for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6248 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (181 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (62 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (257 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (20 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (175 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (187 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (125 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (74 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (112 journals)
    - EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, LABORATORY TECHNIQUE (71 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (27 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY (138 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (100 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (128 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (86 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (61 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (1727 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (244 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (152 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (291 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (101 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (104 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (49 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (88 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (203 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (108 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (624 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (156 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (84 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (53 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (61 journals)
    - SURGERY (277 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (118 journals)

PEDIATRICS (203 journals)                  1 2 3     

AAP Grand Rounds     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Acta Chirurgica Latviensis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Paediatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Paediatric Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Pediatric Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
APSP Journal of Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Disease in Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Assessment and Treatment of Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
BMC Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Boletín de Pediatría     Open Access  
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Child & Family Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Care in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Child Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Child: Care, Health and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Children     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Developmental Disorders Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Opinion in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Pediatric Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Pediatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Child Development and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Pediatric Association Gazette     Open Access  
Enfermería Clínica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidence-Based Child Health: a Cochrane Review Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidencias en Pediatría     Open Access  
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
First Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Pediatrics     Open Access  
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Global Pediatric Health     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Infancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Mental Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Clinical Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
ISRN Pediatrics     Open Access  
Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Jornal de Pediatria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de Pédiatrie et de Puériculture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Specialists In Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research on Children     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asthma Allergy Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Child Health Care     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3     

Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry     [SJR: 0.227]   [H-I: 26]
   [7 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1053-4628
   Published by Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Electromyographic Muscular Activity Improvement in Class II Patients
           Treated with the Pre-Orthodontic Trainer
    • Abstract: Objective: A study was designed to determine changes in the amplitude of the EMG muscular activity of the Masseter and Temporalis muscles at clench in children with a Class II, division 1 malocclusion treated with the pre-orthodontic Trainer functional appliance, for 12 months. Study Design: 36 Class II, division 1 malocclusion patients (mean age 7.6 ± 1.3 years) composed the treated group and wore the functional appliance; 22 children with a similar age and malocclusion composed the untreated controls; and, 20 children with no dental malocclusion participated as normal controls. Electromyographic (EMG) muscular activity of the Temporalis and Masseter muscles were recorded before and after treatment. Results: Subjects in the treated group reported a bilateral significant increase in the muscular electrical activity in the both tested muscles (p < 0.001). After treatment, they recorded values similar to those measured in normal controls, whereas the untreated controls remained on lower values. Conclusion: These results confirm that treatment with the pre-orthodontic Trainer functional appliance significantly increases the EMG muscular activity in the Temporalis and Masseter muscles at clench in patients with Class II, division 1 malocclusion.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Dentofacial Orthopedics and Orthodontics
      Pages 380-384

      Authors
      E A Satygo, Mechnikov North-Western State Medical University, Saint Petersburg, Russia
      A V Silin, Mechnikov North-Western State Medical University, Saint Petersburg, Russia
      G O Ramirez-Yañez, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:02 GMT
       
  • Bispectral Index Monitoring:Validity and Utility in Pediatric Dentistry
    • Abstract: Reliable and safe provision of sedation and general anesthesia is dependent on continuous vigilance of patient’s sedation depth. Failure to do so may result in unintended oversedation or undersedation. It is a common practice to observe sedation depth by applying subjective sedation scales and in case of general anesthesia, practitioner is dependent on vital sign assessment. The Bispectral Index System (BIS) is a recently introduced objective, quantitative, easy to use, and free from observer bias, and clinically useful tool to assess sedation depth and it precludes the need to stimulate the patient to assess his sedation level. The present article is an attempt to orient the readers towards utility and validity of BIS for sedation and general anesthesia in pediatric dentistry. In this article, we attempt to make the readers understand the principle of BIS, its variation across sedation continuum, its validity across different age groups and for a variety of sedative drugs.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 366-369

      Authors
      A Goyal, Unit of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Oral Health Sciences Centre, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
      N Mittal, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Santosh Dental College & Hospital, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
      P Mittal, School of Medical Sciences and Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
      K Gauba, Unit of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Oral Health Sciences Centre, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:01 GMT
       
