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PEDIATRICS (273 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 273 Journals sorted alphabetically
AAP Grand Rounds     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Acta Chirurgica Latviensis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Paediatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Pediátrica de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Pediátrica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Pediátrica Hondureña     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Pediátrica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pediatric Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Alexandria Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Child Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
APSP Journal of Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Disease in Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice Edition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Pediatric Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Assessment and Treatment of Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
BDJ Team     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Boletín de Pediatría     Open Access  
Boletín Médico del Hospital Infantil de México     Open Access  
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Child & Family Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Care in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Child Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Child: Care, Health and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Children     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Children Infections     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Developmental Disorders Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Opinion in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Current Pediatric Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Current Pediatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Treatment Options in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Early Child Development and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Economic and Regional Studies / Studia Ekonomiczne i Regionalne     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pediatric Association Gazette     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EL HORMIGUERO Psicoanálisis ◊ Infancia/s y Adolescencia/s     Open Access  
EMC - Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Enfance en difficulté     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfermería Clínica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Evidence-Based Child Health: a Cochrane Review Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Evidence-Based Practice in Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal  
Evidencias en Pediatría     Open Access  
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
First Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Global Pediatric Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Indian Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Infancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Infant Mental Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Breastfeeding Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Child Development and Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Clinical Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Case Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Child Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Italian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 116)
JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting     Open Access  
Jornal de Pediatria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jornal de Pediatria (Versão em Português)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de Pédiatrie et de Puériculture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Specialists In Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied Research on Children     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Asthma Allergy Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Child Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Child Science     Open Access  
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Early Childhood Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endoscopic and Minimally Invasive Surgery in Newborn, Children and Adolescent     Open Access  
Journal of Fetal Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Memory and Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Nepal Paediatric Society     Open Access  
Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Paediatric Surgeons of Bangladesh     Open Access  
Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric and Neonatal Individualized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Pediatric Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Pediatric Epilepsy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Pediatric Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pediatric Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Pediatric Intensive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Pediatric Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pediatric Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics B     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196)
Journal of Pediatrics : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Perinatal Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Perinatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the International Child Neurology Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
JuKiP - Ihr Fachmagazin für Gesundheits- und Kinderkrankenpflege     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Kinder - und Jugendmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kinder- und Jugendmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
La Pediatria Medica e Chirurgica     Open Access  
Maternal and Child Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
MCN : The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics     Open Access  
Monatsschrift Kinderheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nascer e Crescer : Birth and Growth Medical Journal     Open Access  
Neonatal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neonatal, Paediatric & Child Health Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Neonatologie Scan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
NeoReviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Neuropediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Pediatric Medicine Journal     Open Access  
Pädiatrie & Pädologie     Hybrid Journal  
pädiatrie : Kinder- und Jugendmedizin hautnah     Full-text available via subscription  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Paediatric Respiratory Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Paediatrica Indonesiana     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Paediatrics & Child Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Infant Behavior and Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.784
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0163-6383 - ISSN (Online) 1934-8800
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3204 journals]
  • Experimental manipulation of maternal proximity during short sequences of
           sleep and infant calming response
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 59Author(s): Bindiya L. Raghunath, Atiqah Azhari, Marc H. Bornstein, Peipei Setoh, Gianluca Esposito
       
  • More than meets the eye: The neural development of emotion face processing
           during infancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 59Author(s): Paige Safyer, Brenda L. Volling, Neelima Wagley, Xiaosu Hu, James E. Swain, Maria M. Arredondo, Ioulia Kovelman
       
  • Exploring priming effects of social and non-social attention getters on
           older infants’ preferences for infant-directed speech
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 59Author(s): Tyler C. McFayden, Robin K. Panneton, Madeleine Bruce, Caroline Taylor
       
  • Early infant temperament shapes the nature of mother-infant bonding in the
           first postpartum year
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Lea Takács, Filip Smolík, Maria Kaźmierczak, Samuel P. Putnam
       
  • Do developmental and temperamental characteristics mediate the association
           between preterm birth and the quality of mother-child interaction'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Ayelet Harel-Gadassi, Edwa Friedlander, Maya Yaari, Benjamin Bar-Oz, Smadar Eventov-Friedman, David Mankuta, Nurit Yirmiya
       
