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RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (192 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 192 of 192 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abdominal Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Acta Cytologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Radiológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Computed Tomography     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Alasbimn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Neuroradiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Roentgenology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied In Vitro Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Oceania Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access  
Belgian Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BJR     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
BJR | case reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Medical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Biotherapy & Radiopharmaceuticals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Radiothérapie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Chinese Journal of Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Translational Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Mass Spectrometry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part A     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part B, Magnetic Resonance Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Contemporary Diagnostic Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Critical Ultrasound Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Imaging Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Radiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Der Nuklearmediziner     Hybrid Journal  
Der Radiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Digestive Disease Interventions     Hybrid Journal  
DNA and RNA Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Egyptian Journal of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EJNMMI Radiopharmacy and Chemistry     Open Access  
Emergency Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access  
European Journal of Nanomedicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European Journal of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
European Journal of Radiology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Radiology Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Radiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Feuillets de Radiologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontiers in Neurogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
IEEE Transactions on Radiation and Plasma Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Imagen Diagnóstica     Full-text available via subscription  
Imaging Decisions MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Insights into Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Biomedical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Nanomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Radiation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Radiology and Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Tomography & Simulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Interventionelle Radiologie Scan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Investigative Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Iranian Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Japanese Journal of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal de Radiologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de Radiologie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Clinical Interventional Radiology ISVIR     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Diagnostic Medical Sonography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Diagnostic Radiography and Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Fetal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Liver : Disease & Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medical Imaging     Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Neuroradiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Radiation Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nucleic Acids Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Radiation and Cancer Research     Open Access  
Journal of Radiation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Radiation Research and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiological Protection     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology and Oncology     Open Access  
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiosurgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Thoracic Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
La radiologia medica     Hybrid Journal  
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Medical Image Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Medical Imaging and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nepalese Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neurographics     Free   (Followers: 3)
NeuroImage : Clinical     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Neuroradiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neuroradiology Journal The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nuclear Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nuclear Medicine Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nuclear Medicine Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nuklearmedizin / NuclearMedicine     Hybrid Journal  
Open Journal of Clinical Diagnostics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Medical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Medical Imaging Journal     Open Access  
Oral Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Physica Medica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Radiation Protection and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Radiatsionnaya Gygiena = Radiation Hygiene     Open Access  
Radiographics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Radiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Radiography Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Radiología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Radiología (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Radiologia Brasileira     Open Access  
Radiologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Radiologie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Radiology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Radiology of Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Radiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Radiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
Reports in Medical Imaging     Open Access  
Research and Reports in Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Argentina de Radiología / Argentinian Journal of Radiology     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Radiologia     Open Access  
Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Internacional de Ciencias Podológicas     Open Access  
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Musculoskeletal Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Seminars in Roentgenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Shadows : The New Zealand Journal of Medical Radiation Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Skeletal Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription  
Sri Lanka Journal of Radiology     Open Access  
Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ultraschall in der Medizin - European Journal of Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ultrasonic Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ultrasound Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
West African Journal of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.72
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2212-4403 - ISSN (Online) 2212-4403
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3200 journals]
  • Multiple calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: case report and review
           of the literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Ana Carolina Hanaoka Ibituruna, Anaíra Ribeiro Guedes Fonseca Costa, Luiz Fernando Barbosa de Paulo, Paulo Rogério de Faria, Sérgio Vitorino Cardoso, Adriano Mota LoyolaAbstractCalcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign neoplasm, and few cases of multiple lesions have been published. This article reports the case of a 26-year-old male patient with bilateral gingival lesions near the maxillary canines and a hard tumor on the left side of the mandible. All lesions presented mixed radiographic appearance (radiolucent and radiopaque). Incisional biopsies revealed typical histopathological findings of CEOT. The gingival lesions were removed by curettage, and the mandibular tumor was surgically resected. No recurrence was detected after six years of treatment. Five well-documented cases of multiple CEOT were retrieved from the PubMed database. These patients were slightly older than those with solitary tumors, and none of them presented syndromic features. Three cases had only multiple central tumors while the other two had multiple peripheral lesions, so the present patient is the first to manifest both central and peripheral tumors.
       
  • Evaluation of different soft tissue–simulating materials in pixel
           intensity values in cone beam computed tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Gustavo Machado Santaella, Maria Augusta Portella Guedes Visconti, Karina Lopes Devito, Francisco Carlos Groppo, Francisco Haiter-Neto, Luciana AsprinoObjectiveThis study aimed to evaluate different materials as soft tissue simulators and the influence of soft tissues in cone beam computed tomography.Study DesignImages of 5 piglet heads were acquired with intact soft tissues, with the tissues stripped, and with the use of different soft tissue simulators, following the same acquisition protocol. Four different materials were tested, individually or in combination: acrylic, water, utility wax, and expanded polystyrene (EPS). Pixel intensity values of 8 quadrangular regions, that is, upper and lower teeth and alveolar bone, were obtained. The mean values were used for comparison by analysis of variance (ANOVA; α = 5%).ResultsNo differences were observed for the “No Material,” “EPS,” “Acrylic,” and “EPS and Wax” groups for the lower anterior and posterior teeth, the upper posterior tooth, and the anterior and posterior bone, and for the “No Material,” “EPS,” and “EPS and Wax,” groups for the lower posterior bone. All groups showed statistical differences for the lower anterior bone and the upper anterior tooth.ConclusionsExpanded 2-cm thick polystyrene, with or without 1-cm thick utility wax, was effective for most regions, followed by acrylic 0.5 cm. Soft tissues were not of great influence in most regions. Water was not an effective material for any of the regions.
       
  • Multiple superficial mucoceles concomitant with oral lichen planus: a case
           series
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Kejia Lv, Jianhua Liu, Weijia Ye, Guohua Wang, Hua YaoSuperficial mucoceles are a relatively rare variant of common mucoceles and have an unclear etiology. Clinically, they are small, translucent, subepithelial vesicles affecting the oral mucosa in the retromolar region, the lower labial and buccal regions, and the bilateral soft palate. Superficial mucocele is easily misdiagnosed as pemphigoid, bullous lichen planus, herpes lesion, or venous lake when it is concomitant with oral lichen planus (OLP) or lichenoid disorders on the basis of the initial impression. An inflammatory mechanism related to OLP has been hypothesized to induce the development of superficial mucoceles. It is essential to be familiar with this entity. This report presents 9 cases of multiple superficial mucoceles that occurred sequentially concomitant with OLP and with consistent clinical and histopathologic features. Relevant studies reported in the literature are also reviewed to provide additional clarification of the etiology, clinicopathologic characteristics, and differential diagnosis.
       
  • Twist and E-cadherin deregulation might predict poor prognosis in lower
           lip squamous cell carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Everton Freitas de Morais, Hellen Bandeira de Pontes Santos, Israel Leal Cavalcante, Silvia Helena Barem Rabenhorst, Jean Nunes dos Santos, Hébel Cavalcanti Galvão, Roseana de Almeida FreitasObjectiveThe aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lower lip squamous cell carcinoma (LLSCC) and their association with clinicopathologic parameters.Study DesignFifty-nine cases of LLSCC were analyzed by applying immunohistochemistry techniques in a semiquantitative manner. The systems proposed by Bryne etal., Brandwein-Gensler etal., and Almangush etal. were applied for analysis of the histopathologic malignancy grading system.ResultsHigher E-cadherin expression (general and membrane) was observed in cases presenting with disease-free survival after 5years of follow-up (P < .05). Higher Twist expression was observed in lesions classified as being in advanced stages, displaying recurrence, and having a high degree of malignancy. A significant negative correlation was detected between cytoplasmic Twist expression and membrane E-cadherin expression (P = .028). A statistically significant relationship was detected between high total Twist expression in tumors classified as high risk by Brandwein-Gensler etal., and no significant difference was observed among total, membrane, and cytoplasmic E-cadherin expressions in LLSCC cases and the 3 applied grading systems (P> .05).ConclusionsThe results of the present study suggest the potential involvement of Twist and E-cadherin in the modulation of events related to worse prognoses in LLSCC cases.
       
  • Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw unrelated to bisphosphonates
           and denosumab—a review
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Rebecca King, Nikki Tanna, Vinod PatelThe link between medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) and bone modulating drugs, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, is well established, and the number of reported cases is increasing. The development of novel medications used in the treatment of cancer, as well as autoimmune and bone conditions, has led to more cases of MRONJ being reported. However, in addition to this group of medications, increasing numbers of new agents in cancer therapy, such as antiangiogenic agents, have also been implicated in the development of MRONJ. As these newer agents with similar mechanisms are routinely used, the numbers of reported cases will likely rise further. This article aims to identify and summarize the drugs implicated in MRONJ, besides bisphosphonates and denosumab. A wide range of medications classified as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, radiopharmaceuticals, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and immunosuppressants have been implicated in MRONJ. It remains crucial that oral health care providers are aware of these new medications and their associated risks to manage their patients appropriately.
       
  • How well do we manage the odontogenic keratocyst' A multicenter study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Brian Kinard, Gentry Hansen, Marshall Newman, Peter Dennis, Tyler Haeffs, Sebastian Perez, Aya Hamao-Sakamoto, Martin Steed, Pamela Hughes, Meredith August, Shelly AbramowiczObjectiveThe aim of this study was to answer the following clinical questions: Among patients treated for odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), what is the overall 5-year disease-free rate, and what factors are associated with disease recurrence'Study DesignWe implemented a multicenter retrospective cohort study composed of patients presenting for the evaluation and management of previously untreated OKCs. The predictor variables were grouped into demographic, medical, radiographic, and operative categories. The primary outcome variable was time to lesion recurrence. Data analyses were performed by using bivariate analysis and univariate or multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsThe study sample was composed of 231 OKCs. Of these, 57 (24.7%) were treated with decompression with residual cystectomy, 86 (37.2%) with enucleation without adjuvant therapy, and 78 (33.8%) with enucleation with peripheral ostectomy. There were 44 recurrences (19%), with a median time to recurrence of 26.7 months (range 15.8–49.8).ConclusionsThis multicenter study is the largest study analyzing disease recurrence after treatment of OKCs by using appropriate statistical analysis for a time-to-event outcome (disease recurrence). The 5-year disease-free estimate was 29%. Mandibular lesions, multilocular lesions, and lesions treated with decompression and residual cystectomy were associated with recurrence.
       
  • Dental and craniofacial alterations in long-term survivors of childhood
           head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Valkiria D'Aiuto de Mattos, Sima Ferman, Denise Maria Araújo Magalhães, Héliton Spíndola Antunes, Simone Queiroz Chaves LourençoObjectiveRhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) represents the most common soft tissue sarcoma that affects children. Treatment involves chemoradiotherapy. This study aimed at evaluating the long-term alterations to teeth and cranial bones in children, teenagers, and young adults after oncologic treatment.Study DesignWe conducted a cross-sectional study of patients undergoing treatment for head and neck RMS between 1988 and 2011. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and treatment data and performed panoramic radiography, cephalometry, and photography.ResultsWe evaluated 27 long-term survivors, most of whom had been treated between ages 0 to 5 years (51.9%). The total radiation dose applied was 50.4 Gy, and the chemotherapy combination included vincristine, actinomycin D, and cyclophosphamide in 51.9% of the cases. We observed 603 dental alterations, among which 377 (62.7%) occurred in patients ages 0 to 5 years, and root shortening was the most frequent alteration observed (24.2%). With regard to facial bones, 74% of the patients had some level of facial asymmetry, 70.4% had reduced facial depth, 48.4% had mandibles of short size, and 77.8% had reduced facial height.ConclusionsChildren submitted to RMS treatment involving chemotherapy and radiotherapy displayed significant dental and craniofacial alterations, especially when treatment occurred between ages 0 and 5 years.
       
  • Exophytic swelling of the buccal mucosa in a young female patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): René Martínez, Constanza Marín, Sven Niklander, Maureen Marshall, Wilfredo Alejandro González-Arriagada
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • Society Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • Apocrine epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma of the parotid gland with
           concurrent oncocytic change: A novel variant
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Shu Xia, Xin-Ming Chen, Shao-Dong Yang, Xue-Qing Zheng, Ya-Ying Hu, Jia-Li ZhangAbstractEpithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma (EMCa) is a rare, low-grade, malignant salivary gland tumor. Herein, we report an unusual case of an EMCa with extensive apocrine and oncocytic changes. The tumor occurred in the left parotid gland of a 68-year-old male. Histologically, the tumor was characterized by a biphasic arrangement of luminal ductal cells and abluminal polygonal myoepithelial cells with prominent apocrine differentiation in the luminal layer and dense eosinophilic cytoplasm in both components. Immunohistochemically, the ductal epithelial component was positive for CK7, AR, GCDFP-15 and HER-2, and both components were diffusely positive for the anti-mitochondria antibody and phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin (PTAH). EMCa with apocrine differentiation or oncocytic change is an uncommon variant. To the best of our knowledge, this report describes the first case of these two variants coexisting in EMCa tumor cells in the English-language literature. Awareness of its histopathological features is sufficient to avoid an incorrect diagnosis.
       
