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RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (179 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 179 of 179 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Acta Cytologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Computed Tomography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alasbimn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Neuroradiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Roentgenology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied In Vitro Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Asia Oceania Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access  
Belgian Journal of Radiology     Open Access  
BJR     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
BJR | case reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BMC Medical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Biotherapy & Radiopharmaceuticals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Radiothérapie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical and Translational Imaging     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Mass Spectrometry     Open Access  
Clinical Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part B Magnetic Resonance Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Contemporary Diagnostic Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Critical Ultrasound Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Medical Imaging Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Radiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Nuklearmediziner     Hybrid Journal  
Der Radiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
DNA and RNA Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Journal of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EJNMMI Radiopharmacy and Chemistry     Open Access  
Emergency Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access  
European Journal of Nanomedicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
European Journal of Radiology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Radiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Feuillets de Radiologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontiers in Neurogenesis     Open Access  
IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Imagen Diagnóstica     Full-text available via subscription  
Imaging Decisions MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Insights into Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biomedical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Nanomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Radiation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Tomography & Simulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Interventional Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Interventionelle Radiologie Scan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Investigative Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Iranian Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Japanese Journal of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal de Radiologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de Radiologie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Diagnostic Medical Sonography     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Forensic Radiology and Imaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Global Radiology     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Liver : Disease & Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Medical Imaging     Free   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Neuroradiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Radiation Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nucleic Acids Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiation and Cancer Research     Open Access  
Journal of Radiation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiation Research and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiobiology     Open Access  
Journal of Radiological Protection     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiosurgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Thoracic Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
La radiologia medica     Hybrid Journal  
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Medical Image Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Medical Imaging and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nepalese Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neurographics     Free  
NeuroImage : Clinical     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Neuroradiology Journal The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuclear Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nuclear Medicine Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nuclear Medicine Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nuklearmedizin / NuclearMedicine     Hybrid Journal  
Open Journal of Clinical Diagnostics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Medical Imaging     Open Access  
Open Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Oral Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Photonics & Lasers in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Physica Medica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Radiation Protection and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Radiatsionnaya Gygiena = Radiation Hygiene     Open Access  
Radiographics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Radiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Radiography Open     Open Access  
Radiología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Radiología (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Radiologia Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Radiologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Radiologie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Radiology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Radiology of Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Radiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Radiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
Recent Patents on Medical Imaging     Full-text available via subscription  
Reports in Medical Imaging     Open Access  
Research and Reports in Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Argentina de Radiología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Radiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Internacional de Ciencias Podológicas     Open Access  
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Seminars in Musculoskeletal Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminars in Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Roentgenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Shadows : The New Zealand Journal of Medical Radiation Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Skeletal Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ultraschall in der Medizin - European Journal of Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ultrasonic Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ultrasound Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
West African Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Journal Cover Journal of Clinical Imaging Science
  [SJR: 0.277]   [H-I: 8]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2156-7514 - ISSN (Online) 2156-5597
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided
           Biopsy System

    • Authors: Posy J Seifert, Renee C Morgan, David L Conover, Andrea L Arieno
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Posy J Seifert, Renee C Morgan, David L Conover, Andrea L Arieno
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):1-1
      Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):1-1
      PubDate: Fri,27 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.199055
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Bronchial Artery Aneurysm with Associated Bronchial Artery to Pulmonary
           Artery Fistula: Treatment by Embolization

    • Authors: Caleb G Hsieh, Thomas Le, Keren Fogelfeld, Nader Kamangar
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: Caleb G Hsieh, Thomas Le, Keren Fogelfeld, Nader Kamangar
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):2-2
      Bronchial artery aneurysm (BAA) is a rare vascular phenomenon. This review highlights a case of a BAA that was complicated by the presence of a bronchial artery to pulmonary artery (BA-PA) fistula, consequently presenting a unique challenge to management. BAAs have a strongly reported risk of rupture resulting in life-threatening hemoptysis. Embolization has thus become routine for the management such severe cases. The management of incidentally found anomalies is less obvious, but prophylactic embolization is a generally accepted practice. In this report, we review some of the risks and benefits associated with BAA embolization with specific consideration of the challenges in cases of co-existing BA-PA fistula.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):2-2
      PubDate: Fri,27 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.199052
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Gastropericardial Fistula as a Late Complication of Laparoscopic Gastric
           Banding

