of Congenital
           Heart Block: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Armia Michael, Ahmad A. Radwan, Ahmed Kamel Ali, Ahmed Yassien Abd Elkariem, Sherif A. Shazly, Middle-East Obstetrics and Gynecology Graduate Education (MOGGE) Foundation Research Group ObjectiveTo evaluate outcomes of fluorinated corticosteroids, with or without other medications, for treatment of congenital heart block in-utero.Study designA search was conducted through MEDLINE, EMBASE, WEB OF SCIENCE and SCOPUS from inception to October 2017. Only comparative studies are considered eligible. Outcomes include fetal death, downgrade of heart block, neonatal death, need for neonatal pacing, fetal and maternal complications. Random effects model was used.ResultsOut of 923 articles, 12 studies were eligible. Compared to no treatment, there was no significant difference in incidence of fetal death (OR 1.10, 95%CI 0.65–1.84), neonatal death (OR 0.98, 95%CI 0.41–2.33), or need for pacing (OR 1.46, 95%CI 0.78–2.74). Heart block downgrade was significantly higher in treatment group (9.48%vs.1.76%, OR 3.27, 95%CI 1.23–8.71).Conclusionantenatal fluorinated corticosteroids do not improve fetal/neonatal morbidity or mortality of congenital heart block and are associated with higher incidence of fetal and maternal complications.
       
  • Different methods of pain relief for IVF and ICSI oocyte retrieval –
           a Dutch survey

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Inez Roest, Erato T. Buisman, Jan Willem van der Steeg, Carolien A. Koks ObjectiveWhich analgesia methods are used during oocyte retrieval in the Netherlands'StudyDesignIn April 2017, an online survey containing questions on the analgesia protocol used for IVF/ICSI oocyte retrieval was sent to all clinics in the Netherlands that perform oocyte retrievals.ResultsThe response rate was 97%. We uncovered the large variety of medication protocols used for pain relief during oocyte retrieval in the Netherlands. Based on the main component of the given analgesia, we distinguished the three most frequently used analgesia protocols: intravenously (i.v.) administered opioids, intramuscularly (i.m) administered opioids, and non-sedative oral analgesics. Aside from analgesia, 61% provided anxiolysis with a benzodiazepine. Nearly half of the clinics registered pain scores. The vital functions were monitored at all clinics administering opioids i.v., but at none of the clinics administering opioids i.m.ConclusionsA wide variety of analgesia protocols are used. The three most frequently used are i.v. administered opioids, i.m. administered opioids, and non-sedative oral analgesics. The variety of analgesia protocols is not desirable in the context of good clinical practice, and considering the risks of combining opioids and benzodiazepines. Monitoring of vital functions was only performed after administration of i.v. medication. A comparison of the pain scores could be a first step in finding the optimal method of analgesia, thereby forming the basis of guidelines for analgesia during oocyte retrieval.
       
  • Progress in understanding the relationship between long noncoding RNA and
           endometriosis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Wenying Yan, Hongmei Hu, Biao Tang Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease. However, the etiology of endometriosis is still unclear, and current theories cannot fully elaborate its specific pathogenesis. Recently, some research has suggested that the occurrence and development of endometriosis may be related to genetics. Long-chain non-coding RNA (lncRNAs) is a kind of non-protein-coding RNA molecule with a length of 200-100,000 bp. With complex biological functions, lncRNAs play an important role in the normal development of individuals and the progression of various diseases, and lncRNAs have become an important field of medical research in recent years. This paper mainly illustrates the research progress on lncRNAs as they relate to endometriosis. We also provide some ideas for exploring the pathogenesis of endometriosis.
       