  • Multiple Teeth Fractures in Dentinogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is a hereditary defect consisting of opalescent teeth composed of irregularly formed and hypomineralized dentin. This paper presents the multiple fractures of DGI-affected teeth and suggests the reason of low fracture resistance by observing the dentin microstructures directly using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and by measuring its surface hardness using the Vickers hardness test. .SEM revealed that while the enamel microstructure was similar in the DGI-affected and normal teeth, the microstructure of the DGI-affected dentin was poorly woven and more loosely packed than that of the normal dentin. The Vickers hardness of the DGI-affected dentin was 4.89 times softer than the normal dentin. The low fracture resistance of DGI-affected teeth can be attributed to the poorly woven microstructure of their dentin, which leads to a reduction in hardness.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 362-365

      Authors
      B Min, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
      J S Song, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
      J H Lee, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
      B J Choi, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
      K M Kim, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
      S O Kim, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:01 GMT
       
  • Timing of Class III Treatment with Unfavorable Growth Pattern
    • Abstract: When treating young patients with Class III malocclusion, factors such as timing and an accurate prediction of growth of the mandible are very important. Even though early interceptive treatment of Class III might often be successful, clinicians should be careful to not initiate early treatment with premolar extractions which will compromise the success of orthognathic surgery later due to mandibular prognathism. This case report presents an adolescent female patient who developed a severe Class III skeletal discrepancy during growth and was treated with surgery after her growth had finished.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Growth and Development
      Pages 370-379

      Authors
      K Tai, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Mesa, AZ
      JH Park, Graduate School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea
      S Ohmura, Okayama, Japan
      S Okadakage-Hayashi, Okayama, Japan
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:01 GMT
       
  • In Vitro and Clinical Outcome of Sandwich Restorations with a Bulk-Fill
           Flowable Composite Liner for Pulpotomized Primary Teeth
    • Abstract: Objective: The present study determined whether primary molar pulpotomies showed equal in vitro and clinical success when restored with sandwich restoration with a bulk-fill flowable composite (BFRBC) liner versus a stainless steel crown (SSC) restoration. Study design: Sixty extracted human primary second molars with proximo-occlusal cavities were selected for in vitro test. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20) and restored with sandwich restoration with a BFRBC liner, composite (RBC) restoration and SSC. In addition, sixty teeth were selected from 20 children and each child had at least three primary molars (first and/or second primary molar) requiring pulpotomy. The patients were recalled for clinical and radiographic evaluation at approximately 6- and 12-month intervals. Results: The SSC restoration had significantly higher microleakage than the others. Although there was a significant difference between the RBC and the SSC (P = 0.02), the differences between the BFRBC and the RBC, as well as between the BFRBC and the SSC, were not statistically significant at the 12-month radiographic evaluation (P = 0.33 and P = 0.11, respectively). Conclusion: In laboratory conditions, sandwich restoration with BFRBC liner showed a superior seal margins of pulpotomized primary molars. Based clinical and radiographical evaluation, teeth treated with formocresol pulpotomy and restored with sandwich restoration with BFRBC liner were as successful as those restored with a SSC.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 349-354

      Authors
      K Cantekin, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
      H Gumus, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:00 GMT
       
  • Effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum Containing Yoghurt on Dental Plaque
           Bacteria in Children
    • Abstract: Objective: The aim of the present study is to determine the possible effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum DN-173 010 on dental plaque of children. Study design:52 children (25 F and 27 M), between the ages of 8-10, participated in the present study. The study had a double blind, randomized crossover design and the experimental period consisted of four consecutive time periods. During periods 2 and 4 (2 weeks each), children consumed 110 g probiotic fruit yogurt (Bifidobacterium DN-173 010 (1 x 1010 cfu/g)), or a placebo fruit yogurt per day. Available supragingival plaque (24 h later) was collected from teeth 16, 11, 36 and 31 at baseline and at the end of periods 2 and 4. The counts of dental plaque mutans streptococci (MS) were evaluated using Dentocult SM® (Strep Mutans). Results Changes of pre- and post-treatment levels of dental plaque MS were recorded for four consecutive sampling sites. There were no statistically differences between transition scores of test and placebo groups regarding different dental plaque sampling sites (p≯0.05) (unpaired t-test).Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, Bifidobacterium bifidum DN-173 010 has no effect on dental plaque MS levels in children.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 329-332