    • Authors: Adam A Rudd, Chandana Lall, Ajita Deodhar, Kenneth J Chang, Brian R Smith
      Pages: 3 - 3
      Abstract: Adam A Rudd, Chandana Lall, Ajita Deodhar, Kenneth J Chang, Brian R Smith
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):3-3
      Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a bariatric procedure that is being performed with increasing frequency as an alternative management option for morbid obesity. Several common complications have been reported including gastric band slippage and associated pouch dilatation, intragastric erosion of the band, gastric wall perforation, and abscess formation. We present a case of gastropericardial fistula occurring nine years after an LAGB. There have been no previous documented cases of the complication after this procedure.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):3-3
      PubDate: Fri,27 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.199053
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Elastography-targeted Thyroid Nodule Aspiration: A Novel Approach

    • Authors: Elliot Landau, Danielle Del Re, Bina Kviatkovsky, Aryeh Rothstein, Jonathan Scheiner, Cheryl Lin
      Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: Elliot Landau, Danielle Del Re, Bina Kviatkovsky, Aryeh Rothstein, Jonathan Scheiner, Cheryl Lin
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):4-4
      Objectives: Since 2009, the rate of nondiagnostic (ND) thyroid nodule fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has ranged from 2% to 20%. A ND result can cause further patient morbidity secondary to repeated procedures and delay in diagnosis. The use of real-time strain elastography (RTE) in determining nodule malignant risk has gained considerable focus recently. A less studied area where RTE may prove beneficial is its role in targeting areas for FNA. Our hypothesis is that FNA performed in concurrence with RTE will show a decreased rate of ND results leading to fewer repeated FNA. Materials and Methods: The Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. A retrospective review of all thyroid nodule FNA from January 1, 2011, to January 1, 2014, was performed with review of nodule size, presence of microcalcifications, vascularity, solid components, patient age, and gender. Cases were separated based if RTE was done before FNA or not. Pathology reports were reviewed to assess for specimen adequacy. Statistical comparison was performed using SAS analysis software. Results: A total of 221 specimens were reviewed, with RTE performed on 140 cases (63.4%). Both groups were similar in demographics and previously described nodule characteristics. The ND rate when RTE was not performed was 16% (13/68) compared to 10% when RTE was performed (14/126). The difference was not found to be statistically significant, P = 0.205. Conclusions: The presence of an elastogram failed to demonstrate a significant decrease in ND FNA rates although these results may be secondary to study design. Further evaluation with prospective trials using larger sample size may ultimately detect increased accuracy of RTE-targeted FNA.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):4-4
      PubDate: Fri,27 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.199054
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Infantile Hemangioendothelioma of the Parotid Gland

    • Authors: Rajas Chaubal, Om Tavri, Atul Sawant, Chitrangada Singh
      Pages: 5 - 5
      Abstract: Rajas Chaubal, Om Tavri, Atul Sawant, Chitrangada Singh
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):5-5
      A 4-month-old infant presented with a painless swelling overlying the left angle of mandible. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large lesion replacing the entire left parotid gland, with multiple enlarged vessels. Homogeneous enhancement of the lesion was seen on the postcontrast MRI scans. Based on the imaging features, a diagnosis of infantile hemangioendothelioma of the parotid gland was offered. This helped in avoiding any further invasive testing.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):5-5
      PubDate: Fri,27 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.199056
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Different Sonographic Faces of Ectopic Pregnancy

    • Authors: Charu Chanana, Nishant Gupta, Itisha Bansal, Kusum Hooda, Pranav Sharma, Mohit Gupta, Darshan Gandhi, Yogesh Kumar
      Pages: 6 - 6
      Abstract: Charu Chanana, Nishant Gupta, Itisha Bansal, Kusum Hooda, Pranav Sharma, Mohit Gupta, Darshan Gandhi, Yogesh Kumar
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):6-6
      Vaginal bleeding in the first trimester has wide differential diagnoses, the most common being a normal early intrauterine pregnancy, with other potential causes including spontaneous abortion and ectopic pregnancy. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is approximately 2% of all reported pregnancies and is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide. Clinical signs and symptoms of ectopic pregnancy are often nonspecific. History of pelvic pain with bleeding and positive β-human chorionic gonadotropin should raise the possibility of ectopic pregnancy. Knowledge of the different locations of ectopic pregnancy is of utmost importance, in which ultrasound imaging plays a crucial role. This pictorial essay depicts sonographic findings and essential pitfalls in diagnosing ectopic pregnancy.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):6-6
      PubDate: Mon,20 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_105_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Gastropleural Fistula with Aortic Intramural Involvement

