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OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (206 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 206 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Obstétrica e Ginecológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Sexual Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
African Journal of Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aktuální Gynekologie a Porodnictví     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 276)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Reproductive Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Andrology & Gynecology : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction     Open Access  
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Biology of Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Birth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Birth Defects Research Part B: Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Partially Free   (Followers: 298)
British Journal of Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 89)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clínica e Investigación en Ginecología y Obstetricia     Full-text available via subscription  
Clinical Lactation     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Clinics in Perinatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Contemporary OB GYN - Obstetrics-Gynecology & Women's Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Contraception : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Obstetrics and Gynecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Women's Health Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ecography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
EMC - Ginecología-Obstetricia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Clinics in Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology : X     Open Access  
Expert Review of Obstetrics & Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fertility and Sterility     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Fertility Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Fetal and Maternal Medicine Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Ginekologia i Perinatologia Praktyczna     Hybrid Journal  
Ginekologia Polska     Open Access  
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access  
gynäkologie + geburtshilfe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gynäkologisch-geburtshilfliche Rundschau     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gynakologische Endokrinologie     Hybrid Journal  
Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gynecologic Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Gynecologic Oncology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Gynecologic Oncology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecological Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Gynecological Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gynécologie Obstétrique Fertilité & Sénologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology     Open Access  
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access  
Gynecology Obstetrics & Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Care For Women International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Human Reproduction Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Indian Journal of Gynecologic Oncology     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access  
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Anatomical Variations     Open Access  
International Journal of Childbirth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Gynecological Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Gynecological Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Neonatal Screening     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Obstetrics, Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Reproduction, Contraception, Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Urogynecology Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de Gynécologie Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal für Gynäkologische Endokrinologie / Schweiz     Hybrid Journal  
Journal für Gynäkologische Endokrinologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Breast Health     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Gynecology and Obstetrics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Endometriosis and Pelvic Pain Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Evidence-based Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Genital System & Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Gynecologic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gynecology Obstetrics and Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Lactation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Human Reproductive Sciences (JHRS)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Midwifery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproduction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Midwifery and Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Obstetric Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Obstetrics and Women's Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Perinatal Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Reproduction and Contraception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Reproductive Biotechnology and Fertility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Reproductive Health and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Reproductive Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Kebidanan Midwiferia     Open Access  
Jurnal Ners     Open Access  
La Revue Sage-Femme     Full-text available via subscription  
Majalah Obstetri & Ginekologi     Open Access  
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Menopause     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Menopause International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
MHR: Basic science of reproductive medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Fertility Society Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Midwifery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Midwifery Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Nascer e Crescer : Birth and Growth Medical Journal     Open Access  
Neonatal Network - Journal of Neonatal Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Neonatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Nepal Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
OA Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Obstetric Anesthesia Digest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetric Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Obstetrics & Gynecology     Partially Free   (Followers: 93)
