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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6204 journals)
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PEDIATRICS (200 journals)                  1 2     

AAP Grand Rounds     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Acta Chirurgica Latviensis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Paediatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Paediatric Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
APSP Journal of Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Disease in Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Assessment and Treatment of Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
BMC Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Boletín de Pediatría     Open Access  
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Child & Family Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Care in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252)
Child Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Child: Care, Health and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Children     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Developmental Disorders Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Opinion in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Pediatric Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Pediatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Child Development and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Pediatric Association Gazette     Open Access  
Enfermería Clínica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidence-Based Child Health: a Cochrane Review Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidencias en Pediatría     Open Access  
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
First Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Pediatrics     Open Access  
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Global Pediatric Health     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Infancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Mental Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Clinical Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
ISRN Pediatrics     Open Access  
Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Jornal de Pediatria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de Pédiatrie et de Puériculture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Specialists In Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research on Children     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asthma Allergy Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Child Health Care     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

        1 2     

Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
   [7 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1053-4628
     Published by Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.227]   [H-I: 26]
  • Effect of Corticosteroids on Orthodontic Tooth Movement in a Rabbit Model
    • Abstract: Introduction: While there are a growing number of studies on the effects of medications on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), only few studies have investigated the role of corticosteroids, despite their widespread use. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of triamcinolone acetonide injection on OTM in a rabbit model. Study design: Sixteen one-month old rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: Eight rabbits had triamcinolone acetonide (1mg/kg/day) administered IM daily for 21 days (test group) while the remaining eight rabbits received no drug (control group). The rabbits in both groups had a tube bonded to the upper central incisors and a stainless steel helical spring was inserted in tube slot to apply 50 cN distal force. After 3 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed and the distance between mesial corners of incisors was measured. The incisors are associated tissue was processed for histology and the apical and cervical area of the roots evaluated. An observer who was blind to the study groups evaluated the specimens. Results: All appliance-treated incisors in test and control groups showed evidence of tooth movement. The distance between the incisors was significantly greater in the triamcinolone acetonide treated group compared to the control group (P
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:29 GMT
       
  • Soft Tissue Alterations Following Protraction Approaches with and without
           Rapid Maxillary Expansion
    • Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare the soft tissue changes influenced by reverse headgear therapy with (RHg+RME) or without (RHg) rapid maxillary expansion with each other and with an untreated Class III control group (C). Study design: RHg group (10 girls, 6 boys, mean chronological age 11.1 years), RHg+RME group (12 girls, 4 boys, mean chronological age 10.8 years) and C group (7 girls, 11 boys, mean chronological age 10.2 years) comprised skeletally Class III patients with maxillary deficiency. Soft tissue measurements were made on lateral cephalograms at the beginning and at the end of the treatment and observation periods. Changes within each group and the differences between the groups were analyzed by paired t-test; the differences between the groups were determined by variance analysis and Duncan test with a significance level p
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:29 GMT
       
  • Relationship between Disk Position and Degenerative Bone Changes in
           Temporomandibular Joints of Young Subjects with TMD. An MRI Study
    • Abstract: This study determines the frequency and relationship between disk position and degenerative bone changes in temporomandibular joints in children and adolescent patients with internal derangement. Study design: TMJ, MRI of 88 patients were analyzed (average age: 14.7 years-old, range age: 10-18 years-old), female n=65 (73.9%) and male n=23 (26.1%). Images obtained were used to determine the frequency of disk position, joint effusion (JE) and degenerative bone changes (OA). Images were assessed by a calibrated radiologist (Kappa=0.82). Results: No significant association was found between disk displacement with reduction and degenerative bone changes (Chi2=9.894; OR= 0.375; p=0.0017), nor disk without displacement (Chi2=9.448; OR= 0.223; p=0.0021). A significant association was found between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes (Chi2=30.951; OR=6.304; p=0.0001). Conclusions: There is a significant association between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes (p=0.0001) in children and adolescent patients with TMD.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Growth and Development
      Pages 269-276

