for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 6049 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (173 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (61 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (247 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (20 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (163 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (182 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (125 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (71 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (104 journals)
    - EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, LABORATORY TECHNIQUE (66 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (24 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY (133 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (99 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (124 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (79 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (60 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (1677 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (231 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (146 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (277 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (100 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (103 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (51 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (87 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (196 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (106 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (610 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (153 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (80 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (53 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (59 journals)
    - SURGERY (271 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (114 journals)

PEDIATRICS (196 journals)                  1 2     

AAP Grand Rounds     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Acta Chirurgica Latviensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Paediatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Paediatric Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
APSP Journal of Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Disease in Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Assessment and Treatment of Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
BMC Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Boletín de Pediatría     Open Access  
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Child & Family Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Care in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203)
Child Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Child: Care, Health and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Children     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Developmental Disorders Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Opinion in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Pediatric Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Pediatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Child Development and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Egyptian Pediatric Association Gazette     Open Access  
Enfermería Clínica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery Reports     Open Access  
European Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidence-Based Child Health: a Cochrane Review Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidencias en Pediatría     Open Access  
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
First Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Pediatrics     Open Access  
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indian Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal  
Infancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Mental Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Clinical Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
ISRN Pediatrics     Open Access  
Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Jornal de Pediatria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de Pédiatrie et de Puériculture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Specialists In Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research on Children     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asthma Allergy Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Child Health Care     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics     Open Access  
Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Early Childhood Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

        1 2     

Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
   [7 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1053-4628
     Published by Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.227]   [H-I: 26]
  • Prevalence of Salivary Streptococcus mutans Serotype k in Children
           Undergoing Congenital Heart Surgery
    • Abstract: Objective: The prevalence of Streptococcus mutans serotype k, which was speculated that might be associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases, has been reported in adult cardiovascular surgery patients. There is no information about presence of serotype k in children with cardiac disease. The aim of this study was to determine the salivary prevalence of S.mutans serotype k in children with congenital heart disease. Study Design: Salivary samples of 25 patients undergoing elective surgery for congenital heart defects with cardiopulmonary bypass and an age and gender matched control group of 25 healthy children were enrolled in the study. Species-specific 16SrRNA gene sequences were used for S. mutans and serotype-specific rgpF gene sequences were used for S.mutans serotype k determination in stimulated saliva samples. Results: S.mutans was detected in 19 (76%) of the study and 15 (60%) of the control children. The difference was not shown to be statistically significant. Serotype k was determined from 3 (12%) of the study group, while it was not determined from the samples of the control group. Conclusions: Our results indicate that those children with congenital heart disease may possess S.mutans serotype k in oral cavity at a higher frequency as similar with the adult cardiac surgery patients.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 175-178

      Authors
      Nursen Topcuoglu, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Elif Bozdogan, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Sadiye Deniz Ozsoy, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institute of Cardiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Ismail Haberal, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institute of Cardiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Gurkan Cetin, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institute of Cardiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Oya Aktoren, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Guven Kulekci, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:07 GMT
       
  • Mandibular Condylar Aplasia Treated with a Functional Approach
    • Abstract: Mandibular condyle aplasia is a congenital or acquired malformation, which can be or not associated to some head and neck syndromes. Its treatment involves either a surgical approach or a more conservative treatment with orthopedic functional appliances. This clinical report presents a case of mandibular condyle aplasia treated with a modified KLAMT functional appliance, after a surgical procedure failed to stimulate mandibular condyle remodelling. The successful results presented here, with an orthopedic functional approach, support treatment with functional appliances as an alternative, producing similar results to those reported with surgery. Therefore, functional appliances are proposed as a valid alternative to stimulate mandibular condyle remodelling in patients with mandibular condyle aplasia. Treatment provided at an early age appears to be relevant for a successful result.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Craniofacial Growth and Development
      Pages 179-184

      Authors
      C M Mejia-Gomez, Craniofacial Abnormalities Unit, Calarca, Quindio, Colombia
      G O Ramirez-Yanez, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:07 GMT
       
