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RESPIRATORY DISEASES (102 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 102 of 102 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Respiratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 254)
American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
American Review of Respiratory Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archivos de Bronconeumología     Full-text available via subscription  
Archivos de Bronconeumología (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asthma Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BMJ Open Respiratory Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Breathe     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Respiratory Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 100)
Chest Disease Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Lung Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pulmonary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COPD Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Pulmonology Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Research in Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Respiratory Care Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Der Pneumologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Journal of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ERJ Open Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eurasian Journal of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European Clinical Respiratory Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Respiratory Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
European Respiratory Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Experimental Lung Research     Hybrid Journal  
Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart, Lung and Circulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Indian Journal of Respiratory Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Tuberculosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Asthma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Asthma Allergy Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bronchology & Interventional Pulmonology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Respiratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Respiratory Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Tuberculosis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Respirasi     Open Access  
Karger Kompass Pneumologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kindheit und Entwicklung     Hybrid Journal  
Lung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Lung Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lung Cancer International     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lung Cancer: Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lung India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Respiratory Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Respiratory Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Paediatric Respiratory Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Pediatric Quality & Safety     Open Access  
Pediatric Respirology and Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pulmonary Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pulmonary Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pulmonology and Respiratory Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Respiratory Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Respiratory Investigation     Full-text available via subscription  
Respiratory Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Respiratory Medicine : X     Open Access  
Respiratory Medicine Case Reports     Open Access  
Respiratory Medicine CME     Hybrid Journal  
Respiratory Medicine Extra     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Respiratory Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Respirology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Respirology Case Reports     Open Access  
Revista Americana de Medicina Respiratoria     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias     Open Access  
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revista ORL     Open Access  
Revista Portuguesa de Pneumologia     Open Access  
Sarcoidosis Vasculitis and Diffuse Lung Disese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sleep Medicine Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
The Clinical Respiratory Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
The Lancet Respiratory Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Thorax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Translational Respiratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tuberculosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Tuberculosis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Пульмонология     Full-text available via subscription  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.314
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1069-3424 - ISSN (Online) 1098-9048
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [239 journals]
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Advances in Understanding and Treatment
    • Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 699-700
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3400453



      Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 699-7002019-12-30T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 06 (2019)
       
  • Microbiology of Cystic Fibrosis Airway Disease
    • Authors: Blanchard; Ana C., Waters, Valerie J.
      Pages: 727 - 736
      Abstract: Although survival of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been continuously improving for the past 40 years, respiratory failure secondary to recurrent pulmonary infections remains the leading cause of mortality in this patient population. Certain pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex continue to be associated with poorer clinical outcomes including accelerated lung function decline and increased mortality. In addition, other organisms such as anaerobes, viruses, and fungi are increasingly recognized as potential contributors to disease progression. Culture-independent molecular methods are also being used for diagnostic purposes and to examine the interaction of microorganisms in the CF airway. Given the importance of CF airway infections, ongoing initiatives to promote understanding of the epidemiology, clinical course, and treatment options for these infections are needed.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 727-736
      PubDate: 2019-12-30T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698464
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 06 (2019)
       
  • Organ Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis
    • Authors: Morrell; Matthew R., Kiel, Sarah C., Pilewski, Joseph M.
      Pages: 842 - 856
      Abstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) remains the most common indication for lung transplantation in children and the third most common in adults and has the highest median survival posttransplant for all pretransplant diagnoses. Criteria for transplant in patients with CF vary widely among transplant centers and early referral to multiple centers may be needed to maximize opportunities for lung transplantation. Comorbidities unique to CF such as resistant and atypical pathogens like Burkholderia and Mycobacterium abscessus, and cirrhosis require special consideration for lung transplantation but should not be considered as absolute contraindications. For those patients who are listed for lung transplantation, mechanical support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and mechanical ventilation can be efficacious as bridges to lung transplantation in experienced centers with adequate resources. Liver and pancreas transplantations are also acceptable options for end-organ disease related to CF and can provide improvements in both quantity and quality of life.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 842-856
      PubDate: 2019-12-30T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3399554
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 06 (2019)
       