    • Authors: Akshya Gupta, Abhishek Chaturvedi, Patrick Fultz, Susan Hobbs
      Pages: 7 - 7
      Abstract: Akshya Gupta, Abhishek Chaturvedi, Patrick Fultz, Susan Hobbs
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):7-7
      Gastropleural fistula is a relatively rare complication that can be seen as a result of traumatic, nontraumatic, benign, and neoplastic etiologies. Most commonly, these are found in patients with diaphragmatic herniation or prior thoracic surgery. Aortoenteric fistulas are rare communications typically between the abdominal aorta and bowel. We present a rare case of an 88-year-old male who developed a gastropleural fistula with erosions into the wall of the descending thoracic aorta. Computed tomography (CT) is a leading modality in evaluation of suspected gastropleural or aortoenteric fistulas given the quick scan time and widespread availability. Prompt diagnosis is essential and requires an understanding of appropriate CT protocols and CT imaging appearance.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):7-7
      PubDate: Mon,20 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_110_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Computer-aided Detection Fidelity of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest Radiograph

    • Authors: Nikolaos Dellios, Ulf Teichgraeber, Robert Chelaru, Ansgar Malich, Ismini E Papageorgiou
      Pages: 8 - 8
      Abstract: Nikolaos Dellios, Ulf Teichgraeber, Robert Chelaru, Ansgar Malich, Ismini E Papageorgiou
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):8-8
      Aim: The most ubiquitous chest diagnostic method is the chest radiograph. A common radiographic finding, quite often incidental, is the nodular pulmonary lesion. The detection of small lesions out of complex parenchymal structure is a daily clinical challenge. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the computer-aided detection (CAD) software package SoftView™ 2.4A for bone suppression and OnGuard™ 5.2 (Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, OH, USA) for automated detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated a dataset of 100 posteroanterior chest radiographs with pulmonary nodular lesions ranging from 5 to 85 mm. All nodules were confirmed with a consecutive computed tomography scan and histologically classified as 75% malignant. The number of detected lesions by observation in unprocessed images was compared to the number and dignity of CAD-detected lesions in bone-suppressed images (BSIs). Results: SoftView™ BSI does not affect the objective lesion-to-background contrast. OnGuard™ has a stand-alone sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 58% for nodular lesion detection in chest radiographs. The false positive rate is 0.88/image and the false negative (FN) rate is 0.35/image. From the true positive lesions, 20% were proven benign and 80% were malignant. FN lesions were 47% benign and 53% malignant. Conclusion: We conclude that CAD does not qualify for a stand-alone standard of diagnosis. The use of CAD accompanied with a critical radiological assessment of the software suggested pattern appears more realistic. Accordingly, it is essential to focus on studies assessing the quality-time-cost profile of real-time (as opposed to retrospective) CAD implementation in clinical diagnostics.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):8-8
      PubDate: Mon,20 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_75_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Asymptomatic Urolithiasis Complicated by Nephrocutaneous Fistula

    • Authors: Marion Hamard, Gaël Amzalag, Christoph D Becker, Pierre-Alexandre Poletti
      Pages: 9 - 9
      Abstract: Marion Hamard, Gaël Amzalag, Christoph D Becker, Pierre-Alexandre Poletti
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):9-9
      Asymptomatic spontaneous nephrocutaneous fistula is a rare and severe complication of chronic urolithiasis. We report a case of 56-year-old woman with a nephrocutaneous fistula (NFC) which developed from a superinfected urinoma following calyceal rupture due to an obstructing calculus in the left ureter. The patient was clinically asymptomatic and came to the emergency department for a painless left flank fluctuating mass. This urinoma was superinfected, with a delayed development of renal abscesses and perirenal phlegmon found on contrast-enhanced uro-computed tomography (CT), responsible for left renal vein thrombophlebitis and left psoas abscess.. Thereafter, a 99 mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy revealed a nonfunctional left kidney, leading to the decision of left nephrectomy. Chronic urolithiasis complications are rare and only few cases are reported in medical literature. A systematic medical approach helped selecting the best imaging modality to help diagnosis and treatment. Indeed, uro-CT scan and renal scintigraphy with 99 mTc-DMSA are the most sensitive imaging modalities to investigate morphological and functional urinary tract consequences of NFC, secondary to chronic urolithiasis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):9-9
      PubDate: Mon,20 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_83_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Erratum: SYNTAX Score in Patients with High Computed Tomography Coronary
           Calcium Score

