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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (338 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 338 of 338 Journals sorted alphabetically
JMIR Cardio     Open Access  
Jornal Vascular Brasileiro     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Arrhythmia     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiac Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cardiobiology     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiology Cases     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiothoracic-Renal Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases & Diagnosis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine and Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Congenital Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Endovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Human Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Indian College of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Interventional Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Nuclear Cardiology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Rare Cardiovascular Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Respiratory and CardioVascular Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of the American College of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of the American Heart Association     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of the CardioMetabolic Syndrome     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Egyptian Society of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Open Access  
Journal of The Indian Academy of Echocardiography & Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Practice of Cardiovascular Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of the Saudi Heart Association     Open Access  
Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Vascular Access     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Vascular Diagnostics     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
JRSM Cardiovascular Disease     Open Access  
Kardiologia Inwazyjna     Open Access  
Kardiologie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Kerala Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Microvascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease     Open Access  
Nadciśnienie Tętnicze w Praktyce     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Nepalese Heart Journal     Open Access  
Netherlands Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery     Open Access  
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal     Open Access  
Open Heart     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Operative Techniques in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Pakistan Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parkinsonism & Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Pediatric Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Women's Cardiovascular Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Prenatal Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Preventive Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Progress In Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal  
Progress in Pediatric Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Research in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access  
Research Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research Reports in Clinical Cardiology     Open Access  
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Reviews in Vascular Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Argentina de Cardiología     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Cardiologia Invasiva     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Cardiología     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Cardiologia     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Cardiología     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Angiología y Cirugía Vascular     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Cardiología y Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cardiología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Española de Cardiología Suplementos     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Latinoamericana de Hipertension     Open Access  
Revista Portuguesa de Cardiologia     Open Access  
Revista Portuguesa de Cardiologia (English Edition)     Open Access  
Revista Uruguaya de Cardiologia     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access  
SA Heart     Open Access  
Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminars in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Seminars in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access  
Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery: Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Stroke and Vascular Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Structural Heart : The Journal of the Heart Team     Hybrid Journal  
Systemic Hypertension     Open Access  
Texas Heart Institute Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The VAD Journal     Open Access  
Therapeutic Advances in Cardiovascular Disease     Open Access  
Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Trials     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
University Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
US Cardiology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vascular and Endovascular Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Komplementärmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

  First | 1 2     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.463
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1934-5925
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3207 journals]
  • Highly atypical double barrel outlet to aorta in double inlet left
           ventricle, double outlet right ventricle
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Sarv Priya, Ravi Ashwath
       
  • Aortic valve calcium scoring on cardiac computed tomography: Ready for
           clinical use'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Omar Dzaye, Seamus P. Whelton, Michael J. Blaha
       
  • A rare case of unroofed coronary sinus with a secundum atrial septal
           defect incidentally detected by computed tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Satoshi Shoji, Hideaki Kanazawa, Yoshitake Yamada, Masahiro Jinzaki, Keiichi Fukuda
       
  • Left anterior descending artery from right coronary sinus and left
           circumflex artery from pulmonary artery- a rare association
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Vineeta Ojha, Nirmal Ghati, Kartik P. Ganga, Sunil Kumar Verma, Gurpreet Gulati
       
  • Effect of tube potential and luminal contrast attenuation on
           atherosclerotic plaque attenuation by coronary CT angiography: In vivo
           comparison with intravascular ultrasound
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Hidenari Matsumoto, Satoshi Watanabe, Eisho Kyo, Takafumi Tsuji, Yosuke Ando, Yuka Otaki, Sebastien Cadet, Piotr J. Slomka, Daniel S. Berman, Damini Dey, Balaji K. TamarappooAbstractBackgroundIt has been shown that CT attenuation of noncalcified plaques depends on luminal contrast attenuation (LCA). Although tube potential (kilovolt [kV]) has been shown to exert influence on plaque attenuation through LCA as well as its direct effects, in-vivo studies have not investigated plaque attenuation at lower tube potentials less than 120 kV. We sought to evaluate the effect of kV and LCA on thresholds for lipid-rich and fibrous plaques as defined by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).MethodsCT attenuation of IVUS-defined plaque components (lipid-rich, fibrous, and calcified plaques) were quantified in 52 consecutive patients with unstable angina, who had coronary CT angiography performed at 100 kV (n = 25) or 120 kV (n = 27) using kV-adjusted contrast protocol prior to IVUS. CT attenuation of plaque components was compared between the two groups.ResultsLCA was similar in the 100-kV and 120-kV groups (417.6 ± 83.7 Hounsfield Units [HU] vs 421.3 ± 54.9 HU, p = 0.77). LCA correlated with CT attenuation of lipid-rich (r = 0.49, p = 0.001) and fibrous plaques (r = 0.32, p 
       
  • Non-statin lipid lowering and coronary plaque composition
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Ramzi Dudum, Seamus P. Whelton
       