  • Anatomical study: the potential movability of inferior alveolar nerve
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Shogo Kikuta, Joe Iwanaga, Jingo Kusukawa, R. Shane TubbsAbstractObjectiveNerve repair and repositioning are procedures for treating and avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during oral and maxillofacial surgery. The present study aims to examine how the mobility of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle (IAB) changes with or without removing the bone around the mental foramen (MF).Study DesignSix fresh-frozen cadavers (eleven sides) were dissected in this study. Osteotomy in the buccal cortical bone was performed from 5 mm posterior to the MF to the distal edge of the second molar with a high-speed drill and osteotome. Next, the distance from the lateral surface of the buccal cortical bone to the retracted IAB was measured with and without removing the bone around the MF.ResultsThe distance from the lateral surface of the buccal cortical bone to the retracted IAB without removing the bone around the MF was 0 mm on all sides. After removing the bone, the mean distance changed by 4.71 ± 1.41 mm (range 2.83 to 7.90). There was no statistically significant difference between right and left sides.ConclusionsThe results of this study support removing bone around the MF for increased mobility of the IAB.
       
  • Course of the mandibular canal in hemifacial microsomia: a retrospective
           computed tomography study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Zhixu Liu, Jian Cao, Yifeng Qian, Hao Sun, Yi Sun, Steve Guofang Shen, Xudong WangAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the anatomical course of the mandibular canal in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HM).Study DesignIn this retrospective study, 77 patients were included and stratified by the Pruzansky-Kaban classification. The mandibular canal and mandible were reconstructed based on computed tomography data. The entrance, route, and exit of the mandibular canal (representing the entrance, route, and exit of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), respectively), and the antilingula were analyzed in different types of mandibular deformities in patients with HM.ResultsNo significant difference in the course of the mandibular canal was detected between the affected and unaffected sides in type I and type IIa patients. Abnormalities were observed in some type IIb and type III patients. Significant differences were found between type IIb and type III patients in entrance (p=0.015) and route (p=0.001) of the canals. The antilingula was identified only in type IIb and type III patients and was more common in type III than in type IIb patients.ConclusionsVariation of the anatomical course of mandibular canal exists in Pruzansky-Kaban type IIb and type III patients. Evaluation of the course of the canal in HM patients is suggested before surgical intervention to avoid IAN damage.
       
  • Accuracy and reliability of mandibular digital model registration with use
           of the mucogingival junction as the reference
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 4Author(s): Marcos Ioshida, Brian Andres Muñoz, Hector Rios, Lucia Cevidanes, Juan Fernando Aristizabal, Diego Rey, Hera Kim-Berman, Marilia Yatabe, Erika Benavides, Maria Antonia Alvarez, Sarah Volk, Antonio C. RuellasObjective.The aim of the study was to validate a method of mandibular digital model (DM) registration, acquired from an intraoral scanner, compared with high-resolution voxel-based cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration with use of the mucogingival junction as the reference.Study Design.Pre- and post-treatment CBCT and DM images from 12 adults were randomly selected from an initial sample of 40 patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment. The DM registration was performed in 6 steps: (1) construction of 3-dimensional (3-D) volumetric label maps of CBCT scans, (2) voxel-based registration of CBCT scans, (3) prelabeling of CBCT images, (4) approximation and registration of DM models to the corresponding CBCT models, (5) mucogingival-junction registration of pretreatment and post-treatment DM images, and (6) measurements. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to calculate the significance of differences between the CBCT and DM registrations. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was performed to assess reproducibility of the registration method.Results.When registered CBCT models and registered DM models were compared, no statistically significant differences in the measurements were found (right–left P = .267; anterior–posterior P = .238; superior–inferior P = .384; and 3-D P = .076). ICC showed excellent intra- and inter-rater correlation (ICC> 0.90).Conclusions.The method of DM registration of the mandible with use of the mucogingival junction as the reference is accurate, reliable, and reproducible.
       
  • Solitary Oral Epidermolytic Acanthoma: Case report of a rarely diagnosed
           entity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Prokopios P. Argyris, Zachary M. Slama, Andrew C. Nelson, Ioannis G. KoutlasAbstractEpidermolytic acanthoma (EA) represents a rare localized form of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (EHK) clinically resembling warty lesions and showing a strong predilection for the genital skin of males. Herein, we present a case of oral solitary EA affecting a 71-year-old Caucasian man. Clinically, the lesion was white, well-circumscribed and sessile, measuring 2 mm in diameter and located on the posterior mandibular buccal gingiva. An excisional biopsy revealed, microscopically, pronounced hyperkeratosis and acanthosis with formation of keratin crypts. Lesional cells of the spinous and granular epithelial layers exhibited prominent intracellular vacuolar degeneration, as well as eosinophilic para-nuclear and peri-nuclear condensations. Intracytoplasmic eosinophilic globules were also noticed. No recurrences have been reported within a 12-month follow-up period. Investigation for low- and high-risk HPV infection by in situ hybridization, p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction failed to reveal positivity for HPV subtypes 6, 11, 16 and 18. Review of the pertinent literature revealed scarce reports of EHK-like changes of the oral mucosa associated with malignant neoplasms and inflammatory processes. EA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of benign epithelial papillomatous lesions of the oral cavity.
       
  • A NODULE IN THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT AREA
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Flávia Leite-Lima, Felipe Paiva Fonseca, Ricardo Santiago Gomez, Luiz Felipe Cardoso Lehman, Wagner Henriques de Castro, Felipe Eduardo Baires Campos
       
  • The experiences of people who receive swallow therapy following surgical
           treatment of head and neck cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Camilla Dawson, Jo Adams, Deborah FenlonAbstractPurposeThis research was initiated to explore the experiences and important elements of swallow therapy in people following surgery for treatment of head and neck cancer.MethodsOne to one, face to face interviews were conducted with people with head and neck cancer post oral reconstructive surgery (free, pedicled or bony flap), 7-14 days post-surgery. Analysis was conducted using interpretive phenomenology.ResultsAnalysis of interviews from 15 patients identified two overarching themes: ‘I never dreamt’ and ‘They look at you and they speak to you’. There was no way to adequately prepare for the enormity of surgery and its consequences, however the way health professionals interacted and communicated with the person, rather than their altered and disfigured selves was healing and therapeutic.ConclusionsNovel ways to prepare people for head and neck cancer surgery, and support in recovery are required, including ways to connect and help people feel human again.
       
  • Case report of epithelioid osteoblastoma of the mandible: findings on
           positron emission tomography/computed tomography and review of the
           literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Akram Al-Ibraheem, Basel Yacoub, Andrew Barakat, Mohamad Yasser Dergham, Gilbert Maroun, Hussam Haddad, Alaa Saleh, Nabil Khoury, Mukbil Hourani, Mohamad B. HaidarEpithelioid osteoblastoma is a clinically aggressive subtype of osteoblastoma that favors the mandible and the maxilla. Its histologic features lie on a spectrum between conventional osteoblastoma and low-grade osteosarcoma, thus making it difficult at times to confirm the diagnosis. It is known to have a high risk of recurrence after surgical resection, but it is a benign entity and does not have the propensity to metastasize. To our knowledge, there are no published reports on findings of epithelioid osteoblastoma on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We report a case of a 25-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of epithelioid osteoblastoma of the mandible. The lesion exhibited significantly increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake on PET/CT with a maximum standardized uptake value of 5.5. PET/CT is not specific in differentiating between malignant and benign bone lesions but may be necessary to rule out distant lesions when a confirmed diagnosis of epithelioid osteoblastoma cannot be obtained through histologic examination.
       
  • The Fallacy of pre-Kidney Transplant “Dental Clearance”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Lauren L. Patton
       
  • Mandibular bone effects of botulinum toxin injections in masticatory
           muscles in adult
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Alexis Kahn, Jean-Daniel Kün-Darbois, Helios Bertin, Pierre Corre, Daniel ChappardAbstractObjectiveBotulinum toxin (BTX) is injected in masticatory muscles to treat various conditions. Animal studies have evidenced a bone loss at the condylar and alveolar regions of the mandible following BTX injection in masticatory muscles. The aim of the present study was to seek for mandibular bone changes in patients following BTX injections in masticatory muscles.Study designTwelve adult patients in which a BTX injection in masticatory muscles was performed were included. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed before and twelve months after the injection. The condylar and alveolar regions of the mandible were analyzed using texture analysis of the CBCT images with the run length method. Condylar cortical thickness was measured and 3D analysis of the mandible was also performed. Six subjects, without BTX injection, were used as controls.ResultsA run length parameter (gray level non-uniformity) was found increased in condylar bone and alveolar bone. A significant cortical thinning was found at the anterior portion of the right condyle. 3D analysis showed significant bone changes of condylar bone and at the digastric fossa. No change was found on mandibular angles.ConclusionThis study identified mandibular bone changes in adult patients after BTX injection into masticatory muscles.
       
  • Extracapsular Dissection via Sternocleidomastoid Muscle-Parotid Space
           Approach–A New Operative Technique for Treating Clinically Benign Tumor
           in the Parotid Tail
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Rong Yang, Yuxing Guo, Chi Mao, Chuanbin Guo, Diancan WangAbstractObjectiveIn this article, we introduced extracapsular dissection via sternocleidomastoid muscle-parotid space approach (ECD SMPSA) as a modified operative technique for removal of clinically benign tumors from the parotid tail.Study design52 patients with clinically benign tumor in the parotid tail were enrolled and divided into two groups: one treated with ECD SMPSA and one with extracapsular dissection (ECD), respectively. All the patients were followed up for at least 2 years.ResultsThe ECD SMPSA group had lower incidence of subjective Frey's syndrome (p=.03) and higher satisfaction with the cosmetic result after the surgery (p=.023) compared to ECD group. All the patients were free of salivary fistulae. The facial palsy (p=.234) and earlobe numbness (p=.291) were not significantly different between the groups. (P
       
  • The Cost of Training: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at a Crossroad
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Joshua E. Lubek
       
  • A Rare Case of Oral Tumor Presenting as First Sign of IgG4-related Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Wan-Ting Yang, Kuo-Yang TsaiAbstractIgG4-related disease is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by elevated serum and tissue IgG4 levels, organ enlargement, and a clinical response to immunosuppressants. We present such a case in a 39-year-old female, whose lesion was located in the right buccal space involving the minor salivary gland. After the tumor-like growth was removed, diagnosis was confirmed with histopathologic slides showing lymphoid cell infiltration, dense fibrotic stroma, and IgG4-positive plasma cells. Thus, the patient underwent steroid therapy, and there has been no recurrence since.Conclusion: Rarely do we see IgG4-related sclerosing disease involve the buccal minor salivary gland in its early stages. Thus, it is important to include IgG4-related disease in the differential diagnosis when considering autoimmune diseases with oral manifestations.
       
  • Desmoplastic Fibroma Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis: Case Report and
           Literature Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Mina D. Fahmy, Anish Gupta, Ricardo J. Padilla, Annette Segura, Carolyn Dicus BrookesAbstractTuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that affects the skin, brain, kidneys, and other organ systems. It may exhibit a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Desmoplastic fibroma (DF) of the jaw is a rare benign myofibroblastic neoplasm. Less than 10 cases of DF associated with TSC have been published previously. We report a new case of a maxillary DF in a 12 year old girl with TSC. The presentation, diagnostic process, and management of this case are discussed, and the literature is reviewed for the additional cases of DF associated with TSC; seven previously reported cases are summarized. Small sample size limits conclusions, but there may be differences in the presentations of DF of the jaws in patients with TSC versus the general population. DF of the jaws may be a manifestation of TSC, and the authors propose surveillance panoramic radiographs every 2-3 years in patients with TSC.
       