      Authors
      Esber Caglar
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:00 GMT
       
  • Green Pigmentation in Human Teeth. A Stereomicroscopic Study
    • Abstract: Green pigmentation in teeth is an uncommon condition associated with bilirubin deposits in hard dental tissues. Its occurrence can cause anxiety to both the child and parents and is not diagnosed easily by clinicians. The aim of this study is to analyze the current knowledge about the etiology, the intraoral alterations, and the macroscopic and microscopic features of green teeth pigmentation related to a high bilirubin levels. A primary tooth was extracted and manually sliced into 600 microns thin sections. The slenderized slices were examined with a light microscope AxioImager M1 to evaluate the microscopic teeth structure.The clinical characteristics of teeth may help in the diagnosis of current or past systemic diseases. Pediatricians should be able to quickly note the signs in order to perform the proper diagnosis. This study may help clinicians gain more knowledge about the current status of this uncommon pathology.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 355-361

      Authors
      A Rakauskaite, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
      G Juodzbalys, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
      DH Pauza, Institute of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
      M Cicciù, Human Pathology Department, University of Messina School of Dentistry, Italy
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:00 GMT
       
  • Serum-Containing Medium Effect on Isolation Rate of Dental Pulp Cells from
           Cryopreserved Intact Deciduous Teeth
    • Abstract: Objectives: To isolate cells from pulp of intact cryopreserved deciduous teeth. The null hypothesis raised here is to find no difference in the establishment of cell culture after cryopreservation (1) using culture medium supplemented with different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS); and (2) between teeth with different stages of physiological root resorption. Study design: Intact deciduous teeth with different root resorption stages were cryopreserved using FBS and Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) medium (9:1) in a progressive freezing process, by placing the samples in the refrigerator (4°C/60 min) and subsequently transferring them to a -80°C freezer (controlled device -1°C/min/24 hours), and finally into liquid nitrogen (-196°C/30 days). After the thawing process, the cell isolation was performed by enzymatic digestion (type I collagenase). The cells were re-suspended into the culture medium with 10% (G1) or 20% (G2) of FBS. Microscopic analysis was performed after 30 days to visualize the cell attachment. Results: The culture establishment rate was higher in G2 (75%) than G1 (12.5%) (p=0.041). There was no difference between the different stages of root resorption. Conclusions: It was possible to establish cell cultures from the pulp of intact cryopreserved deciduous teeth. The use of 20% FBS after thawing improved the culture rate.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 345-348

      Authors
      S Bressan Werle, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
      D Lindemann, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
      J Machado, School of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
      P Pranke, Hematology and Stem Cell Laboratory and Stem Cell Research Institute, School of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
      L Casagrande, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:59 GMT
       
  • Dental Fluorosis: Concentration of Fluoride in Drinking Water and
           Consumption of Bottled Beverages in School Children
    • Abstract: Objective: The purpose of the study was to identify dental fluorosis prevalence and to analyze its association with tap water fluoride concentration and beverage consumption in school children from the city of Oaxaca, who were receiving fluoridated salt. Study design: A cross-sectional study was performed on elementary public school children. Dean's Index was applied to assess dental fluorosis. The parents of the children who were studied completed a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics and type of beverages consumed by their children. A total of 917 school children participated in this study. Results: Dental fluorosis prevalence was 80.8%. The most frequent fluorosis category was very mild (41.0%), and 16.4% of the children were in the mild category. The mean water fluoride concentration was 0.43 ppm (±0.12). No association was detected between tap water fluoride concentration and fluorosis severity. The multinomial regression model showed an association among the mild fluorosis category and age (OR = 1.25, [95%CI 1.04, 1.50]) and better socio-economic status (OR = 1.78, [95%CI 1.21, 2.60]), controlling for fluoride concentration in water. Moderate and severe fluorosis were associated with soft drink consumption (OR = 2.26, [95%IC 1.01, 5.09]), controlling for age, socio-economic status, and water fluoride concentration. Conclusions: The prevalence of fluorosis was high. Mild fluorosis was associated with higher socio-economic status, while higher fluorosis severity was associated with soft drink consumption.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 338-344