  • The impact of IVF on deep invasive endometriosis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Nicola Berlanda, Laura Benaglia, Lara Bottelli, Chiara Torri, Andrea Busnelli, Edgardo Somigliana, Paolo Vercellini ObjectiveOvarian hyper-stimulation during IVF is associated with a significant raise in serum estrogens and one may expect detrimental effects on estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis. However, available evidence from large case series of affected women performing IVF is generally reassuring with the possible exception of women carrying deep invasive lesions. On this basis we deemed important investigating more in depth whether women with deep invasive endometriosis could be a subgroup at higher risk of recurrence or disease progression during IVF.Study designWomen with endometriosis who underwent IVF and who had a second evaluation after 3-6 months from a failed cycle were retrospectively reviewed. The main inclusion criteria were the presence of deep invasive endometriosis and/or a history of surgery for this form of the disease. The primary aim of the study was to determine the frequency of endometriosis-related complications in the interval between the two evaluations. Secondary aims were pain symptoms and lesion size modifications.ResultsEighty-four women were ultimately selected: baseline ultrasound documented deep invasive lesions in 60 of them. One case of possible endometriosis-related complication was recorded, corresponding to a rate of 1.2% (95%: 0.05%-5.5%) for the whole cohort and 1.7% (95%CI: 0.08-7.6%) for the subgroup of women with ultrasound detected lesions. This rate appears similar to the reported frequency of endometriosis progression in women not receiving IVF. No significant modifications in pain symptoms or lesions size occurred.ConclusionsWomen with deep invasive endometriosis who underwent IVF do not seem to be exposed to a substantially increased risk of recurrence/disease progression. Larger evidence from independent groups is however required for a definitive conclusion.
       
  • Reassessment of prevalence of tubal endometriosis, and its associated
           clinicopathologic features and risk factors in premenopausal women
           received salpingectomy

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Hang Qi, Huiyu Zhang, Druo Zhang, Juan Li, Zhen Huang, Xiaoya Zhao, Jian Zhang IntroductionTo reassess the prevalence of fallopian tube endometriosis (EM), and its associated clinicopathologic characteristics and risk factors.MethodsCross-sectional study was conducted from June 2016 to August 2017. Unpregnant premenopausal women who underwent unilateral or bilateral salpingectomy due to gynecologic diseases were recruited. Patient clinical data and fallopian tube specimens were collected. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and CD10 immunohistochemistry were used to diagnose tubal EM.ResultsTubal EM prevalence was 14.48% (161/1112, 95% confidence interval [CI] 12.41%-16.55%). Prevalence of tubal EM in patients with EM was 37.37% (95%CI 30.58%-44.17%) which is higher in patients without EM (9.52%, 95%CI 7.61%-11.42%) and even higher in those with multi-organ EM (43.94%, 95%CI 35.36%-52.52%). At unilateral or bilateral salpingectomy, tubal EM was more likely located in the left fallopian tube (52.17%) than the right one (40.37%) and presence of hydrosalpinx/ hematosalpinx increased in women with tubal EM than without tubal EM (43.47% versus 23.79%). With increasing severity of pelvic EM (r = 0.26, P
       
  • FERTILITY-SPARING SURGERY FOR YOUNG WOMEN WITH OVARIAN ENDOMETRIOID
           CARCINOMA: A MULTICENTERIC COMPARATIVE STUDY USING INVERSE PROBABILITY OF
           TREATMENT WEIGHTING

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Hiroaki Kajiyama, Masato Yoshihara, Satoshi Tamauchi, Nobuhisa Yoshikawa, Shiro Suzuki, Fumitaka Kikkawa IntroductionThe aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic outcome of women with stage I ovarian endometrioid carcinoma (EC) who underwent fertility-sparing surgery (FSS).Materials and nethodsBetween 1987 and 2015, a total of 3,227 patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma were retrospectively evaluated based on a central pathological review and search of the medical records from multiple institutions. We identified 24 and 54 patients with stage I EC who underwent FSS and conventional radical surgery (CRS), respectively. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW)–adjusted Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were employed to compare OS between the two groups.ResultsWith follow-up of a total of 78 patients, 9 patients (11.5%) developed recurrence. In addition, 5 patients (6.4%) died of the disease. Recurrence was noted in 3 (10.7%) patients in the FSS group and 6 (11.1%) patients in the CRS group. Death was noted in 2 (8.3%) patients in the FSS group and 3 (5.6%) patients in the CRS group. In the original cohort, there was no significant difference in overall survival (OS) or recurrence-free survival (RFS) between the FSS and RS groups {Log-rank: OS (P = 0.630), RFS (P = 0.757)}. In the IPTW-adjusted cohort, the 5-year OS rates were 96.6 and 92.4% in patients with FSS and CRS, respectively (P = 0.319). Furthermore, the 5-year RFS rate was 88.6% for the FSS group and 88.1% for the CRS group (Log-rank: P = 0.556).ConclusionsYoung women with stage I EC undergoing FSS showed a relatively satisfactory prognosis, equal to those receiving CRC.
       