  • Prognostic value of CT myocardial perfusion imaging and CT-derived
           fractional flow reserve for major adverse cardiac events in patients with
           coronary artery disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): M. van Assen, C.N. De Cecco, M. Eid, P. von Knebel Doeberitz, M. Scarabello, F. Lavra, M.J. Bauer, D. Mastrodicasa, T.M. Duguay, B. Zaki, G.G. Lo, Y.H. Choe, Y. Wang, Pooyan Sahbaee, Christian Tesche, M. Oudkerk, R. Vliegenthart, U.J. SchoepfStructured AbstractObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic value of dynamic CT perfusion imaging (CTP) and CT derived fractional flow reserve (CT-FFR) for major adverse cardiac events (MACE).Methods81 patients from 4 institutions underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) with dynamic CTP imaging and CT-FFR analysis. Patients were followed-up at 6, 12, and 18 months after imaging. MACE were defined as cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina requiring hospitalization, or revascularization. CT-FFR was computed for each major coronary artery using an artificial intelligence-based application. CTP studies were analyzed per vessel territory using an index myocardial blood flow, the ratio between territory and global MBF. The prognostic value of CCTA, CT-FFR, and CTP was investigated with a univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model.Results243 vessels in 81 patients were interrogated by CCTA with CT-FFR and 243 vessel territories (1296 segments) were evaluated with dynamic CTP imaging. Of the 81 patients, 25 (31%) experienced MACE during follow-up. In univariate analysis, a positive index-MBF resulted in the largest risk for MACE (HR 11.4) compared to CCTA (HR 2.6) and CT-FFR (HR 4.6). In multivariate analysis, including clinical factors, CCTA, CT-FFR, and index-MBF, only index-MBF significantly contributed to the risk of MACE (HR 10.1), unlike CCTA (HR 1.2) and CT-FFR (HR 2.2).ConclusionOur study provides initial evidence that dynamic CTP alone has the highest prognostic value for MACE compared to CCTA and CT-FFR individually or a combination of the three, independent of clinical risk factors.
       
  • Double chambered right ventricle diagnosed on cardiac CTA: A case series
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Kashif Shaikh, Eranthi Jayawerdena, Matthew Budoff, Priya Pillutla
       
  • Anomalous origin of the left circumflex artery from the right coronary
           sinus with retro-aortic course: A potential malign variant
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Alberico Del Torto, Andrea Baggiano, Marco Guglielmo, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Gianluca Pontone
       
  • Subtle sings of contained cardiac rupture following myocardial infarction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Matteo Fronza, Diana Penha, Erique Guedes Pinto
       
  • Evaluation of ventricular septal defects using high pitch computed
           tomography angiography of the chest in children with complex congenital
           heart defects below one year of age
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): David Nau, Wolfgang Wuest, Oliver Rompel, Matthias Hammon, Martin Gloeckler, Okan Toka, Sven Dittrich, André Rueffer, Robert Cesnjevar, Michael M. Lell, Michael Uder, Matthias S. MayAbstractBackgroundAim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ventricular septal defects (VSD) using high pitch computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the chest in children below 1 year of age, compared to the intraoperative findings and echocardiography.MethodsOut of 154 patients that underwent Dual-Source CTA of the chest using a high-pitch protocol at low tube voltages (70–80 kV), 55 underwent surgical repair of a VSD (median age 8 days, range 1–348 days). The margins of the VSDs and their relation to the surrounding structures were reproduced by en-face views using multiplanar reformations (MPR). Absolute diameter, normalized area and relative area compared to the aortic valve annulus were used for discrimination between restrictive and non-restrictive defects. Localization was classified into four subtypes. The results were compared to two-dimensional echocardiography and intraoperative findings.ResultsMedian absolute size of VSDs did not differ significantly between CTA-measurements (10.8 mm, range 2.8–18.1 mm) and intraoperative findings (12.0 mm, 3.0–25.0 mm, p = 0.09). Echocardiographic values were significantly lower (9.6 mm, 3.0–18.5 mm, both p 
       
  • Quantified dual energy computed tomography perfusion imaging using
           myocardial iodine concentration: Validation using CT derived myocardial
           blood flow and invasive fractional flow reserve in a porcine model
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Rohan Poulter, David A. Wood, Andrew Starovoytov, Stephanie Smith, Mehran Chitsaz, John MayoAbstractBackgroundMyocardial CT perfusion imaging with dual energy (DE-CTP) can produce myocardial iodine perfusion maps. This study evaluated the accuracy of first pass myocardial iodine concentration in DE-CTP compared to CT derived dynamic myocardial blood flow (MBF) to determine regional myocardial ischemia in an animal model of coronary stenosis using invasive Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR).MethodsSeven anaesthetised pigs (mean weight 51 ± 4 kg) had a graded coronary artery stenosis produced in six vessels (plus one control animal) using a methacrylate plug with FFR recorded in the target artery (ischemia = FFR
       