  • Prolonged touch screen device usage is associated with emotional and
           behavioral problems, but not language delay, in toddlers
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Han-Pin Lin, Kuan-Lin Chen, Willy Chou, Kuo-Shu Yuan, Shih-Yin Yen, Yu-Shao Chen, Julie Chi Chow
       
  • Initial psychometric properties of the Denver II in a sample from
           Northeast Brazil
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Florencia Lopez Boo, Mayaris Cubides Mateus, Ana Llonch Sabatés
       
  • Infant brain responses to live face-to-face interaction with their
           mothers: Combining functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) with a
           modified still-face paradigm
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Hannah F. Behrendt, Kerstin Konrad, Katherine L. Perdue, Christine Firk
       
  • Association of preterm birth and intrauterine growth restriction with
           childhood motor development: Brisa cohort, brazil
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Paulo Ricardo H. Rocha, Maria da C.P. Saraiva, Marco A. Barbieri, Alexandre A. Ferraro, Heloisa Bettiol The present study investigated the association between preterm birth PT conditions, intrauterine growth restriction IUGR and the combination of both PT-IUGR with infant motor development. A cohort with 1006 children was monitored during prenatal, at birth, and two years of age. Bayley-III screening was used to evaluate of fine and gross motor skills. The data did not indicate an increased risk for motor delays in the PT or IUGR, composed mainly by mild cases. However, the combination of the conditions PT-IUGR increased the risk of delays in motor, which emphasizes the importance of monitoring the motor development of the group.
       
  • Neuroimaging the sleeping brain: Insight on memory functioning in infants
           and toddlers
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Elliott Gray Johnson, Janani Prabhakar, Lindsey N. Mooney, Simona Ghetti Episodic memory, or the ability to remember past events with specific detail, is central to the human experience and is related to learning and adaptive functioning in a variety of domains. In typically developing children, episodic memory emerges during infancy and improves during early childhood and beyond. Developmental processes within the hippocampus are hypothesized to be primarily responsible for both the early emergence and persistence of episodic memory in late infancy and early childhood. However, these hypotheses are based on non-human models. In-vivo investigations in early human development of hippocampal processes have been significantly limited by methodological challenges in acquiring neuroimaging data, particularly task-related functional neuroimaging data, from infants and toddlers. Recent studies in adults have shown neural activity in the brain regions supporting episodic memory during slow-wave sleep using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and fMRI has been increasingly utilized in infancy and early childhood to address other research questions. We review initial evidence and present preliminary data showing the promise of this approach for examining hippocampal contribution to how infants and toddlers remember individual events, and their association with information about the context in which the event occurred. Overall, our review, integrated with the presentation of some preliminary data provides insight on leveraging sleep to gain new perspectives on early memory functioning.
       
  • Keeping the end in mind: Preliminary brain and behavioral evidence for
           broad attention to endpoints in pre-linguistic infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Amy Pace, Dani F. Levine, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Leslie J. Carver, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek Infants must learn to carve events at their joints to best understand who is doing what to whom or whether an object or agent has reached its intended goal. Recent behavioral research demonstrates that infants do not see the world as a movie devoid of meaning, but rather as a series of sub-events that include agents moving in different manners along paths from sources to goals. This research uses behavioral and electrophysiological methods to investigate infants’ (10–14 months) attention to disruptions within relatively unfamiliar human action that does not rely on goal-objects to signal attainment (i.e., Olympic figure skating). Infants’ visual (Study 1, N = 48) and neurophysiological (Study 2, N = 21) responses to pauses at starting points, endpoints, and within-action locations were recorded. Both measures revealed differential responses to pauses at endpoints relative to pauses elsewhere in the action (i.e., starting point; within-action). Eye-tracking data indicated that infants’ visual attention was greater for events containing pauses at endpoints relative to events with pauses at starting points or within-actions. ERP activity reflecting perceptual processes in early-latency windows (
       