  • PREDICTION OF RECURRENT PRETERM DELIVERY IN ASYMPTOMATIC WOMEN- AN ANXIETY
           REDUCING MEASURE'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Sarah Petch, Alison DeMaio, Sean Daly ObjectivesThe QUiPP application is used to predict the risk of recurrent preterm birth (PTB) in asymptomatic high risk women with a previous PTB. Our study aims to evaluate the impact of the use of the QUiPP app on maternal anxiety levels.Study DesignA retrospective cohort study on asymptomatic pregnant women attending the Prevention of Preterm Birth Clinic in a busy tertiary unit. Women included in the study had a history of previous PTB. The study assessment occurred at approximately 4 weeks prior to the gestation of the earliest previous PTB and included measurement of cervical length and vaginal fetal fibronectin. Data was inputted into the QUiPP application, which in turn estimated risk of preterm delivery at specific intervals. Measured outcomes were gestation at delivery, time from risk assessment to delivery, infant birth weight, NICU admission and length of stay. In addition, maternal anxiety levels were retrospectively assessed using a questionnaire with a Likert scale.ResultsSeventy six women were included in the study. All women were asymptomatic for preterm labour at assessment. The mean gestation at the time of risk assessment was 27 weeks, the mean time from risk assessment to delivery was 72 days. Average gestation at time of delivery was 37 weeks (range 22-42 weeks). The preterm birth rate was 29% (n = 22).Seventy seven percent of women who delivered
       
  • Live birth rate is associated with oocyte yield and number of biopsied and
           suitable blastocysts to transfer in preimplantation genetic testing (PGT)
           cycles for monogenic disorders and chromosomal structural rearrangements

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Jara Ben-Nagi, Benjamin Jones, Roy Naja, Ahmed Amer, Sesh Sunkara, Sioban Gupta, Paul Serhal ObjectivesTo investigate whether live birth (LB) is associated with oocyte yield and number of biopsied and suitable blastocyst to transfer following preimplantation genetic testing (PGT) for monogenic disorders (PGT-M) and chromosomal structural rearrangements (PGT-SR).Study DesignAll couples underwent controlled ovarian stimulation, blastocyst biopsy, vitrification and transfer of suitable embryo(s) in a frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycle.ResultsOf 175 couples who underwent PGT treatment, 249 oocytes retrievals were carried out and 230 FET were subsequently undertaken. 122/230 (53%, 95% CI 47-59) FET resulted in a LB and 16/230 (7%, 95% CI 4-11) have resulted in ongoing pregnancies. 21/230 (9%, 95% CI 6-14) FET resulted in miscarriage and 69/230 (30%, 95% CI 24-36) concluded with failed implantation. Two (1%, 95% CI 0-3) transfers underwent termination for congenital malformation, with no evidence of misdiagnosis by prenatal testing. The relationship between number of oocytes retrieved and number of blastocysts biopsied and suitable embryos to transfer were significant (p = 0.00; Incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.05; 95% 1.04-1.06; p = 0.00; IRR 1.04; 95%, 1.03-1.06), respectively. The number of oocytes collected (p = 0.007; OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.10), the number of blastocysts biopsied (p = 0.001; OR 1.14; 95% 95% CI 1.06-1.23) and the number of suitable embryos to transfer (p = 0.00; OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.17-1.64) were all significantly associated with the odds of achieving a LB. There is a 14% and 38% increased chance of a LB per additional blastocyst biopsied and suitable embryo to transfer, respectively.ConclusionsPGT-M and PGT-SR outcomes are significantly associated with egg yield, number of blastocysts to biopsy and suitable embryos to transfer.
       
  • Potential chances for natural fertility influence results of intrauterine
           inseminations

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Jessika Moreau, Nicolas Gatimel, Cynthia Simon, Clémentine Cohade, Florence Lesourd, Jean Parinaud, Roger Léandri ObjectiveIntra-uterine insemination (IUI) is widely used for different indications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of intra-uterine insemination as a function of indication and origin of the inseminated spermatozoa.Study designThe retrospective study involved 827 first attempts of IUI in 827 couples between January 2011 and July 2017 in the Toulouse university hospital. Of these, 642 used fresh sperm from the husband, 40 frozen sperm from the husband and 145 frozen sperm from donors. The measured outcome parameter was live birth rate per attempt.ResultsWhen comparing couples lacking functional gametes (due to male or female causes), to couples who could potentially conceive spontaneously, i.e. subfertile, the latter were found to have a significantly lower live birth rate (18% vs 26%; P 
       