  • A cross-sectional survey of coronary plaque composition in individuals on
           non-statin lipid lowering drug therapies and undergoing coronary computed
           tomography angiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Subhi J. Al’Aref, Amanda Su, Heidi Gransar, Alexander R. van Rosendael, Asim Rizvi, Daniel S. Berman, Tracy Q. Callister, Augustin DeLago, Martin Hadamitzky, Joerg Hausleiter, Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, Matthew J. Budoff, Philipp A. Kaufmann, Gilbert L. Raff, Kavitha Chinnaiyan, Filippo Cademartiri, Erica Maffei, Todd C. Villines, Yong-Jin Kim, Jonathon LeipsicAbstractIntroductionNon-statin therapy (NST) is used as second-line treatment when statin monotherapy is inadequate or poorly tolerated.ObjectiveTo determine the association of NST with plaque composition, alone or in combination with statins, in patients undergoing coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA).MethodsFrom the multicenter CONFIRM registry, we analyzed individuals who underwent coronary CTA with known lipid-lowering therapy status and without prior coronary artery disease at baseline. We created a propensity score for being on NST, followed by stepwise multivariate linear regression, adjusting for the propensity score as well as risk factors, to determine the association between NST and the number of coronary artery segments with each plaque type (non-calcified (NCP), partially calcified (PCP) or calcified (CP)) and segment stenosis score (SSS).ResultsOf the 27,125 subjects in CONFIRM, 4,945 met the inclusion criteria; 371 (7.5%) took NST. At baseline, patients on NST had more prevalent risk factors and were more likely to be on concomitant cardiac medications. After multivariate and propensity score adjustment, NST was not associated with plaque composition: NCP (0.07 increase, 95% CI: −0.05, 0.20; p = 0.26), PCP (0.10 increase, 95% CI: −0.10, 0.31; p = 0.33), CP (0.18 increase, 95% CI: −0.10, 0.46; p = 0.21) or SSS (0.45 increase, 95% CI: −0.02,0.93; p = 0.06). The absence of an effect of NST on plaque type was not modified by statin use (p for interaction > 0.05 for all).ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, non-statin therapy was not associated with differences in plaque composition as assessed by coronary CTA.
       
  • A rare coronary anomaly -- type 4 dual left anterior descending artery
           accompanying anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the right
           coronary sinus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Yee-Fan Lee, Jou-Hsuan Huang, Jo-Yu Chen, Wen-Jone Chen, Wen-Jeng Lee
       
  • Infected (“Mycotic”) coronary artery aneurysm: Systematic
           review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Carlos S. Restrepo, Tomas V. Gonzalez, Ameya Baxi, Carlos A. RojasAbstractBackgroundInfected coronary artery aneurysms (ICAA) represent a rare but potentially fatal complication of pre-existent atherosclerotic or non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, percutaneous coronary artery intervention, endocarditis or extracardiac infection.MethodsA retrospective analysis of four cases in addition to 51 infected coronary artery aneurysms from the literature, for a total of 55 ICAA was performed. Clinical and morphological information including age, sex, clinical presentation, microbial cultures, size, location and associated abnormalities as well as patient outcome was reviewed.Results83% of affected patients were adult males, with an average age of 55.24 years. The right coronary artery was the most commonly affected vessel (40%). In nearly 80% of the time, the responsible organism was either Staphylococcus aureus (53.3%), or Streptococcus (20%) infection. ICAA are typically large, on average 3.4 cm in diameter and can measure up to 9 cm. On contrast enhanced CT, imaging features include lobulated contour or saccular shape (54.2%) with thick wall or mural thrombus (87.5%). Associated abnormal appearance of the pericardium with either pericardial fluid, thickening or loculation is common (79.2%).ConclusionICAA are typically large, and characterized by a thick wall with a lobulated or saccular shape. Association with mediastinal, chest wall or pericardial abnormalities are common. This combination of findings, in the setting of fever, known infection, or recent coronary intervention should raise concern for ICAA.
       
  • Isolation of left subclavian artery in Tetralogy of Fallot with right
           aortic arch: A rare association diagnosed on dual source CT
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Vineeta Ojha, Akash Vadher, S.H. Chandrashekhara, Amarinder Singh Malhi, Sanjeev Kumar
       
  • Reproducibility of aortic valve calcification scoring with computed
           tomography – An interplatform analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): M. Eberhard, R. Hinzpeter, M. Polacin, F. Morsbach, F. Maisano, F. Nietlispach, T.D.L. Nguyen-Kim, F.C. Tanner, H. AlkadhiAbstractBackgroundTo investigate whether aortic valve calcification (AVC) scoring performed with different workstation platforms generates comparable and thus software-independent results.MethodsIn this IRB-approved retrospective study, we included 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing CT prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Two independent observers performed AVC scoring on non-enhanced images with commercially available software platforms of four vendors (GE, Philips, Siemens, 3mensio). Gender-specific Agatston score cut-off values were applied according to current recommendations to assign patients to different likelihood categories of aortic stenosis (unlikely to very likely). Comparative analysis of Agatston scores between the four platforms were performed by using Kruskal-Wallis analysis, Spearman rank correlation, linear regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis. Differences in category assignment were compared using Fisher's exact test and Cohen's kappa.ResultsFor both observers, each workstation platform produced slightly different numeric AVC Agatston scores, however, without statistical significance (p = 0.96 and p = 0.98). Excellent correlation was found between platforms, with r = 0.991–0.996 (Spearman) and r2 = 0.981–0.992 (regression analysis) for both observers. Bland-Altman analyses revealed small mean differences with narrow limits of agreement between platforms (mean differences: 6 ± 128 to 100 ± 179), for inter-observer (mean differences: 1 ± 43 to 12 ± 70), and intra-observer variability (mean differences: 9 ± 42 to 20 ± 96). Observer 1 assigned 11 (kappa: 0.85–0.97) and observer 2 assigned 10 patients (kappa: 0.88–0.95) to different likelihood groups of severe aortic stenosis with at least one platform. Overall, there was no significant difference of likelihood assignment between platforms (p = 0.98 and p = 1.0, respectively).ConclusionWhile absolute values differ slightly, common commercially available software platforms produce comparable results for AVC scoring, which indicates software-independence of the method.
       