  • Adult Care in Cystic Fibrosis
    • Authors: Elborn; J. Stuart
      Pages: 857 - 868
      Abstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is now more common in adults than children in countries with well-developed health care systems. The number of adults continues to increase and will further increase if the new cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators are disease modifying. Most of the complex morbidity and almost all the mortality of CF occur in adults and will increasingly follow this pattern even with new effective modulator therapies. Maintaining good quality of life including social functioning and maximizing survival for adults are the key priorities. This requires a highly knowledgeable and adaptable multidisciplinary team, which, though focused on maintaining lung health, requires an increasing range of other disciplines and specialties to maximize well-being. Changes in health care systems will require current models of care to adapt to provide care for the large number of adult patients. With increasing survival and age, many are likely to have both CF morbidities and additional diseases of aging. New models are needed for health care delivery for this expanding population with complex medical conditions.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 857-868
      PubDate: 2019-12-30T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3400289
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 06 (2019)
       
  • Controversies in Critical Care
    • Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 569-570
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698401



      Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 569-5702019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • The Long and Winding Road to Personalized Glycemic Control in the
           Intensive Care Unit
    • Authors: Tickoo; Mayanka
      Pages: 571 - 579
      Abstract: In the critically ill adult, dysglycemia is a marker of disease severity and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Close monitoring of glucose and use of insulin in critically ill patients have been done for more than 2 decades, but the appropriate target glycemic range in critically ill patients remains controversial. Physiological stress response, levels of inflammatory cytokines, nutritional intake, and level of mobility affect glycemic control, and a more personalized approach to patients with dysglycemia is warranted in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We discuss the pathophysiology and downstream effects of altered glycemic response in critical illness, management of glycemic control in the ICU, and future strategies toward personalization of critical care glycemic management.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 571-579
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697603
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Reconsidering Nutritional Support in Critically Ill Patients
    • Authors: Korwin; Amy, Honiden, Shyoko
      Pages: 580 - 593
      Abstract: Provision of nutrition is universally considered a key element of supportive care in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, there is a relative dearth of high-quality data, and where available, results are often conflicting. As we understand more about the process of recovery for critically ill patients, ICU nutrition might be better thought of as active therapy that can and should be tailored to the needs of patients in more dynamic ways. With the advent of the programmable feeding pump, continuous feeding modes have become the default manner in which patients are fed in many ICUs. In the modern ICU era, where the goal of critical care has shifted from mere survival to surviving and living well, non-continuous modes of feeding may have advantages related to fewer feeding interruptions, ICU mobilization, optimizing protein synthesis and autophagy, as well as restoring gastrointestinal physiology and the circadian rhythm. More research is desperately required to provide a framework in order to guide best nutrition practices for clinicians at the bedside.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 580-593
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697967
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Current Controversies in Sepsis Management
    • Authors: Moss; Stephanie R., Prescott, Hallie C.
      Pages: 594 - 603
      Abstract: The overarching goals of early sepsis management include early recognition, appropriate antibiotic therapy and source control, maintenance of hemodynamic stability, and supportive care of organ dysfunction. Despite increasing awareness of the global burden of sepsis, and general agreement on the goals of management, there is ongoing controversy regarding the implementation of specific treatment strategies to optimize patient outcomes. This article will address five current points of controversy in the management of sepsis and septic shock. These include optimal timing of antibiotics in patients with potential sepsis, the role of glucocorticoids in septic shock, vitamin C as a novel therapy for sepsis, the ideal intravenous fluid for resuscitation, and the optimal balance of fluid resuscitation and vasopressor administration in septic shock. For each of these topics, we review relevant literature, discuss areas of controversy, and present our current approach to management.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 594-603
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1696981
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Pain and Delirium in Critical Illness: An Exploration of Key 2018 SCCM
           PADIS Guideline Evidence Gaps