      Authors
      G Moncada, DDS Universidad Mayor
      D Cortés, DDS Universidad de Chile, Dental School
      P Millas, Diagnostico por Imágenes San Vicente de Paul
      C Marholz, DDS, Universidad Nacional Andrés Bello
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:29 GMT
       
  • A Comparative evaluation of Intrnasal Dexmedetomidine, Midazolam and
           Ketamine for their sedative and analgesic properties: A Triple Blind
           Randomized Study
    • Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of Intranasal (IN) Dexmedetomidine, Midazolam and Ketamine in producing moderate sedation among uncooperative pediatric dental patients. Study Design: This randomized triple blind comparative study comprises of eighty four ASA grade I children of both sexes aged 4-14 years, who were uncooperative and could not be managed by conventional behavior management techniques. All the children were randomized to receive one of the four drug groups Dexmedetomidine 1'g/ kg (D1), 1.5μg/kg (D2), Midazolam 0.2mg/kg (M1) and Ketamine 5mg/kg (K1) through IN route. These drug groups were assessed for efficacy and safety by gauging overall success rate and by monitoring vital signs, respectively. Results: The onset of sedation was significantly rapid with M1 and K1 as compared to D1 and D2 (p=Ã0.001). The overall success rate was highest in D2 (85.7%) followed by D1 (81%), K1 (66.7%) and M1 (61.9%), however, the difference among them was not statistically significant (p=ã0.05). Even though all the vital signs were within physiological limits, there was significant reduction in pulse rate (PR) (p=Ã0.001) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p=Ã0.05) among D1 and D2 as compared to M1 and K1. D1, D2 and K1 produced greater intra- and post-operative analgesia as compared to M1. There were no significant adverse effects with any group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine, Midazolam and Ketamine, all the three drugs evaluated in the present study can be used safely and effectively through IN route in uncooperative pediatric dental patients for producing moderate sedation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 255-261

      Authors
      M Natarajan Surendar, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, From King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India
      R Kumar Pandey, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, From King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India
      A Kumar Saksena, Department of Pharmacology, From King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India
      R Kumar, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, From King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India
      G Chandra, Department of Anesthesia, From King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:28 GMT
       
  • Assessing Changes in Oral Health-Related Quality of Life Following Dental
           Rehabilitation under General Anesthesia
    • Abstract: This study determines the frequency and relationship between disk position and degenerative bone changes in temporomandibular joints in children and adolescent patients with internal derangement. Study design: TMJ, MRI of 88 patients were analyzed (average age: 14.7 years-old, range age: 10-18 years-old), female n=65 (73.9%) and male n=23 (26.1%). Images obtained were used to determine the frequency of disk position, joint effusion (JE) and degenerative bone changes (OA). Images were assessed by a calibrated radiologist (Kappa=0.82). Results: No significant association was found between disk displacement with reduction and degenerative bone changes (Chi2=9.894; OR= 0.375; p=0.0017), nor disk without displacement (Chi2=9.448; OR= 0.223; p=0.0021). A significant association was found between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes (Chi2=30.951; OR=6.304; p=0.0001). Conclusions: There is a significant association between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes (p=0.0001) in children and adolescent patients with TMD.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 263-267

      Authors
      G Moncada, DDS Universidad Mayor
      D Cortés, DDS Universidad de Chile, Dental School
      R Millas, Diagnostico por Imágenes San Vicente de Paul
      C Marholz, DDS, Universidad Nacional Andrés Bello
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:28 GMT
       
  • Management of Oral Lesions in Lesch-Nyham Syndrome
    • Abstract: Lesh-Nyhan Syndrome is a hereditary disorder that affects the way in which the body handles the production and breakdown of purines. One of its main characteristic is self-mutilation. We present a new appliance which allows healing to occur.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 247-249

      Authors
      M Romero Maroto, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, Rey Juan Carlos University, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
      C Ruiz Duque, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, Rey Juan Carlos University, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
      G Vincent, Laboratory Technician Madrid Spain
      I Garcia Recuero, Hospital 12 de Octubre Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Madrid, Spain
      A Romance, Hospital 12 de Octubre Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Madrid, Spain
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:27 GMT
       