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Obstetrics and Gynecology International     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perinatología y Reproducción Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Placenta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Postgraduate Obstetrics & Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Progresos de Obstetricia y Ginecología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Reprodução & Climatério     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reproductive BioMedicine Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Reproductive Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reproductive Health Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Reproductive Medicine and Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Research and Reports in Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Brasileira de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia / RBGO Gynecology and Obstetrics     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Obstetricia y Ginecología     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Andrología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Peruana de Ginecología y Obstetricia     Open Access  
Revue de médecine périnatale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientific Journal of Hamadan Nursing & Midwifery Faculty     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seksuologia Polska     Full-text available via subscription  
Seminars in Breast Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Seminars in Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Sexes     Open Access  
Siklus : Journal Research Midwifery Politeknik Tegal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Southern African Journal of Gynaecological Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lanka Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teratology Studies     Open Access  
Thai Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access  
The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Practising Midwife     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Trends in Urology Gynaecology & Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)

        1 2 | Last

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Seminars in Reproductive Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.143
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1526-8004 - ISSN (Online) 1526-4564
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [239 journals]
  • James H. Segars, MD and Ayman Al-Hendy, MD, PhD
    • Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 469-470
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607998



      Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 469-4702017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Uterine Leiomyoma: New Perspectives on an Old Disease
    • Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 471-472
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606569



      Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 471-4722017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Uterine Fibroids: Burden and Unmet Medical Need
    • Authors: Al-Hendy; Ayman, Myers, Evan Robert, Stewart, Elizabeth
      Pages: 473 - 480
      Abstract: Uterine fibroids affect a wide cross-section of the population, with prevalence, symptom severity, and overall disease burden generally higher among black women, likely due to both genetic and environmental factors. Potential symptoms of uterine fibroids include painful and excessive uterine bleeding, interference with everyday life and self-image, and impaired fertility. Because of the high estimated prevalence and costs associated with treatments, the direct and indirect costs of uterine fibroids are substantial for both the health care system and the individual patient. Special patient populations—such as black women, women seeking to retain fertility, and women with asymptomatic fibroids—have particular treatment needs that require a variety of diagnostic methods and treatment options. Despite the widespread occurrence of uterine fibroids and newer treatment options, little high-quality data are available to formulate evidence-based guidelines that address these unmet patient needs. Specific areas in need of attention include improving diagnostic techniques, increasing patient access to early treatment, and identifying best practices for this diverse patient population.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 473-480
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607264
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Origin of Uterine Fibroids: Conversion of Myometrial Stem Cells to
           Tumor-Initiating Cells
    • Authors: Elkafas; Hoda, Qiwei, Yang, Al-Hendy, Ayman
      Pages: 481 - 486
      Abstract: Uterine fibroids (UFs) are the most frequent gynecologic tumors, affecting 70 to 80% of women over their lifetime, Although these tumors are benign, they can cause significant morbidity and may require invasive treatments such as myomectomy and hysterectomy in premenopausal women at a cost of up to $34 billion per year. Many risk factors for these tumors have been identified, including environmental exposures to endocrine-disrupting chemicals such as genistein and diethylstilbestrol (and other environmental agents) resulting in hyper-responsiveness to hormone in the adult uterus and promotion of hormone-dependent UFs. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of UFs is largely unknown, a growing body of evidence implicates unfavorable early-life environmental exposure and multiple biological pathways express as potentially import contributors. In this article, we will review the role of genetic and epigenetics in the conversion of myometrial stem cells to tumor (fibroid) initiating cells, and their role in UF development.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 481-486
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607205
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Mechanical Signaling and Extracellular Matrix in Uterine Fibroids
    • Authors: Rafique; Saima, Segars, James H., Leppert, Phyllis C.
      Pages: 487 - 493
      Abstract: Fibroids (uterine leiomyomas) are the most common benign tumors of the female reproductive tract. Steroid hormones, growth factors, and cytokines have long been implicated in fibroid growth; however, research suggests that changes in the extracellular matrix and mechanical signaling play a critical role in fibroid growth and differentiation. Studies have shown that growth of fibroids is related to the change in the volume and composition of extracellular matrix with increased deposition of abnormal collagen, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, and an increased osmotic stress. These changes generate mechanical stress which is converted to chemical signals in the cells through mechanotransduction and eventually affects gene expression and protein synthesis. Current studies also suggest that mechanical signaling in fibroid cells is abnormal as evidenced by decreased apoptosis of abnormal cells and deposition of a stiff extracellular matrix promoting fibrosis. Understanding and defining these mechanisms could help design new therapies for the treatment of fibroids.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 487-493
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607268