    • Pages: 10 - 10
      Abstract:
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):10-10

      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):10-10
      PubDate: Mon,20 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.200569
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Congenital Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation Presenting as Postcoital
           bleeding: A Rare Presentation of a Rare Clinical Condition

    • Authors: Neha Agarwal, Seema Chopra, Neelam Aggarwal, Ujjwal Gorsi
      Pages: 11 - 11
      Abstract: Neha Agarwal, Seema Chopra, Neelam Aggarwal, Ujjwal Gorsi
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):11-11
      Congenital uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an extremely rare condition with <100 cases documented in literature. We report multiparous women presenting to us with a history of postcoital bleed. Initial Doppler ultrasonography was consistent with features suggestive of AVM. Subsequently, computed tomography (CT) angiography confirmed the diagnosis. Embolization was chosen as the treatment because of the large extension of AVM and the risk of hemorrhage during hysterectomy. The patient was discharged in a stable condition with a plan of repeat embolization in the next setting. At 6 and 12 weeks of follow-up, she did not experience any further episodes of bleed. The purpose of this case report is to highlight the salient clinical features, diagnosis, and the management options available for this rare clinical condition.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):11-11
      PubDate: Mon,27 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_95_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Measurement in Mediastinal
           Lymphadenopathies: Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Lesions

    • Authors: Fethi Emre Ustabasioglu, Cesur Samanci, Deniz Alis, Nilay Sengul Samanci, Osman Kula, Deniz Cebi Olgun
      Pages: 12 - 12
      Abstract: Fethi Emre Ustabasioglu, Cesur Samanci, Deniz Alis, Nilay Sengul Samanci, Osman Kula, Deniz Cebi Olgun
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):12-12
      Objectives: We aimed to prospectively assess the diagnostic value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement in the differentiation of benign and malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathies. Materials and Methods: The study included 63 consecutive patients (28 women, 35 men; mean age 59.3 years) with 125 mediastinal lymphadenopathies. Echoplanar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the mediastinum was performed with b-factors of 0 and 600 mm2/s before mediastinoscopy and mediastinotomy, and ADC values were measured. The ADC values were compared with the histological results, and statistical analysis was done. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean ADC value of malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy (1.030 ± 0.245 × 10−3 mm2/s) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) when compared to benign lymphadenopathies (1.571 ± 0.559 × 10−3 mm2/s). For differentiating malignant from benign mediastinal lymphadenopathy, the best result was obtained when an ADC value of 1.334 × 10−3 mm2/s was used as a threshold value; area under the curve 0.848, accuracy 78.4%, sensitivity 66%, specificity of 86%, positive predictive value 76.7%, and negative predictive value of 79.2%. Interobserver agreement was excellent for ADC measurements. Conclusions: ADC measurements could be considered an important supportive method in differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathies.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):12-12
      PubDate: Mon,6 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_84_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation: Acellular Dermal Matrix
           (Alloderm®) Used in Breast Reconstructive Surgery

    • Authors: Christine U Lee, Aleh Bobr, Jorge Torres-Mora
      Pages: 13 - 13
      Abstract: Christine U Lee, Aleh Bobr, Jorge Torres-Mora
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):13-13
      Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) such as Alloderm® is sometimes used in tissue reconstruction in primary and reconstructive breast surgeries. As ADM is incorporated into the native tissues, the evolving imaging findings that would correlate with varying degrees of host migration and neoangiogenesis into the matrix can be challenging to recognize. In the setting of a palpable or clinical area of concern after breast reconstructive surgery following breast cancer, confident diagnosis of a mass representing ADM rather than recurring or developing disease can be challenging. Such diagnostic imaging uncertainties generally result in short-term imaging and clinical follow-up, but occasionally, biopsy is performed for histopathological confirmation of benignity. A case of biopsy-proven Alloderm® is described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first radiologic-pathologic correlation of ADM in the literature.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):13-13
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_7_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Anatomic Variations of the Right Portal Vein: Prevalence, Imaging
           Features, and Implications for Successful Transjugular Intrahepatic
           Portosystemic Shunt Creation