  • Chemotherapy Induced Dental Changes in a Child with Medulloblastoma: A
           Case Report
    • Abstract: We describe the dental findings and therapeutic management of a child aged three years and eight months with medulloblastoma treated by surgical resection at age eight months followed by 20 months of chemotherapy. Thin and short roots of the primary molars were observed, as were microdontia and anodontia of the premolars. The boy suffered from severe early childhood caries (ECC). Dental treatment was carried out under general anesthesia. Follow-up examinations at three, six and twelve months after the initial dental treatment revealed healthy gingival tissue and no new caries. The boy passed away before the next scheduled follow-up dental examination.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 251-254

      Authors
      B Peretz, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
      H Sarnat, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
      J Kharouba, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:27 GMT
       
  • Prevalence and Characteristics of Non-Syndromic Orofacial Clefts and the
           Influence of Consanguinity
    • Abstract: The Objective of this study was to identify the prevalence and describe the characteristics of non-syndromic orofacial cleft (NSOFC) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and examine the influence of consanguinity. Study Design: Six hospitals were selected to represent Jeddah's five municipal districts. New born infants with NSOFC born between 1st of January 2010 to 31st of December 2011 were clinically examined and their number compared to the total number of infants born in these hospitals to calculate the prevalence of NSOFC types and sub-phenotypes. Referred Infants were included for the purpose of studying NSOFC characteristics and their relationship to consanguinity. Information on NSOFC infants was gathered through parents’ interviews, infants’ files and patient examinations. Results: Prospective surveillance of births resulted in identifying 37 NSOFC infants born between 1st of January 2010 to 31st of December 2011 giving a birth prevalence of 0.80/1000 living births. The total infants seen, including referred cases, were 79 children. Consanguinity among parents of cleft palate (CP) cases was statistically higher than that among cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) patients (P=0.039). Although there appears to be a trend in the relationship between consanguinity and severity of CL/P sub-phenotype, it was not statistically significant (P= 0.248). Conclusions: Birth prevalence of NSOFC in Jeddah City was 0.8/1000 live births with CL/P: 0.68/1000 and CP: 0.13/1000. Both figures were low compared to the global birth prevalence (NSOFC: 1.25/1000, CL/P: 0.94/1000 and CP: 0.31/1000 live births). Consanguineous parents were statistically higher among CP cases than among other NSOFC phenotypes.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 241-246

      Authors
      NM Alamoudi, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      H J Sabbagh, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      NPT Innes, Dental School, Dundee University, Dental School 1Park Place Dundee, DD1 4HR Scotland, UK
      D El Derwi, Pediatric Dentistry Division, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      AZ Hanno, Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University
      JY Al-Aama, Genetic Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Princess Al-Jawhara Albrahim Center of Excellence in Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University Hospital
      A H Habiballah, Orthodontic Division, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      P A Mossey, Dental School, Dundee University, Dental School 1Park Place Dundee, DD1 4HR Scotland, UK
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:26 GMT
       
  • Assessment of Salivary Total Antioxidant Levels and Oral Health Status in
           Children with Cerebral Palsy
    • Abstract: Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Saliva may constitute a first line of defence, against free radical-modified oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to evaluate Total Antioxidant Capacity(TAC), levels of Nitric Oxide(NO), and Sialic Acid (SA) in saliva of cerebral palsied children. Study design: Thirty four non-institutionalized children in the age group of 7-12 years having cerebral palsy formed the study group. The control group consisted of thirty three normal, healthy children. The W.H.O. criteria was used for diagnosis and recording of dental caries. Oral hygiene status was assessed using the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index OHI-S. Estimation of Total Antioxidant Capacity, levels of Nitric Oxide and Sialic Acid in saliva was done. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Children with CP had higher deft scores than that of normal children. Oral hygiene of children with CP was significantly poorer than that of normal children. Total Antioxidant Capacity of saliva was significantly higher in normal children than cerebral palsied children. Levels of Sialic Acid in saliva were significantly higher in cerebral palsy children. Conclusions: In children with CP, TAC of saliva showed an inverse relation with dental caries.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 235-239