  • In reply to the letter to the editor (MS#TRIPLEO-D-19-00120) concerning
           "Vital signs changes during different dental procedures. A prospective
           longitudinal cross-over clinical trial".
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Raed Ghaleb Salma
       
  • Letter to Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Craig S. Miller
       
  • Conservative therapy versus arthrocentesis for the treatment of
           symptomatic disc displacement without reduction: a prospective,
           randomised, controlled study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): B. Öhrnell Malekzadeh, B. Johansson Cahlin, G. WidmarkAbstractObjectiveDisc displacement without reduction (DDwoR) results in pain and limited mouth opening, with negative impact on daily function. Non-invasive interventions are the standard primary treatment for DDwoR. This study compared the clinical outcomes from non-invasive (conservative) and minimally invasive (arthrocentesis) treatments for patients with DDwoR.Study design24 patients with clinically diagnosed symptomatic closed lock, were randomised to non-invasive (information, self-exercise, occlusal splints) and minimally invasive (information, arthrocentesis with lavage, manipulation, post-operative self-exercise) intervention groups. Maximal mouth opening (MMO) and pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) were measured at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment.ResultsBoth groups showed a successful outcome after 1 year, with (mean ± SD) MMO value of 46.3 ± 7.2 mm and VAS score of 11.0 ± 17.1 for the non-invasive group, and MMO value of 42.7 ± 6.1 mm and VAS score of 10.0 ± 6.3 for the minimally invasive group. There were no significant differences between the groups. Interestingly, a sub-group of patients that recovered spontaneously before treatment start had significantly higher MMO values at baseline (p=0.028).ConclusionTreatment outcomes for the two interventions are similar and patients with a higher baseline MMO are more likely to undergo spontaneous recovery.
       
  • Exuberant manifestation of Neurofibromatosis Type 1 affecting three
           generations: delayed diagnosis and the importance of the multidisciplinary
           approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Elen de Souza Tolentino, Gustavo Nascimento de Souza Pinto, Larissa Maciel, Ana Regina Casaroto Moreschi, Cleverson Teixeira Soares, Vanessa Soares LaraAbstractNeurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by mutations of chromosome 17. The NF1 clinical diagnosis is based on pre-established criteria including the presence of cutaneous neurofibromas, café au lait spots and iris (Lisch) nodules. Early detection and multidisciplinary approach are essential for prevention of complications, including problems of function, aesthetics and self-esteem, and occurrence of malignant transformation. This study reports a case of an exuberant NF1 manifestation diagnosed by a dental surgeon, whose family investigation allowed the diagnosis in three generations, with different expressivities.
       
  • Comparison of radiographic and fractal analysis findings on panoramic
           radiographs of patients with early-stage and advanced-stage
           medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Onur ŞAHİN, Onur ODABAŞI, Kemal Özgür DEMİRALP, Emine Şebnem KURŞUN-ÇAKMAK, Toghrul ALİYEVAbstractObjectivesTo compare the panoramic radiographs of patients with early- and advanced-stage medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw for differences in radiographic findings and fractal dimension.Study DesignData were collected from the medical records of 66 patients confirmed as having MRONJ. Panoramic radiographs of 66 patients (Group I; without bone exposure and Group II; with bone exposure) were evaluated for the following signs; osteolysis, cortical erosion, focal and diffuse sclerosis, sequestrum, lamina dura thickening, enhancement of inferior alveolar canal (IAC), persistent alveolar socket, pathological fractures, and enhancement of the external oblique ridge. Fractal dimension (FD) values were also compared between groups.ResultsThe signs of focal and diffuse sclerosis, sequestrum, and enhancement of the IAC were observed significantly more often in Group II than Group I (p
       
  • Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound after intraoral vertical ramus
           osteotomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Satomi Arimoto, Takumi Hasegawa, Daisuke Takeda, Chizu Tateishi, Masaya Akashi, Shungo Furudoi, Takahide KomoriAbstractObjectiveThe present study investigated the effect of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) on long-term osseous healing of the cleavage space between bone fragments after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO).Study DesignPatients undergoing IVRO were randomly selected to be in the LIPUS group (n=12) or control group (n=9) after surgery. LIPUS treatments were applied daily to the cleavage space between bone fragments for 3 weeks. We observed three-dimensional quantitative color mapping of the whole mandible created by computed tomography (CT) data at one month, six months, and one year postoperatively. Based on CT values, the color grades were classified as D1 to D5 using Misch criteria. We then calculated mean CT values and rated each color grade in different selection ranges.ResultsThe mean CT values of the LIPUS group were significantly higher than that of the control group at one month, six months and one year postoperatively (p
       
  • Society Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s):
       
  • Comparison of mandibular index values determined from standard panoramic
           versus cone beam computed tomography reconstructed images
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Cansu Koseoglu Secgin, Ayse Gulsahi, Yasemin Yavuz, Kivanc KamburogluObjectiveThe aim of this study was to compare mandibular index values, including the mandibular cortical index (MCI), mental index (MI), and panoramic mandibular index (PMI), determined on the basis of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic reconstructed (PR) images.Study DesignPR and CBCT images of 182 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Cross-sectional (CS) and PR images were obtained from CBCT data. The MCI, MI, and PMI were assessed on CS, PR, and panoramic images and evaluated for intra- and interobserver agreements by κ-value or intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Agreement among measurement methods was assessed by using the Bland-Altman method, with CS images as the gold standard for linear measurements.ResultsMeasurements from PR and CS images agreed with those from panoramic images in 66.7% and 53.8% of C3 classifications of MCI (porous cortices forming many endosteal residues), respectively. Panoramic and CBCT images exhibited good agreement in MI findings (ICC 0.91) and moderate (PR and panoramic images: ICC 0.79) to good (CS and panoramic images: ICC 0.87) agreement in PMI findings.ConclusionsBecause of the overlapping of buccal and lingual cortices, panoramic images are especially inadequate for determining the C3 category of MCI. However, CS images obtained from available CBCT data provide better visibility compared with panoramic images and, therefore, can be used for evaluating mandibular indices.
       
  • KLF4 expression in the surgical cut margin is associated with disease
           relapse of Oral squamous cell carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Souvick Roy, Madhabananda Kar, Shomereeta Roy, Swatishree Padhi, Arka Saha, Birendranath BanerjeeAbstractObjectiveThe presence of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in the bulk of tumor is one of the factor responsible for disease relapse in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study we investigated the role of OCT4 and KLF4 in OSCC progression and disease relapse.Study design102 OSCC patients were included in this study. The expression of β-catenin and CSC markers (KLF4, OCT4) in surgical cut margin (CM) and tumor of OSCC patients’ were investigated by western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and qPCR analysis. Chi square test was used to evaluate the association of β-catenin, OCT4 and KLF4 expression with clinico-pathological characteristics. Kaplan-Meier and COX regression analysis were performed to correlate different clinical factors with prognosis of OSCC patients.ResultsWe observed increased expression of OCT4, KLF4 and β-catenin in CM of recurrent OSCC patients. Chi-square test exhibited recurrence as one of the key factor associated with high expression of these markers. Kaplan-Meier and COX regression analysis demonstrated that increased expression of KLF4 in CM region of recurrent patients was independently associated with poor prognosis.ConclusionOur findings indicated that expression of KLF4 can be used for monitoring disease progression and may serve as prognostic marker to predict recurrence.
       
  • Panoramic radiography is of limited value in the evaluation of maxillary
           sinus disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Sarah Constantine, Bruce Clark, Andreas Kiermeier, Professor Peter AndersonObjectivesThe aim of this study was to determine (1) the diagnostic efficacy of orthopantomography (OPG) in the diagnosis of sinus diseases by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as the imaging gold standard, (2) which diseases can be diagnosed by using panoramic radiography or CBCT, and (3) the interobserver agreement of 2 experienced dental radiologists.Study DesignThe images of 714 individuals who underwent OPG and CBCT on the same day were assessed separately by 2 dental radiologists. The results were compared by using Gwet's AC1 statistical methods.ResultsIn total, 1322 maxillary sinuses were imaged. The sensitivity of OPG for the detection of any maxillary sinus pathology was poor compared with CBCT, but the specificity was high. The sensitivity of OPG for detecting mucosal thickening was 36.7%. The positive predictive value of OPG for diagnosing mucosal thickening was 79.9 %, but the negative predictive value was 51.9%. Interobserver agreement was strong (≥0.912) for all lesions except mucosal thickening.ConclusionsPanoramic imaging has low efficacy in the diagnosis of sinus disease, even when examined by experienced dental radiologists. OPG can be useful in excluding disease, but 3-dimensional scanning is necessary for the definitive investigation of sinus lesions.
       
  • Minor salivary gland intraductal mucoepidermoid carcinoma: a case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Ibrahim Nawroz, Jonathan Bowman, Neil Frazer, Victoria CookAbstractWe describe the second case of an intraductal mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from a minor salivary gland of the oral cavity. This is a rare presentation, and our literature review identified only a single previously documented case. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case to be verified by immunohistochemistry demonstrating myoepithelial or basal cells around all the neoplastic units.
       
  • Application of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the
           diagnosis of salivary gland diseases: a systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Luciana Munhoz, Erika Antonia dos Anjos Ramos, Daniel Cho Im, Miki Hisatomi, Yoshinobu Yanagi, Junich Asaumi, Emiko Saito AritaAbstractObjectivesThis systematic literature review addresses the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) for salivary gland disease evaluation.Study DesignDatabases were searched and original research manuscripts up to 2018 were included using the keywords "diffusion" combined with “salivary gland”, “salivary gland neoplasm”, “sialadenitis”, “parotid gland”, “submandibular gland”, “sublingual gland”, “minor salivary gland”, “salivary gland fistula”, “salivary gland calculi”, “salivary ducts”, “xerostomia”, and “sialorrhea”. Only English language manuscripts and studies pertaining to DWI were selected.ResultsIn all, 66 investigations regarding various salivary gland diseases were included, such as neoplasms, post-irradiation changes, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Most study objectives involved the use of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in differentiating between benign lesions and malignant neoplasms. Histological features of evaluated samples were heterogeneous.ConclusionsDWI may improve the differential diagnosis of salivary gland diseases, particularly in distinguishing between benign and malignant neoplasms. A unique ADC cutoff value could not be established due to the heterogeneity of methods applied for ADC assessment and the heterogeneity of the diseases. DWI and the ADC are valuable tools in the diagnosis of salivary gland disease. The PROSPERO systematic review registration number is CRD42018091554.
       
  • Widely distributed purple bullae and nodules in the oral cavity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Xueke Shi, Duanxian Lin, Xiangjian Wang, Hongmei Wang, Liran Shi, Feifei Wu, Shan Liu, Lisa Yang, Xiaoru Hou, Lanyan Wu, Hongmei Zhou
       
  • Feasibility of a combination of intraoral UHFUS and CBCT in the study of
           peri-implantitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Rossana Izzetti, Saverio Vitali, Mario Gabriele, Davide CaramellaObjectivesThe aim of this study was to investigate the combination of intraoral ultra-high-frequency ultrasonography (UHFUS) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the evaluation of hard and soft tissues in a case of peri-implantitis.Study DesignA 57-year-old patient was referred for pain and numbness of the chin after implant placement and the subsequent guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedure. Clinical examination revealed hard tumefaction of the mandibular mucosa, with mild mobility of the implants. Assessment with UHFUS was undertaken for the study of the width, degree of tissue alteration, and vascularity of the swollen mucosa, and CBCT was used to evaluate the bone surrounding the implants and the possible impingement of the inferior alveolar nerve.ResultsA combination of CBCT and UHFUS was effective in the evaluation of GBR complications in peri-implantitis, revealing alterations in the periosteum secondary to suboptimal GBR treatment. This was the first study to use UHFUS to evaluate the characteristics of oral soft tissues.ConclusionsUHFUS is a promising tool for the diagnosis of complicated soft tissue diseases. When used with CBCT, it can provide useful information on oral and maxillofacial diseases involving hard and soft tissue in a noninvasive way, with reduced radiation dose exposure.
       