    • Authors: Senthil S Gunasekaran, Ron C Gaba
      Pages: 14 - 14
      Abstract: Senthil S Gunasekaran, Ron C Gaba
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):14-14
      Given the widespread use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation for the treatment of portal hypertensive complications, a working knowledge of portal venous anatomy is critical for interventional radiologists. The right portal vein – which is most commonly accessed during TIPS – is subject to various anatomic variants that may potentially impact procedure success. This pictorial essay characterizes the anatomic patterns of the right portal vein branching in terms of type and frequency based on case series review. The work also explains the potential procedural implications of the right portal vein anatomic variations as they pertain to TIPS technical success.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):14-14
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_10_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Large Bowel Obstruction in the Emergency Department: Imaging Spectrum of
           Common and Uncommon Causes

    • Authors: Subramaniyan Ramanathan, Vijayanadh Ojili, Ravi Vassa, Arpit Nagar
      Pages: 15 - 15
      Abstract: Subramaniyan Ramanathan, Vijayanadh Ojili, Ravi Vassa, Arpit Nagar
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):15-15
      Although large bowel obstruction (LBO) is less common than small bowel obstruction, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to delayed diagnosis and/or treatment. Plain radiographs are sufficient to diagnose LBO in a majority of patients. However, further evaluation with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become the standard of care to identify the site, severity, and etiology of obstruction. In this comprehensive review, we illustrate the various causes of LBO emphasizing the role of MDCT in the initial diagnosis and detection of complications along with the tips to differentiate from disease which can mimic LBO.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):15-15
      PubDate: Wed,5 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_6_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lingual Foramina and Canals of the Mandible: Anatomic Variations in a
           Lebanese Population

    • Authors: Georges Aoun, Ibrahim Nasseh, Sayde Sokhn, Mohamad Rifai
      Pages: 16 - 16
      Abstract: Georges Aoun, Ibrahim Nasseh, Sayde Sokhn, Mohamad Rifai
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):16-16
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mandibular lingual foramina (LF) and canals and their anatomic variations using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology in a Lebanese population. Materials and Methods: In this study, we analyzed CBCT images of 90 adult Lebanese patients (41 males and 49 females). We assessed the number and location of the LF. In additional, we measured: (a) The distance from both the alveolar crest and the inferior border of the mandible to the LF and (b) the length of the lingual canals (LCs). The data obtained was analyzed statistically using Shapiro–Wilk normality test, t-test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: In our sample, the LF and canals were present in 93.33% of the CBCT analyzed, and the majority (76.64%) was located above the genial tubercles. The distance from the foramen of the superior and the inferior LCs to the alveolar crest was 16.24 ± 2.82 mm and 25.49 ± 2.43 mm, respectively. The distance from the foramen of the superior canal to the inferior border of the mandible was 14 ± 2.32 mm. The mean length of the superior canal was 5.81 ± 1.6 mm and 4.25 ± 1.2 mm for the inferior one. There were no gender-related differences in the anatomic characteristics of the LF and canals except for the distance measured from the superior canal foramina to the alveolar crest where the measurement was significantly greater in males compared to females. Neither the number of canals nor the positions of the foramina were different between males and females. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, we concluded that in our sample of Lebanese adults, there was substantial variability in the LF and canals anatomy and location.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):16-16
      PubDate: Tue,25 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_15_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Vaginal Ewing Sarcoma: An Uncommon Clinical Entity in Pediatric Patients

    • Authors: Nathan M Cross, A Luana Stanescu, Erin R Rudzinski, Douglas S Hawkins, Marguerite T Parisi
      Pages: 17 - 17
      Abstract: Nathan M Cross, A Luana Stanescu, Erin R Rudzinski, Douglas S Hawkins, Marguerite T Parisi
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):17-17
      Ewing sarcoma, including classical Ewing sarcoma of the bone and primitive neuroectodermal tumors arising in bone or extraosseous primary sites, is a highly aggressive childhood neoplasm. We present two cases of Ewing sarcoma arising from the vagina in young girls. Previously reported cases in literature focused on their pathologic rather than radiographic features. We describe the spectrum of multimodality imaging appearances of Ewing sarcoma at this unusual primary site. Awareness of vaginal Ewing tumors may facilitate prompt diagnosis and lead to a different surgical approach than the more commonly encountered vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):17-17
      PubDate: Tue,25 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_96_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Renal Epithelioid Angiomyolipoma Associated with Pulmonary
           Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Imaging Findings