      Authors
      P Subramaniam, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bangalore, India
      L Mohan Das, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bangalore, India
      KL Girish Babu, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bangalore, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:26 GMT
       
  • Pulpal Response to Nano Hydroxyapatite, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and
           Calcium Hydroxide when Used as a Direct Pulp Capping Agent: An in Vivo
           study
    • Abstract: Nano hydroxyapatite (Nano-HA) and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) because of its better qualities can be used as an alternative to calcium hydroxide in direct pulp capping procedures. The aim of the study was to compare the response of exposed human pulp to Nano-HA, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and calcium hydroxide. Study design: The study was done on 30 premolars, ranging from patients between 11-15 years. Intentional pulp capping was done using one of the experimental materials. The extracted teeth were then subjected to staining procedure and evaluated for dentin bridge and pulpal response after 15 and 30 days. Intragroup comparisons of the observed values were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: Nano-HA and MTA produced continuous dentin bridges. Dentin bridge that was formed in MTA group had regular pattern of dentinal tubules but no tubules were seen in the nano-HA group. Dentin bridge was not observed in Dycal group for the 15 days period in majority of the sample and by 30 days dentin bridge was observed that were both continuous and interrupted in equal number of samples. The initial inflammatory response and necrosis was more with Nano-HA and calcium hydroxide which reduced with time. Conclusion: MTA showed no inflammatory changes in majority of the samples in both the study periods. Necrosis was least observed in MTA group followed by Nano-HA. Vascularity increased in Nano-HA group in the initial periods which reduced with increasing time. Based on the ability of nano-HA to produce complete dentinal bridges, favorable cellular and vascular response, the material could be considered as an substitute and could be tried used as a direct pulp capping agent.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 201-206

      Authors
      SJ Swarup, Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore
      A Rao, Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore
      K Boaz, Oral Pathology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore
      N Srikant, Oral Pathology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore
      R Shenoy, Public Health Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Treatment of Oral Ulcers in Dogs Using Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal
           Stem Cells
    • Abstract: Aim: Adipose tissue Derived Mesenchymal Stem cells (ADMSCs) represent a promising tool for new clinical concepts in supporting cellular therapy. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of ADMSCs transplantation on oral ulcer healing in dogs. Study design: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissues of dogs obtained by suction-assisted lipectomy (liposuction), by dish adherence and were expanded in culture. Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of 18 dogs. The dogs were classified into 3 groups. Either autologous ADMSCs, Corticosteriod (Dexamethasone) or vehicle (saline) was injected. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelets derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and collagen was assessed in biopsies obtained from all ulcers ‘’as healing markers’’, by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: ADMSCs group showed significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with the Dexamethasone and control groups. There was increased expression of VEGF, PDGF, EGF and collagen genes in ADMSCs-treated ulcers compared with Dexamethasone and controls. Conclusion: ADMSCs transplantation may help accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF and PDGF, as well as epithelial and connective tissue proliferation as evidenced by increased EGF and collagen gene expression.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 215-222

      Authors
      N M Alamoudi, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      E A El Ashiry, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      N M Farsi, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      D A El Derwi, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      H M Atta, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Minimally Invasive Clinical Approach in Indirect Pulp Therapy and Healing
           of Deep Carious Lesions
    • Abstract: Indirect pulp treatment is a conservative vital pulp procedure performed in deep carious lesion approximating the pulp, but without signs or symptoms of pulp degeneration. Removing the carious biomass along with sealing the residual caries from extrinsic substrate and oral bacteria makes residual caries after the first excavation less active. This allows time for pulpo dentinal complex to form tertiary dentine so that at the second excavation, there is less likelihood of pulpal exposure. It has also been suggested that by changing the cavity environment from an active lesion into a more slowly progressing lesion, will be accompanied by more regular tubular tertiary dentin formation. The success of this approach has been demonstrated by various randomized controlled studies comparing conventional treatment of such lesions with stepwise excavation. These results are echoed at clinical, radiographic, macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural level during follow up visits. This study reviews promising concepts and rationale of minimally invasive indirect pulp therapy technique where conventional wisdom of caries removal is challenged.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Review Article
      Pages 185-192

