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PEDIATRICS (209 journals)                  1 2 3     

AAP Grand Rounds     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Acta Chirurgica Latviensis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Paediatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Perinatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Perinatology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Paediatric Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Pediatric Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
APSP Journal of Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Disease in Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Archivos argentinos de pediatría     Open Access  
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Assessment and Treatment of Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bangladesh Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
BMC Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Boletín de Pediatría     Open Access  
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Perinatal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Child & Family Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Child Care in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 305)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access  
Child Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Child: Care, Health and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Children     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Contemporary Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Developmental Disorders Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Opinion in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Pediatric Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Pediatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Current Treatment Options in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal  
Early Child Development and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Early Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Open Access  
Egyptian Pediatric Association Gazette     Open Access  
Enfermería Clínica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Pediatric Surgery Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidence-Based Child Health: a Cochrane Review Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidencias en Pediatría     Open Access  
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
First Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Pediatrics     Open Access  
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Global Pediatric Health     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Infancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Infant Mental Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Clinical Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Extra     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Journal of Pediatrics     Open Access  
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Jornal de Pediatria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal de Pédiatrie et de Puériculture     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Specialists In Pediatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research on Children     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asthma Allergy Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Child Health Care     Hybrid Journal  

        1 2 3     

  Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.327]   [H-I: 29]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1053-4628
   Published by Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Pediatric Dental Patients are Part of a Larger Picture: Detailing
           Population Realities
    • Abstract: The traditional setting of a dental practice may offer pediatric dentists a potentially isolated picture of the general health and use of health services by youngsters in their community. Results from the latest National Health Interview Survey are reviewed to provide broad dimensions to supplement and reinforce the general and specific information usually developed regarding individual patients.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Viewpoint Article
      Pages 91-93

      Authors
      HB Waldman, Department of General Dentistry, Stony Brook University, NY, USA
      SP Perlman, Boston University School of Dental Medicine, Boston MA, USA
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:30:51 GMT
       
  • Giving a Second Thought to Brisement Force – A Case Report
    • Abstract: Fractures of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) may be caused by indirect trauma where force of trauma is transmitted to the mandibular condyle from a blow elsewhere or in other situations may also result from direct trauma. TMJ trauma in children is usually accompanied with pain, swelling, limited jaw movement and other additional findings. This report highlights a case of post traumatic trismus successfully managed with Brisement force - gradual tractional forces applied to the temporomandibular joint.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 120-123

      Authors
      R Thakur, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Peoples' College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
      AL Shigli, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University Dental College, Sangli, Maharashtra, India
      G Thakur, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peoples' College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
      R Ahuja, Department of Pediatrics, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:30:51 GMT
       
  • Biomarkers in the Dentin-Pulp Complex: Role in Health and Disease
    • Abstract: Biomarkers are functional elements at the cellular or molecular level, playing important roles in health and disease. The dentin-pulp complex of the tooth houses several biomarkers at different stages of development, and a lack of these biomarkers results in developmental disorders. Furthermore, biomarkers play a very important role in the pathogenesis of dental caries, pulpal and periapical pathoses in two ways - they are essential elements in the pathological process and their detection helps in accurate diagnosis of the pathological condition. The aim of this paper is to review the literature regarding the important biomarkers involved in the development of the dentin-pulp complex and in the pathological conditions involving the dentin-pulp complex.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Review Article
      Pages 94-99

      Authors
      E Emilia,
      P Neelakantan,
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:30:51 GMT
       
  • A Comparative Clinical Study of Three Fissure Sealants on Primary Teeth:
           24-Month Results
    • Abstract: Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success of three fissure sealants(FSs) with different contents on primary teeth. Study design: Three FSs were used to seal 150 primary molars in 75 children aged 4–7 years. All FSs were placed on occlusal surfaces in a split-mouth and randomized clinical trial. For patients in Group1,amorphous calcium phosphate(ACP) containing resin-based sealant(RBS)(Aegis) was applied to a primary molar tooth on one side ,and non-fluoride RBS(Helioseal) FS was applied to symmetrical molar tooth. For patients in Group2, fluoride-containing RBS(Helioseal F) was applied to a primary molar tooth on one side, and Helioseal FS was applied to symmetrical molar tooth. For patients in Group3,Helioseal FS was applied to a primary molar tooth on one side, and Aegis FS was applied to symmetrical molar tooth. Clinical evaluation of FSs was carried out to assess retention, marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation,and the presence of caries in months 1,3,6,12,18 and 24 after FS application. Results: There were no significant differences for all criteria in groups 2 and 3(p≯0.05). In group 1,cumulative success rates according to 24 months’ follow-up were statistically insignificant during the comparisons performed in terms of retention, marginal adaptation, and presence of caries(p≯0.05). Marginal discoloration was found to be statistically significant(p
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:30:51 GMT
       