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with asymmetric mosaic of paternal disomy
           causing hemihyperplasia
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Tomohiro Yamada, Goro Sugiyama, Ken Higashimoto, Azusa Nakashima, Hiroyuki Nakano, Tomoki Sumida, Hidenobu Soejima, Yoshihide MoriBeckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a congenital disorder with 3 main features—overgrowth in infancy, macroglossia, and abdominal wall defects. Here, we report on a 5-month old girl with hemihyperplasia and macroglossia caused by paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) asymmetric mosaic on chromosome 11p15.5. She could not retract her tongue into her mouth and the midline of the tongue was shifted to the left. Glossectomy was performed at age 1 year. A specimen of the tongue showed normal skeletal muscle, but the muscle fibers were closely spaced, and there were fewer stroma components in the tissue from the right side of the tongue than that from the left side. With respect to pUPD of chromosome 11p15.5, microsatellite marker analysis of the tongue tissue specimen revealed a higher mosaic rate in the tissue from the right side of the tongue (average 48.3%) than that from the left side (average 16.9%). Methylation analysis of Kv differentially methylated region (DMR) 1 (KvDMR1) and H19DMR revealed hypomethylation of KvDMR1 and hypermethylation of H19DMR in the tissue on the right side of the tongue (hyperplastic side). In this case, the difference in mosaic rate of pUPD in the 11p15.5 region was hypothesized to influence the expression level of insulin-like growth factor 2. This result may be helpful to clinicians, especially surgeons, when planning plastic surgery for hemihyperplasia.
       
  • Evaluation of maxillary trabecular microstructure as an indicator of
           implant stability by using 2 cone beam computed tomography systems and
           micro-computed tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Kıvanc Kulah, Ayse Gulsahi, Kıvanç Kamburoğlu, Ferhat Geneci, Mert Ocak, H. Hamdi Celik, Tuncer OzenObjectiveThe aim of this study was to assess the trabecular microarchitecture of the maxilla by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) ex vivo.Study DesignSeventeen maxillary cadaver specimens were scanned by using micro-CT and CBCT devices. Samples were scanned with 2 CBCT devices at different voxel sizes (0.08, 0.125, and 0.160 mm for 3-D Accuitomo 170; 0.75 and 0.200 mm for Planmeca Promax 3-D Max). Morphometric parameters, such as bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) ratio, trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular number (Tb.N), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were assessed by using CTAnalyzer software. Bland-Altman limits of agreement and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were performed to evaluate agreement between CBCT and micro-CT in consideration of measured morphometric parameters. Statistical significance was set at P < .05.ResultsThe BV/TV, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, and DA values were higher for CBCT images compared with micro-CT images, whereas the Tb.N value was lower with CBCT images than with micro-CT images. The BV/TV and DA parameters showed the highest agreement between CBCT and micro-CT devices (ICC = 0.421 for BV/TV and ICC = 0.439 for DA; P < .01).ConclusionsThe BV/TV and DA parameters measured on CBCT obtained at the smallest voxel size were found to be useful for the assessment of maxillary trabecular microstructure.
       
  • Craniopharyngiomas and odontogenic tumors mimic normal odontogenesis and
           share genetic mutations, histopathologic features, and molecular pathways
           activation
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Carolina Cavalieri Gomes, Silvia Ferreira de Sousa, Ricardo Santiago GomezOdontogenic tumors bear some histopathologic and molecular resemblance to craniopharyngiomas. Specifically, adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma shares morphologic features and CTNNB1 (the gene encoding β-catenin) mutations with calcifying odontogenic cyst, whereas papillary craniopharyngioma and ameloblastoma are driven by BRAF mutations. Recently, important similarities between adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma and the cell signaling pathways involved in tooth formation have been described. Here, we expand the interpretation of these data in the context of odontogenic tumors. We discuss some morphologic and molecular features that are shared by tumors from these 2 distinct sites (i.e., craniopharyngiomas and odontogenic tumors). Current conservative surgical treatment is effective in most cases of benign odontogenic tumors, but in the future, the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis could impact the treatment of aggressive and/or malignant cases.
       
  • Genetic alteration of Exon 5 of the PTEN gene in Indian patients
           with ameloblastoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Bhaskar Narayan, Aadithya B. Urs, Jeyaseelan Augustine, Hanspal Singh, Sunil Kumar Polipalli, Somesh Kumar, Seema KapoorObjectiveThe PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is one of the signaling pathways associated with the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma. The phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) homologue controls cell migration and proliferation. It monitors the level of Akt and maintains cellular integrity. The aim of the present study was to study the genetic alteration of Exon 5 of the PTEN gene in Indian patients with ameloblastoma.Study DesignTotal DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 20 cases with solid multicystic ameloblastoma (SMA) and from 10 cases with normal tooth germ. Exon 5 of the PTEN gene, was assessed for its role in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma.ResultsFive of 20 cases of SMA showed genetic alteration. Of these cases 3 (15%) showed silent mutation, 1 (5%) showed change in amino acid sequence from valine to glutamic acid, and 1 (5%) showed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.ConclusionsThe present study showed 25% somatic mutational frequency in exonic region 5 of the PTEN gene. This may indicate its role in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma.
       
  • Anxiety and genetic polymorphisms in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)
           and serotonin transportation gene (5HTT) are associated with benign
           migratory glossitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Rafaela Scariot, Aline Monise Sebastiani, Michelle Nascimento Meger, Vinicius Theodoro Broska, Juliana Feltrin Souza, Antonio Adilson Lima, João Armando Brancher, Cleber Machado de Souza, Paulo Henrique Couto Souza, Paula Cristina TrevillatoObjectiveThe aim of this case-control study was to investigate whether benign migratory glossitis (BMG) is associated with catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and serotonin transportation gene (5HTT) polymorphisms and anxiety.Study DesignThe study comprised 43 patients with BMG and 114 patients without a history of BMG. We used the Hamilton Anxiety (HAM-A) rating scale to assess each individual's anxiety. We collected DNA from buccal cells and analyzed polymorphisms of COMT and 5HTT. We conducted statistical evaluations by using SPSS software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) and STATA (StataCorp, College Station, TX). Alpha value was set at 0.05.ResultsOverall anxiety level was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P
       
  • Early detection of cherubism with eventual bilateral progression: a
           literature review and case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Tyler J. Holley, Peter J. Giannini, Nagamani Narayana, Valmont P. DesaCherubism is a rare familial disease of childhood that commonly affects the bilateral mandible and maxilla and typically resolves in adulthood. It has been shown to have a male predilection and has been mapped to the SH3 BP2 gene. Only 2 cases of unilateral cherubism have been documented in the literature; in the first case, the contralateral side was eventually affected. Although rare, unilateral cherubism presents a diagnostic dilemma. This case report describes a unique presentation of unilateral cherubism that progressed to affect the contralateral side and describes some of the considerations in the diagnosis and treatment of unilateral benign giant cell lesions of the jaws.
       
  • Coronectomy root retrievals: a review of 92 cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Bizhan Shokouhi, Selvam Thavaraj, Chris Sproat, Jerry Kwok, Kiran Beneng, Vinod PatelBackgroundCoronectomy has become an increasingly prescribed surgical treatment for mandibular third molars that are deemed to pose a risk to the inferior dental nerve. Retention of the roots poses a risk of need for root retrieval in the future if symptoms are present. Long-term outcomes and the symptoms that lead to root retrieval via coronectomy have not been well documented or studied, and this has understandably led to hesitation in some clinicians in offering the procedure. The current series assesses patients who have undergone root retrieval, their reported indications for removal, and the histopathologic status of the removed roots.Study DesignA total of 92 cases of root retrievals via coronectomy carried out at Guy's Dental Hospital are included in this analysis. Data were collected retrospectively from patient records regarding patient symptoms, clinical and radiographic findings, function of the inferior dental nerve, and histologic results.ResultsThe mean age of patients in the study group was 31.6 years (range 19–70 years), with a female-to-male ratio of 62:18 (77.5% female). Mean time to the second surgery for root retrieval was 17 months. In “successfully” performed coronectomies, 75.3% (61 of 81) of root pulps appeared vital histopathologically. Mucosal tenderness (39 of 81 [48.1%]) was the most common symptom leading to root retrieval.ConclusionsRoot retrieval after coronectomy should be based on findings from sound clinical and radiographic examinations. In the presence of obvious indications, such as an unhealed socket resulting from retained enamel or soft tissue infection after eruption of roots, then retrieval should be performed with confidence that resolution would occur. However, if the coronectomy root appears an unlikely culprit, then the clinician should consider and investigate alternative diagnoses, such as overerupted upper third molars causing trauma, temporomandibular dysfunction, and the dental status of the adjacent tooth as potential causes of symptoms.
       
  • Rapidly expanding mixed lesion of the maxilla in a 17-month-old boy
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Ho-Hyun (Brian) Sun, Chan M. Park, Jeffrey A. Elo
       
  • There is strength in numbers: A call to develop new collaborations
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s): Faizan Alawi
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 127, Issue 3Author(s):
       
  • Low-level laser as a complementary therapy in orofacial granulomatosis
           management: a case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Humberto Jácome-Santos, Renata Gonçalves Resende, André Myller Barbosa Silva, Aline Fernanda Cruz, Sérgio Henrique Tanos de Lacerda, Ricardo Alves Mesquita, Júlio César Tanos de LacerdaAbstractOrofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a chronic inflammatory disease that typically affects the soft tissues of the orofacial region. The most common clinical manifestation of OFG is lip swelling, which may be associated with intrabuccal ulcerations and increased growth of the gingiva and mucosa, resulting in a cobblestone-like appearance, as well as cutaneous erythema and facial edema. The treatment for OFG is challenging and presents variable prognoses, which are sometimes considered unsatisfactory. Thus, this study presents a case report of OFG and the therapeutic regimen applied. A 47-year-old man presented with increased lip volume which had started 10 months earlier. His lips were thick with a fibroelastic consistency, which were painless upon palpation. Incisional biopsy and histopathological analysis of the upper lip revealed non-specific granulomatous inflammation. Hematological, serological and chest radiography showed no alterations. The patient reported no systemic changes, and inflammatory gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases were excluded. The diagnosis of OFG was subsequently made. Low-level laser therapy was successfully used to treat OFG in this case, and appears to be an efficient treatment for OFG when corticosteroid therapy is not enough. Thus, new approaches are necessary for OFG treatment and management.
       
  • Comorbidity between fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders. A
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): I. Ayouni, R. Chebbi, H. Zeglaoui, M. DhidahAbstractObjectiveFibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by body-wide diffuse and chronic musculoskeletal pain that in some patients can include the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints; those patients are defined as having a temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The purpose of this systematic review is to study the comorbidity between FM and TMD, as well as the prevalence and characteristics of TMD in patients with fibromyalgia or the features and prevalence of FM in patients with TMD.MethodsOur bibliographic search was conducted from 01/01/2005 to 31/05/2018 in Medline database using its free search engine PubMed and the keywords “fibromyalgia”, “temporomandibular joint disorder” and “orofacial pain”.ResultsOut of the 185 studies found in this search, only 19 met the inclusion criteria. These studies have shown a high prevalence of TMD in patients with fibromyalgia. Muscle pain, TMJ pain, and muscle tenderness on palpation are the most common symptoms. These results suggest the existence of comorbidity between TMD and FM which can be an etiological or aggravating factor for TMD, or it may represent a general vulnerability to pain disorders. Besides, the two pathologies may share some regional or central mechanisms in common.ConclusionThe high prevalence of TMD in patients with fibromyalgia emphasizes the need to integrate the signs and symptoms of TMD in the diagnosis of FM in order to improve the pain management in these patients.
       
  • Association between biomarkers and medication-related osteonecrosis of the
           jaws: a systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Vittorio Moraschini, Daniel Costa Ferreira de Almeida, Carlos Marcelo Figueredo, Monica Diuana Calasans-MaiaAbstractObjectivesOur aim was to conduct a systematic review (SR) of the literature assessing the role of human biomarkers in the diagnosis or prognostication of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ).Study designAn electronic search without date or language restriction ​​was carried out in PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and LILACS until March 2018. In addition, a manual search in the grey literature was conducted. The search process was performed by two independent reviewing authors. Eligibility criteria included randomised and non-random clinical trials, prospective or retrospective cohorts, case controls, and case series evaluating the association between biomarkers and MRONJ. The protocol of this SR was registered in PROSPERO under number CRD42018095886.ResultsThe search and selection process yielded 19 studies (2 case series, 6 case-control studies, 9 prospective cohort studies and 2 retrospective studies) published between 2008 and 2018. Twenty-four biomarkers collected from serum, saliva, and urine were investigated by these studies. Eleven biomarkers were possibly related to MRONJ; however, no consensus is observed in the literature in regard to the sensitivity and clinical effectiveness of these biomarkers.ConclusionWhile many biomarkers have been associated with MRONJ, the present SR found scarce clinical evidence supporting the use of these biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of MRONJ.
       