      Authors
      S Opal, Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maharishi Markandeshwar College of Dental Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India
      S Garg, Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maharishi Markandeshwar College of Dental Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India
      A Dhindsa, Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maharishi Markandeshwar College of Dental Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India
      T Taluja, Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maharishi Markandeshwar College of Dental Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Zirconia Crowns - An Esthetic and Resistant Restorative Alternative For
           ECC Affected Primary Teeth
    • Abstract: The present report discusses briefly the problem of ECC in very young children and the recommended approaches for prevention and treatment.The esthetic restoration of the maxillary incisors with Zirconia Nu Smile™ crowns is described. It is also stressed that the luxation injury two months after placement did not damage the appearance nor the stability of the crowns.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 193-195

      Authors
      P Planells del Pozo, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
      AB Fuks, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Hadassah Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Comparison of Relative Efficacy of Two Techniques of Enamel Stain Removal
           on Fluorosed Teeth. An in Vivo Study
    • Abstract: The present study was conducted to compare and evaluate the relative efficacy of enamel microabrasion (using 18% HCl) and bleaching with McInnes solution in the esthetic improvement of fluorosed teeth and to check postoperative sensitivity. Study design: 30 children aged between 9-14yrs with a mild or moderate grade of fluorosis as classified according to Dean's fluorosis index and who complained of objectionable esthetics were selected. Split mouth study design was selected in our study. Each subject had one of their maxillary central incisor randomly selected for Enamel microabrasion and the contra lateral maxillary central incisor for McInnes bleaching. Esthetic improvement was assessed by comparing the pre and postoperative digital photographs. During the evaluation session, the pre and postoperative photographs of 30 subjects were incorporated into a power point presentation and were projected side by side in a darkened room. Four calibrated and blinded examiners, including a layman rated the photographs under standardized viewing conditions. Esthetic improvement was assessed for both short and long term improvement. The postoperative sensitivity was recorded for both the procedures immediately after treatment and at one, three and six months intervals. Results: The results proved that both immediate and long term (6month) esthetic improvement achieved by McInnes bleaching were superior to enamel microabrasion. There is a reduction in aesthetics of teeth in both the procedures after six months, which was very minimal in McInnes procedure and significant in enamel micro abrasion. Postoperative sensitivity in both techniques were negligible. The sensitivity observed were transient and subsided within an one-month post operatively. None of the subjects reported sensitivity at one, three and six months intervals. Conclusion: McInnes bleaching is a better procedure compared to enamel microabrasion in improving the appearance of fluorosed teeth. Both techniques are conservative and safe.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 207-214

      Authors
      KP Bharath, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, India
      VV Subba Reddy, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, India
      P Poornima, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, India
      V Revathy, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Karpaga Vinayaga Institute of Dental Sciences, Chennai, India
      HV Kambalimath, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, India
      B Karthik, Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Colonization Levels of Streptococcus Mutans between Mother and Infant: A
           Postnatal Prospective Cohort Study
    • Abstract: Objective: To investigate the possible association between maternal S. mutans levels and those of the infant during the period between birth and 5 months and evaluate possible risk factors in the S mutans colonization. Study Design: A prospective cohort study was carried out comprising 62 infants and their mothers, selected at the time of childbirth. For each infant, a sample swab was taken at 0, 15, 30, 90, and 150 days postpartum; on the same days, a sample was obtained from the mothers. TYCSB medium was employed for identifying the microorganism, which was later confirmed by Gram staining, the catalase activity test, and the API strep test. Results: The final total sample consisted of 60 infants, from which S. mutans was detected in only 2 (3%) at the 150th day of oral sample collection. Of the sample of 60 mothers, 54 exhibited colonization levels. Conclusions: In the studied sample pairs up to 150 days, it was not possible to demonstrate the presence of a direct relationship between maternal S. mutans oral levels.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 197-200