  • Severe Congenital Hypoglossia: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Hypoglossia is referred to a small volume and/or size of the tongue. It is a rare congenital condition caused by failed embryogenesis of the lateral lingual swellings and tuberculum impar during the fourth to eighth weeks of gestation. The anomaly has often occurred in association with limb abnormalities and various syndromes, and it affects facial and mandibular growth. The present report describes a case of severe congenital hypoglossia in a female infant, her systemic and dentofacial features, and the initial management.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 167-169

      Authors
      M Noyola-Frías, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, San Luis Potosí, México
      M Santos-Díaz, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, San Luis Potosí, México
      C Chávez-Herrera, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, San Luis Potosí, México
      L Santos-Calderón, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, San Luis Potosí, México
      A Garrocho-Rangel, Pediatric Dentistry Postgraduate Program, Facultad de Estomatología, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, México
      A Pozos-Guillén, Pediatric Dentistry Postgraduate Program, Facultad de Estomatología, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, México
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:06 GMT
       
  • Buccal Midazolam Spray as an Alternative to Intranasal Route for Conscious
           Sedation in Pediatric Dentistry
    • Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the acceptance of midazolam spray through buccal route as compared to intranasal route and compare the efficacy of the drug through both the routes. Study Design: 30 patients aged 2-8 years with Grade I or II Frankl's Behaviour Rating Scale were selected who required similar treatment under local anesthesia on two teeth. Midazolam spray was administered randomly through buccal or intranasal routes for the two appointments. Scoring was done for the acceptance of drug and Houpt's score was recorded for the behaviour of patients during the treatment. Results: Acceptance of drug through buccal route was significantly better than the intranasal route (p
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:06 GMT
       
  • Shear-Bond Strength of a New Self-Adhering Flowable Restorative Material
           to Dentin of Primary Molars
    • Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to dentin of primary molars of a new self-adhering flowable resin composite with two ionomer-based cements and one flowable resin composite in combination with two different adhesive systems. Study design: Fifty primary molars were grinded on the occlusal surface to obtain flat dentin substrate and randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10): OFL:Phosphoric Acid/Optibond FL/Premise Flow; OAO:Optibond All-In-One/Premise Flowable; II:Polyacrylic Acid/Fuji II; IX:Polyacrylic Acid/Fuji IX; V:Vertise Flow. Cylinders (3mm diameter – 5mm height) of restorative material were built-up in three increments over the dentin surfaces. A shear load was applied until failure. Bond strength values were statistically analysed with Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA followed by Dunn's test (P
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:05 GMT
       
  • Presence of Oral Bacterial Species in Primary Endodontic Infections of
           Primary Teeth
    • Abstract: Objective: Knowledge of the microbial composition of deciduous endodontic infections is limited. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of the 10 oral bacterial species in samples from primary tooth root canals by using microarray technology and to determine the association of these organisms with clinical conditions. Study Design: The samples were collected from 30 root canals of primary teeth with primer infection. The bacterial composition of the samples was semi-quantitatively defined using a microarray system (Parocheck®). Results: All the tested species were detected in the samples. Fusobacterium nucleatum was the most frequently isolated bacterium (96.7%), followed by Prevotella intermedia (86.7%), Parvimonas micra (83.3%), Treponema denticola (76.7%) and Tannerella forsythia (66.7%). These bacteria were also present in high levels. All pairs of bacterial species were positively associated (RR≯1), except P.intermedia and P.micra. On average, five species (range:3-8) were detected per amplified sample. Root canals of teeth with ≯5 different species were statistically associated with periapical radiolucency (P=0.049). Conclusions: Primary teeth with endodontic infections show a highly diverse variety of bacteria, in which the most prevalent specie are present in high proportions. The well-directed use of the improved microarray technology will provide additional valuable information for causative factors associated with endodontic diseases, helping to develop more successful antibacterial or anti-inflammatory treatment strategies.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 155-160

      Authors
      N Topcuoglu, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      E Bozdoğan, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      O Aktoren, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      G Kulekci, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:05 GMT
       