  • Coincidence or cascade' The temporal relation between locomotor
           behaviors and the emergence of stranger anxiety
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Rebecca J. Brand, Kelly Escobar, Ariana M. Patrick Two infant milestones, self-propelled locomotion and stranger anxiety, tend to emerge at a similar age in development. An adaptive relation may exist in which the onset of one influences the development of the other in individual children. We examine whether these milestones systematically co-occur and whether one reliably precedes the other. In the current study, 104 parents completed weekly online surveys between 6 and 12 months, noting milestones as they occurred. Onset ages for locomotor behaviors were correlated with onset of stranger anxiety over and above a milestone in a third domain, namely consonant-vowel babbling. These data suggest that infants’ earliest locomotor behaviors may play a role in galvanizing the development of stranger anxiety.
       
  • Covert orienting of attention in 3-month-old infants: The case of
           biological motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Marco Lunghi, Elisa Di Giorgio, Silvia Benavides-Varela, Francesca Simion Humans attend to different positions in the space either by moving their eyes or by moving covertly their attention. The development of covert attention occurs during the first year of life. According to Colombo’s model of attention (2001), within the first years there is a significant change in infants’ visuo-spatial orienting mechanisms, from a predominantly overt form to a covert orienting starting from 4 to 5 months of life. The use of non-invasive brain imaging techniques can shed light on the origin of such mechanisms. In particular, EEG and ERP studies can directly investigate the neural correlates of covert attention in young infants. The present study investigated the neural correlates of covert attention employing a visuo-spatial cueing paradigm in 3-month-old infants. Infants were presented with a central point-light walker (PLD) followed by a single peripheral target. The target appeared randomly at a position either congruent or incongruent with the walking direction of the cue. We examined infants’ target-locked P1 component and the saccade latencies toward the peripheral target. Results showed that the P1 component was larger in response to congruent than to incongruent targets and saccade latencies were faster for congruent rather than incongruent trials. Moreover, the facilitation in processing sensory information (priming effects) presented at the cued spatial location occurs even before the onset of the oculomotor response, suggesting that covert attention is present before 4 months of age. Overall, this study highlights how ERPs method could help researchers at investigating the neural basis of attentional mechanisms in infants.
       
  • Understanding the role and function of maternal touch in children with
           neurodevelopmental disabilities
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Livio Provenzi, Elisa Rosa, Eleonora Visintin, Eleonora Mascheroni, Elena Guida, Anna Cavallini, Rosario Montirosso During the first years of life, maternal touch can serve different functions including facilitation of child’s gaze orientation to faces which is a key precursor for social attention. Although children with neurodevelopmental disability (ND) may have reduced social skills, the role of maternal touch in contributing to gaze orientation to maternal face has not been explored in previous research. In the present study, we investigate the functions of maternal touch in dyads of mothers and children with ND, compared to dyads of children with typical development (TD). Micro-analytic 2-s coding of maternal touch (i.e., affectionate, playful, facilitating, holding, no touch) and children’s gaze orientation (i.e., mother-oriented, object-oriented, non-oriented) occurred during 5-minute interactions between mothers and their 12-to-24-month-old ND and TD children. Dyads were paired for children chronological age and sex. Mothers of children with ND used more touch – especially facilitating and holding types –, compared to mothers of TD peers. Children with ND exhibited more non-orientated gaze compared to TD counterparts. Playful touch associated with increased mother-oriented gaze in children with ND, whereas affectionate and holding touch associated with greater mother-oriented gaze in TD children. Findings suggest that specific types of touch support children’s attention to social partners.
       
  • Consistency in maternal affect and positive vocalization over the first
           year of life
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Charu T. Tuladhar, Amanda R. Tarullo Consistency in parenting infants has positive developmental outcomes. Yet, the role of socioeconomic status (SES) in consistency of maternal behaviors is not well understood. We investigated individual-order continuity of maternal smile and laughter and positive vocalization from 6 to 12 months of age in 82 mother-infant dyads. Overall, individual differences in maternal smile and laughter, and positive vocalization were consistent across time. A multidimensional measure of SES moderated the association of maternal smile and laughter from 6 to 12 months, such that infants from lower SES families were vulnerable to unpredictable parenting - experiencing a lack of consistency in maternal smiles and laughter.
       