      Authors
      S Ruiz-Rodriguez, Pediatric Dentistry Posgraduate Program, Facultad de Estomatología
      V Lacavex-Aguilar, Pediatric Dentistry Posgraduate Program, Facultad de Estomatología
      M Pierdant-Perez, Clinical Epidemiology Postgraduate Program, Facultad de Medicina
      P Mandeville, Clinical Epidemiology Postgraduate Program, Facultad de Medicina
      M Santos-Diaz, Pediatric Dentistry Posgraduate Program, Facultad de Estomatología
      A Garrocho-Rangel, Pediatric Dentistry Posgraduate Program, Facultad de Estomatología
      AJ Pozos-Guillen, Basic Sciences Laboratory, Facultad de Estomatología
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Bacterial Penetration along Different Root Canal Fillings in the Presence
           or Absence of Smear Layer in Primary Teeth
    • Abstract: Aims: To study the effect of the smear layer on the penetration of bacteria along different root canal fillings and to compare the sealing ability of new endodontic material Apexit plus as compared to Zinc Oxide Eugenol (ZOE) in primary teeth. Study design: A total of 60 human root segments were instrumented for endodontic treatment. Half of the sample size was irrigated with normal saline and in other half, 3% NaOCl, 3% H2O2 and 17% EDTA was used alternatively as irrigant during instrumentation. The roots were rinsed thoroughly with distilled water and sterilized by autoclaving for 20 min at 121 ± 2 °C. Roots with and without smear layer were obturated with Apexit plus, Zinc oxide eugenol. Following storage in humid conditions at 37°C for 2 days, the specimens were mounted into a bacterial leakage test model for 180 days. Results: At 180 days, there is statistically significant difference with a P value of < 0.05 among all groups except ZOE -smear and -nonsmear. In the presence of smear layer, Apexit plus demonstrated more leakage. No leakage was observed in ZOE groups. ZOE demonstrated better sealing ability than Apexit plus. Conclusions: Removal of smear layer helps in better resistance to bacterial penetration along Apexit plus root canal fillings but no effect is seen along ZOE root canal fillings.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 229-234

      Authors
      R Sisodia, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry,, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and RC, Bhopal, India
      KS Ravi, Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of dentistry, King Khalid University, Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia
      ND Shashikiran, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and RC, Bhopal, India
      S Singla, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and RC, Bhopal, India
      V Kulkarni, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Modern Dental College, Indore, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • The Effects of Dentin Adhesives and Liner Materials on the Microleakage of
           Class II Resin Composite Restorations in Primary and Permanent Teeth
    • Abstract: >Purpose: To compare the occlusal and gingival microleakage of Class-II composite restorations utilizing etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives and different liner materials in primary and permanent teeth. Study design: Standardized class-II cavities were prepared in freshly-extracted sound primary and permanent molars (n=80/each), with all cavosurface margins involving enamel. The main experimental groups were; A. Single Bond 2/primary teeth; B. Adper SE Plus/primary teeth; C. Single Bond 2/permanent teeth; and D. Adper SE Plus/permanent teeth. Each group comprised 4 subgroups (n=10/each) with respect to the liner material employed (n=10/subgroup): 1. Fuji VII; 2. Fuji Triage; 3. Filtek Supreme XT Flowable Composite, and 4. No liner. All teeth were restored with Filtek Supreme XT Universal Nanofilled Composite. Following thermocycling and immersion in basic fuchsin, the extent of microleakage was measured on crown sections using image analysis. The data were analyzed with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Kruskal-Wallis One-Way ANOVA at '=0.05. Results: In both primary and permanent teeth the use of etch-and-rinse adhesive resulted in similar occlusal and gingival microleakage values (p>0.05). As for the self-etch adhesive, similar results were observed (p>0.05) with the exception of significantly less occlusal leakage in the Fuji Triage VII and Fuji Triage subgroups of primary teeth than those of permanent teeth (pÃ0.05). When the effects of liner material and the type of adhesive were disregarded, significantly more gingival microleakage was observed in primary teeth than in permanent teeth (pÃ0.01), while the occlusal microleakage values were similar (p>0.05). Irrespective of the tooth type and adhesive material, comparison of subgroups containing a liner material with those without one revealed no significant differences for both occlusal and gingival microleakage values (p>0.05). Conclusions: Occlusal microleakage was similar in both primary and permanent teeth, while a lesser extent of gingival seal was observed in primary teeth. Overall, placement of a liner material did not improve resistance to microleakage.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 223-228