  • Non-ECG gated CT in a case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Takashi Norikane, Yuka Yamamoto, Kotone Hayuka, Yasukage Takami, Katsuya Mitamura, Hanae Arai-Okuda, Ryosuke Tani, Yoshihiro Nishiyama
       
  • The effect of coronary plaque on events in patients with type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Tomoyuki Kawada
       
  • Reply: Impact of diabetes on coronary artery plaque volume by coronary CT
           angiography and subsequent adverse cardiac events
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Simon Deseive, Jörg Hausleiter
       
  • Patient anxiety during CCTAs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Noah Weg
       
  • Submillisievert CT angiography for carotid arteries using wide array CT
           scanner and latest iterative reconstruction algorithm in comparison with
           previous generations technologies: Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Andrea Daniele Annoni, Piero Montorsi, Daniele Andreini, Gianluca Pontone, Maria Elisabetta Mancini, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Alberto Formenti, Saima Mushtaq, Piero Trabattoni, Luca Dainese, Mauro PepiAbstractObjectivesTo assess evaluability and diagnostic accuracy of a low dose CT angiography (CTA) protocol for carotid arteries using latest Iterative Reconstruction (IR) algorithm in comparison with standard 100 kVp protocol using previous generation CT and IR.Materials and methods105 patients, referred for CTA of the carotid arteries were prospectively enrolled in our study and underwent CTA with 80 kVp and latest IR algorithm (group 1). Data were retrospectively compared with 100 consecutive patients with similar examination indications that had previously undergone CTA of carotid arteries with a standard 100 kVp protocol and a first generation IR algorithm (group 2). Image quality was evaluated with a 4-point Likert-scale. For each exam CT number, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at level of common carotid artery (CCA), internal carotid artery (ICA) and at level of Circle of Willis and Effective Dose (ED) were evaluated. 62 Group 1 patients underwent a clinically indicated DSA and results were compared with CTA.ResultsNo exams reported as not diagnostic. The overall mean CT number value of all arterial segments was above 450 HU in both groups. Significant lower noise, and higher SNR and CNR values were found in group 1 in comparison with group 2 despite the use of 80 kVp. In 62-group 1 patients studied by DSA, CTA showed in a segment-based analysis a sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy of 100%, 100% and 99% respectively. Mean ED in group 1 was 0.54 ± 0.1 mSv with a dose reduction up to 86%.ConclusionsCTA for carotid arteries using latest IR algorithm allows to perform exams with submillisievert radiation exposure maintaining good image quality, overall evaluability and diagnostic accuracy.
       
  • Diagnostic performance of free-breathing coronary computed tomography
           angiography without heart rate control using 16-cm z-coverage CT with
           motion-correction algorithm
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Zhuo Liu, Zhuolu Zhang, Nan Hong, Lei Chen, Chengfu Cao, Jian Liu, Ye SunAbstractObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with free-breathing using 16-cm z-coverage CT with motion correction algorithm.Methods616 patients underwent CCTA without heart rate control. 325 examinations were performed during breath-holding (group A), and the remaining 291 were performed during free-breathing (group B). The image quality scores were defined as 1 (excellent), 2 (good), 3 (adequate), and 4 (poor). 22 patients in group A and 24 in group B underwent invasive coronary angiography (ICA) after CCTA within two weeks. The image quality score, diagnostic accuracy using ICA as reference, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and effective dose (ED) were compared between the two groups.ResultsMean heart rate during scanning was 70.8 ± 13.8 bpm in group A and 70.7 ± 13.2 bpm in group B (P = .950). No significant differences were observed in SNR and image quality score (1.49 ± 0.62 vs. 1.53 ± 0.67; P = .647) between the breath-holding and free-breathing groups. ED (1.99 ± 0.83  mSv vs. 2.01 ± 0.88  mSv) was not significantly different between the two groups (P = .975). In a segment-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy in the detection of coronary stenosis of more than 50% were 82.1%, 96.8% and 92.2%, respectively in the breath-holding group and 82.2%, 96.6% and 92.2%, respectively in the free-breathing group with no significant differences for these parameters between the two groups.ConclusionsCCTA for patients without heart rate control and during free-breathing using 16-cm z-coverage CT with motion correction algorithm showed no significant difference in image quality and diagnostic performance compared with CCTA during breath-holding.
       