  • Eighteen-month-olds integrate verbal cues into their action processing:
           Evidence from ERPs and mu power
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Christiane Patzwald, Daniel Matthes, Birgit Elsner Behavioral research has shown that infants use both behavioral cues and verbal cues when processing the goals of others’ actions. For instance, 18-month-olds selectively imitate an observed goal-directed action depending on its (in)congruence with a model’s previous verbal announcement of a desired action goal. This EEG-study analyzed the electrophysiological underpinnings of these behavioral findings on the two functional levels of conceptual action processing and motor activation. Mid-latency mean negative ERP amplitude and mu-frequency band power were analyzed while 18-month-olds (N = 38) watched videos of an adult who performed one out of two potential actions on a novel object. In a within-subjects design, the action demonstration was preceded by either a congruent or an incongruent verbally announced action goal (e.g., “up” or “down” and upward movement). Overall, ERP negativity did not differ between conditions, but a closer inspection revealed that in two subgroups, about half of the infants showed a broadly distributed increased mid-latency ERP negativity (indicating enhanced conceptual action processing) for either the congruent or the incongruent stimuli, respectively. As expected, mu power at sensorimotor sites was reduced (indicating enhanced motor activation) for congruent relative to incongruent stimuli in the entire sample. Both EEG correlates were related to infants’ language skills. Hence, 18-month-olds integrate action-goal-related verbal cues into their processing of others’ actions, at the functional levels of both conceptual processing and motor activation. Further, cue integration when inferring others’ action goals is related to infants’ language proficiency.
       
  • Parent-Training with Kangaroo Care Impacts Infant Neurophysiological
           Development & Mother-Infant Neuroendocrine Activity
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Jillian S. Hardin, Nancy Aaron Jones, Krystal D. Mize, Melannie Platt A randomized control trial was conducted to investigate the effects of skin-to-skin, chest-to-chest contact (kangaroo care, KC) in mother-infant dyads on patterns of infant brain activity and associated mother-infant neurohormone releases. 33 mother-infant dyads participated during pregnancy (29–38 weeks gestation), at neonatal and 3-month periods. Overall, analyses indicated that: 1) infants in the KC group showed left frontal brain activation patterns (asymmetry and coherence) associated with KC training; 2) KC produced moderate to large increases in oxytocin levels; and 3) KC yielded moderate decreases in cortisol reactivity. Findings suggest KC may garner favorable neuro-maturational and neurobiological outcomes for dyads.
       
  • Wearable strain sensor suit for infants to measure limb movements under
           interaction with caregiver
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Shinya Fujii, Hama Watanabe, Gentaro Taga Development of motion capture technology has enabled the measurement of body movements over long periods of time in daily life. Although accelerometers have been used as primary sensors, problems arise when they are used to measure the movements of infants. Because infants and caregivers interact frequently, accelerometer data from infants may be significantly distorted by a caregiver’s movement. To overcome this problem, a strain sensor suit was developed for infants to measure flexion and extension movements of the limbs. A case study was performed to analyze the strain sensor data of an infant in relation to the accelerometer data of the infant’s and a caregiver’s body under various types of infant–caregiver interaction. The results demonstrated that the strain sensor data had low correlation with the accelerometer data of the infant and caregiver while the accelerometer data between infant and caregiver had higher correlation. This suggests that the strain sensor is suitable to detect limbs’ angular displacements mostly independent from the translational body movements exerted by a caregiver.
       