  • Impact of letrozole supplementation during ovarian stimulation for
           fertility preservation in breast cancer patients

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Charlotte Sonigo, Nathalie Sermondade, Jéremy Calvo, Julie Benard, Christophe Sifer, Michaël Grynberg ObjectivesOocyte and/or embryo vitrification after controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) represents the most established method of fertility preservation (FP) before cancer treatment. However, traditional COS regimens are associated with supraphysiologic serum estradiol and are therefore not recommended in estrogen-sensitive diseases such as breast cancer (BC). To protect the patients from the potential deleterious effects of elevated estrogen levels during COS for FP, protocols using aromatase inhibitors (letrozole) were developed. The present study aims at investigating whether COS with letrozole supplementation (COSTLES) modifies ovarian response in BC patients.Study designOne hundred and seventy-seven BC patients candidates for FP using oocyte and/or embryo vitrification following COS referred to our center between July 2013 and December 2016 were included in this retrospective case-control study. 94 patients underwent COSTLES while 83 had standard GnRH antagonist protocol. The number of oocytes retrieved, oocyte maturation rates, number of oocytes vitrified and follicle responsiveness to FSH assessed by the Follicular Output Rate (FORT) were assessed.ResultsWomen in both groups were comparable in terms of age and ovarian reserve tests leading to a similar number of oocyte recovered (13.1 ± 10.0 vs. 12.2 ± 8.0 oocytes, respectively, NS). However, oocyte maturation rates were significantly lower in COSTLES compared to standard protocol (64.9 ± 22.8 vs. 77.4 ± 19.3%, p 
       
  • Diagnostic Accuracy of Lamellar Body Count as a Predictor of Fetal Lung
           Maturity: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Ahmed Mahmoud Abdou, Mohammad S. Badr, Khaled F. Helal, Mohamed E. Rafeek, Amr A. Abdelrhman, Mahmoud Kotb ObjectiveThis study aimed to synthesize evidence from published studies about the diagnostic accuracy of lamellar body count (LBC) as a predictor of fetal lung maturity.Study designWe searched Medline (via PubMed), EBSCO, Web of Science, Scopus and the Cochrane Library for relevant published studies assessing the accuracy of LBC as a predictor of fetal lung maturity. Studies were classified according to the counting essays, centrifugation protocols, and the reported optimum cut off values. Data of the true positive, true negative, false positive, and false negative were extracted and analyzed to calculate the overall sensitivity and specificity of the LBC.ResultsThirty-one studies were included in the final analysis. Fourteen studies reported data for centrifuged amniotic fluid (AF) samples, 13 studies reported data for uncentrifuged samples, and four studies did not have enough information about whether centrifugation was done. LBC showed an area under the curve>80% in diagnosing lung immaturity with variable cut off values. Pooled analysis showed that LBC a 100% specificity to exclude respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) at a cut off value of 15000 and 100% sensitivity to diagnose RDS at a cut off value of 55000.ConclusionCases with LBC  45000 in centrifuged AF samples or>55000 in uncentrifuged AF samples are likely to have mature lungs. Cases with LBC ranging between these maturity and immaturity limits should be considered for further evaluation by other lung maturity tests.
       
  • Weight loss is beneficial for increasing female sexual function

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Yi Sun, Xin Wei, Guo-lin Lei, Hong Shen, Qiang Wei, Lu Yang BackgroundRecently, increasing attention and controversy have focused on whether weight loss can improve female sexual function, so we performed this study to explore this question.MethodsWe searched the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases to identify all studied variables; the search terms included “weight loss”, “bariatric surgery”, “no surgery weight loss”, and “female sexual function”. We compared the female sexual function index (FSFI) scores before and after weight loss through bariatric surgery or exercise.ResultsTen studies comprising a total of 494 patients met the inclusion criteria. The data synthesized from these studies indicated that weight loss improved the total FSFI score (p 
       
  • Double-balloon catheter for induction of labor in 362 women with and
           without prior cesarean section