  • Reduction in Bacterial Loading Using MTAD as an Irrigant in Pulpectomized
           Primary Teeth
    • Abstract: Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reduction in bacterial loading uing MTAD as an irrigating solution in pulpectomized primary teeth. Study design: A randomized, controlled clinical trial was performed that included primary teeth with pulp necrosis. Sixty necrotic canals were included, 30 irrigated with MTAD (experimental group) and 30 with 1% Na0Cl solution (control group); in all cases, 2 microbiological samples from within the canals were taken with sterile paper points, the first after the canal opening and before the first irrigation, and the second after instrumentation and final irrigation, before obturation. All samples were evaluated by Agar plate method. Results: The results were statistically analyzed by student ‘t’ test. After analyzing samples before and after irrigation in the control group (NaOCl), we found a significant decrease of bacterial load ( p = < 0.001). The same occurred in the MTAD group samples ( p = < 0.001). When both groups were compared post irrigation, a statistically significant difference was observed in favor of MTAD. Conclusion: MTAD can be suggested as an alternative irrigant for pulpectomy of necrotic teeth.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 100-104

      Authors
      K Farhin,
      PM Viral,
      P Thejokrishna,
      M Sajjad,
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:30:51 GMT
       
  • Orthodontic Treatment of Skeletal Class II Adolescent with Anterior Open
           Bite using Mini-Screws and Modified Palatal Anchorage Plate
    • Abstract: This article presents a non-extraction orthodontic treatment case using mini-screws and a modified palatal anchorage plate (MPAP) to intrude the maxillary posterior teeth, and distalize the whole arch dentition and control the extrusion of the maxillary posterior dentition during distalization.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 187-192

      Authors
      YA Kook, Department of Orthodontics, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
      JH Park, Postgraduate Orthodontic Program, Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health, A.T. Still University, Mesa, AZ, USA
      Y Kim, Department of Orthodontics, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
      CS Ahn, Department of Orthodontics, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
      M Bayome, Department of Orthodontics, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:17 GMT
       
  • Clinical Usefulness of Proseal Laryngeal Mask Airway for Anesthesia during
           Dental Procedures in Children
    • Abstract: Aim: Although the Proseal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) has been widely used in anesthesia, little is known about its clinical effectiveness during dental procedures. We describe the clinical feasibility of the PLMA for managing airways in the field of pediatric dentistry. .Study design: We reviewed the medical records of children who underwent airway management with the use of the PLMA from January 2011 to December 2012 at an outpatient facility at Seoul National Dental University Hospital. Results: During the study period, the airways of 19 children were managed with the PLMA for dental procedures. During its placement, blood pressure and heart rate were stably maintained. There were no interruptions of the dental procedures. None of the children experienced oxygen desaturation or ventilation difficulty. In one patient, the PLMA was dislodged for a short time, but the problem was easily solved with repositioning. After transferring to the post-anesthetic care unit, there were no incidences of oxygen desaturation or vomiting. All of the children were discharged from the hospital without complications. Conclusion: The PLMA can be successfully used in airway management during dental treatment in children.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 179-182

      Authors
      Young-Jae Kim, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Hong-Keun Hyun, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Jung-Wook Kim, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Ki-Taeg Jang, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Sang-Hoon Lee, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Chong-Chul Kim, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Teo Jeon Shin, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Yong-Seo Koo, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:16 GMT
       