  • Parotid Gland Enlargement in Pediatric HIV Population
    • Abstract: Objectives: To establish the significance of parotid enlargement, state frequency, cytological features and effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on parotid enlargement among a pediatric HIV population. Study design: A 6 month cross sectional survey that utilised clinical features, serial immunological indices and fine needle aspiration cytology. Results: 287 HIV positive children were seen at special paediatric clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, 114 (39.7%) had oral features and among these 24 (8.4%) had parotid involvement comprising of 10 males and 14 females. The overall mean age was 43.4 + 39.7 months compared with 59.6 + 36.5 months in the parotid enlargement group (p = 0.03). Mean ages of parotid enlargement and non enlargement group was significantly different (p = 0.03). The mode of transmission was vertical in (91.7%), 87.5% was bilateral (87.5%) and (75%) presented as a syndrome state with generalised lymphadenopathy. The predominant cytology was lymphoid hyperplasia (62.5%). ART resulted in marked clinical reduction in all the cases and statistically significant improvement in serum indices of CD4 count, CD4% and viral load (p = 0.001, 0.000 & 0.009 respectively). Conclusion: HIV positive children often present with bilateral parotid enlargement and the syndrome state with classical clinical and cytological features of lymphoid hyperplasia predominated. ART resulted in satisfactory reduction of the swellings in most of the cases with no need for further intervention.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 161-166

      Authors
      NM Kolude, Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
      RE Oladokun, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:05 GMT
       
  • Pediatric Dental Patients’ Attitudes to Rubber Dam
    • Abstract: Objectives: To explore young patients’ experiences of rubber dam (RD) and determine how personal and clinical factors may influence opinions. Study design: A self-completed questionnaire was developed to capture pediatric patients’ experiences of treatment under RD in a hospital setting. Patients’ acceptance of RD and perceptions of how well it was explained to them were recorded on a 10cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), where zero represented the most negative score. The following clinical variables were also recorded: type of RD; procedure undertaken; use of local anaesthetic and procedure duration. Results: One hundred children (52 male, 48 female) with a mean age of 11.8 years (SD=2.29; range 7-17 years) participated. Overall, acceptance of RD was satisfactory (mean VAS=5.0). Patients were happy with the explanation of why RD was used (mean VAS=7.7). The type of RD, use of local anaesthetic, procedure undertaken and duration of the procedure did not significantly influence acceptance levels. However, RD was significantly less acceptable to patients who underwent radiographic examination whilst wearing the RD (P< 0.05, t-test). Nearly five times as many patients expressed concern at being seen wearing RD when taken to the radiography department (39.2%, n=20/51), compared to those who were reportedly self-conscious about RD when treated only on the paediatric dentistry clinic (8.2%, n=4/49). Conclusions: The use of RD appears acceptable physically and psychologically to most pediatric patients, however, visibility of the RD to others was a potential concern to some children.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 139-141

      Authors
      A McKay, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, Sheffield, UK
      M Farman, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, Sheffield, UK
      H Rodd, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, Sheffield, UK
      H Zaitoun, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, Sheffield, UK
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:04 GMT
       
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors of Dental Erosion in American Children
    • Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of dental erosion in children aged 2-4 years old and 12 years old. Study design: 243 subjects were recruited from daycare centers, preschools, and grade schools; they received dental examinations assessing their condition of dental erosion, including both depth and area of tooth surface loss on four maxillary incisors. Questionnaires were given to the subjects to obtain socio-demographic, oral health behaviors at home, and access to dental care. Dental erosion was analyzed and risk factors were assessed using Chi-Square and logistic regression analysis. Results: The subjects were 60% Caucasians, 31% Black, 7% Hispanic and others were 2%. 34% of children could not get the dental care they needed within the past 12 months and 61% of all children brushed their teeth twice or more daily. Overall, 12% of study children had dental erosion with 13% for 2-4 years old and 10% for 12 years old, with the majority of erosive lesions within enamel. Family income (OR 3.98, p=0.021) and acidic fruit juice consumption (OR 2.38, p=0.038) were significant risk factors for dental erosion, even after controlling for other factors, such as source of drinking water and oral hygiene using logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Dental erosion is a relatively common problem among the children in this study and it is seen as a multi-factorial process.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 143-148