  • Identification of NSDHL Mutations Associated with CHILD Syndrome in Oral
           Verruciform Xanthoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): George Getz, Kshitij Parag-Sharma, Jonathan Reside, Ricardo J. Padilla, Antonio L. AmelioABSTRACTObjectiveTo perform a systematic analysis of the NAD(P)-dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL) gene in cases of oral verruciform xanthoma (VX) and test for the presence of mutations associated with Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform nevus and Limb Defects (CHILD) Syndrome patients.Study DesignDNA was extracted from archived paraffin-embedded tissue of oral VX and control cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was then used to screen exons 4 and 6 of the NSDHL gene for the presence of four known germline mutations associated with CHILD Syndrome and one somatic mutation previously identified in VX lesions with no known CHILD Syndrome association.Results50% (8 out of 16) oral VX tissue samples had known missense mutations associated with CHILD syndrome. Furthermore, two of these aforementioned eight tissue samples also had an additional missense mutation previously identified in cutaneous VX lesions. No mutations of exons 4 and 6 were found in the five negative control tissue samples.ConclusionNSDHL gene mutations associated with CHILD Syndrome are common in sporadic oral VX cases suggesting that these mutations confer a greater risk for developing epithelial barrier defects that promote recurrent oral VX lesions and the potential for direct germline transmission of oral VX susceptibility.
       
  • Diagnostic delay and sub-optimal management in persistent idiopathic
           facial pain and persistent dento-alveolar pain; a cross sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Yazan Hassona, Ahmad El-Ma'aita, Jacqueline Amarin, Anas Al TaeeAbstractObjectivesTo explore the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges encountered by patients with persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), and to investigate factors influencing its delayed diagnosis.Study DesignIn this cross-sectional study, 34 newly diagnosed PIFP patients were interviewed. Data about diagnostic delay, number and nature of previous consultations, and previous medical and surgical interventions were recorded. Pearson correlation and Student's t-test were used to examine differences among various variables in relation to diagnostic delay.ResultsThe average time between the onset of symptoms to the correct diagnosis was 19.3 ±11.1 months. Diagnostic delay was significantly longer in patient with pain localized to intraoral sites (22.6 ± 7.4) compared to patients with extra-oral pain (16.1 ±9.3). The average number of health care professionals consulted before correct diagnosis was 3.7 ±2.3. General dental practitioners were the most commonly consulted professionals (n=27; 79.4%). On average, patients were offered 2.3± 0.24 misdiagnoses prior to correct diagnosis, and were prescribed 3.5 ± 2.4 classes of drugs. Twenty-five patients (73.5%) underwent unnecessary surgical/dental interventions.ConclusionPatients with PIFP are frequently misdiagnosed leading to prescription of ineffective medications and unnecessary investigations and surgical interventions. Educational efforts should emphasize on improving knowledge and awareness of this condition.
       
  • Acinetobacter baumannii orofacial cellulitis: report of two cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Thaís dos Santos Fontes Pereira, Denise Vieira Travassos, Raissa Cristina Costa Silva, Laiz Fernandes Mendes Nunes, Maria Edileusa Santos, Célia Regina Lanza, Gabriela Assunção Goebel, Fabiana Maria Kakehasi, Tarcília Aparecida SilvaAbstractAcinetobacter baumannii infection of skin and soft tissues is uncommon and usually associated with trauma. The present report describes two cases of cellulitis in the orofacial region, caused by an A. baumannii infection in paediatric patients, and with fatal outcome. A twelve-year-old male patient, diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia, presented an ulcerated lesion on the lip suggestive of local trauma. The condition evolved with cellulitis, epithelial necrosis and non-specific vesicles and blisters. The second case occurred in a 10-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient evolved with mucositis WHO Grade IV and cellulitis. In both cases, hemoculture was positive for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. In conclusion, A. baummanii should be considered a potential multidrug-resistant pathogen in the presence of skin and soft tissue cellulitis. Ulcerated oral lesions may place hospitalised paediatric patients at risk of A. baummanii infection.
       
  • Upregulation of eIF3a promotes cell survival in ameloblastoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Zhenjiang Ding, Jie Liu, Junting Wang, Biying Huang, Ming ZhongAbstractObjectivesThis study aimed to detect the expression of eIF3a in ameloblastoma (AB) tissues compared with normal oral mucosa (NOM) tissues and investigate the roles of eIF3a in AM-1 cell proliferation and apoptosis.Study DesignWe performed immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of eIF3a in AB tissues (n = 83) and NOM tissues (n = 20). RT-qPCR and western blotting analyses were conducted with AB tissues (n = 30) and NOM tissues (n = 6). The correlation between eIF3a expression and the clinical/pathological features of AB patients is also presented. The functional role of eIF3a in AM-1 cells was assessed with lentiviral vector-mediated shRNA.ResultsOur results indicated that eIF3a was significantly upregulated in AB. Additionally, eIF3a knockdown in AM-1 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis.ConclusionThese data indicate that eIF3a facilitates the survival of AB cells and may serve as a promising therapeutic target for AB.
       
  • Asymptomatic right cheek nodule in a 65-year-old female
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Raj Thaker, Kevin C. Lee, Scott Peters, David Greenman, James R King
       
  • A submucosal nodule on the buccal mucosa
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Eduardo Morato de Oliveira, Lauren Frenzel Schuch, Patrícia Carlos Caldeira, Karine Duarte da Silva, Evandro Neves Abdo, Maria Cássia Ferreira de Aguiar
       
  • Expression of Cornulin in Oral Premalignant Lesions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Neetha Santosh, Kristin K. McNamara, F. Michael Beck, John R. KalmarAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate expression of cornulin in oral mucosa as an adjunct to histopathologic grading of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED).Study designBiomarker expression was assessed in normal oral mucosa (NOM), low-grade (LD) and high-grade (HD) OED and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Photomicrographs were evaluated with Aperio Imagescope using the positive-pixel-counting algorithm. A histo-score (H-score) was calculated based on the staining intensity and the percentage of positive cells. Intra-rater reliability for H-score and %-staining was determined by calculating interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Mean differences in H-scores and %-staining values were each analyzed using an analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc procedure.ResultsCornulin expression progressively diminished with increasing grades of dysplasia and OSCC. ICCs for H-score and %-staining were each>0.99. Except for OSCC vs HD, all other pairwise comparisons were statistically significant (P
       
  • T2 relaxation times of the retrodiscal tissue in patients with
           temporomandibular joint disorders and healthy volunteers: A comparative
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Naoya Kakimoto, Hiroaki Shimamoto, Jira Kitisubkanchana, Tomomi Tsujimoto, Yurie Senda, Yuri Iwamoto, Rinus G. Verdonschot, Yoko Hasegawa, Shumei MurakamiAbstractObjectiveThe aims of this study were to compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) retrodiscal tissue T2 relaxation times between patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and asymptomatic volunteers and to assess their diagnostic potential.Study DesignPatients with TMD (n = 173) and asymptomatic volunteers (n = 17) were examined using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The imaging protocol consisted of oblique sagittal T2-weighted eight-echo fast spin echo sequences in a closed mouth position. Retrodiscal tissue T2 relaxation times were obtained. Additionally, disc location and reduction, disc configuration, joint effusion, osteoarthritis, and bone edema or osteonecrosis were classified using MR images. The T2 relaxation times of each group were statistically compared.ResultsRetrodiscal tissue T2 relaxation times were significantly longer in patient groups than in asymptomatic volunteers (p < 0.01). T2 relaxation times were significantly longer in all of the morphological categories. The most important variables affecting retrodiscal tissue T2 relaxation times were disc configuration, joint effusion, and osteoarthritis.ConclusionRetrodiscal tissue T2 relaxation times of patients with TMD were significantly longer than those of healthy volunteers. This finding may lead to the development of a diagnostic marker to aid in the early detection of TMDs.
       
  • RELATIONSHIP OF INFILTRATING INTRAEPITHELIAL T-LYMPHOCYTES IN DIAGNOSIS OF
           ORAL LICHEN PLANUS VS EPITHELIAL DYSPLASIA: A PILOT STUDY
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Andres Flores-Hidalgo, Valerie Murrah, Yuri Fedoriw, Ricardo J. PadillaAbstractObjectiveIdentify the type and distribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in oral mucosa specimens to potentially distinguish underlying alterations or patterns between oral epithelial dysplasia and oral lichen planus.MethodsFor this pilot study, 10 archived tissue samples received at UNC Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Laboratory, diagnosed as oral lichen planus and moderate to severe epithelial dysplasia, were selected. Dual staining with CD4 and CD8 antibodies was carried out on each case. Slides were scanned in the Aperio ScanScope FL (Leica Biosystems, Wetzlar, Germany) and archived. Histomorphometric analysis was performed to detect inflammatory cells expressing CD4 and CD8 biomarkers of in the epithelium and connective tissue regions.ResultsNo differences were found in amount and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes between the three groups analyzed; however, the intraepithelial CD8+ lymphocyte distribution was strikingly different between lichen planus and moderate to severe epithelial dysplasia.ConclusionsThe localization of CD8+ cells potentially can be used as an adjunctive diagnostic procedure to distinguish oral epithelial dysplasia from other inflammatory entities such as lichen planus.
       
  • A bibliometric analysis of the most cited articles about squamous cell
           carcinoma of the mouth, lips and oropharynx
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Y. Hassona, T. QutachiAbstractObjectivesto identify the top cited articles about squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth, lips, and oropharynx.MethodWeb of Science database was searched for the 100 most-cited articles using the algorithm “Oral cancer” OR “Mouth cancer” OR “Oral squamous cell carcinoma” OR “oropharyngeal carcinoma” OR “oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma” OR “lip cancer” OR “lip squamous cell carcinoma”. The search was conducted independently by two researchers, and the characteristics of the most cited articles were analyzed.Resultsthe most-cited articles received a combined total of 38215 citations. Citation rates ranged from 191 to 2062. The earliest article was published in 1984 and the latest in 2013, but most articles (n=69) were published in the period between 2000 to2010. Articles were published in 46 different journals, and were cited on average 33.2 times/year. Articles were originated from 19 different countries, but there was a predominance of articles from USA. Narrative reviews and experimental studies were the most common types among the 100 most-cited articles.ConclusionEtiology and risk factors were the most commonly represented topic in the list of the 100 most cited articles. Narrative reviews and experimental studies are the most common types of studies among the top cited articles.
       
  • Plasmacytoid cells in salivary pleomorphic adenoma. An alternative
           interpretation of their immunohistochemical characteristics highlights
           function and capability for epithelial-mesenchymal transition
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Ioannis G. Koutlas, Michelle Dolan, Mark W. Lingen, Prokopios P. ArgyrisAbstractObjectivesPlasmacytoid cells (PLCs) in salivary pleomorphic adenoma (SPA) are regarded as modified neoplastic myoepithelia and define plasmacytoid myoepithelioma (pMYO). However, histochemically, immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally, PLCs fail to demonstrate frank myogenous properties. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may explain the phenotypes in SPA. Our aim was to evaluate 1) PLCs with accepted or purported myoepithelial and EMT-related markers; and 2) pMYOs for PLAG1 aberrations by FISH.Study DesignEight SPAs with or without PLC-predominance and 3 pMYOs were immunohistochemically studied.ResultsPLCs in SPA and pMYO exhibited strong, scattered to diffuse positivity for K7, rare K14 positivity and were mostly negative for α-SMA, h-caldesmon, and p63/p40. S100 staining was strong and diffuse, while calponin was variable. DOG1 was negative. PLCs in pMYO and PLC-rich-SPA exhibited selective or diffuse, WT-1 and D2-40 immunoreactivity. EMT markers SNAIL/SLUG exhibited strong and variable immunoreactivity in PLCs, in contrast to weak or absent e-cadherin expression. SOX10 was diffusely and strongly positive. PLAG1 rearrangement was present in 1 pMYO.Conclusions1) PLCs mostly fail to express myoepithelial markers; 2) PLCs are neoplastic cells adapting to micro-environmental changes and capable of EMT; 3) Tumors composed solely of PLCs are apparently SPAs depleted of a ductal component.
       