      Authors
      N Pérez-Pérez, Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
      N Torres-Mendoza, Odontología, Universidad del Regional del Sureste
      A Borges-Yéñez, Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
      ME Irigoyen-Camacho, Departamento de Atención a la Salud, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:59 GMT
       
  • Primate Pulpal Healing after Exposure and TheraCal Application
    • Abstract: Aim: The purpose of this in vivo study was to compare the effectiveness of a new light cured resin based dicalcium/tricalcium silicate pulp capping material (TheraCal LC, Bisco), pure Portland cement, resin based calcium hydroxide or glass ionomer in the healing of bacterially contaminated primate pulps. Study design: The experiment required four primates each having 12 teeth prepared with buccal penetrations into the pulpal tissues with an exposure of approximately 1.0 mm. The exposed pulps of the primate teeth were covered with cotton pellets soaked in a bacterial mixture consisting of microorganisms normally found in human pulpal abscesses. After removal of the pellet, hemostasis was obtained and the pulp capping agents applied. The light cured resin based pulp capping material (TheraCal LC) was applied to the pulpal tissue of twelve teeth with a needle tip syringe and light cured for 15 seconds. Pure Portland cement mixed with a 2% Chlorhexidine solution was placed on the exposed pulpal tissues of another twelve teeth. Twelve additional teeth had a base of GIC applied (Triage, Fuji VII GC America) and another twelve had a pulp cap with VLC DYCAL (Dentsply), a light cured calcium hydroxide resin based material. The pulp capping bases were then covered with a RMGI (Fuji II LC GC America). The tissue samples were collected at 4 weeks. The samples were deminerilized, sectioned, stained and histologically graded. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in regard to pulpal inflammation (H= 0.679, P=1.00). However, both the Portland cement and light cured TheraCal LC groups had significantly more frequent hard tissue bridge formation at 28 days than the GIC and VLC Dycal groups (H= 11.989, P=0.009). The measured thickness of the hard tissue bridges with the pure Portland and light cured TheraCal LC groups were statistically greater than that of the other two groups (H= 15.849, P=0.002). In addition, the occurrence of pulpal necrosis was greater with the GIC group than the others. Four premolars, one each treated according to the protocols were analyzed with a microCT machine. The premolar treated with the light cured TheraCal LC demonstrated a complete hard tissue bridge. The premolar treated with the GIC did not show a complete hard tissue bridge while the premolar treated with VLC Dycal had an incomplete bridge. The pure Portland with Chlorhexidine mixture created extensive hard tissue bridging.Conclusion: TheraCal LC applied to primate pulps created dentin bridges and mild inflammation acceptable for pulp capping.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 333-337

      Authors
      M Cannon, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL USA
      N Gerodias, Ann and Robert Lurie Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL USA
      A Vieira, University of Sao Paulo, Aracatuba
      C Percinoto, University of Sao Paulo, Aracatuba
      R Jurado, Ann and Robert Lurie Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL USA
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:59 GMT
       
  • Pre-eruptive Intra-Coronal Resorption: Controversies and Treatment Options
    • Abstract: Pre-eruptive intra-coronal resorption (PIER) is a defect located in the dentin of an unerupted tooth, just beneath the dentin-enamel junction, with a prevalence of 0.5-2% of the teeth. The depth of the lesion is variable and may also reach the pulp. In the past, these lesions were confused with caries, and were therefore called “hidden” or “pre-eruptive caries”. These defects are usually detected incidentally in routine dental radiographs. It has been proven that in the pre-eruptive stage the lesions contain soft tissue and inflammatory cells. The present report describes the clinical management of a case of PEIR on a mandibular first permanent molar and discusses the alternatives for treatment.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 326-328