      Authors
      M Habib, Center College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science
      TL Hottel, Department of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science
      L Hong, Department of Pediatrics and Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:04 GMT
       
  • The Potential Lifespan Impact of Gingivitis and Periodontitis in Children
    • Abstract: The prevalence of gingivitis in children can be similar to or greater than dental caries, but has received much less attention in understanding the long-term impact on overall health. Oral health providers must take into consideration that the clinical presentation of the gingivitis progression/severity in the primary dentition is only evident when the magnitude of the inflammatory cell infiltrate approximates the gingival surface reflected by inflamed tissues. Moreover, despite its relatively benign clinical appearance, the establishment of chronic inflammation of the periodontal tissues in childhood may have the potential for local tissue destruction leading to periodontitis, and/or create an “at-risk” environment in the tissues that could adversely affect the health of these tissues across the lifespan. The present manuscript presents some fundamental information regarding the characteristics of chronic inflammation in gingival tissues of children and adolescents and speculates about the lifetime impact of gingival and periodontal infections in childhood on future oral and systemic health in the adult.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Review Article
      Pages 95-99

      Authors
      E Bimstein, Division Pediatric Dentistry
      PE Huja, Division of Periodontics
      JL Ebersole, Center of Oral Health Research
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Microbiological Assessment of Root Canals Following Use of Rotary and
           Manual Instruments in Primary Molars
    • Abstract: To assess the microflora of root canals in primary molars following use of rotary NiTi files and conventional hand NiTi and stainless steel files. Study design: This randomized clinical trial consisted of a total of 60 first and second primary molars requiring root canal treatment, who were selected from children aged 5-9 years. Based on type of root canal instrumentation, the teeth were randomly assigned to three groups of twenty teeth each; Group A: Rotary NiTi files, Group B: Hand NiTi files and Group C: Hand stainless steel files. Following administration of local anesthesia, isolation with rubber dam was carried out. For the purpose of instrumentation and sampling, the palatal canal of maxillary molars and the distal canal of mandibular molars were selected. Prior to sampling, the orifices of other canals in these teeth were sealed, so as to prevent any contamination. Instrumentation was carried out in each group using respective instruments along with intermittent saline irrigation. Root canal samples were obtained both before and after instrumentation, using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to a sterile vial with transport fluid. Serial dilutions were prepared and cultured on suitable agar media. Both aerobic and anaerobic microbial counts were made. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test and one-way Analysis of variance. Results: In all three groups, there was a significant reduction in both aerobic and anaerobic mean microbial count following root canal instrumentation. (p
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Salivary pH Levels and Caries among Siblings and Parents within Families
    • Abstract: Background: High level of caries activity is related to organisms in the dental plaque with high acidogenesis capacity. Aim: To test salivary pH in children of the same family and compare it with their caries status. To compare pH levels between children and their parents. To examine the relationship between pH and caries status among children of the same family and their parents. Study design: We examined 123 children and adolescents aged 3-18, (73 boys and 50 girls) and 33 adults, (12 men and 21 women), parents of these children. Caries status was examined clinically, using DMF index. Salivary pH measurements were made by a digital pH meter. Results: Among adults, increase in patient age led to increased DMF (p = 0.005). The higher the pH, the lower the DMF (p = 0.037). Among men, DMF was lower by 3 compared to women (p = 0.049). Children's pH correlated with the parents’ (p = 0.004). Children's DMF correlated to their pH (p = 0.001). Children's pH was the best predictor of their DMF (R2 = 0.309, p = 0.001). Conclusions: Among children, the higher the pH, the lower the DMFT. Children's pH was the best predictor of their DMF.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 129-132