  • Pericoronal radiolucency surrounding an impacted mandibular molar
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Nashwin Laungani, Steven Hengen, Christopher Nester, Molly Housley Smith
       
  • Association of geographic tongue and fissured tongue with ABO blood group
           among adult psoriasis patients: a novel study from a tertiary care
           hospital in Saudi Arabia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Nabeeh A. Al Qahtani, Angeline Deepthi, Nada Mohammed Alhussain, Bashayer Ayesh Mohammed Al Shahrani, Hamza Alshehri, Amal Alhefzi, Betsy JosephObjectiveWe aimed to determine if there was any association between geographic tongue (GT) and fissured tongue with ABO blood group among adult psoriasis patients in Saudi Arabia.Study DesignThis hospital-based cross-sectional study included 100 consecutive new adult patients diagnosed with psoriasis and 100 case-matched participants in the control group (nonpsoriatic). Sociodemographic and dermatologic parameters, intraoral lesions (GT and fissured tongue), and ABO blood grouping and immunoglobulins were recorded and evaluated using χ2 or Fisher's exact test.ResultsA total of 74% of patients had an early age of onset, and 48% of them reported this disease in their parents. A total of 76% of those with generalized psoriasis had plaque type, whereas 78% with the localized type had pustular lesions. A total of 70% of psoriatic patients had O Rh-positive blood; 63% of tongue lesions seen in these patients were GT, and it was most prominent in O Rh-positive (64.28%) and O Rh-negative (62.50%) blood types. GT was prevalent among women (75.6%).ConclusionsThis study found a positive association of both GT and fissured tongue in this population of adult patients with psoriasis compared with a case-matched control population without psoriasis.
       
  • Stensen duct dilation: Case series of minimally invasive treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Marc-Kevin Le Roux, Nicolas Graillon, Mehdi Hadj-Saïd, Ugo Scemama, Jean-Christophe Lutz, Cyrille ChossegrosStensen's duct dilation is a rare condition characterized by a global or partial idiopathic dilation of the Stensen duct. Affected individuals usually show either aesthetically compromised features, such as a tubular-shaped swelling in the cheek, or with mildly painful inflammatory episodes. Three women between ages 61 and 67years were diagnosed with Stensen duct dilation after sialo–magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They were treated with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A). Our preliminary results suggest that BTX-A was efficient as a suspensive treatment. BTX-A should remain a first-line treatment of the early silent symptoms of Stensenduct dilation, such as swelling and aesthetic issues. The use of BTX-A avoids more serious procedures and further complications.
       
  • Evaluation of artifacts generated by titanium, zirconium, and
           titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants on MRI, CT, and CBCT images: A
           phantom study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Husniye Demirturk Kocasarac, Gulbahar Ustaoglu, Seval Bayrak, Rujuta Katkar, Hassem Geha, S. Thomas Deahl, Brian L Mealey, Murat Danaci, Marcel NoujeimObjectiveThe aim of this study was to assess artifacts generated by zirconium, titanium, and titanium–zirconium alloy implants on magnetic resonance imaging(MRI), computed tomography(CT), and cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) and to correlate the findings to the dose–area product and exposure factors on CT and CBCT.Study DesignThree phantoms were built by embedding zirconium, titanium, and titanium–zirconium implants in ultrasound gel. MRI, CT, and CBCT images were acquired by using multiple sequences and settings. For MRI, “artifact” was described as the length of signal void beyond the limits of the implant. For CT and CBCT, “artifact” was calculated by subtracting the gray level of the darkest pixel from the level of the lightest pixel.ResultsOn MRI, zirconium implants had minor distortion artifacts, whereas titanium and titanium–zirconium implants created extensive artifacts (P < .05). On CT and CBCT, artifacts were less prominent with titanium and titanium–zirconium implants compared with zirconium (P < .05). Titanium grade 5 implants with 0.3 and 0.4 mm3 voxels produced the least severe artifacts.ConclusionsMRI images were less affected by artifacts from zirconium implants, whereas CT and CBCT images showed less severe artifacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants. CT generated greater artifacts compared with CBCT. Larger CBCT voxel sizes reduced the dose–area product and the severity of artifacts.
       
  • Chronic treatment with zoledronic acid alters the expression levels of
           inflammatory, bone and apoptotic markers and toll-like receptors 2 and 4
           in rat dental pulp.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Paulo Goberlânio de Barros Silva, Antonio Ernando Carlos Ferreira, Camila Carvalho de Oliveira, Maria Elisa Quesado Lima Verde, Milena Oliveira Freitas, Fabrício Bitu Sousa, Mário Rogério Lima Mota, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes AlvesAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the immunostaining of inflammatory, apoptotic and bone markers and the toll-like-receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 in dental pulp from rats treated with zoledronic acid (ZA).Study DesignWe administered four intravascular infusions of saline (control group) or 0.20 mg.kg−1 ZA in Wistar rats (n=6/group). After 70 days the three rights molars (n=18/group) were microscopically evaluated (presence of ectasic/dilated blood vessels and inflammatory cells). Immunohistochemistry was performed for TRAP (cell counting), COX-2, IL-6, TLR2, TLR4, RANKL, OPG and caspase-3 (scored (0-3) in odontoblast and non-odontoblast dental pulp cells). The Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact tests and Spearman correlation were used (GraphPadPrism 5.0).ResultsThere was no alteration in ectasic/dilated blood vessels (p=0.101) or inflammatory cells (p=0.500), but the number of TRAP-positive cells was reduced in the ZA-group (p=0.027). In ZA-group odontoblasts, immunostaining for COX-2 (p=0.044), TLR4 (p=0.003), OPG (p=0.035) and caspase-3 (p=0.039) increased and RANKL (p=0.045) reduced. In non-odontoblast dental pulp cells, RANKL immunostaining reduced (p=0.009). In ZA-group RANKL/OPG ratio reduced in odontoblast (p=0.022) and non-odontoblast dental pulp cells (p=0.007). IL-6 did not differ between groups.ConclusionsZA increases the expression levels of inflammatory, apoptotic markers and TLR4 and alters bone makers in the dental pulp of rats.
       
  • Redo orthognathic surgery: a report of 10 cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Jeffrey C. Posnick, Mihai Radulescu, Brian E. KinardObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to compare a cohort of patients who had a developmental dentofacial deformity (DFD) and then underwent redo orthognathic surgery (OGS) to a similar cohort who underwent primary OGS. We hypothesized that there would be no difference in operative time, blood replacement, perioperative airway risks, length of hospital stay, or complication rates.Study DesignWe implemented a retrospective study of patients with a DFD initially treated with orthodontics and jaw osteotomies and later with redo OGS. The predictor variables were demographic, anatomic, and operative. The primary outcome variables were hospital course and complications. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed.ResultsTen patients met inclusion criteria. The mean age at redo OGS was 31 (range 20–47 years). The operating time was 3:36 ± 47 minutes for redo OGS compared with 2:59 ± 32 minutes for a similar cohort's primary OGS (P < .05). All redo patients had favorable outcomes with reference to the occurrence of lingual nerve injury, “bad” split, infection, and need for reoperation. Of the 10 patients, 9 achieved and maintained optimal long-term occlusion for all parameters studied.ConclusionsPatients who underwent redo OGS required a longer operating time, but the remainder of the hospital course and occurrence of major complications were similar to those documented for individuals undergoing primary orthognathic surgery.
       
  • Fixed drug eruption on the tongue associated with piroxicam: report of two
           cases and literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Eleni-Marina Kalogirou, Konstantinos I. TosiosObjectiveThe aim of this study was to describe 2 patients with piroxicam-associated fixed drug eruption on the tongue and to review the literature.Study DesignTwo females presented with recurrent ulcers after taking piroxicam for dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain. The English language literature was reviewed for cases of piroxicam-induced fixed drug eruptions, with a report on the site of occurrence.ResultsThe ulcers reappeared in the identical lingual site after piroxicam intake; 3 times in patient #1 and 2 times in patient #2. Extraoral lesions were not observed. Following discontinuation of piroxicam, no relapse was reported. The literature review found 25 patients with piroxicam-associated fixed drug eruption. The oral mucosa/lips were affected in 8 patients who also had cutaneous/genital lesions. Solitary tongue involvement was not reported in any of them. Cross-sensitivity among different drugs of the same class is not unusual.ConclusionsFixed drug reactions to piroxicam are rare, although nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are among the most common causes of fixed drug eruptions. Of these rare fixed drug reactions to piroxicam, cutaneous lesions are reported much more often compared with oral mucosal lesions. Discontinuation of the causative drug is essential to promote healing and to avoid recurrences. Patients with history of piroxicam-induced fixed drug eruption should also avoid other oxicams because of potential cross-sensitivity.
       
  • Spindle-Cell Variant of Ameloblastic Carcinoma: A Report of 3 Cases and
           Demonstration of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Tumor Progression
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Anne C. McLean-Holden, Justin A. Bishop, Harvey P. Kessler, Larry L. Myers, Alaaaldin M. Radwan, Tyler C. Wildey, John M. Wright, Yi-Shing Lisa ChengABSTRACTAmeloblastic carcinoma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm that demonstrates the histologic characteristics of ameloblastoma, accompanied by the cytologic features of malignancy. The spindle-cell variant of ameloblastic carcinoma (SCAC) is exceptionally rare, with a total of 10 cases having been reported in the literature to date. Histologically, a prominent sarcomatoid cell population is seen, which appears to originate from the epithelial (ameloblastic) component. Like conventional ameloblastic carcinoma, most cases of SCAC occur in individuals older than 40 years. Herein, three additional cases of SCAC are reported, two of which occurred in young people. Diagnostic criteria to aid in identification of SCAC are proposed. Finally, histologic and immunohistochemical evidence supporting the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in SCAC is presented.
       
  • Cone beam computed tomography study of osteoarthritic alterations in the
           osseous components of temporomandibular joints in asymptomatic patients
           according to skeletal pattern, gender, and age
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Letícia Ângelo Walewski, Elen de Souza Tolentino, Fernanda Chiguti Yamashita, Lilian Cristina Vessoni Iwaki, Mariliani Chicarelli da SilvaObjectiveThe aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of osteoarthritic alterations in the osseous components of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in asymptomatic patients with different skeletal patterns, gender, and age groups with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.Study DesignCBCT images of 213 asymptomatic patients were assessed for the presence of any degenerative changes in the condyle and fossa/eminence complex. Each TMJ was evaluated separately and was classified as normal, indeterminate for osteoarthritis, or affected by osteoarthritis. Differences were tested by using the χ2 and Fisher's exact tests (P < .05).ResultsIn total, 52.3% of the joints presented some visible alteration in the osseous components. Abnormalities were detected in 32.6% of the condyles and 31.5% of the articular fossae/eminences, and flattening was the most prevalent alteration in all classes. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of alterations in either the condyle or the articular fossa/eminence among the skeletal groups for the entire sample or for the gender and age subsets.ConclusionsThere are no differences in degenerative TMJ changes in patients with or without skeletal jaw discrepancies. No differences were found when gender and age were considered.
       
  • Role of the Human Papillomavirus in Malignant Transformation of Oral
           Leukoplakia Distinct from Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Study
           of 76 Patients with Internal-Control Specimens.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Wenyan Wu, Zhen Wang, Zengtong ZhouAbstractObjectiveThis study sought to investigate the role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oral leukoplakia (OLK) carcinogenesis, with the oral cavity as the site of interest.Study DesignA total of 76 patients (152 specimens) were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: the malignant transformation of OLK (OLK-MT) group and the non-malignant transformation of OLK (OLK-non-MT) group. HPV reverse dot blot analysis, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and p16INK4A immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to determine HPV infection status.ResultsCarcinogenesis of OLK was commonly located in the lateral/ventral tongue, buccal mucosa, and gingiva. Based on the initial specimens, only 5.3% (4/76) of patients were HPV-16 positive, and these patients’ final specimens were negative. Overexpression of p16INK4A in the initial stage was associated with OLK carcinogenesis (p=0.013, OR=3.544).ConclusionsOLK carcinogenesis was common in patients who were elderly, female, and non-smokers/non-drinkers; had lesions located in the lateral/ventral tongue; had OLK with dysplasia; and overexpressed p16INK4A during the initial stage. HPV might be an opportunistic infection in the oral cavity and may not be a cause of OLK carcinogenesis. p16INK4A expression that initially increases and then diminishes or disappears might be an early predictor of OLK carcinogenesis.
       