  • Treatment Considerations in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A Case
           Report
    • Abstract: Hutchinson-Guilford progeria syndrome is an extremely rare condition classified as one of the premature ageing syndromes. This case presents a 16-year-old Israeli female patient, suffering from a variant of Hutchinson-Guilford progeria with a history of treatment with oral biphosphnates. The patient presented with typical cranial and facial features of the syndrome including delayed teeth eruption and root development probably due to insufficient jaw growth and severs retrognatic position of the maxilla and mandible. Orthodontic treatment considerations are described along with those required in light of the previous treatment by oral biphosphonates.All primary teeth were extracted in three appointments while creating as minimal trauma as possible to the surrounding tissue and alveolar bone. For now, the patient refuses to begin the orthodontic treatment course. There are no limitations to conduct any dental procedures in progeria patients, however, extreme caution must be exercised during oral surgery due to the inelasticity of tissues and dermal atrophy. Orthodontic procedure commencement should be early enough to manage the delayed development and eruption of teeth. Patients taking oral biphosphonates should be advised of this potential complication. If orthodontic treatment is considered appropriate, plans should be assessed and modified to include compromises.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 172-178

      Authors
      H Hazan-Molina, Orthodontic and Craniofacial Department, Graduate School of Dentistry, Rambam Health Care Campus, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
      Aizenbud D Dror, Orthodontic and Craniofacial Department, Graduate School of Dentistry, Rambam Health Care Campus, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:16 GMT
       
  • Maxillary Dental Anomalies in Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate: A Cone
           Beam Computed Tomography Study
    • Abstract: Objective: To compare the frequency of maxillary dental anomalies in patients affected by unilateral (UCLP) and bilateral (BCLP) cleft lip with palate and to determine whether statistical differences were present or not between cleft and normal sides in UCLP group by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In addition, the frequency of those dental anomalies was compared with previous studies presenting the same population without cleft Study Design: Fifty non-syndromic patients affected by UCLP (28 patients) and BCLP (22 patients) were selected for analysis of dental anomalies by means of CBCT. The frequency of maxillary dental anomalies including tooth agenesis, microdontia of lateral incisor, ectopic eruption and impaction of canine and supernumerary tooth were examined. Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for statistical comparisons. Results: All patients affected by UCLP and BCLP were found to have at least one maxillary dental anomaly. The most frequently observed dental anomaly was tooth agenesis (92.5% and 86.4%, respectively) in UCLP and BCLP groups. Tooth agenesis and canine impaction were observed more commonly in the cleft side (75.0% and 35.7%, respectively) than in the normal side (57.1% and 14.3%, respectively) in UCLP group (p≯0.05). All dental anomalies were found to be higher in both cleft groups than in general populations not affected by cleft. Conclusion: Since patients affected by UCLP and BCLP had at least one dental anomaly and higher dental anomaly frequency as compared to patients without cleft, those patients should be examined carefully prior to orthodontic treatment.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Hospital Dentistry
      Pages 183-186

      Authors
      M Celikoglu, Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey
      SK Buyuk, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey
      AE Sekerci, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
      K Cantekin, Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
      C Candirli, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:16 GMT
       
  • Oral Manifestations of Neurofibromatosis Type 1 in Children with Facial
           Plexiform Neurofibroma: Report of Three Cases
    • Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal genetic disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 births. NF1 is a complex syndrome characterized by many abnormalities and may affect all organ systems. Oral manifestations of NF1 occur frequently, but reports including NF1 children with facial plexiform neurofibromas and oral alterations are scant. Facial plexiform neurofibroma may cause asymmetry, disfigurement and usually arises from the trigeminal nerve. The aim of this paper is to to report three pediatric NF1 cases with facial plexiform neurofibroma presenting with oral manifestations, which were evaluated clinically and radiographically, and also to briefly review the literature. Patients presented with changes in the oral soft tissues, jaws, and teeth ipsilateral to the tumor.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Oral Pathology
      Pages 168-171

      Authors
      KS Cunha, School of Medicine, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
      RE Rozza-de-Menezes, Department of Specific Formation, School of Dentistry, Nova Friburgo University Pole, Fluminense Federal University, Nova Friburgo, RJ, Brazil
      RM Andrade, School of Medicine, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
      LMS Almeida, School of Medicine, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
      MER Janini, Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
      M Geller, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Serra dos Órgãos University Center (UNIFESO), Teresópolis, RJ, Brazil
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:15 GMT
       