      Authors
      A Spierer Weil, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
      AB Fuks, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:58 GMT
       
  • Comparison of Salivary Calcium, Phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase Levels
           in Children with Early Childhood Caries after Administration of Milk,
           Cheese and GC Tooth Mousse: An in Vivo Study
    • Abstract: Background and Objectives: This study compares the Salivary Calcium, Phosphate and Alkaline Phosphataselevels in children with Early Childhood Caries after administration of Milk, Cheese and GC Tooth Mousse to a control group of caries resistant children. Study design: 90 kindergarten children both males and females aged 5 years, from the South Canara region were included in the study. Based on the dmfs score, children were divided into 3 groups: Control group, ECC group and S-ECC group. The Salivary Calcium, Phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase levels in the sample were assessed before and after administration of Milk, Cheese and GC Tooth Mousse at three different intervals, i.e within 5 minutes, 30 minutes and 60 minutes by using Spectrophotometry. Results: The mean Salivary Calcium levels were higher in caries free group whereas Phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase were lower in the caries free group which was statistically highly significant (p
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:58 GMT
       
  • Associations between Psychological Factors and the Presence of Deleterious
           Oral Habits in Children and Adolescents
    • Abstract: Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the associations between psychological factors and the presence of deleterious oral habits in children and adolescents. Study Design: 147 students aged 8 to 14-years-old were divided in two groups concerning the presence and absence of DOH: Habit group (HG) and Habit free group (HFG). Participants were asked about the presence of DOH using the domain III (Oral Habits) of the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S). Symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated using the Brazilian Portuguese versions of the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), respectively. Saliva was collected 30min after waking and at night to determine the diurnal decline in salivary cortisol (DDSC). Data were analyzed using the Chi-squared, Mann-Whitney, Spearman's correlation and logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of DOH was higher in females than males (65.1 vs 34.9; p
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:58 GMT
       
  • Direct Pulp Capping of Carious Primary Molars. A Specialty Practice Based
           Study
    • Abstract: Objective: Recommendations against direct pulp capping (DPC) for carious primary teeth are based on old, low level evidence. This study investigates the medium to long term clinical and radiographic outcomes of such treatment. Study design: Each of 62 3-9 year old children with any deep, primary molar cavity was included if a pulp exposure occurred during caries excavation. Exclusion criteria were irreversible pulp damage / uncontrolled hemorrhage. Using rubber-dam, fast setting calcium hydroxide (CH) and tooth restoration were placed. Patients were followed up for signs/symptoms. Survival analysis, the Kaplan-Meier method and the Mantel-Cox test were used for statistically analyzing the data. Results: Seven patients (11.3%) dropped out. Controlled hemorrhage occurred in 25 exposures. Fourteen exposures were large and 46 were pin point. Out of 60 primary molars with DPC (in 55 patients), 7 failed by clinical and/or radiographic criteria. The remaining 53/60 (88.3%) teeth survived for 21.0 (±9.0) months. The 4 year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier analysis was 80%. All restorations remained in place with 3 needing replacement without affecting pulp survival. Conclusion: The CH success rate of carious primary molar DPC justifies further research based on careful initial diagnosis of pulp inflammation reversibility.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 307-312

      Authors
      N Kotsanos, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Dental School
      KN Arapostathis, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Dental School
      A Arhakis, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Dental School
      G Menexes, Laboratory of Agronomy, School of Agriculture
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:57 GMT
       