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 May 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Anne B. Boisen, Ellen C. Løkkegaard, Jens Fuglsang ObjectiveBalloon catheter is the preferred method for induction of labor in women with prior cesarean section. We sought to evaluate the rate of vaginal delivery, induction-delivery time and outcome predictors after induction with double-balloon catheter.Study designWe conducted a retrospective cohort study including women with prior cesarean section undergoing induction of labor with a double-balloon catheter during the period January 2007–June 2014 at a large, tertiary Danish university hospital. For comparison, we included women with no prior cesarean section undergoing induction with double-balloon catheter after failed medical induction. Inclusion criteria were singleton pregnancy, an unfavorable cervix, intact membranes, cephalic presentation and either previous cesarean section or failed medical induction of labor. Exclusion criteria included contraindications for vaginal delivery, severe fetal malformation and stillbirth. Study subjects were identified in a local computerized system and data extracted from the medical records.ResultsWomen with prior cesarean section (n = 304) induced with double-balloon catheter had a vaginal delivery rate of 50.3% (95% CI 44.7–55.9) compared to 51.7% (95% CI 39.2–64.1) in women with no prior cesarean section but preceding failed medical induction of labor (n = 58) (p = 0.85). BMI≥30 was associated with increased frequency of cesarean section. Median time from induction to vaginal delivery was 27.1(20.4–31.1) hours and 28.4(25.5–36.1) hours, respectively (p = 0.05). The rate of complete uterine rupture was 1.0%.ConclusionsSimilar success rates of approximately 50% for vaginal delivery were observed after induction of labor with a double-balloon catheter in women with and without prior caesarean section. A BMI ≥ 30 was associated with an increased frequency of caesarean section.
       
  • Is there evidence for efficacy of human papillomavirus vaccination in
           solid organ transplant recipients'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Emeline Vinkenes, Martine A. Nielsen, Jan Blaakaer Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide and is associated with precancerous lesions and cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, tonsils and base of the tongue. Several studies show an increased risk of HPV-associated cancers in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTR). The aims of this review are to investigate the evidence of efficacy for the HPV vaccination in transplant recipients and to discuss the known national guidelines. A systematic literature search has been conducted to identify studies where SOTR received the HPV vaccination to evaluate the efficacy of the HPV vaccine on this population. The primary outcome was antibody response against the HPV genotypes included in the vaccines and the secondary outcome was national guidelines recommending HPV vaccination of SOTR. Three cohort studies evaluated immunogenicity. Two studies found suboptimal effect of the HPV vaccine, while an early terminated study detected 100% seropositivity. We have identified four national guidelines in the following countries; United States of America, Canada, Australia and Ireland, along with a recommendation from the World Health Organization (WHO).The results from the three studies were inconclusive due to the small sample sizes and the diverging results. Recommendations of HPV vaccination of SOTR is based on the knowledge about safety and efficiency in the general population and the safety of other inactivated (not live) vaccines in SOTR. Theoretically, the nonavalent vaccine should be recommended as the first choice in SOTR without age- or sex restrictions.
       
  • Stillbirth: Perceptions among hospital staff in the Middle East and the UK

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 April 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology: XAuthor(s): Suruchi Mohan, Thomas Gray, Weiguang Li, Mohamed Alloub, Andrew Farkas, Stephen Lindow, Tom Farrell Objectives Stillbirth is an important and yet relatively unacknowledged public health concern in many parts of the world. Public awareness of stillbirth and its potentially modifiable risk factors is a prerequisite to planning prevention measures. Cultural and regional differences may play an important role in awareness and attitudes to stillbirth prevention. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the awareness of stillbirth among hospital staff in Qatar and the UK, representing two culturally different regions.Study design An online population survey for anonymous completion was sent to the hospital email accounts of all grades of staff (clinical and non-clinical) at two hospitals in Qatar and one tertiary hospital Trust in the UK. The survey was used to gather information on the participants’ demographic background, the experience of stillbirth, knowledge of stillbirth, awareness of information and support sources, as well as attitude towards investigation and litigation. Data were analysed using descriptive and comparative statistics (Chi-Square test and Fisher’s exact test).Results 1002 respondents completed the survey, including 349 in the Qatar group and 653 in the UK group. There were significant differences in group demographics in terms of language, religion, gender, nationality and experience of stillbirth. The groups also differed significantly in the knowledge of stillbirth, its incidence and risk factors. The two groups took different views on apportioning blame on healthcare services in cases of stillbirth. The Qatar group showed significantly less awareness of available support organisations and relied significantly more on online sources of information for stillbirths (p 
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.233.220.21
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-