  • The SCOT-HEART Trial. What we observed and what we learned
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Philip D. Adamson, David E. Newby
       
  • Reply to letter to the editor regarding “Prevalence and impact of
           scan-related anxiety during Coronary CT angiography: A prospective cohort
           study of 366 patients”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Mickaël Ohana, Stephanie L. Sellers, Jonathon A. Leipsic
       
  • Simple cough presentation of a rare variant of a meandering left pulmonary
           vein
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Muhammad Q. Shahid, Amir Awwad
       
  • SCOT-HEART: Does it live up to the PROMISE'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Jordan B. Strom, Changyu Shen, Robert W. Yeh
       
  • Non obstructive high-risk plaque but not calcified by coronary CTA, and
           the G-score predict ischemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Gudrun M. Feuchtner, Fabian Barbieri, Christian Langer, Christoph Beyer, Gerlig Widmann, Guy J. Friedrich, Fabiola Cartes-Zumelzu, Fabian PlankAbstractBackgroundThe association of plaque morphology with ischemia in non-obstructive lesions has not been fully eludicated: Calcium density and high-risk plaque features have not been explored.Objectives: to assess whether high-risk plaque or calcified, and global mixed including non-calcified plaque burden (G-score) by coronary CTA predict ischemia in non-obstructive lesions using non-invasive fractional flow reserve (FFRCT).MethodsIn 106 patients with low-to-intermediate pre-test probability referred to coronary 128-slice dual source CTA, lesion-based and distal FFRCT were computated.The 4 high-risk-plaque criteria: Low-attenuation-plaque, Napkin Ring Sign, positive remodelling and spotty calcification were recorded. Plaque density (HU) and stenosis (MLA,MLD,%area,%diameter stenosis) were quantified. Plaque composition was classified as type 1–4:1 = calcified, 2 = mixed (calcified > non-calcified), 3 = mixed (non-calcified > calcified), 4 = non-calcified, and expressed by the G-score: Z = Sum of type 1–4 per segment. The total plaque segment involvement score (SIS) and the Coronary Calcium Score (Agatston) were calculated.Results89 non–obstructive lesions were included. Both lesion-based and distal FFRCT were lower in high-risk-plaque as compared to calcified (0.85 vs 0.93, p 
       
  • SCOT-HEART is the trial that we have been waiting for!
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Leslee J. Shaw, Jagat Narula
       
  • “Cantrell’s pentalogy”- Angiographic CT evaluation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Miguel A. Reyes Caldelas, Regina de la Mora Cervantes, Susana I. Vargas Hernández
       
  • Diagnostic Accuracy Of On-site FFRCT And The New Concept Of FFRangio: A
           Head To Head Comparison With Invasively Measured FFR
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Fabian Ammon, Monique Tröbs, Daniel Bittner, Markus Göller, Silvia Smolka, Stephan Achenbach, Mohamed Marwan
       
  • FFR As A Gold Standard For CT-FFR Validation. Does The FFR Measurement
           Device Alter The Flow'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Michael F. Wilson, Kelsey N. Sommer, Lauren M. Shepard, Vijay Iyer, Umesh Sharma, Frank J. Rybicki, Dimitris Mitsouras, Erin Angel, Ciprian N. Ionita
       
  • Coronary Artery Calcification quantification in Chest Computed Tomography
           Imaging
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Augustinas Tumenas, Laima Tamkeviciute, Monika Arzanauskaite, Timothy Fairbairn
       
  • Impact of Sublingual Nitroglycerin Dosage on FFRCTAssessment and Coronary
           Luminal Volume to Myocardial Mass Ratio
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Stephanie Sellers, Kenneth R. Holmes, Tim A. Fonte, Jonathan Weir-McCall, Malcolm Anastasius, Philipp Blanke, Geoffrey Payne, Jennifer Ellis, Darra Murphy, Charles A. Taylor, Jonathon Leipsic
       
  • Targeting Inflammatory Protagonists with Nuclear Imaging: A Novel
           Dual-Radiotracer Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Hilary E. Barrett, Eric Meester, Kim van der Heiden, Monique Bernsen, Marion de Jong, Frank Gijsen
       
  • High Coronary Calcium Score and Diagnostic Accuracy of CT Coronary
           Angiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Spiros Zidros, Sanjay Karamsadkar, Anu Balan, Ceri Davies, Emma Cheasty
       
  • Probability Of Finding Significant Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease By
           Coronary Ct Angiography In Male vs Female Patients With Hyperlipidemia In
           A Large, Multi-physician Outpatient Cardiology Private Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ronak Agarwal, Yesh Dhruva, Saachi Singal, Ayushi Agarwal, Mayank Agarwal, Rajiv Agarwal
       
  • Probability Of Finding Significant Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease By
           Coronary Ct Angiography In Male vs Female Patients Presenting with Chest
           Pain In A Large, Multi-physician Outpatient Cardiology Private Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Yesh Dhruva, Ronak Agarwal, Ayushi Agarwal, Saachi Singal, Mayank Agarwal, Rajiv Agarwal
       
  • Correlation Between Body Mass Index and Coronary Calcium score By Coronary
           Computed Tomography In Patients Age 65 And Below In A Large, Multi-
           physician Outpatient Cardiology Private Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ayushi Agarwal, Saachi Singal, Ronak Agarwal, Yesh Dhruva, Mayank Agarwal, Rajiv Agarwal
       
  • Probability Of Finding Significant Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease By
           Coronary Ct Angiography In Patients Age 65 And Below In A Large,
           Multi-physician Outpatient Cardiology Private Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Saachi Singal, Ayushi Agarwal, Yesh Dhruva, Ronak Agarwal, Mayank Agarwal, Rajiv Agarwal
       
  • Association Of Dynamic Aortic Annulus Area With Paravalvular Regurgitation
           After TAVR
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Mihir Barvalia, Viloki Patel, Chunguang Chen
       