      Authors
      Y Basch, Maurice and Gabriela School of Dental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
      B Peretz, Maurice and Gabriela School of Dental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Clinical and Microbiological Evaluation of the Carious Dentin Before and
           After Application of Papacarie Gel
    • Abstract: Objective: To evaluate clinically and microbiologically the efficacy of Papacarie® in the removal of carious dentin in both permanent and primary teeth. Study design: Thirty permanent and primary molars with dentinal carious lesions were excavated and subjected to clinical and microbiological assessment before and after application of Papacarie®. The gel was further tested for in vitro antimicrobial efficacy against standard cariogenic micro-organisms using agar diffusion assay. Results: Papacarie® was able to differentiate between infected and affected dentin clinically along with high patient comfort during caries excavation. The mean time taken for caries removal and restoration was observed to be 4.17 ± 0.40 min. and 8.57 ± 0.45 min. for permanent teeth and 4.21 ± 0.36 min. and 9.24 ± 0.58 min. for primary teeth. There was a significant reduction in the total viable colony forming units from the dentin samples before and after application of Papacarie®. It was also observed that Papacarie® had no inhibitory effect on standard cariogenic microorganisms in the agar diffusion assay. Conclusions: Papacarie® is an effective caries removal method clinically in both permanent and primary teeth. The number of viable microorganisms after complete caries excavation using Papacarie® still appears to be high and this bacterial count should be tackled by a suitable restorative material with potent antimicrobial activity.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 133-138

      Authors
      S Gupta, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KD Dental College and Hospital
      C Singh, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KD Dental College and Hospital
      Y Ramakrishna, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KD Dental College and Hospital
      K Chaudhry, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KD Dental College and Hospital
      AK Munshi, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KD Dental College and Hospital
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Utilization of Emergency Services for Non-Traumatic Dental Disease
    • Abstract: Purpose: To identify and characterize children who utilize emergency dental services for non-traumatic dental disease. Study design: Caregivers of children under 12 years old who seek out emergency services for the treatment of non-traumatic dental disease will be surveyed regarding their child's current oral health status. Patient's clinical data will be obtained and they will be further followed for a period of 2 months to determine if they follow-up with recommendations for comprehensive dental care. Results: One hundred and ninety-eight people participated in the study (97% response rate). Eighty-three percent of the children were diagnosed with dental caries. Seventy-four percent of patients of record presented with an emergency at least once before and 73% had a history of one or more broken appointments. Patients with a history of previous emergency visits (OR=3.45, CI=2.05, 5.81) or a history of missed appointments (OR=2.21, CI=1.42, 3.58) were significantly more likely to fail to return for comprehensive care (P
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Biological Restoration in a Young Patient with a Complicated Crown Root
           Fracture with an Autogenous Tooth Fragment
    • Abstract: Crown-root fractures are one of the most challenging trauma cases to treat. Reattachment of tooth fragment to a fractured tooth being a simple procedure conserves the tooth structure, maintains the natural esthetics value and is thus considered as a favorable treatment option. The reattachment procedure using composite resin should be considered if the subgingival fracture can be exposed to provide isolation after a careful evaluation of the biologic width involvement. This case report presents a complicated crown-root fracture of permanent maxillay left central incisor, involving the biologic width in an 11-year-old boy. The traumatized tooth was treated endodontically and reinforced by using glass fiber-post. Access to the subgingival margins was gained by electro surgery. The fractured fragment was reattached using bonding system and composite resin.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 117-121

      Authors
      Vinaya Kumar Kulkarni, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
      Raja Sridhar, Department of Periodontics, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
      Mahesh Kumar Duddu, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Panineeya Mahavidyalaya Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh
      Naveen Reddy Banda, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
      Saket Vyawahare, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
      Divya S Sharma, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Esthetic and Functional Recovery of Extensively Decayed Posterior Teeth
           Through Conservative Treatment
    • Abstract: The case exemplifies the combination of two important principles in dentistry: 1) the maintenance of pulp vitality by the partial excavation of the contaminated dentin followed by the application of a biomaterial; and 2) esthetic and functional recovery based on biological restoration. Tooth vitality was confirmed two months after pulp treatment and restoration was accomplished with a fragment of a tooth extracted from another individual. This method is easy to perform and offers esthetic, functional, emotional and social benefits to the patient.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 113-115