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Uterine Fibroids: Bridging Genomic Defects and Chronic Inflammation
    • Authors: El Andaloussi; Abdeljabar, Chaudhry, Zuni, Al-Hendy, Ayman, Ismail, Nahed
      Pages: 494 - 498
      Abstract: Uterine fibroids (UF; aka leiomyoma, myomas) are the most common benign tumors of female reproductive tract. They are highly prevalent, with 70 to 80% of women burdened by the end of their reproductive years. Fibroids are a leading cause of pelvic pain, abnormal vaginal bleeding, pelvic bulk symptoms, miscarriage, and infertility. They are the leading indication for hysterectomy, and costs exceed 34 billion dollars annually in the United States alone. Recently, somatic mutations in exons 1 and 2 of Med12 gene emerged as common UF driver mutations. Unfortunately, the detailed etiology of UF is not fully realized. Particularly, very little is known about possible dysregulation of inflammatory and immune processes and their possible contribution to UF pathogenesis. The notion on possible impact of altered estrogen and progesterone signaling in UF on inflammatory responses and DNA repair machinery that can conceivably lead to tumor-specific somatic mutation is indeed an intriguing concept which has some foundation in available observation in other hormonally responsive tissues. This review highlights and summarizes our current knowledge on the convergence of such pathways and their relevance for UF pathogenesis.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 494-498
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607240
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Activin A in Inflammation, Tissue Repair, and Fibrosis: Possible Role as
           Inflammatory and Fibrotic Mediator of Uterine Fibroid Development and
           Growth
    • Authors: Protic; Olga, Islam, Md Soriful, Greco, Stefania, Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele, Lamanna, Pasquale, Petraglia, Felice, Ciavattini, Andrea, Castellucci, Mario, Hinz, Boris, Ciarmela, Pasquapina
      Pages: 499 - 509
      Abstract: The growth factor activin A belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and was initially isolated as an inducer of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion. Activin A was later found to play roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metabolism. More recently, activin A has also been recognized as a novel player in mediating inflammation, immunity, wound repair, and fibrosis. Elevated levels of activin A during inflammation are responsible for the increased production of extracellular matrix in different pathological conditions, including fibroids. Our group has demonstrated a profibrotic role of activin A in leiomyoma growth. Uterine leiomyoma can be considered as a fibrotic disorder that initiates from myometrial smooth muscle layer of uterus in reproductive-age women and that is driven by a strong inflammatory component. In fertile women, transient inflammation is a physiological and essential process during menstruation, ovulation, and parturition. However, tissue injury from extravasated menstrual blood and/or an altered response to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants, can establish chronic inflammation in the uterus, ultimately leading to dysregulated tissue repair. Myofibroblasts are key cells in normal repair and the chronic tissue remodeling characteristic for fibrosis and uterine leiomyoma. In this review, we discuss the role of activin A in inflammation, tissue repair, and fibrosis and we elaborate the hypothesis that it plays a central role in myofibroblast activation and leiomyoma development and growth.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 499-509
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607265
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Current and Emerging Medical Treatments for Uterine Fibroids
    • Authors: Chwalisz; Kristof, Taylor, Hugh
      Pages: 510 - 522
      Abstract: Uterine fibroids (leiomyomata) are common uterine neoplasms that are often associated with detrimental symptoms, such as heavy menstrual bleeding, dysmenorrhea, and pressure-related symptoms, which often lead to surgical intervention, including hysterectomy. Although our understanding of the pathophysiology of uterine fibroids, particularly their dependency on progesterone and the role of growth factors, has increased during the past two decades, the medical options currently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration are limited and are only used for short-term symptom management. A long-term, safe, and effective treatment is not yet available in the United States. However, emerging medical treatments that are currently under clinical development, including progesterone receptor modulators and oral gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists, offer hope of new long-term medical therapies for symptomatic uterine fibroids as an alternative to surgery. Herein, we discuss the current and emerging medical therapies for fibroids based on evidence from randomized clinical trials.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 510-522
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606302
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • The Effect of Uterine Fibroids on Infertility: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Whynott; Rachel M., Vaught, Kamaria C. Cayton, Segars, James H.
      Pages: 523 - 532
      Abstract: Fibroids are present in up to 27% of patients seeking reproductive assistance, and can affect fertility through cavity distortion, alteration of endometrial receptivity, and sexual function. Surgical, noninvasive, and medical approaches have been developed to manage fibroids, but evidence-based data regarding their safety and efficacy for the treatment of infertility and the effects on pregnancy outcome are limited. Myomectomy, through minimally invasive techniques, is the most evidence-based approach to fibroids in women planning conception, and increases pregnancy rates by up to 68% in previously infertile patients. Laparoscopic uterine artery occlusion is under investigation as an alternative and simpler surgical approach to decrease fibroid size. Uterine artery embolization is not recommended for women intending future pregnancy, as the rate of spontaneous abortion (SAB) is up to 64% and the rate of abnormal placentation is 12.5%. Magnetic resonance imaging–guided focused ultrasound surgery is gaining interest as a noninvasive procedure with positive preliminary pregnancy outcomes, but appears to have an SAB rate of 20.6%. Selective progesterone receptor modulators, aromatase inhibitors, and vitamin D supplementation are under investigation to improve uterine conditions for pregnancy. Submucosal and intramural fibroids affect fertility and pregnancy outcomes and should be addressed during infertility workup.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 523-532
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607295
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Minimally Invasive Approaches to the Surgical Management of Fibroids
    • Authors: Wu; Harold Y., Wang, Karen C.