      Authors
      H C Güngör, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey
      E Canoğlu, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey
      Z C Çehreli, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 3 / Spring 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:26:24 GMT
       
  • Prevalence of Salivary Streptococcus mutans Serotype k in Children
           Undergoing Congenital Heart Surgery
    • Abstract: Objective: The prevalence of Streptococcus mutans serotype k, which was speculated that might be associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases, has been reported in adult cardiovascular surgery patients. There is no information about presence of serotype k in children with cardiac disease. The aim of this study was to determine the salivary prevalence of S.mutans serotype k in children with congenital heart disease. Study Design: Salivary samples of 25 patients undergoing elective surgery for congenital heart defects with cardiopulmonary bypass and an age and gender matched control group of 25 healthy children were enrolled in the study. Species-specific 16SrRNA gene sequences were used for S. mutans and serotype-specific rgpF gene sequences were used for S.mutans serotype k determination in stimulated saliva samples. Results: S.mutans was detected in 19 (76%) of the study and 15 (60%) of the control children. The difference was not shown to be statistically significant. Serotype k was determined from 3 (12%) of the study group, while it was not determined from the samples of the control group. Conclusions: Our results indicate that those children with congenital heart disease may possess S.mutans serotype k in oral cavity at a higher frequency as similar with the adult cardiac surgery patients.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 175-178

      Authors
      Nursen Topcuoglu, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Elif Bozdogan, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Sadiye Deniz Ozsoy, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institute of Cardiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Ismail Haberal, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institute of Cardiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Gurkan Cetin, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institute of Cardiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Oya Aktoren, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Guven Kulekci, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:07 GMT
       
  • Mandibular Condylar Aplasia Treated with a Functional Approach
    • Abstract: Mandibular condyle aplasia is a congenital or acquired malformation, which can be or not associated to some head and neck syndromes. Its treatment involves either a surgical approach or a more conservative treatment with orthopedic functional appliances. This clinical report presents a case of mandibular condyle aplasia treated with a modified KLAMT functional appliance, after a surgical procedure failed to stimulate mandibular condyle remodelling. The successful results presented here, with an orthopedic functional approach, support treatment with functional appliances as an alternative, producing similar results to those reported with surgery. Therefore, functional appliances are proposed as a valid alternative to stimulate mandibular condyle remodelling in patients with mandibular condyle aplasia. Treatment provided at an early age appears to be relevant for a successful result.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Craniofacial Growth and Development
      Pages 179-184

      Authors
      C M Mejia-Gomez, Craniofacial Abnormalities Unit, Calarca, Quindio, Colombia
      G O Ramirez-Yanez, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:07 GMT
       
  • Buccal Midazolam Spray as an Alternative to Intranasal Route for Conscious
           Sedation in Pediatric Dentistry
    • Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the acceptance of midazolam spray through buccal route as compared to intranasal route and compare the efficacy of the drug through both the routes. Study Design: 30 patients aged 2-8 years with Grade I or II Frankl's Behaviour Rating Scale were selected who required similar treatment under local anesthesia on two teeth. Midazolam spray was administered randomly through buccal or intranasal routes for the two appointments. Scoring was done for the acceptance of drug and Houpt's score was recorded for the behaviour of patients during the treatment. Results: Acceptance of drug through buccal route was significantly better than the intranasal route (p
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:06 GMT
       
 
 
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