    • Authors: Athina C Tsili, Alexandra Ntorkou, Maria I Argyropoulou
      Pages: 18 - 18
      Abstract: Athina C Tsili, Alexandra Ntorkou, Maria I Argyropoulou
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):18-18
      Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) are the most common tumors of the perivascular epithelioid cell (PEComa) family. Both may be associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS) complex. Epithelioid AML (EAML) is a rare variety of AMLs, with a potential aggressive behavior. There are few reports in the English literature addressing on the imaging findings of renal EAMLs, which are considered nonspecific. We present the sonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a renal EAML in a pregnant woman with concomitant pulmonary lesions indicative of LAM, without stigmata of TS. We conclude the importance of considering EAML as a possible diagnosis in the presence of a large renal mass with high cellular content and small amounts of fat in the coexistence of pulmonary LAM.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):18-18
      PubDate: Mon,22 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_14_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Extra-pituitary Cerebral Anomalies in Pediatric Patients of Ectopic
           Neurohypophysis: An Uncommon Association

    • Authors: Deb K Boruah, Shantiranjan Sanyal, Arjun Prakash, Sashidhar Achar, Rajanikant R Yadav, T Pravakaran, Dhaval D Dhingani, Barun K Sarmah
      Pages: 19 - 19
      Abstract: Deb K Boruah, Shantiranjan Sanyal, Arjun Prakash, Sashidhar Achar, Rajanikant R Yadav, T Pravakaran, Dhaval D Dhingani, Barun K Sarmah
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):19-19
      Context: Ectopic neurohypophysis (EN) refers to an interrupted, nonvisualized, and thinned out pituitary stalk with ectopic location of the posterior pituitary gland. Concurrent extra-pituitary cerebral and extra-cranial anomalies have been rarely reported in patients of EN. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of extra-pituitary cerebral anomalies in pediatric patients of EN. Settings and Design: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care center. Subjects and Methods: The study group comprised eight pediatric patients of EN associated with extra-pituitary cerebral or vascular anomalies. Clinical and biochemical assessment was done in all patients. Results: Out of the total eight patients with EN, MRI showed interrupted pituitary stalk in five patients (62.5%) and nonvisible pituitary stalk in three patients (37.5%). Ectopic posterior pituitary bright spot was demonstrated in median eminence in six patients (75%), faintly visualized in one patient (12.5%) and nonvisualized in another one patient. Statistical significant association was noted between pituitary gland height and patient's body height with the pituitary gland volume (P < 0.001). Varied extra-pituitary cerebral anomalies encountered in our patients ranged from isolated anomalies such as optic nerve hypoplasia in three patients (37.5%), corpus callosum dysplasia in four patients (50%), agyria-pachygyria complex in two patients (25%), and intracranial vascular anomalies in two patients to syndromic association of tuberous sclerosis in one patient. Conclusion: Identifying and reporting of associated extra-pituitary cerebral anomalies in patients with EN are crucial in assessing the overall neurological outcome of such patients.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):19-19
      PubDate: Mon,22 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_23_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Fluorine-18-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine Positron-emission Tomography
           Scans of Neuroendocrine Tumors (Carcinoids and Pheochromocytomas)