  • A Spectroscopic and Surface Microhardness Study on Enamel Exposed to
           Beverages Supplemented with Lower Iron Concentrations
    • Abstract: Objectives: This study aimed to compare the in vitro mineral loss and surface microhardness (SMH) changes in human enamel specimens following supplementation of acidic carbonated beverages with low iron concentrations than when treated without. Study Design: 180 enamel blocks each from primary and permanent teeth were prepared and equally subdivided (n=10) for their respective treatments in Group 1 (Coca Cola and Sprite without iron supplementation) and Group 2 (beverages supplemented with 2/5mmol/L FeSO4.7H2O). Following initial SMH estimation, the blocks were subjected to 3 treatment cycles of 5/20 minute incubation periods, equally interspaced by a 5-min treatment in artificial saliva. The calcium and phosphate released after each cycle were analyzed spectrophotometrically and the final SMH was recorded. The results were tested using student's T test, One-way ANOVA and Kruskal Walli's test (p
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:15 GMT
       
  • Bond Strength of Different Restorative Materials to Light-Curable Mineral
           Trioxide Aggregate
    • Abstract: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass-ionomer cement (GIC) in comparison to TheraCal and to compare those findings with the reference pulp capping material (MTA). Study design: A total of 90 acrylic blocks were prepared. Each of the blocks were prepared as 15 mm high and 10 mm diameter and the blocks had a 2 mm high and a 5 mm diameter central hole. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with TheraCal and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The TheraCal and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: Methacrylate-based (MB) composite; Group-2: Silorane-based (SB) composite; and Group-3: Glass-ionomer cement (GIC). For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. After the SBS test, the fractured surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Results: The analysis of variance that compared the experimental groups revealed the presence of significant differences among the groups (P < 0.001). The highest (19.3 MPa) and the lowest (3.4 MPa) bond strength value were recorded for the MB composite-TheraCal and the GIC-TheraCal, respectively.There were significant differences in bond strength between the TheraCal and the MTA groups for the MB composite subgroup (P < 0.001) and the SB composite subgroup (P < 0.05); however, there was no significant difference in bond strength for the GIC subgroup (P ≯ 0.05). Conlusions: The results from this in vitro study suggest that the new pulp capping material, known as light-curable MTA, showed clinically acceptable and higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 143-148

      Authors
      K Cantekin, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:15 GMT
       
  • Effect of Three Different Pastes on Remineralization of Initial Enamel
           Lesion: An in Vitro Study
    • Abstract: Objective: Dental caries in enamel is unique as enamel is both acellular and avascular. Fluoride is one of the most effective remineralizing agents in caries prevention. The purpose of the study was to assess whether nano-hydroxyapatite and CPP-ACP can be used as an alternative to fluoride for remineralization of early carious lesions. Study design: Initial artificial carious lesions were prepared in enamel with demineralization solution. The treatment materials used as remineralizing agents were Nano-hydroxyapatite (10%), CPP – ACP (10%), NaF (1000 ppm) and Deionized water (negative control). Surface microhardness (SMH) measurements were performed before/after demineralization and after 3, 6, 9 and 12 days of pH cycling and the percentage surface microhardness recovery (%SMHR) was calculated. The specimens were then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results: Percentage surface microhardness recovery of nano-hydroxyapatite and fluoride was significantly greater than CPP – ACP and negative control. There was no significant difference of %SMHR between n-HA and fluoride at different time periods in the pH cycling. SEM analysis revealed n-HA particles were deposited on the demineralized enamel surface which formed a new surface layer. When observed under SEM CPP – ACP failed to show any significant surface remineralization while surface globular crystal depositions with multiple discrete porosities were evident with fluoride. Conclusion: It was concluded that nano-hydroxyapatite and fluoride had the potential to remineralize initial enamel lesions. CPP – ACP can be used as an effective adjunct to fluoride therapy but cannot be used as an alternative to fluoride.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 149-160

      Authors
      S Vyavhare, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore,India
      DS Sharma, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore,India
      VK Kulkarni, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore,India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:15 GMT
       