    • Authors: Pisani; Margaret A., Devlin, John W., Skrobik, Yoanna
      Pages: 604 - 613
      Abstract: Managing pain and delirium are crucial to patients, families, and caregivers in intensive care units. The Society of Critical Care Medicine 2018 Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep disruption (PADIS) guidelines reviewed literature until October 2015 and made its recommendations for critically-ill adults. This chapter addresses evidence gaps, identified during the guideline process, most relevant to clinicians, adds newer evidence published after the PADIS 2018 guidelines were produced, describes hindsight-driven PADIS process or content-related gaps, and reflects on how these considerations may help inform future research investigations and new guideline efforts.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 604-613
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698809
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit: Strategies for Improvement
    • Authors: Dorsch; Jennifer J., Martin, Jennifer L., Malhotra, Atul, Owens, Robert L., Kamdar, Biren B.
      Pages: 614 - 628
      Abstract: Sleep in the intensive care unit (ICU) is considered to be subjectively poor, highly fragmented, and sometimes referred to as “atypical.” Although sleep is felt to be crucial for patient recovery, little is known about the association of sleep with physiologic function among critically ill patients, or those with clinically important outcomes in the ICU. Research involving ICU-based sleep disturbance is challenging due to the lack of objective, practical, reliable, and scalable methods to measure sleep and the multifactorial etiologies of its disruption. Despite these challenges, research into sleep-promoting techniques is growing and has demonstrated a variety of causes leading to ICU-related sleep loss, thereby motivating multifaceted intervention efforts. Through a focused review of (1) sleep measurement in the ICU; (2) outcomes related to poor sleep in the ICU; and (3) ICU-based sleep promotion efforts including environmental, nonpharmacological, and pharmacological interventions, this paper examines research regarding sleep in the ICU and highlights the need for future investigation into this complex and dynamic field.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 614-628
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698378
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Circadian Biology and Its Importance to Intensive Care Unit Care and
           Outcomes
    • Authors: Gao; Catherine A., Knauert, Melissa P.
      Pages: 629 - 637
      Abstract: Circadian rhythms are an integral part of life on earth. Circadian rhythms play a fundamental role in homeostasis as they ensure coordination between the environment and an organism's behavior and physiology. This coordination is called entrainment. Entrainment depends on environmental cues known as zeitgebers. Human zeitgebers include light (primary zeitgeber), sleep, eating, exercise, and activity. Circadian rhythms are disrupted in critically-ill patients due to both critical illness and current intensive care unit (ICU) practices. Disruptions in circadian rhythms are tightly linked with ICU sleep disruption. Together these entities potentiate numerous adverse outcomes including delirium, metabolic derangements, cardiovascular instability, and immune compromise. Herein, we will highlight potential areas for care improvement via chronobundles. We suggest bright light during the day, maintaining darkness, and protecting sleep at night, intermittent rather than continuous feeds, and activity via mobilization during the day. Optimizing circadian rhythms is a low-risk intervention that is underutilized in current ICU practice. This optimization could be a powerful tool in helping to improve outcomes in the critically-ill patient.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 629-637
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698394
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Patient-Centered Outcomes in Critical Illness: Will My Patient Be
           Functionally and Cognitively Intact'
    • Authors: Geer; Jacqueline H., Qi, Wei, Ferrante, Lauren E.
      Pages: 638 - 647
      Abstract: Survival in the intensive care unit (ICU) has steadily increased over the past several decades; millions of patients now survive a critical illness every year. ICU survivors are at a significantly increased risk of impairments in physical function, cognitive function, and mental health. These patient-centered outcomes are among the most meaningful to patients. Landmark studies concerning treatment preferences have demonstrated that patients value functional and cognitive outcomes over mortality. In this chapter, we discuss the determinants of functional and cognitive outcomes post critical illness to address the question, “Will my ICU patient be functionally and cognitively intact'”
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 638-647
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698379
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Family-Centered Care in the Intensive CareUnit—What Does Best
           Practice Tell Us'
    • Authors: Ludmir; Jonathan, Netzer, Giora
      Pages: 648 - 654
      Abstract: Families in the intensive care unit (ICU) experience high-stress levels and are at risk of developing psychological symptoms including depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Family-centered care defines an approach that encompasses respect, compassion, and support for families. By alleviating stress and anxiety, this approach can increase family satisfaction, improve communication with staff, and decrease ICU length of stay. Family-centered care relies on an interdisciplinary approach. Its components include daily family-centered rounds, frequent family meetings, and ensuring an adequate family support environment. Each of the components of family-centered care depend on adequately trained clinical staff who are champion in empathetic communication and constantly support family member throughout an ICU stay.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 648-654