    • Authors: Italo Zanzi, Yana Studentsova, David Bjelke, Richard Warner, Barry Babchyck, Thomas Chaly
      Pages: 20 - 20
      Abstract: Italo Zanzi, Yana Studentsova, David Bjelke, Richard Warner, Barry Babchyck, Thomas Chaly
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):20-20
      Objectives: Conventional methods of imaging neuroendocrine tumors with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, indium-111-octreotide, or radiolabeled metaiodobenzilguanidine scintigraphy have limitations. This pilot study tried to improve the localization of these tumors with fluorine-18-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA) positron-emission tomography (PET) scanning. Materials and Methods: We studied 22 patients, the majority of whom were referred with clinical diagnosis or suspicion of carcinoid (n = 11), neuroendocrine tumors (n = 7) or pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PGL) (n = 4). The comparison was made with the prior conventional imaging. Results: The F-DOPA findings were compared with the results of subsequent surgery (2), endoscopy (1), or a long-term follow-up (mean duration, 49 months) for 17 patients. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Foci of F-DOPA deposition were detected in eight patients (final diagnosis of carcinoid in six, of neuroendocrine tumors in one, and of PGL in another). Comparison with the final diagnoses revealed concordance in 16 of the 22 patients. F-DOPA results appeared superior to those obtained with conventional imaging. Despite the small number and diagnostic heterogeneity, in a substantial fraction of patients F-DOPA PET added information relevant to clinical management. Conclusion: F-DOPA scanning added prognostic value, particularly when multiple abnormal foci versus a negative examination were considered.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):20-20
      PubDate: Mon,22 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_107_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Antenatal Umbilical Coiling Index and Newborn Outcomes: Cohort Study

    • Authors: Josephine Mwikali Ndolo, Sudhir Vinayak, Micah Ominde Silaba, William Stones
      Pages: 21 - 21
      Abstract: Josephine Mwikali Ndolo, Sudhir Vinayak, Micah Ominde Silaba, William Stones
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):21-21
      Objectives: We aimed to test the predictive value of antenatal umbilical coiling index (aUCI) among a prospectively recruited cohort of antenatal women. Methods: Women with singleton pregnancies were recruited at their second-trimester scan. Images of the umbilical cord were used to calculate the aUCI. Pregnancy and birth outcomes were recorded and statistical associations between aUCI and small for gestational age (SGA) using international standard birth weight centiles and preterm birth were investigated (n = 430). Results: aUCI results were consistent with the literature and showed good reproducibility between observers. Abnormal aUCI was not associated with SGA, but there was a statistical association with preterm birth (odds ratio 3.3 (95% confidence interval 1.4–7.7,P = 0.003). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for preterm birth were 47.6%, 76.9%, 9.6%, and 96.6%, respectively. Conclusions: The coiling index is unlikely to be useful in clinical practice as a screening tool for preterm birth owing to limited predictive value. We exclude a statistically or clinically significant association between abnormal coiling and SGA.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):21-21
      PubDate: Mon,22 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_111_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Integrated Interactive-Spaced Education Radiology Curriculum for
           Preclinical Students

    • Authors: Eli Tshibwabwa, Robert Mallin, Madeleine Fraser, Martin Tshibwabwa, Reza Sanii, James Rice, Jenifer Cannon
      Pages: 22 - 22
      Abstract: Eli Tshibwabwa, Robert Mallin, Madeleine Fraser, Martin Tshibwabwa, Reza Sanii, James Rice, Jenifer Cannon
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):22-22
      Introduction: The objective of this study is to determine whether a radiology module, together with online spaced education, helps students of an integrated problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum increase their radiology knowledge and long-term retention. Materials and Methods: Second-year students at the American University of Antigua College of Medicine participated in small groups of ten students each into two 2 h of radiology laboratories. The study comprised two cohorts: winter and fall 2013 students (control group) and 2014 students (experimental group). Both groups used face-to-face PBL. The students of the experimental group received additional online-spaced education. The skills were assessed for both groups before the beginning of laboratories and 4 weeks and 7 months after laboratories. Results: There was no significant difference on pretest between the control and experimental groups. On completion of the radiology laboratories, comparison of test results before and after training showed net improvement for both groups. The corresponding difference for the experimental group was higher compared to the one for the control group (7.83 vs. 6.21, P < 0.001). The difference between the scores on delayed test and pretest showed that the students of both groups demonstrated average knowledge improvement even though their level of performance was slightly below the posttest. The corresponding difference for the experimental group did not differ much from the posttest (P > 0.05), and no significant difference of scores was observed 7 months later for either group. Further, a higher percentage of the students in the experimental group strongly agreed that their learning objectives were met (92% vs. 71%, P > 0.001), and this trend persisted throughout the study. Conclusion:Online spaced education combined to a face-to-face PBL enhances not only the student's knowledge of basic radiology along with his/her self-assessment skills but also the long-term retention of radiology material and satisfaction with the integrated interactive system-based module. Future research is needed to see if medical students in need of additional education support may benefit from spaced education in the field of remediation.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):22-22
      PubDate: Wed,24 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_1_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Unusual Patterns of Thoracic Metastasis of Urinary Bladder Carcinoma