  • Clinical impact of FFRct-guided care in the National Health Service
           District General Hospital setting
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Benjamin J. Hudson, Dan McKenzie, Raveen Kandan, Dan Augustine, Rob Lowe, Richard Mansfield, Antony French, Jacob Easaw, Anu Garg, Toby Hall, Dominic Fay, Kevin Carson, Jonathan C.L. Rodrigues
       
  • CAC-RDS and CAD-RADS as a potential tool to better Characterise CAD
           Disease Prevalence, Severity And Variation Within Described Disease
           Cohorts And Populations.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Abid Ullah, Anna Reid, Craig Caswell, Gaetano Nucifora, Matthias Schmitt
       
  • Calcific Plaque Versus Non-calcific Plaque: A CAD-RADS And FFRct Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jonathan C.L. Rodrigues, Dan McKenzie, Raveen Kandan, Dan Augustine, Rob Lowe, Richard Mansfield, Antony French, Jacob Easaw, Anu Garg, Dominic Fay, Toby Hall, Kevin Carson, Ben Hudson
       
  • Diagnostic Utility of CT Coronary Angiography for the Detection of
           Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Dyspnoea
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Hannah C. Sinclair, Sally Olsen, Trisha Singh, Saad Ezad, Kavin Jayawardhana, Jehangir N. Din, Russell K. Bull
       
  • Prognostic Role Of Coronary Artery Calcification In Lung Cancer Patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Stefania Rosmini, Clare R. Kane, Gabriella Captur, Brendan Chia, Niall Macdougall, John Conibear, Ceri Davies, Arjun K. Ghosh
       
  • Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion for the Evaluation of Right
           Ventricular Function in Functional Cardiac CT Compared to MRI
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ryan Wilson, Killian Newman, Asik Mohamed Ali, Anto Sedlic
       
  • Presence And Quantification Of Valvular Heart Disease In The SCOT-HEART
           Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Michelle C. Williams, Daniele Massera, Alastair J. Moss, Amanda Hunter, Philip Adamson, Shirjel Alam, Anoop Shah, Tania Pawade, Jonathan Weir-McCall, Giles Roditi, Edwin J.R. van Beek, Edward Nicol, David Ernest Newby, Marc Dweck
       
  • Single Dose Ivabradine (15mg Single Dose 2 Hours Before The Scan) Is Safe
           & Effective In Reducing Heart Rate Before Cardiovascular Ct Angiogram
           (ctca)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Mudassar Baig, Hassaan Ahmed, Ammar Nazir, Amir Anwar, Yogesh Raja
       
  • OSCRIS; An Efficient and Patient preferred Cardiac CT service
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Subramanya G.N. Upadhyaya, Ainkaran Santhirasekaram, Muhammad Dharas, Abdel Yousif, Anthony D'sa, Indrajeet Das, Derek Connolly
       
  • Non-invasive Coronary Physiology Based On Computational Analysis Of
           Intracoronary Transluminal Attenuation Gradient
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jin-Ho Choi, Yong Gyun Bae, Seung Tae Hwang, Huan Han, Young-June Moon
       
  • Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Cardiac Computed Tomography
           Measured Fractional Area Change
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ali A. Alsaad, Martin Gibbs, Oludamilola Oluleye, Amit Pursnani, Patricia Mergo, Brian Shapiro
       
  • Additional Diagnostic Value of CT Perfusion Over Coronary CT Angiography
           in Patients with Suspected In-stent Restenosis or Coronary Artery Disease
           Progression The ADVANTAGE Prospective Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Saima Mushtaq, Edoardo Conte, Gianluca Pontone, Marco Guglielmo, Andrea Baggiano, Daniela Trabattoni, Franco Fabbiocchi, Piero Montorsi, Andrea D. Annoni, Jeroen Sonck, Carlos Collet, Elisabetta Mancini, Alberto Formenti, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Antonio Bartorelli, Daniele Andreini
       
  • Comprehensive Evaluation Of Newly Diagnosed Left Ventricle Dysfunction By
           A Novel Whole-heart Coverage Cardiac Ct: Preliminary Results Of The E-
           PLURIBUS Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Edoardo Conte, Saima Mushtaq, Marco Guglielmo, Andrea Baggiano, Andrea D. Annoni, Alberto Formenti, Elisabetta Mancini, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Gianluca Pontone, Mauro Pepi, Daniele Andreini
       
  • Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA) Of Orthotopic Heart
           TransplantRecipients: A Single Centre Experience.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Alexandra N. Murphy, John Buckley, Jim O'Neill, John Murray
       
  • Impact Of A Novel Post Processing Technique For Calcium Deblooming On The
           Diagnostic Accuracy Of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jonathan Weir-McCall, Rui Wang, Lei Xu, Zhanming Fan, Cameron Hague, Jaydeep Halankar, Jiang Hsieh, Shmuel Rosenblatt, Jonathon Leipsic
       
  • Assessment Of Heart Team’S Treatment Decision Variability: Insights From
           The Syntax III Revolution Trial.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Daniele Andreini, Saima Mushtaq, Carlos Collet, Gianluca Pontone, Mauro Pepi, Laurent Macron, Giorgia Bonalumi, Cristina Ferrari, Maurizio Roberto, Yosuke Miyazaki, Laura Cavallotti, Yoshinobu Onuma, Paolo Olivares, Francesco Maisano, Antonio Bartorelli, Patrick Serruys
       