      Pages: 533 - 548
      Abstract: Uterine fibroids, as the most common benign neoplasm of the female reproductive tract, can significantly impact a woman's quality of life through abnormal uterine bleeding, infertility, and bulk symptoms. When medical therapy for symptomatic fibroids fails, surgery is the recommended treatment. While a hysterectomy through laparotomy was historically the first-line surgical approach for fibroids, multiple minimally invasive and uterine-sparing techniques are now available. An evidence-based literature review of the following minimally invasive approaches is detailed in this article: hysteroscopic myomectomy, laparoscopic and robotically assisted myomectomy, laparoscopic and robotically assisted hysterectomy, and ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation. For each approach, this review discusses the indications, patient selection, adjunct preoperative treatment modalities, instrumentation, techniques, and pertinent intraoperative considerations such as fluid management, interventions to reduce blood loss, antiadhesion barriers, and tissue extraction. Perioperative benefits, long-term outcomes including recurrence and fertility, and comparisons of outcomes among the various approaches are outlined as well. With continued technological advancements and surgical innovations, minimally invasive techniques will become the mainstay of surgical management for symptomatic fibroids to provide high-quality patient-centered care.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 533-548
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606304
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • New and Emerging Therapies for Uterine Fibroids
    • Authors: Fritton; Kate, Borahay, Mostafa A.
      Pages: 549 - 559
      Abstract: The pain, bleeding, and anemia associated with uterine fibroids debilitate many women. In addition to limited efficacy, the side effects of the currently used medical therapies prevent long-term use and nearly all pregnancies. Thus, women hoping to achieve pregnancy have limited options and usually opt for myomectomy. Once completed childbearing, many patients proceed with hysterectomy despite its risks and costs. Thus, there is a clear need for a new medical treatment for fibroids that is safe and effective. To this end, researchers have investigated several new treatments over the recent years, including both hormonal and nonhormonal ones. Some examples include selective progesterone receptor modulators, vitamin D, aromatase inhibitors, gene therapy, simvastatin, nanoparticles, epigallocatechin gallate, and intratumor collagenase injections. The aim of this article is to review and critically analyze the evidence (both laboratory and clinical) for these emerging therapies. We will discuss strengths and weaknesses of studies, areas where further evidence is needed, and finally deliberate on novel targets potentially amenable for development of future therapeutics.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 549-559
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606303
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Patient-Centered Care and Uterine Fibroids
    • Authors: Marsh; Erica E., Chibber, Shani, Saad, Wael
      Pages: 560 - 564
      Abstract: Uterine leiomyomas are the most prevalent tumors in reproductive-aged women and are a major public health concern in the United States. Commonly known as fibroids, these benign tumors continue to be the leading cause of hysterectomy and are responsible for as much as $34 million in costs annually in the United States. Despite the increasing numbers of gains that are being made in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors, relatively little work has been done to advance understanding of care delivery with regard to these tumors, specifically the patient perspective. Herein, we provide an overview of patient-centered care, a review of the available literature on the fibroid patient's perspective, and a discussion of opportunities to re-envision patient care with regard to fibroids.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 560-564
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607267
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 06 (2017)
       
  • Iris L. Romero, MD, MS
    • Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 393-394
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607361



      Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 393-3942017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Specialty at the Forefront of Care for LGBTQ
           Patients
    • Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 395-396
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607044



      Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 395-3962017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Establishing Effective Health Care Partnerships with Sexual and Gender
           Minority Patients: Recommendations for Obstetrician Gynecologists
    • Authors: Cook; Scott C., Gunter, Kathryn E., Lopez, Fanny Y.
      Pages: 397 - 407
      Abstract: Sexual and gender minority patients have historically experienced high rates of inappropriate and low-quality care, disrespect, and discrimination in health care settings, as well as significant health disparities. Obstetricians and gynecologists can take action on multiple fronts if they wish to improve the quality of care for their sexual and gender minority patients. Examples include improving their relationships with sexual and gender minority patients and family members by purposefully reflecting upon individual and team biases, engendering empathy for sexual and gender minority patients, and creating effective working health care partnerships with them. They can also take steps to improve their cultural competency by improving their knowledge base about sexual orientation and gender identity, using welcoming language and creating health care environments that signal to sexual and gender minority patients that they are welcomed and understood. This article documents multiple suggestions and resources that health care teams can use to improve the health and health care of their sexual and gender minority patients.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 397-407
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1604464
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Family Building by Same-Sex Male Couples via Gestational Surrogacy
    • Authors: Kim; Helen H.