  • Effect of Ethanol Wet Bonding Technique on the Durability of Resin- Dentin
           Bond with Contemporary Adhesive Systems
    • Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the effect of ethanol wet bonding technique on the immediate and long term bond strength of simplified etch and rinse adhesive systems to dentin. Study Design: 96 extracted human permanent molars were ground to expose the flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into four groups (n=24) according to the adhesives used, either Tetric N Bond or Solobond M and bonding techniques i.e. water wet bonding or ethanol wet bonding (EWB). Composite cylinder was bonded to each specimen using the respective adhesive technique. Ten samples from each group were then tested immediately for shear bond strength evaluation and two samples for SEM analysis. The remaining samples (12) were tested after 6 month storage in distilled water. Results: Upon immediate testing, there was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength of the groups regardless of the bonding technique or adhesive used. The bond strength fell dramatically in the water wet bonded specimens after 6 months water storage, while the bond strength of both the adhesives was maintained when EWB technique was used. SEM observation revealed good interfacial adaptation in EWB groups even after six months. Conclusion: For both simplified etch and rinse adhesives used, ethanol wet bonding technique led to significant preservation of the resin dentin bond over 6 months.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 133-142

      Authors
      R Nagpal, Department of Conservative Dentistry, Kothiwal Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
      N Manuja, Department of Pediatric Dentistry Kothiwal Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
      IK Pandit, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, DAV Dental College, Yamunanagar, Haryana, India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:13 GMT
       
  • Salivary Cortisol Levels and its Implication on Behavior In Children with
           Autism during Dental Treatment
    • Abstract: The aim of the study was to estimate the diurnal variations of salivary cortisol in children with autism and healthy children and it's implication on behavior during non-invasive dental procedures. Study design: 50 children with autism and 50 healthy children in the age group between 6 to 12 years of both genders with the need for dental treatment were included in the study. Whole unstimulated saliva was collected from them during early hours of the day and during evenings for 2 consecutive days . The collected saliva was then subjected to electrochemiluminescence assay . Minimum invasive dental procedures like hand scaling, pit and fissure sealants and glass ionomer cement restorations were performed for the participants each time after the saliva sample collection and their behavior during the procedures was rated using Frankl's Behavior Rating Scale. Results:Significant correlation was seen between cortisol levels and behavior in children with autism. As cortisol levels increased in children with autism, behavior worsened and as the cortisol levels decreased they showed positive behaviour. Conclusion: Cortisol acts as a stress marker and studying the diurnal variations of salivary cortisol can help us in attaining better knowledge about the behavior pattern and thereby assist us in modifying the behavior modification procedures and treatment planning in this group of special children.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 128-132

      Authors
      AM Abdulla, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, A.B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore,Karnataka,India
      AM Hegde, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, A.B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore,Karnataka,India
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:13 GMT
       
  • Oral Health Knowledge of Pregnant Women on Pregnancy Gingivitis and
           Children's Oral Health
    • Abstract: Objective: Pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries remain prevalent in Hong Kong. The aim of this study was to assess pregnant women's knowledge and beliefs related to pregnancy gingivitis and children's oral health. Study design: An outreach survey was carried out in a clinic that provided antenatal examination. A written oral health questionnaire related to pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries was administered to pregnant women. Of the 106 pregnant women who enrolled in the study, 100 completed the questionnaires. Results: Among the 100 subjects, only 39% correctly identified that hormonal changes contribute to pregnancy gingivitis. Only 36% identified red and swollen gums as signs of gingivitis. Furthermore, 53% of the surveyed pregnant women were not sure about the amount of toothpaste to administer to a child aged 18 months to 5 years. Almost 50% assumed that a replanted avulsed tooth would probably not survive within a short extra-alveolar period of less than 60 minutes. Conclusion: Prenatal women generally lack knowledge of a common oral disease that occurs during pregnancy and of what constitutes adequate oral health care for children. Oral health care education should be implemented as part of a prenatal care program.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Articles
      Pages 105-108

      Authors
      C Zhong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital
      KN M a, Health and Care Dental Care Ltd.
      YS Wong, United Christian Nethersole Community Health Service
      Y So, Prince Philip Dental Hospital
      PC Lee, Oral Surgery and Implant Centre
      Y Yang, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:13 GMT
       
  • Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Evaluation of Demineralized Human
           Enamel after Titanium Tetrafluoride Application
    • Abstract: Objective: Evaluate the presence of a titanium dioxide layer after application of titanium tetrafluoride on human permanent tooth enamel. Study design: The sample consisted of unerupted third molars. After the removal of the roots, each tooth was mesiodistally divided into 2 fragments, one reserved for the experimental group and the other for the control group. Before the treatments the fragments were artificially demineralized. The experimental group (n=5) received an application of 4% titanium tetrafluoride, for one minute and the control group (n=5) did not receive any treatment. The samples were sputter-coated with a 20-30nm gold layer as the energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer analysis was carried out in a scanning electron microscope and the results were descriptively analyzed. Results: The titanium dioxide layer was present on all experimental samples with a titanium peak varying between 6.82 and 26.37%. This layer was not found in the control group. Fluoride and calcium fluoride precipitates were present in the samples treated with titanium tetrafluoride. Conclusion: Titanium dioxide layer was formed after one titanium tetrafluoride application, but it was not uniform. Further studies should be carried out so that both the morphology and thickness of such layers can be better understood.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Clinical Research for Better Practice
      Pages 124-127

      Authors
      PCC Alcântara,
      AK Alexandria,
      IPR Souza,
      LC Maia,
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 39
      Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 2 / Winter 2015
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:13 GMT
       
  • Efficacy and Tolerance of Papain Gel with Conventional Drilling Method: A
           Clinico-Microbiological Study
    • Abstract: Background: Conventional methods of caries removal are commonly associated with pain, fear and discomfort. Chemomechanical methods were introduced to instill a positive dental attitude. Agents like GK-101, Caridex, Carisolv did not prove effective alternatives owing to their high cost, need of special instruments and taste of chlorine. A new chemomechanical agent, Papacarie®, has been introduced to overcome these deficiencies.Objective:This study was aimed to compare the effectiveness and tolerance of Papacárie® with the conventional method. Method:25 children with at least two primary teeth with broad cavitated occlusal or cervical lesion were selected. One carious tooth from each patient was randomly treated with each of Papacarie® and conventional drilling method, one after the other. Time taken for caries excavation, child's pain perception, change in anxiety levels, microbial flora and child's preference of treatment were recorded separately for both the methods. Result:Although the mean time taken for caries removal by the Papacarie® method was slightly longer (P≯0.05) but it led to reduction in pain and anxiety (p
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:15:13 GMT
       
  • Electromyographic Muscular Activity Improvement in Class II Patients
           Treated with the Pre-Orthodontic Trainer
    • Abstract: Objective: A study was designed to determine changes in the amplitude of the EMG muscular activity of the Masseter and Temporalis muscles at clench in children with a Class II, division 1 malocclusion treated with the pre-orthodontic Trainer functional appliance, for 12 months. Study Design: 36 Class II, division 1 malocclusion patients (mean age 7.6 ± 1.3 years) composed the treated group and wore the functional appliance; 22 children with a similar age and malocclusion composed the untreated controls; and, 20 children with no dental malocclusion participated as normal controls. Electromyographic (EMG) muscular activity of the Temporalis and Masseter muscles were recorded before and after treatment. Results: Subjects in the treated group reported a bilateral significant increase in the muscular electrical activity in the both tested muscles (p < 0.001). After treatment, they recorded values similar to those measured in normal controls, whereas the untreated controls remained on lower values. Conclusion: These results confirm that treatment with the pre-orthodontic Trainer functional appliance significantly increases the EMG muscular activity in the Temporalis and Masseter muscles at clench in patients with Class II, division 1 malocclusion.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Dentofacial Orthopedics and Orthodontics
      Pages 380-384

      Authors
      E A Satygo, Mechnikov North-Western State Medical University, Saint Petersburg, Russia
      A V Silin, Mechnikov North-Western State Medical University, Saint Petersburg, Russia
      G O Ramirez-Yañez, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:02 GMT
       
  • Timing of Class III Treatment with Unfavorable Growth Pattern
    • Abstract: When treating young patients with Class III malocclusion, factors such as timing and an accurate prediction of growth of the mandible are very important. Even though early interceptive treatment of Class III might often be successful, clinicians should be careful to not initiate early treatment with premolar extractions which will compromise the success of orthognathic surgery later due to mandibular prognathism. This case report presents an adolescent female patient who developed a severe Class III skeletal discrepancy during growth and was treated with surgery after her growth had finished.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Growth and Development
      Pages 370-379

      Authors
      K Tai, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Mesa, AZ
      JH Park, Graduate School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea
      S Ohmura, Okayama, Japan
      S Okadakage-Hayashi, Okayama, Japan
      Journal Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
      Print ISSN 1053-4628
      Journal Volume Volume 38
      Journal Issue Volume 38, Number 4 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:55:01 GMT
       
 
 
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