      Authors
      SD Barroso, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil
      TS Jales, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil
      P Corrêa-Faria, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil
      CEP Alcântara, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil
      AM Botelho, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil
      KTA Tavano, Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 2 / Winter 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Clinical Evaluation of Desensitizing Treatment for Incisor Teeth Affected
           by Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization
    • Abstract: Background: Sensitivity complaints are commonly observed in teeth affected by MIH (molar incisor hypomineralization). Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the hypersensitivity observed in MIH-affected teeth and the effect of desensitizing agents applied with and without ozone to incisors affected by MIH. Study Design: The first part of the study included 120 teeth from 42 patients with MIH. These 42 patients included 33 children with 92 incisor teeth with a Vas score of ≥30, and these 92 incisors were included in the second part of the study. The patients included in the second part were divided into three main groups and six subgroups. The main groups included the following: fluoride, CPP-ACP and CPP-ACP with fluoride. Each main group was divided into two subgroups: one with ozone use and one without ozone use. Results: Girls exhibited significantly more sensitivity compared with boys (p
      PubDate: Mon, 19 May 2014 12:59:03 GMT
       
  • Alternative Approaches to Managing the Cleft Alveolus
    • Abstract: The cleft alveolus component of the oral cleft deformity is addressed with a separate surgical stage. Several host and operator related factors affect the surgical outcome. When factors that increase the likelihood of secondary alveolar bone graft failure are identified, alterative methods like dentoalveolar distraction (DAD) may be employed. In infants, molding of the alveolar segments is possible and when a synergistic surgical approach is used, the possibility of successful alveolar cleft repair is increased. The authors present two case reports wherein the use of nasoalveolar molding (NAM) and DAD helped to tackle the alveolar cleft deformity.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Craniofacial Growth and Development
      Pages 89-93

      Authors
      VP Sabarinath, Ibn Sina National College for Medical Studies, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
      Vasant Radhakrishnan, Charles Pinto Cleft Center, Jubilee Mission Hospital, Trichur, Kerala
      PV Hazarey, Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha
      Ravindran Sreeja, Ibn Sina National College for Medical Studies, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 1 / Fall 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 17:02:11 GMT
       
  • Prevalence of Dental Caries and its Impact on Quality of Life (QoL) among
           HIV-infected Children in Kenya
    • Abstract: Aim: To determine the prevalence of dental caries and its impact on QoL among HIV-infected children in Kenya. Study design: Cross-sectional survey of HIV-positive children aged 3-15 years. Method: Two hundred and twenty participants were selected by consecutive sampling. Dental examination was undertaken to determine the presence of dental caries among the children using the dmft/DMFT indices. The children's perceived QoL in the domains of oral symptoms, functional limitations, emotional and social wellbeing was assessed using the WHO Simplified Oral Health Questionnaires for children. Results: The overall prevalence of dental caries was 65% whence the prevalence in the deciduous dentition was 50% while that of the permanent dentition was 30.9%. The mean dmft and DMFT scores were 1.75 and 1.08 respectively. Children with high dmft manifested negative impacts on appearance, chewing, biting hard foods and missing school on account of toothache and discomfort, while in the permanent dentition children with high DMFT had a negative impact on biting hard foods. Conclusion: A high caries experience had significant negative impacts on the children's QoL, especially in the primary dentition.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 83-87

      Authors
      MA Masiga, Department of Paediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics, School of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi
      JM M'Imunya, UNITID
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 1 / Fall 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 17:02:11 GMT
       
  • Initial Experience with Dexmedetomidine for Dental Sedation in Children
    • Abstract: Sedation of uncooperative children for dental treatment is difficult since treatment is mainly carried out inside the oral cavity. Dexmedetomidine (DEX), recently introduced into clinical practice, has little influence on respiratory system even at high doses. We present cases of patients who underwent dental treatment under sedation using DEX infusion. DEX at a dose of 1 μg/kg was administered over 10 min after intravenous cannulation. DEX was infused to maintain sedation level within the range of the Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (OAA/S) scale 3- 4 throughout dental treatments. They were successfully treated under DEX sedation without any complications. Their uncooperative behaviors were successfully managed under DEX sedation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 79-82

      Authors
      Kim Hyo Sun, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Kim Hyo Sun, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Jang Ki-Taeg, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Lee Sang-Hoon, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Kim Chong-Chul, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Shin Teo Jeon, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 1 / Fall 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 17:02:11 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014