      Pages: 408 - 414
      Abstract: Best estimates suggest that the number of households with same-sex male couples is increasing. One option for family building by same-sex male couples is gestational surrogacy. Embryos would be generated in vitro, using the biologic father's sperm with donor oocytes, and another woman (the gestational carrier) would undergo an embryo transfer to bear a child. Conceiving via gestational surrogacy requires advance planning, not only to coordinate the oocyte donor and gestational carrier but also to comply with regulations set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) has also published recommendations for practices using gestational carriers, which, in many cases, are more stringent than the FDA regulations. This article will review the FDA regulations and ASRM recommendations and their implications for same-sex male couples who plan to conceive via gestational surrogacy.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 408-414
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1607333
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Co-IVF for Same-Sex Female Couples
    • Authors: Getrajdman; Chloe, Lee, Joseph A., Copperman, Alan B.
      Pages: 415 - 419
      Abstract: The utilization of assisted reproductive technology (ART), particularly by same-sex female couples (SSFCs), has increased over the past few decades. Alongside the increase in use by lesbian women, there has also been an increase in the number of available treatment options. The process by which SSFCs make the various decisions associated with conceiving and parenting, however, has been largely overlooked. This review provides an overview of the reproductive treatments available to lesbian women and specifically highlights the “biological” and “social” obstacles they must overcome on their journey to parenthood. This review also describes how a relatively novel treatment strategy, co-in vitro fertilization, can give couples greater flexibility and provide them with the unique opportunity of a shared biological motherhood.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 415-419
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1605380
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Lesbian Pregnancy: Care and Considerations
    • Authors: Bushe; Sierra, Romero, Iris L.
      Pages: 420 - 425
      Abstract: The constructs and the provision of preconception and obstetrical care have historically been based on the assumption of heterosexuality, and have often excluded lesbian women. However, due to significant strides in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) civil rights, more lesbian women desire to create and expand their families, and lesbian parented families are increasing. This places obstetrical care providers at the forefront of the movement to build inclusive health care environments. Therefore, it is incumbent upon those of us who work in obstetrics to understand, recognize, and respect the unique cultural considerations that pertain to lesbian women and couples seeking parenthood. This review seeks to provide culturally sensitive guidance on the specific concerns and challenges lesbians face, from preconception care to postpartum care, and briefly addresses legal issues and considerations for the nonbiologic mother. The recommendations outlined here are drawn from studies of the experiences of lesbian women with pregnancy. However, the scientific literature is very limited, and there is a clear need for additional obstetrical research focused on this patient group. As professionals committed to assuring optimal outcomes for all obstetrical patients, it is crucial that we promote the inclusion of sexual minority women in our clinical practices and research endeavors.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 420-425
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606385
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Preventive Health for Transgender Men and Women
    • Authors: Imborek; Katherine L., Graf, Elizabeth M., McCune, Kaitlyn
      Pages: 426 - 433
      Abstract: Transgender men and women experience an incongruity between their assigned sex at birth and their identified gender. Gender dysphoria is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) as clinically significant distress or impairment resulting from misalignment in assigned and experienced gender. Transgender people have a history of negative experiences in health care and efforts should be made to create a welcoming environment through staff training, gender neutral restrooms, and gender inclusive electronic medical record systems. Transgender men and women face unique preventive health concerns in areas of metabolic screening, cancer screening, immunizations, and anticipatory guidance secondary to cross-sex hormone therapy, gender confirming surgical procedures, and certain high-risk behaviors. Here, the available data are reviewed and suggested best practices are outlined to optimize the preventive health for this patient population.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 426-433
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1604457
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Breast Cancer Screening, Management, and a Review of Case Study Literature
           in Transgender Populations
    • Authors: Deutsch; Madeline B., Radix, Asa, Wesp, Linda
      Pages: 434 - 441
      Abstract: Because of a lack of uniform collection of gender identity data, population-level breast cancer statistics in the transgender community are unknown. With recent estimates that at least 0.6% (1 in every 167 people) of the U.S. population is transgender, guidance on breast cancer risk, screening, and management in this population is needed. Such guidance should examine modifications, if any, to recommendations in cisgender populations, taking into consideration any history of hormone therapy exposure or breast surgery. This article describes existing evidence on breast cancer incidence in transgender women and men, and attempts to make rational recommendations regarding the screening for and approach to managing breast cancer in transgender populations. Current data are mostly limited to case reports which are reviewed here. More prospective, population-level research is needed to better understand the risks and predictors of breast cancer in this population, as well as to better inform the most appropriate screening modality, age of starting screening, and interval. Ultimately, a risk score calculator similar to existing risk models such as the Gail score, as well as an approach to shared decision making that involves patient-centered perspectives, is needed to best guide practices in this area.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 434-441
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606103
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Update on Gender-Affirming Treatment for the Transgender Woman
    • Authors: Unger; Cecile A.