  • Infant-directed language following a brief behavioral parenting
           intervention: The importance of language quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Perrine Heymann, Brynna H. Heflin, Melissa Baralt, Daniel M. Bagner Behavioral parenting interventions decrease early childhood behavior problems and increase positive parenting skills. However, few studies have examined the impact of low intensity interventions for infants at risk for behavior problems on changes in parent language. This study examined the effect of a brief parenting intervention, the Infant Behavior Program, on changes in parent linguistic input and its influence on infant language. Participants were 58 mothers and their12- to 15-month-olds, with elevated levels of behavioral problems. Mothers and their infants were from primarily Hispanic and low-income backgrounds. Mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to receive the Infant Behavior Program or standard pediatric primary care. Mothers receiving the Infant Behavior Program provided more linguistic input, which indirectly influenced infant language, and suggest targeting infants at risk for behavior problems can have a broader impact on language development.
       
  • Does preterm birth affect child temperament' A meta-analytic study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Rafaela G.M. Cassiano, Livio Provenzi, Maria Beatriz Martins Linhares, Claudia M. Gaspardo, Rosario Montirosso The present meta-analytic study was conducted to examine differences in temperament between preterm and full-term children, considering behavior style and psychobiological approaches. Moreover, we explored the potential moderators of the associations between prematurity and temperament. A systematic literature search was performed on PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Twenty-two studies were analyzed. Preterm children showed a higher Activity level as well as lower Attentional Focusing and Attention Span/Persistence, in comparison with their full-term counterparts. Extremely preterm children showed a higher Activity level than other preterm levels. These findings support the conclusion that preterm children present with a less regulated temperament relative to those born full term.
       
  • Sucking patterns are not predictive of further feeding development in
           healthy preterm infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Nicole Hübl, Saakje P. da Costa, Nicole Kaufmann, Jun Oh, Klaus Willmes Preterm infants are at risk of experiencing difficulties in their feeding development. For a possible early identification of these, we examined the association between sucking patterns, assisted spoon feeding, and chewing skills in 40 healthy preterm infants, and the role of experience in the acquisition of these skills in a prospective longitudinal study. Sucking patterns were evaluated at 34, 37, and 44 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA), assisted spoon feeding was evaluated at 6, 9, and 12 months PMA, and chewing was evaluated at 9, 12, and 24 months PMA. Sucking patterns were rated using the Neonatal Oral Motor Assessment Scale, assisted spoon feeding was rated using the Observation List Spoon Feeding, and chewing was evaluated using the Mastication Observation and Evaluation Instrument.All infants showed progression in their oral motor skills during the study period, but not all demonstrated a stable progression of skills. Quality of sucking patterns was not associated with skill level achievement of assisted spoon feeding or with chewing. Length of experience in sucking was significantly associated with duration of supplemental tube feeding but not with the quality of the sucking pattern. Length of chewing experience was significantly associated with chewing abilities at 9 and 12 months PMA. No clinical characteristics were sufficiently predictive of oral motor skill development. Results show that sucking patterns are not predictive of subsequent feeding development in healthy preterm infants. The food consistency offered and the length of feeding experience influenced the acquisition and quality of oral motor skills differently.
       
  • Infant behaviors and maternal parenting practices: Short-term reliability
           assessments
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Marc H. Bornstein, Chun-Shin Hahn, Diane L. Putnick, Gianluca Esposito Consistency in the order of individuals in a group across short periods of time—reliability—is both important developmentally and meaningful psychologically. For example, documenting the reliabilities of infant behaviors and maternal parenting practices elucidates the nature and structure of early development. In this prospective short-term longitudinal study (Ns = 51 5-month infants and their mothers), we examined reliabilities of individual variation in multiple infant behaviors (physical development, social interaction, exploration, nondistress vocalization, and distress communication) and maternal parenting practices (nurturing, encouragement of motor growth, social exchange, didactic interaction, provision of the material environment, and speech to infant). Medium to large effect size reliabilities characterize infant behaviors and maternal parenting practices, but both betray substantial amounts of unshared variance. Established reliability is essential to the application of these measures in infancy studies, it is central to replication, and it is a limiting factor in predictive validity.
       