  • Development of a Tongue-Tie Case Definition (TTCD) in Newborns using a
           Delphi Survey: the NYU-TTCD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Ralph V. Katz, Bianca A. Dearing, James M. Ryan, Lisa K. Ryan, Malik K. Zubi, Gurpreet K. SokhalAbstractObjectiveThe primary purpose of this study was to develop an operational definition of the oral condition of ankyloglossia (aka: tongue-tie) in newborns (i.e., birth-6 months) that could consistently be used in research studies.Study DesignThis 4-round Delphi survey developed the consensus NYU - Tongue-Tie Case Definition (NYU-TTCD) using a panel of ankyloglossia treatment experts.ResultsThis Tongue-Tie Case Definition was carefully and step-wise created from the bottom up by expert panelists over 4 rounds of inquiry. As a functioning case definition, it offers the diagnostician two separate pathways to identifying a newborn as being tongue-tied. One pathway requires but a single pathognomonic anatomic feature while the other pathway requires a single functional deficit accompanied by at least two of 12 other diagnostic items (either functional, anatomic or behavioral).ConclusionsThis Delphi survey, as administered to a panel of ankyloglossia treatment experts, produced the first consensus case definition of tongue-tie for newborns, i.e., birth-6 months for use in epidemiological research studies ranging from descriptive prevalence studies to clinical trials. Next step studies should establish the validity, reliability and utility of this novel NYU-TTCD case definition for epidemiologic and clinical purposes.
       
  • A retrospective study of the accuracy of template-guided vs. freehand
           implant placement: a non-radiological method
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Vasilios Alevizakos, Gergo Mitov, Marcus Stoetzer, Constantin von SeeAbstractObjectiveThe aim of this retrospective case study was to evaluate the implant placement accuracy for inexperienced clinicians compared to the preoperatively planned implant position when using a surgical guide template vs. the freehand method.Materials and methodsOral implant therapy was performed by inexperienced dental practitioners (< 20 implants placed) on eligible patients after Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT)-based software planning. Two patients’ groups were formed according to the surgical technique: guided and freehand implant placement. Casts, used for the fabrication of the reconstructions were scanned using a 3D laser scanner, the implant positions were superimposed with preoperative planning data and the three-dimensional deviations were calculated.ResultsTwenty adult patients were included in this retrospective study (with 20 guided and 21 freehand placed implants). The mean calculated deviations, when using a surgical guide template were significantly lower compared to the freehand method, concerning angulation (p = 0.002), apical (p = 0.002) and basal position (p = 0.012). No significant differences in the implant placement accuracy were detected within the groups according to the implant position (premolars / molars; upper jaw / lower jaw) (p> 0.05).ConclusionComputer-aided planning and the use surgical guides in accordance with CBCT images may help inexperienced clinicians to place implants with a high accuracy.
       
  • Trends Associated with Debt Loads Amongst Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
           Chief Residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Jason P. Jones, III Edward EllisAbstractBackgroundThis survey-based study was undertaken to investigate how total debt loads are impacting the personal and professional decisions that graduating oral and maxillofacial (OMS) surgeons. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in total debt load on graduating residents and analyze the effects of this debt on career, family, and lifestyle choices after graduation.Study DesignThis study was a cross-sectional, web-based survey of all graduating OMS residents in accredited U.S. oral and maxillofacial surgery residency programs. Participation in the survey was optional and all responses were anonymously collected and data analyzed using Qualtrics software. The respondents were analyzed as a collective with the predictor of the study being program training length and the outcome being total debt load with independent analysis of select other financial variables.ResultsWith 120 respondents out of 246 deliverable emails (48.7% response rate), the average graduating OMS resident was a Caucasian male with a median age of 32 who is living with a significant other or spouse who independently earned money without any dependents. The average range of accumulated debt of graduating residents was between $300,000 and $350,000 with 50.83% of the respondents having less than or equal to $350,000 in overall debt and 49.17% of the respondents having greater than or equal to $350,000 in accumulated debt. Of those respondents completing 4-year programs, the average range of accumulated debt was between $250,000 and $300,000 and of those respondents completing 6-year programs, the average range of accumulated debt was between $400,000 and $450,000 (p
       
  • Efficacy of curcumin for management of oral submucous fibrosis: a
           systematic review of randomized clinical trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Sadeq Ali Al-MaweriObjectivesOral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a chronic debilitating disease that has a high risk of malignant transformation. Management of OSF is quite challenging, with no definitive cure being available. This systematic review assessed the available evidence for using curcumin for pain alleviation and clinical improvement in patients with OSF.Study DesignA comprehensive search of PubMed/Medline, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science databases was conducted to identify all relevant clinical trials comparing patients receiving curcumin treatment to active and/or nonactive controls for the treatment of OSF.ResultsSix clinical trials comprising 298 patients were included. All studies found curcumin to be effective in the management of OSF. Three studies found significantly higher improvement in burning sensation in the curcumin group compared with controls, whereas 3 other studies found comparable results. With regard to clinical signs, 2 studies showed better improvement in mouth opening in the curcumin group; 3 studies reported no differences in effectiveness; and only 1 study found curcumin to be inferior to conventional therapy.ConclusionsThe available evidence remains inconclusive but suggests that curcumin is a promising effective treatment option for the management of patients with OSF. Further well-designed clinical trials with large sample sizes and adequate follow-up periods are warranted.
       
  • Three-Dimensional Measurement and Registration Accuracy of a Third
           Generation Optical Tracking System for Navigational Maxillary Orthognathic
           Surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Ji Wook Choi, Jaeseong Jang, Kiwan Jeon, Seongho Kang, Sang-Hoon Kang, Jin Keun Seo, Sang-Hwy LeeABSTRACTObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an optical tracking system during reference point localization, measurement, and registration of skull models for navigational maxillary orthognathic surgery.Study DesignAccuracy was first evaluated based on the position recording discrepancy at a static point and at two points of fixed lengths. Ten reference points were measured on a skull model at seven different locations and their measurements were compared with predicted positions using four registration methods. Finally, positional tracking of reference points for simulated maxillary surgery was performed and compared with laser scan data.ResultsThe average linear measurement discrepancy was 0.28 mm and the mean measurement discrepancy with the five registered cranial points was 1.53 mm. The average measurement discrepancy after maxillary surgery was 1.91 mm (for impaction) and 1.56 mm (for advancement). The registration discrepancy in jitter and point registration on the y-axis was significantly greater than on the other axes.ConclusionsThe optical tracking system seems clinically acceptable for precise tracking of the maxillary position during navigational orthognathic surgery notwithstanding the chance of greater measurement error on the y-axis.
       
  • Gingival manifestations of tuberculosis in pediatric patients: series of 4
           cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Sunita Gupta, Puneet Vats, Abhishek Jha, Khushboo Singh, Sujoy Ghosh, Shruti Tandon, Ashwani Khanna, Seema Kapoor, Nita KhuranaObjectiveThe aim of the study was to evaluate the gingival manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) in the oral cavity in pediatric patients.Study DesignFour pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Clinical symptoms, auxiliary examinations, treatments, and outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Four pediatric patients who presented with atypical gingival lesions were thoroughly examined for local and systemic signs and symptoms, and a detailed history was obtained. All relevant investigations led to a definitive diagnosis of oral tuberculous lesions. On the basis of the final diagnosis, antitubercular therapy (ATT) was started for all the pediatric patients, and outcomes were measured.ResultsAll 4 patients responded very well to the treatment, with complete resolution of the lesions within 6 months after the initiation of ATT.ConclusionsHealth care professionals should rule out TB as one of the differential diagnoses in pediatric patients with atypical gingival lesions. ATT is strongly recommended for the treatment of oral TB to achieve good clinical outcomes. Rapid molecular tests based on nucleic amplification should be utilized for the diagnosis of TB in children and also for extrapulmonary TB because they are much faster and reliable compared with conventional methods.
       
  • 5-Aza-CdR promotes partial MGMT demethylation and modifies expression of
           different genes in oral squamous cell carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Guilherme C.L.S. do Amaral, Aline C. Planello, Gabriell Borgato, Dieila Giomo de Lima, Gustavo N. Guimarães, Marcelo Rocha Marques, Ana Paula de SouzaObjectiveTreatment strategies for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) vary, depending on the stage of diagnosis. Surgery and radiotherapy are options for localized lesions for stage I patients, whereas chemotherapy is the main treatment for metastatic OSCC. However, aggressive tumors can relapse, frequently causing death. In an attempt to address this, novel treatment protocols using drugs that alter the epigenetic profile have emerged as an alternative to control tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, the objective in this study was to investigate the effect of the demethylating drug 5-aza-CdR in SCC9 OSCC cells.Study DesignSCC9 cells were treated with 5-Aza-CdR at concentrations of 0.3 μM and 2 μM for 24 hours and 48 hours. DNA methylation of the MGMT, BRCA1, APC, c-MYC, and hTERT genes were investigated by using the methylation-specific high-resolution melting technique. Real time–polymerase chain reaction and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed to analyze gene expression.Results5-Aza-CdR promoted demethylation of MGMT and modified the transcription of all analyzed genes. Curiously, 5-aza-CdR at the concentration of 0.3 μM was more efficient than 2 μM in SCC9 cells.ConclusionsWe observed that 5-aza-CdR led to MGMT demethylation, upregulated the transcription of 3 important tumor suppressor genes, and promoted the downregulation of c-Myc.
       
  • Atypical ulceration of the hard palate
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Liam Robinson, Jaco Swanepoel, Willie F.P. van Heerden
       
  • Seeking treatment for temporomandibular disorders: What patients can
           expect from non-dental health care providers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Charles S. Greene, Andrew E. BertagnaThe dental profession has long been the primary source for clinical management of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). However, patients with a facial pain problem may seek diagnosis and/or treatment from other health care providers. These providers may be physicians or other professional-level practitioners, or they could be members of various allied groups, such as physical therapists or occupational therapists. However, little has been written about what patients might experience if they seek care outside of the dental profession.This article reports the results of an Internet survey of non-dental professionaland allied health care professionals to learn what they might offer to patients who may be seeking treatment for TMDs. The official organizational websites for all groups, as well as the websites of individual practitioners in each group, were reviewed. Most of the official websites had little or no information about TMDs, but some members of every group surveyed were offering to treat TMDs in their offices. The variety of treatments being offered went far beyond the boundaries of appropriate TMD management in the 21st century. These results are presented with a critical discussion of each concept or practice, as well as advice for both dentists and patients to deal with this situation.
       
  • Influence of interpretation conditions on the subjective differentiation
           of radiographic contrast of images obtained with a digital intraoral
           system
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Carlos Augusto Souza Lima, Deborah Queiroz Freitas, Glaucia Maria Bovi Ambrosano, Francisco Haiter-Neto, Matheus Lima OliveiraObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate interpretation conditions in the subjective in vitro assessment of dental tissue–equivalent radiographic contrast.Study DesignRadiographic images with the density of dental structures were randomized and arranged in 20 sequences with images juxtaposed and separated. Twelve observers interpreted the sequence among the most radiolucent and radiopaque images with 3 displays, 3 horizontal viewing angles, and 3 ambient light conditions. The evaluation time was recorded. The hit percentage was calculated for each evaluation. Three-way analysis of variance with Tukey's test was used to compare the conditions of interpretation. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess agreement (α = 0.05).ResultsNo differences in hit percentages were found among the 3 displays or among the juxtaposed and separated images. Increased hit percentages were recorded for images assessed at 90° compared with 45° for all displays and in high ambient light vs intermediate and low light at 90°. Increased evaluation time was recorded for the consumer-grade display under high ambient light and for the separated images.ConclusionsThe subjective in vitro assessment of dental tissue–equivalent radiographic contrast is not influenced by computer display, which should be viewed at a horizontal viewing angle of 90° and under high ambient light. Longer evaluation times may be expected with consumer-grade displays.
       