  • Does Casein Phosphopeptid Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Provide
           Remineralization on White Spot Lesions and Inhibition of Streptococcus
           mutans?
    • Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the remineralization effect of Casein Phosphopeptid Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions (WSL) and its inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans colonization. Study design: The study group consisted of 60 children exhibiting at least 1-WSL. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: a test group of using CPP-ACP cream (Tooth Mousse, GC Europe N.V., Leuven, Belgium) and a control group using only fluoride containing toothpaste for a period of 3-months. Baseline WSLs were scored using DIAGNOdent device (KaVo Germany) and the saliva samples were collected to measure S. mutans counts. After the 3-month period the WSLs were again recorded and the saliva sample collection was repeated. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used for statistical analysis. Results: DIAGNOdent measurements were increased by time (p=0.002) in control group and no statistically significant difference (p=0.217) was found in test group by the 3-month period. In both groups, the mutans counts were decreased in 3-month experimental period. Conclusions: These clinical and laboratory results suggested that CPP-ACP containing cream had a slight remineralization effect on the WSL in the 3-month evaluation period however longer observation is recommended to confirm whether the greater change in WSLs is maintained.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 302-306

      Authors
      Arzu Aykut-Yetkiner, Department of Pedodontics, School of Dentistry
      Nazan Kara, Department of Pedodontics, School of Dentistry
      Mustafa Ateş, Faculty of Science, Biology Department, Basic and Industrial Microbiology Program
      Nazan Ersin, Department of Pedodontics, School of Dentistry
      Fahinur Ertuğrul, Department of Pedodontics, School of Dentistry
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:57 GMT
       
  • Changing Demographics and Providing Dental Services for Hispanic Children
    • Abstract: General population demographics in the United States are undergoing dramatic changes. Long term customary populations which provided the bulwark for many successful dental practices are being replaced by the many minority populations, in particular the Hispanic population. Despite these significant general population developments, the demographic profile of the dental profession has experienced (and apparently – based on dental student populations – will continue to experience) limited changes. The economic strength of the profession may well be predicated upon its responses to these developments.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Review Article
      Pages 298-301

      Authors
      H B Waldman, Department of General Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook University, NY
      SP Perlman, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:57 GMT
       
  • Tissue Engineering in Endodontics: Root Canal Revascularization
    • Abstract: Root canal revascularization attempts to make necrotic tooth alive by the use of certain simple clinical protocols. Earlier apexification was the treatment of choice for treating and preserving immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This procedure promoted the formation of apical barrier to seal the root canal of immature teeth and nonvital filling materials contained within root canal space. However with the success of root canal revascularization to regenerate the pulp dentin complex of necrotic immature tooth has made us to rethink if apexification is at the beginning of its end. The objective of this review is to discuss the new concepts of tissue engineering in endodontics and the clinical steps of root canal revascularization.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Review Article
      Pages 291-297

      Authors
      M C Palit, Dept. of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Awadh Dental College and Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India
      K S Hedge, Dept. Of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Yenepoya Dental College and Research Centre, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
      S S Bhat, Dept. Of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Yenepoya Dental College and Research Centre, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
      S S Sargod, Dept. Of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Yenepoya Dental College and Research Centre, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
      S Mantha, Dept. of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Chhattishgarh Dental College and Research Institute, Rajnanadgaon, Chhattishgarh, India
      S Chattopadhyay, Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Awadh Dental College and Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:57 GMT
       
  • Evaluation of the Accessory Mental Foramen in a Pediatric Population Using
           Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
    • Abstract: Objective: The aim of the present study was to clarify the occurrence, diameter, and location of the accessory mental foramen (AMF) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from a sample of Turkish children. Study design: This retrospective was carried out using a total of 275 CBCT images from child and adolescent patients were randomly selected from existing records in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the University of Erciyes, Kayseri, Turkey. The mental foramen (MF) and AMF were assessed on axial, sagittal, and coronal CBCT slices. Results: The mean age was 10.51 ± 3.32 years, consisting of 139 males (mean age 10.64 ± 3.42) and 126 females (mean age 10.38 ± 3.18). Twenty-one AMFs were observed in 18 of 275 patients (6.5%, 10 boys and eight girls). There was no significant difference in gender in relation to the prevalence of AMF (p = 0.65). The mean area of the 21 AMFs and the MF on the side with the AMF were 0.7 mm2 (SD ± 0.5) and 3.8 mm2 (SD ± 2.2), respectively. Conclusion: It is important to stress that detecting the AMN using CBCT with 3D reconstructions may reduce the risk of paralysis, hemorrhage, and postoperative pain in this region. Our study presents the first report assessing the occurrence, diameter, and location of the AMF in the pediatric population using CBCT images. In this respect, not surprisingly, the mean size of the AMF of our population is smaller than other reports in the literature that involve adult populations.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Growth and Development
      Pages 85-89