    • Authors: Robert Hiensch, Habtamu Belete, Mahsan Rashidfarokhi, Irene Galperin, Fouzia Shakil, Oleg Epelbaum
      Pages: 23 - 23
      Abstract: Robert Hiensch, Habtamu Belete, Mahsan Rashidfarokhi, Irene Galperin, Fouzia Shakil, Oleg Epelbaum
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):23-23
      Urinary bladder carcinoma (UBC) is the ninth most common malignancy and the second most common urological malignancy after prostate cancer in men. Thoracic metastases occur in more than half of those with muscle-invasive disease, and these generally assume the form of multiple solid parenchymal lesions characteristic of hematogenous seeding of the lung. Unusual patterns of thoracic spread of UBC have also been described albeit sporadically in the form of case reports and series. The aim of our case series is to provide illustrations of several atypical patterns of thoracic involvement by UBC such as isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy, cavitary lung metastases, malignant pleural effusion, endobronchial disease, and pulmonary tumor embolism. This review is meant to highlight the intersection of the fields of urological oncology and thoracic radiology in the care of patients with UBC.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2017 7(1):23-23
      PubDate: Thu,25 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_9_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Sonography in the Diagnosis and Assessment of Dengue Fever

    • Authors: VR Santhosh, Prashanth G Patil, MG Srinath, Ashok Kumar, Aditi Jain, M Archana
      Pages: 14 - 14
      Abstract: VR Santhosh, Prashanth G Patil, MG Srinath, Ashok Kumar, Aditi Jain, M Archana
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2014 4(1):14-14
      Objective: The objective of the following study is to determine the use of ultrasound as an important adjunct to clinical and laboratory profile in diagnosing dengue fever and in predicting the severity of the disease by correlating imaging features with platelet count. The variation in sonographic features seen in patients from different age groups was also studied. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study. 96 patients who were serologically diagnosed as having dengue fever between April and August 2012 were referred for ultrasound scanning of the abdomen and thorax and the imaging findings were analyzed. Results: Out of 96 sero-positive dengue cases, 64 (66.7%) patients showed edematous gallbladder (GB) wall thickening, 62 (64.5%) patients showed ascites, 48 (50%) patients had pleural effusion, 17 (17.7%) patients had hepatomegaly, 16 (16.7%) patients had splenomegaly and in 17 (17.7%) patients ultrasound findings were normal. Edematous GB wall thickening, ascites and pleural effusion were the most common combination of findings in all age groups. Edematous GB wall thickening was seen in 97.8% of patients with platelet count of less than 40,000 along with ascites (86.9%) and pleural effusion (58.6%). In patients with platelet count between 40,000 and 80,000 ascites was more common than edematous GB wall thickening. Significantly no abnormal sonographic finding was detected in patient with platelet count more than 150,000. Conclusion: Sonographic features of thickened GB wall, pleural effusion (bilateral or right side), ascites, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly should strongly favor the diagnosis of dengue fever in patients presenting with fever and associated symptoms, particularly during an epidemic. The degree of thrombocytopenia showed a significant direct relationship to abnormal ultrasound features.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2014 4(1):14-14
      PubDate: Mon,1 Jan 1900
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.129260
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (1900)
       
  • A Rare Case of Oropharyngeal Teratoma Diagnosed Antenatally with MRI

    • Authors: Murali Mohan Manchali, Chandrahasa Sharabu, Meher Latha, Leela Kumar
      Pages: 15 - 15
      Abstract: Murali Mohan Manchali, Chandrahasa Sharabu, Meher Latha, Leela Kumar
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2014 4(1):15-15
      Oropharyngeal teratomas are extremely rare congenital tumors and have an incidence rate of one in 35,000-200,000 newborn babies/neonates. Oropharyngeal teratomas may cause life threatening airway obstruction to a newborn. Early diagnosis with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential to plan management. Here, we present a rare case of oropharyngeal true teratoma diagnosed with MRI antenatally in a fetus at 34 weeks of gestation in a 25-year-old female who was being evaluated for polyhydraminos. We found MRI to be more helpful for antenatal diagnosis, counseling, and management than ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT).
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2014 4(1):15-15
      PubDate: Mon,1 Jan 1900
      DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.129261
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 1 (1900)
       
 
 
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