  • Human immunodeficiency virus and salivary gland pathology: an update
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Shabnum MeerSalivary gland disease is a common manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with a significant increase in prevalence over the last two decades. This review summarizes contemporary knowledge of non-neoplastic salivary gland disease in HIV infection. The aim is to update information on and bring attention to those lesions, which are almost exclusive to the salivary glands in the HIV setting. The associated conditions include xerostomia or salivary gland hypofunction; Sjögren syndrome–like illness; salivary gland enlargements, including benign lymphoepithelial cysts (cystic lymphoid hyperplasia); diffuse infiltrative CD8+ lymphocytosis syndrome; and mucous extravasation phenomena, especially ranula. Many of these conditions show considerable overlap, and thus, the term HIV-associated salivary gland disease is used to designate HIV infection with xerostomia or salivary gland hypofunction, enlargement of one or more of the major salivary glands, or both. These manifestations may be related to HIV infection, and therefore, prompt recognition is invaluable in the diagnosis and treatment of both the salivary gland disease and HIV infection.
       
  • Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and the human interface in
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Aditya Tadinada
       
  • Canalis sinuosus: a systematic review of the literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Rafaela Ferlin, Bruna Stuchi Centurion Pagin, Renato Yassutaka Faria YaedúObjectiveThe aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the frequency, location, diameter, variations in course, relationship to the course of the anterior superior alveolar nerve (ASAN), patient age and gender, and surgical implications of canalis sinuosus (CS), identified through imaging examinations, macerated skulls, or cadaver heads.Study DesignMedline, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched, and the retrieved articles were analyzed by 2 reviewers. The articles were selected by using well-established inclusion criteria. The Hawker scale was used for quality analysis. A kappa test was used to measure interobserver agreement.ResultThe search identified 70 articles, of which 11 were selected for extraction and data analysis. Most studies consisted of cone beam computed tomography examinations of the location, diameter, and variable presence of accessory channels (ACs) in the CS. In total, 90.9% of the studies were of high or moderate quality.ConclusionsThe CS may present variations in its course, location, and diameter. It involves ASAN and a extension to the anterior palate region, the ACs. No statistically significant differences with regard to age or gender were discovered in the studies. Most articles report the relevance of the CS identification in surgical procedures close to the canal and emphasize the importance of awareness of the variable appearance of the CS.
       
  • Comparison of micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry in the
           measurement of bone–implant contact ratios
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Jung-Yoo Choi, Jae-Il Park, Ji Soo Chae, In-Sung Luke YeoObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to measure the 3-dimensional (3D) bone-to-implant contact (BIC) ratios calculated with an associated software algorithm on 3D micro–computed tomography (μCT) scans and compare them with measurements made with 2-dimensional histomorphometry.Study DesignFor uncomplicated calculation of the 3D BIC ratios, 16 implants (8 grade 2 titanium and 8 grade 4 titanium) with simple cylindrical geometry were inserted into 8 rabbit tibiae; 2 implants were inserted into each tibia. The experimental animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks after surgery. The implants were surgically removed en bloc with surrounding bone. 3D μCT images were acquired and reconstructed, and histomorphometric procedures were performed. The calculated 3D BIC ratios were compared with the histomorphometrically measured BIC ratios.ResultsWhen the 3D BIC ratios calculated in this study were compared with the BIC ratios measured conventionally by using histologic slides for light microscopy, no significant statistical correlation was found between the 2 ratios (P ≥ .35).ConclusionsThis study indicated that 3D μCT should be used for more accurate BIC assessment to produce an overall 3D picture for the bone–implant interface.
       
  • Comparing the diagnostic efficacy of intraoral radiography and cone beam
           computed tomography volume registration in the detection of mandibular
           alveolar bone defects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Peter T. Green, André Mol, Antonio J. Moretti, Donald A. Tyndall, Heidi B. KohltfarberObjectivesThe aim of this study was to (1) compare bone loss detection accuracy with intraoral radiography and registered cone beam computed tomography (CBCT); (2) assess repeatability with both modalities; (3) determine factors affecting defect detection; and (4) determine the effect of buccolingual bone thickness on defect detection.Study DesignSix observers viewed intraoral radiographs and CBCT scans before and after the defect to determine defect presence and extent. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC), sensitivity, specificity, logistic regression, odds ratio, intraclass correlation coefficient, and weighted kappa were used.ResultsCBCT and intraoral radiography mean ROC area under the curve values were not statistically different (0.90 vs 0.81; P = .06). CBCT had higher sensitivity compared with intraoral radiography (0.85 vs 0.63; P = .01) but similar specificity (0.91 vs 0.84; P = .45). Bone thickness, imaging modality, and observer had significant effects on defect detection (P < .001). Odds ratios for CBCT vs intraoral radiography were 2.29 for diagnostic accuracy and 1.52 for buccolingual bone thickness. There was moderate interobserver agreement for detection of defects and substantial intraobserver agreement for measurement of extent.ConclusionsCBCT showed equivalent diagnostic efficacy and specificity for defect detection and higher sensitivity compared with intraoral radiography. CBCT increases the odds of accurate defect assessment more than 2-fold compared with intraoral radiography. The odds of bone loss detection increase by approximately 50% per millimeter of buccolingual alveolar bone loss.
       
  • Three-dimensional computed tomography cinematic rendering of mandibular
           odontogenic myxofibroma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 January 2019Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Steven P. Rowe, Elliot K. FishmanThree-dimensional (3D) methods for visualizing volumetric computed tomography (CT) data can aid in understanding the extent of a disease process and planning necessary surgical interventions. Recently, a new method of 3D image creation, known as cinematic rendering (CR), has been developed; it produces photorealistic images from standard CT acquisitions. We describe the CT appearance of a rare tumor type, odontogenic myxofibroma, in the mandible of a 33-year-old woman, and we focus on the potential applications of CR visualizations in this and similar scenarios. Although prospective data quantifying the advantages of CR relative to traditional methods of 3D visualization are still forthcoming, the photorealistic quality of CR images, nonetheless, suggests the important potential utility of this method. Realistic shadowing effects in the images create depth and show the relative positions of objects within a visualized volume in an advantageous manner. Furthermore, soft tissue details allow for visualization of structures that can otherwise be difficult to render with traditional methods.
       
  • Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint and increase of the
           horizontal condylar angle: a longitudinal study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Peggy P. Lee, Alexander R. Stanton, Austin E Schumacher, Edmond Truelove, Lars G. HollenderObjectiveOur previous study of patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) showed that the affected joints had greater horizontal condylar angle (HCA) compared with the contralateral unaffected joints. However, it was unclear whether the HCA changes preceded or were the result of OA changes. The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the relationship between HCA and OA progression.Study DesignIn total, 127 patients (with or without TMJ disorders) completed baseline and follow-up examinations (average time to follow-up 7.9 years). Generalized estimating equation models were used to account for correlation of observations within the same patients.Results(1) HCA was greater in OA-affected joints than in unaffected joints (P = .04). (2) Increased HCA at follow-up was associated with change in joint status from no OA to OA. (P = .001). (3) Baseline HCA value alone did not predict future OA diagnosis. (4) All OA changes in fossa/articular eminence morphology, and some combinations of condylar changes, were associated with a greater HCA. (5) OA diagnosis was associated with pain during maximum opening (P = .005) and pain history (P = .002). (6) Aging alone was not correlated with increased HCA.ConclusionsClinical progression of OA preceded increases in HCA. HCA alone did not predict OA development.
       
  • Changes of the condylar position after modified disc repositioning: a
           retrospective study based on magnetic resonance imaging
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Xu-Zhuo Chen, Ya-Ting Qiu, Shan-Yong Zhang, Ji-Si Zheng, Chi YangAbstractObjectiveThis study aims to explain the malocclusion after unilateral open disc repositioning surgery from the changes of condylar position.Study DesignPatients treated with unilaterally modified TMJ disc repositioning were reviewed. All subjects had pre and immediately postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The occlusion was checked, and the changes of the joint space and condylar position were measured in MRI. The paired t test was used for analysis.ResultsThirty-two subjects were included in the final analysis. The incidences of the posterior open bite in the affected side were 100%, 87.5%, 71.9%, 9.4%, 3.1%, and 3.1% at 0, 3, 7 days, 3, 6 months, and the last follow-up after surgery. The mean distances of the condylar movements were 2.67 and 0.32 mm in the affected and normal joints. There were significant differences for the anterior (P=0.03), superior (P
       
  • Comparison of fatty acid synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 immunoexpression in
           embryonal, benign, and malignant odontogenic tissues
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Celeste Sánchez-Romero, Adalberto Mosqueda-Taylor, Wilson Delgado-Azañero, Oslei Paes de Almedia, Ronell Bologna-MolinaObjectivesThe aim of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in tooth germ (TG), ameloblastoma (AM), ameloblastic carcinoma (AC), ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AFS).Study DesignImmunohistochemistry for FASN and COX-2 was performed in 10 TG, 44 AM, 10 AC, 9 AF, and 5 AFS specimens. The results were analyzed by using the immunoreactive score (IRS) and Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's post-test.ResultsMost TG specimens were strongly positive for FASN, whereas COX-2 was weak or negative. All AM and AC specimens expressed both proteins. In AF specimens, FASN and COX-2 were variably expressed in the epithelium and negative in the mesenchyme. In AFS specimens, FASN was strongly positive in the malignant mesenchyme and variable in the epithelium; COX-2 was focal or weak in both components. FASN expression showed significant differences in the following comparisons: TG vs AC, AM vs AC, and AF vs AFS. Differences in COX-2 were significant when comparing TG specimens with AM, AC, and AF specimens.ConclusionsThe results suggest that FASN and COX-2 overexpression may have a role in the pathogenesis of AM and AC, whereas in AFS, FASN seems to be mainly involved. Further studies are necessary to clarify these mechanisms and their clinical implications.
       
  • Postprocessing of all-zirconia restorations in digital dental radiographs:
           a quality assurance predicament
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Allison Buchanan, Amelia Orta, Sajitha KalathingalObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe a quality assurance issue, that is, the production of nondiagnostic high-contrast radiographs when imaging teeth restored with all-zirconia crowns on bitewing radiographs.Study DesignAll-zirconia crowns were imaged with DIGORA Optime photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plates (Soredex/Orion Corp., Helsinki, Finland). To assess the differences in software processing, the PSP plates were scanned into third-party software as well as directly into the twain and native software provided by the manufacturer. Gamma correction, histogram stretch, and scanner resolution settings were adjusted. Vertical bitewings were acquired to increase anatomic coverage.ResultsScanning into third-party software or directly into the twain and native software did not improve contrast. Shifting the lower limit of the histogram stretch to 3 with a gamma correction of 2 resolved the problem. Neither scanner resolution setting nor vertical bitewings improved contrast.ConclusionsThe nondiagnostic high-contrast radiographs result from imaging software not effectively displaying the available gray scale. The software processing error appears to be initiated by the high-attenuation characteristics of zirconia. Consequently, radiographs with a high ratio of zirconia crown to normal anatomy are particularly susceptible.
       
  • Regulation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway may be related to Regγ in benign
           epithelial odontogenic lesions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral RadiologyAuthor(s): Hellen Bandeira de Pontes Santos, Hianne Cristinne de Morais Medeiros, Rodrigo Porpino Mafra, Márcia Cristinada Costa Miguel, Hébel Cavalcanti Galvão, Lélia Batista de SouzaObjectivesThe aim of this study was to analyze and compare the immunoexpressions of Regγ, Wnt-1, and β-catenin in ameloblastomas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs).Study DesignThirty solid ameloblastomas, 20 AOTs, and 30 OKCs were selected for analysis of the immunoexpression of Regγ, Wnt-1, and β-catenin. Each case was semiquantitatively evaluated in the epithelial component and in their different cellular compartments (membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus).ResultsAmeloblastomas displayed higher cytoplasmic and nuclear Regγ expression compared with AOTs and OKCs, as well as higher membrane and cytoplasmic Wnt-1 expression (P < .05). β-catenin membrane expression was higher in OKCs compared with ameloblastomas and AOTs (P < .05). Nuclear β-catenin expression was higher in ameloblastomas and AOTs than in OKCs (P < .05). Cytoplasmic and nuclear Regγ expression in AOTs were positively correlated with nuclear β-catenin expression (P < .05).ConclusionsThe marked expressions of Regγ, Wnt-1, and β-catenin suggest the participation of these proteins in the pathogenesis of the studied lesions. The greater expressions of Regγ, Wnt-1, and nuclear β-catenin in ameloblastomas may be related to their more aggressive behavior. Pro-tumor effects of nuclear β-catenin may be counterbalanced by inhibitory pathways in AOTs, justifying their low aggressiveness.
       
 
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