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697957
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Emerging Ethical Challenges in Critical Care for the 21st Century: A
           Case-Based Discussion
    • Authors: Lee; Jisoo, Ward, Nicholas S.
      Pages: 655 - 661
      Abstract: Ethical challenges for doctors and other health care professionals have existed since the practice of medicine began. Many of the oldest challenges live on to this day, such as who has more authority to make key decisions (autonomy vs. paternalism) and what are the boundaries of life at the beginning and at the end. Two powerful driving forces are new technologies and an ever-changing culture and society. The practice of medicine in intensive care units (ICUs) has been the source of many ethical challenges. Once firmly fixed concepts, such as death or “brain death” are now coming under increasing debate. In other areas, the concept of patient autonomy has been used to request life-prolonging therapies, once thought “futile.” New technologies for procreation have necessitated new ethical challenges as well. In this paper, we will use a series of cases, based on experiences from our hospital ethics committee, that occurred over the course of several years and illustrate ethical challenges which are either new to us or not new but growing in frequency due to technological or societal changes. Each one of these topics is complex and worthy of its own large review but for this overview, we will briefly discuss the key points of each dilemma.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 655-661
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698408
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Controversies Surrounding Renal Replacement Therapy in the Critically Ill
           Patient
    • Authors: Iacovella; Gina M., Kumar, Neelja
      Pages: 662 - 672
      Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) commonly occurs in the intensive care unit and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Patients with AKI often require initiation of dialysis to control electrolytes, metabolic abnormalities, and volume status. This review will discuss controversies in renal replacement therapy (RRT), including timing of dialysis initiation, dialysis modality and dose, nonrenal indications for dialysis, and the patient population best suited for RRT therapy.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 662-672
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697966
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Innovative ICU Solutions to Prevent and Reduce Delirium and
           Post–Intensive Care Unit Syndrome
    • Authors: Luetz; Alawi, Grunow, Julius J., Mörgeli, Rudolf, Rosenthal, Max, Weber-Carstens, Steffen, Weiss, Bjoern, Spies, Claudia
      Pages: 673 - 686
      Abstract: Delirium, the most common form of acute brain dysfunction affecting up to 80% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients, has been shown to predict long-term cognitive impairment, one of the domains in “Post-ICU Syndrome” (PICS). The ICU environment affects several potentially modifiable risk factors for delirium, such as disorientation and disruption, of the sleep–wake cycle. Innovative solutions aim to transform standard concepts of ICU room design to limit potential stressors, and utilizing the patient care space as a treatment tool, exerting positive, therapeutic effects. The main areas affected by most architectural and interior design modifications are sound environment, light control, floor planning, and room arrangement. Implementation of corresponding solutions is challenging considering the significant medical and technical demands of ICUs. This article discusses innovative concepts and promising approaches in ICU design that may be used to prevent stress and to support the healing process of patients, potentially limiting the impact of delirium and PICS.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 673-686
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698404
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
  • Translational Research in Intensive Care Unit: Novel Approaches for Drug
           Development and Personalized Medicine
    • Authors: Samanta; Romit J., Summers, Charlotte
      Pages: 687 - 698
      Abstract: The major clinical presentations seen by critical care physicians are sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), both of which are heterogeneous clinical syndromes rather than specific diagnoses. The current diagnostic criteria provide little insight into the mechanisms underlying these heterogeneous syndromes and minimal progress has been made with regard to the development of therapies, despite many large randomized controlled trials being undertaken. This review outlines the advances made in improved characterization of critically-ill patients, using ARDS as an exemplar, and highlights the need for this improved patient characterization to be coupled with mechanistic science to develop therapies that target specific pathomechanisms.
      Citation: Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 687-698
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698407
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 05 (2019)
       
 
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