      Pages: 442 - 447
      Abstract: Transgender women often transition with cross-sex hormone therapy and some opt to further affirm themselves with breast augmentation, facial feminization procedures, and/or vaginoplasty surgery. When considering medical and surgical transition for the transgender woman, careful preoperative evaluation and individual assessment is imperative and the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) Standards of Care provide the framework from which health care providers and surgeons may assess eligibility for affirming treatments. Vaginoplasty for the transgender woman may be performed by a variety of techniques, mainly penile inversion vaginoplasty or intestinal segment vaginoplasty. Surgical outcomes vary according to technique, and the unique risks, advantages, and disadvantages must be considered. Outcomes appear to be satisfactory following vaginoplasty surgery, but prospective, long-term data are still lacking. Providers should be aware of the peri- and postoperative management of the transgender women after genital surgery, as many women require ongoing care and management after surgery.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 442-447
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1604454
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Sexual Dysfunction in Lesbian Women: A Systematic Review of the Literature
    • Authors: Sobecki-Rausch; Janelle Nicole, Brown, Oluwateniola, Gaupp, Christina Lewicky
      Pages: 448 - 459
      Abstract: Over the past two decades, a growing body of literature has demonstrated the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in heterosexual women. Few, if any, studies have investigated sexual problems specifically in women who identify as lesbian. The aim of this article is to systematically review data on sexual dysfunction in lesbian women. We performed a systematic review of the literature searching MEDLINE via Ovid, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, CPCI-SSH, and Web of Science from inception through March 2017. We included all studies assessing sexual dysfunction or sexual problems in lesbian women. Heterosexual, bisexual, and transsexual groups were excluded. Of the 1,822 articles identified, 20 articles met inclusion criteria, 1 of which was a population-based probability study. These studies included 16 cross-sectional studies, 1 case–control study, 1 qualitative interview study, and 1 review of the literature. Sexual dysfunction is prevalent in lesbian women and may differ from sexual dysfunction experienced by heterosexual women. Available data are limited by small convenience samples and varied outcome measures. Current validated surveys may be applicable to this subgroup. There is need for population-based studies with harmonized measures of sexual function to guide an evidence-based approach to sexual dysfunction in lesbian women.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 448-459
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1604455
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
  • Family Planning for Sexual Minority Women
    • Authors: Stoffel; Cynthia, Carpenter, Emma, Everett, Bethany, Higgins, Jenny, Haider, Sadia
      Pages: 460 - 468
      Abstract: The family planning needs of sexual minority women (SMW) are an understudied but growing area of research. SMW have family planning needs, both similar to and distinct from their exclusively heterosexual peers. Specifically, SMW experience unintended pregnancies at higher rates than their exclusively heterosexual peers, but factors that increase this risk are not well understood. Contraception use is not uncommon among SMW, but lesbian women are less likely to use contraception than bisexual or exclusively heterosexual women. High rates of unintended pregnancy suggest contraception is underused among SMW. Contraception counseling guidelines specific to SMW do not yet exist, but greater adoption of current best practices is likely to meet the needs of SMW. SMW may have unique needs for their planned pregnancies as well, for which obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) providers should provide care and referrals. In general, understandings of the distinct family planning needs for SMW are limited and further research is needed, with particular attention to issues of overlapping health disparities related to status as a SMW and other factors such as race/ethnicity that may add additional layers of stigma and discrimination. Clinical resources are needed to help Ob/Gyns make their practice more welcoming to the needs of SMW.
      Citation: Semin Reprod Med 2017; 35: 460-468
      PubDate: 2017-10-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1604456
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 05 (2017)
       
 
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