  • Infant carrying as a tool to promote secure attachments in young mothers:
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Lela Rankin Williams, Patricia R. Turner Infants of adolescent mothers have a greater risk of developing insecure attachment types and attachment disorders into adulthood. Previous research suggests that skin-to-skin contact predicts secure attachment; however, it is largely unknown whether infant carrying or “babywearing” has similar benefits. We hypothesized that adolescent mothers (Mage=19.1 years, SD = 2.0; 40.6 % Hispanic; 40 %< = 11th grade) who were randomly assigned to an infant carrying condition at 2–4 weeks’ post-partum (n = 16; 1 h daily for 3 months), compared to a control group (n = 17; reading), would be more likely to have securely attached infants at 7 months (M = 29.0 weeks, SD = 3.4). We coded infant gaze orientation, fretfulness, affect, self-soothing behaviors, and vocalizations in the reunion phase of the Still-Face Paradigm, and used an algorithm derived from the infant Global Rating Scales to determine attachment type. Infants in the intervention condition were more likely to have secure attachments and less likely to have disorganized attachments compared to the control condition. Hours spent babywearing was positively correlated with secure attachment, rpb = .40, and negatively correlated with disorganized attachment, rpb =−0.36. There were no statistically significant differences between the conditions or babywearing hours for avoidant or resistant attachment types. The results suggest that infant carrying may be an effective tool at promoting secure attachments, particularly for mothers and infants at greater risk for attachment insecurity.
       
  • Audio-visual priming in 7-month-old infants: An ERP study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Stefanie Peykarjou, Julia Wissner, Sabina Pauen The current study investigates categorical priming across modalities in 7-month-old infants using electroencephalographic (EEG) measures. In two experiments, infants were presented with sounds as primes, followed by images of human figures and furniture items as targets. In experiment 1 (N = 20), images were preceded by infant-directed (ID) or adult-directed (AD) speech to explore effects of intermodal categorical mismatches. Furniture targets (mismatching category) elicited an increased amplitude of the Negative central (Nc) component compared to human targets (matching category), p 
       
  • 14 challenges and their solutions for conducting social neuroscience and
           longitudinal EEG research with infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Valdas Noreika, Stanimira Georgieva, Sam Wass, Victoria Leong The use of electroencephalography (EEG) to study infant brain development is a growing trend. In addition to classical longitudinal designs that study the development of neural, cognitive and behavioural functions, new areas of EEG application are emerging, such as novel social neuroscience paradigms using dual infant-adult EEG recordings. However, most of the experimental designs, analysis methods, as well as EEG hardware were originally developed for single-person adult research. When applied to study infant development, adult-based solutions often pose unique problems that may go unrecognised. Here, we identify 14 challenges that infant EEG researchers may encounter when designing new experiments, collecting data, and conducting data analysis. Challenges related to the experimental design are: (1) small sample size and data attrition, and (2) varying arousal in younger infants. Challenges related to data acquisition are: (3) determining the optimal location for reference and ground electrodes, (4) control of impedance when testing with the high-density sponge electrode nets, (5) poor fit of standard EEG caps to the varying infant head shapes, and (6) ensuring a high degree of temporal synchronisation between amplifiers and recording devices during dual-EEG acquisition. Challenges related to the analysis of longitudinal and social neuroscience datasets are: (7) developmental changes in head anatomy, (8) prevalence and diversity of infant myogenic artefacts, (9) a lack of stereotypical topography of eye movements needed for the ICA-based data cleaning, (10) and relatively high inter-individual variability of EEG responses in younger cohorts. Additional challenges for the analysis of dual EEG data are: (11) developmental shifts in canonical EEG rhythms and difficulties in differentiating true inter-personal synchrony from spurious synchrony due to (12) common intrinsic properties of the signal and (13) shared external perturbation. Finally, (14) there is a lack of test-retest reliability studies of infant EEG. We describe each of these challenges and suggest possible solutions. While we focus specifically on the social neuroscience and longitudinal research, many of the issues we raise are relevant for all fields of infant EEG research.
       