  • Atherosclerotic Coronary Artery Disease in Single Coronary Artery with
           Dual LAD:A Rarecase of Diagnostic Challenge
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Keyur Vora
       
  • Table of contents-4C
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • Title Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • Cover 1/spine update
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • Feasibility of extracellular volume quantification using dual-energy CT
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Marly van Assen, Carlo N. De Cecco, Pooyan Sahbaee, Marwen H. Eid, L. Parkwood Griffith, Maximilian J. Bauer, Rock H. Savage, Akos Varga-Szemes, Matthijs Oudkerk, Rozemarijn Vliegenthart, U. Joseph SchoepfAbstractObjectiveTo assess the feasibility of dual energy CT (DECT) to derive myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) and detect myocardial ECV differences without a non-contrast acquisition, compared to single energy CT (SECT).MethodsSubjects (n = 35) with focal fibrosis (n = 17), diffuse fibrosis (n = 10), and controls (n = 9) underwent non-contrast and delayed acquisitions to calculate SECT-ECV. DECT-ECV was calculated using the delayed acquisition and the derived virtual non-contrast images. In the control and diffuse fibrotic groups, the entire myocardium of the left ventricle was used to calculate ECV. Two ROIs were placed in the focal fibrotic group, one in normal and one in fibrotic myocardium.ResultsMedian ECV was 33.4% (IQR, 30.1–37.4) using SECT and 34.9% (IQR, 31.2–39.2) using DECT (p = 0.401). For both techniques, focal and diffuse fibrosis had significantly higher ECV values (all p 
       
  • Iliofemoral artery lumen volume assessment with three dimensional
           multi-detector computed tomography and vascular complication risk in
           transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Yoav Hammer, Uri Landes, Oren Zusman, Ran Kornowski, Guy Witberg, Katia Orvin, Amos Levi, Pablo Codner, Hanna Vaknin-Assa, Mithal Nassar, Gideon Shafir, Abid Assali, Ashraf HamdanAbstractBackgroundTransfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) carries a risk of Vascular Complications (VCs) at the access site. The currently used measures for assessing the risk for VCs are not accurate enough, and sometimes fail to predict them. We therefore aimed to examine whether Iliofemoral artery lumen volume (IFV) assessment with 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) predicts VCs after transfemoral TAVR.MethodsWe identified 45/560 trans-femoral TAVR patients with VC, then performed nearest neighbor 1:1 matching for patients with no VC, matching for age, sex, TAVR year, valve size and type, closure-device, sheath size and peripheral vascular disease. IFV, minimal diameter, tortuosity, and calcification were measured, and their diagnostic performance assessed.ResultsThe final analysis included 45 patients with and 45 patients without VCs. The two groups were well balanced. For all patients, median IFV was 8.65 ml (IQR 6.5–11.95). IFV was lower in patients with VC compared to patients without VC: 7.10 ml (IQR 5.4–9.0) vs. 10.10 ml (IQR 8.3–13.3), p 
       
  • The evaluation of coronary artery-to-pulmonary artery fistula in adulthood
           on 256-slice CT coronary angiography: Comparison with coronary catheter
           angiography and transthoracic echocardiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Jing-Lei Li, Lei Huang, Wei Zhu, Wei-Tao Ye, Li-Fen Yan, Xiao-Mei Zhong, Hai-Ying Luo, Sachin Saboo, Mei-Ping Huang, Chang-Hong LiangAbstractObjectiveTo review the imaging features of coronary artery-to-pulmonary artery fistula (CPAF) on CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and evaluate its diagnostic performance compared with coronary catheter angiography (CCA) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE).Materials and methodsWe retrospectively reviewed with a diagnosis of CPAF from among 19855 consecutive CCTA performed with 256-slice MDCT scanner for suspected coronary artery disease. CT images were evaluated for – origin, number, size and course (tubular/worm-like dilation/significant aneurysm formation/wall attachment sign) of fistula vessels, drainage site, drainage site imaging features (pierced sign, isodensity sign, smoke sign, jet sign), and main pulmonary artery (MPA) enlargement. 25 patients of CPAF also underwent CCA and 47 patients underwent TTE.ResultsThere were 72 patients with CPAF (0.36%) in our study, of which 44 were men and 28 were women, with mean age of 55.8 ± 13.2 years (range 22–85 years). CPAF originated from conus artery, left anterior descending artery (LAD), combined conus artery and LAD in 55, 67, 50 cases, respectively. Tubular dilation, worm-like dilation and aneurysm was seen in 14, 58 and 35 cases, respectively. Wall attachment sign was noted in 69 cases. All the cases demonstrated only a single drainage site, with left lateral wall, left anterolateral, anterior, right lateral and right anterolateral walls of MPA in 44, 21, 5, 1 and 1 cases, respectively. The mean diameter of the fistula drainage site was 2.6 ± 1.3 mm. Pierced sign, jet sign, smoke sign, isodensity sign was seen in 72, 46, 41 and 24 cases, respectively. MPA enlargement was seen in 20 patients. CCA showed CPAF in only 20 cases among 25 patients; while TTE showed CPAF in only 9 patients among 47 patients.ConclusionCTCA is competent in detecting and characterizing CPAF with an excellent diagnostic performance as the first imaging modality of choice, which is valuable for giving a distinct and intuitive explanation to patients and physicians and making an objective and exact assessment for further management.
       