      Authors
      K Cantekin, Department of Pediatric Dentistry
      AE Şekerci, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 1 / Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:56 GMT
       
  • Assessment of Skeletal Maturation using Mandibular Second Molar Maturation
           Stages
    • Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the relationship between cervical vertebrae maturation and mandibular second molar calcification stages.Study design: The study was designed as a retrospective, descriptive and crosssectional research project. Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms and panoramic radiographs of 99 males and 110 females in the age range of 7 to 18 years 7 months were evaluated with Demirjian Index (DI) and cervical vertebrae maturation indicators (CVMI) of Hassel and Farman. A null hypothesis was proposed that there is no relation between CVMI and DI. Results: A highly significant association (Pearson's contingency coefficient 0.713 for males and 0.863 for females) was found between DI and CVMI. In males, the DI stage E corresponded to stage 2 of CVMI (pre–peak of pubertal growth spurt) and DI stages F and G corresponded to stages 3 and 4 of CVMI (peak of pubertal growth spurt). DI stage H was associated with stages 5 and 6 of CVMI (end of pubertal growth spurt). In females, the DI stages C, D corresponded to CVMI stages 1, 2; DI stages E, F with CVMI stages 3, 4; DI stages G, H with CVMI stages 5, 6. Conclusion: Mandibular second molar calcification stages can be used as indicators for assessment of skeletal maturity.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Growth and Development
      Pages 79-84

      Authors
      S Goyal, King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre, Rwanda Biomedical Centre, Kigali, Rwanda
      S Goyal, Polyclinique LaMedicale, Kigali
      N Gugnani, Dept of Pedodontics, DAV Dental College, Yamunanagar, Haryana, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 1 / Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:56 GMT
       
  • Lidocaine versus Mepivacaine in Sedated Pediatric Dental Patients:
           Randomized, Prospective Clinical Study
    • Abstract: Dental anxiety is usually seen in the pediatric patients. specially in the case of minor oral surgical procedures and exodontia, cooperation of the patients and their families with the dentist will lead to superior treatment outcomes. Pain control is important in dentistry. The aim of this randomized prospective clinical study is to compare the local anaesthetic and haemodynamic effects of 2% lidocaine (Group 1) and 3% mepivacaine (Group 2) in sedated pediatric patients undergoing primary tooth extraction. Study design: 60 pediatric patients undergoing sedation for elective primary tooth extraction was prospectively included in the study in a randomized fashion. Inclusion and exlusion criteria were assigned. Patients were given premedication via oral route. Local anesthesia was achieved before extraction(s). Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in patient demographics, number of teeth extracted, duration of the operation and time from the end of the procedure to discharge (p≯0.05). FLACC pain scale scores were not statistically significant between the groups, except at 20 minutes post-operatively when the score is significantly lower in Group 2 (p=0.029). Conclusion: Prevention of pain during dental procedures can nurture the relationship of the patient and dentist. Tooth extraction under sedation in pediatric patients could be safe with both local anesthetics.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 74-78

      Authors
      Aylin Sipahi Çalış, Ege University Faculty of Dentistry, Izmır, Turkey
      Esra Cagiran, Ege University Faculty of Dentistry, Izmır, Turkey
      Candan Efeoglu, Ege University Faculty of Dentistry, Izmır, Turkey
      Aslı Topaloglu Ak, Ege University Faculty of Dentistry, Izmır, Turkey
      Huseyın Koca, Ege University Faculty of Dentistry, Izmır, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 1 / Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:54:55 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014