  • The Influence of Maternal Schizotypy on the perception of Facial Emotional
           Expressions during Infancy: an Event-Related Potential Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): E.S. Smith, T.J. Crawford, M. Thomas, V.M. Reid Parenting directly affects the developmental and clinical outcomes of children. How parental personality relates to perceptual and cognitive mechanisms during early development is not clear. For parents with traits of the personality dimension schizotypy, would their infant display brain responses similar to those on the schizophrenia-spectrum' This study investigates whether maternal personality influences early social-cognitive awareness during the first 6 postnatal months.Schizotypy is a dimension of personality within the general population. If deficits contribute to the development of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders by influencing the development of symptom-like characteristics, they may be observable in neurotypical individuals with schizotypal characteristics. Parents and their infants were shown standardised positive and negative faces and event-related potential responses were assessed. It was hypothesised that the infants of schizotypic mothers would display differential Negative-central event-related potentials for the happy and fearful expressions when compared to infants of non-schizotypic mothers.Results support prior literature; indicating 6-month-old infants allocate more attentional resources to fearful when contrasted to happy faces. The adult cohort displays this same ability. In addition, schizotypic mothers displayed comparable amplitudes for both expressions in comparison to the control mothers who exhibited larger amplitudes towards the fearful compared to the happy expression. Infants of schizotypic mothers did not show a greater sensitivity to facial expressions at 6-months, but schizotypic mothers showed a generalised response towards facial expressions compared to the typical P600 response illustrated by the control mothers. The present study suggests that development in the higher cognitive domains, such as the allocation of attention to novel stimuli, are not affected at 6 months of age by maternal personality related to schizotypy when examined at the group level. Implications for personality development, maternal-infant interactions and cognitive neuroscience methodologies are discussed.
       
  • A decade of infant neuroimaging research: What have we learned and where
           are we going'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Atiqah Azhari, Anna Truzzi, Michelle Jin-Yee Neoh, Jan Paolo M. Balagtas, HuiAnn Hannah Tan, PeiLin Pamela Goh, XinHui Anais Ang, Peipei Setoh, Paola Rigo, Marc H. Bornstein, Gianluca Esposito The past decade has seen the emergence of neuroimaging studies of infant populations. Incorporating imaging has resulted in invaluable insights about neurodevelopment at the start of life. However, little has been enquired of the experimental specifications and study characteristics of typical findings. This review systematically screened empirical studies that used electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on infants (max. age of 24 months). From more than 21,000 publications, a total of 710 records were included for analyses. With the exception of EEG studies, infant studies with MEG, fNIRS, and fMRI were most often conducted around birth and at 12 months. The vast majority of infant studies came from North America, with very few studies conducted in Africa, certain parts of South America, and Southeast Asia. Finally, longitudinal neuroimaging studies were inclined to adopt EEG, followed by fMRI, fNIRS, and MEG. These results show that there is compelling need for studies with larger sample sizes, studies investigating a broader range of infant developmental periods, and studies from under- and less-developed regions in the world. Addressing these shortcomings in the future will provide a more representative and accurate understanding of neurodevelopment in infancy.
       
  • Sleep duration associates with moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical
           activity and body fat in 1- to 3-year-old children
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 58Author(s): Isabella T. Felzer-Kim, Janet L. Hauck Sleep during early childhood is important for many developmental outcomes and shows promise as an important correlate of both obesity risk and physical activity behaviors. This was a cross-sectional study concerning the relationships between sleep and moderate- to – vigorous intensity physical activity and body fat percentage in a sample of 1- to 3-year-old children (N = 50; ages 27.512 ± 10.363 months). Sleep was measured with a caregiver questionnaire. Sedentary time, light, moderate, vigorous, and moderate- to – vigorous intensity physical activity were measured with Actigraph wT3x-BT accelerometers. Body fat was measured using Air Displacement Plethysmography with the BodPod Pediatric Option. Moderate- to – vigorous intensity physical activity and body fat percentage both associated with sleep duration, controlling for age and accelerometer wear time. These factors combined explained 54.3 % of the variance in sleep duration present in the sample. These results suggest the presence of relationships between sleep and physical activity and body composition constructs in this sample. Sleep may be an important variable in efforts to both promote early childhood physical activity and healthy body composition.
       
 
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