  • Coronary CTA enhanced with CTA based FFR analysis provides higher
           diagnostic value than invasive coronary angiography in patients with
           intermediate coronary stenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Łukasz Wardziak, Mariusz Kruk, Weronika Pleban, Marcin Demkow, Witold Rużyłło, Zofia Dzielińska, Cezary KępkaAbstractBackgroundCTA based FFR, a software based application, enhances diagnostic value of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) examination. However it remains unknown whether it improves accuracy over the gold standard of invasive coronary angiography (ICA) in predicting functionally significant coronary stenosis. The aim of our study was to compare diagnostic accuracies of coronary CTA, CTA based FFR, and ICA, with invasive FFR as the reference standard in patients with intermediate stenosis on CTA.Methods96 intermediate stenoses (50–90%) from 90 subjects, with intermediate pre-test probability of CAD, who underwent coronary CTA were analyzed. Each patient had subsequent ICA with FFR. CTA based FFR (cFFR v2.1, Siemens) analysis was performed on-site. The stenoses with invasive FFR≤0.8 were considered hemodynamically significant.Results41/96 stenoses were hemodynamically significant (FFR≤0.8). While the area under ROC curves (AUC) for identification of significant stenosis evaluated on QCA (0.653), visual ICA (0.652), qCTA (0.690) and visual CTA (0.660) did not significantly differ, the AUC for CTA based FFR (0.835) was significantly higher (p = 0.004, p = 0.004, p = 0.010, p = 0.007, respectively). The accuracies of CTA based FFR, qCTA and QCA were 76%, 63% and 58% respectively.ConclusionOur results suggest that diagnostic potential of routine coronary CTA, augmented with CTA based FFR analysis, is superior to ICA in patients with intermediate stenosis.
       
  • Feasibility of dynamic myocardial CT perfusion using single-source 64-row
           CT
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Nobuo Tomizawa, Shengpu Chou, Yusuke Fujino, Masaru Kamitani, Kodai Yamamoto, Shinichi Inoh, Takeshi Nojo, Kanako K. Kumamaru, Shigeki Aoki, Sunao NakamuraAbstractBackgroundDynamic myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an emerging technique to diagnose significant coronary stenosis. However, this procedure has not been reported using single-source 64-row CT.ObjectiveTo investigate the radiation dose and the diagnostic performance of dynamic CTP to diagnose significant stenosis by catheter exam.MethodsWe prospectively included 165 patients who underwent CTP exam under adenosine stress using a single-source 64-row CT. MBF was calculated using the deconvolution technique. Quantitative perfusion ratio (QPR) was defined as the myocardial blood flow (MBF) of the myocardium with coronary stenosis divided by the MBF of the myocardium without significant stenosis or infarct. Of the 44 patients who underwent subsequent coronary angiography, we assessed the diagnostic performance to diagnose ≥50% stenosis by quantitative coronary analysis (QCA).ResultsThe average effective dose of dynamic CTP and the entire scans were 2.5 ± 0.7 and 7.3 ± 1.8 mSv, respectively. The MBF of the myocardium without significant stenosis was 1.20 ± 0.32 ml/min/g, which significantly decreased to 0.98 ± 0.24 ml/min/g (p 
       
  • Consistency of quantitative analysis of coronary computed tomography
           angiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Sang-Eun Lee, Hyung-Bok Park, Dongchun Xuan, Byoung Kwon Lee, Myeong-Ki Hong, Yangsoo Jang, Hyuk-Jae ChangAbstractBackgroundThe present study aimed to assess the reliability and reproducibility of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) for the serial quantitative assessment of plaque volume.MethodsPatients who underwent repeated CCTA scans within 90 days were retrospectively screened and enrolled. Clinical data and CCTA imaging data were collected. Paired CCTA scans were analyzed using the quantitative method by separate observers blinded to the other paired CCTA scans. Results were compared between the index CCTA and follow-up CCTA.ResultsPaired CT scans of 95 patients (61 ± 13 years; 56.8% men) with same tube voltages (kVp) at both CCTAs and 24 patients (57 ± 19 years; 48.3% men) with different kVp at two CCTAs were analyzed. In patients with same kVp at both CCTAs, there were no difference in PV and PVs of each components in per-segment analysis and per-lesion analysis (all p > 0.05). In per-lesion analysis of CCTAs from patients who used different kVp between two CCTAs, lesion length, area and diameter stenosis, and PVs were not different between index and follow-up CCTAs (all p > 0.05). Segment length and PV were also showed no difference between two serial CCTAs in per-segment analysis.ConclusionWe showed the reproducibility and reliability of quantitative analysis of CCTA for assessment of coronary plaques. CCTA can be applied for the serial quantitative assessment of coronary artery disease progression, regardless of differences in the image acquisition protocol.
       
  • Association of endogenous sex hormone levels with coronary artery calcium
           progression among post-menopausal women in the Multi-Ethnic Study of
           Atherosclerosis (MESA)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Vinita Subramanya, Di Zhao, Pamela Ouyang, Wendy Ying, Dhananjay Vaidya, Chiadi E. Ndumele, Susan R. Heckbert, Matthew J. Budoff, Wendy S. Post, Erin D. MichosAbstractBackgroundSex differences in the incidence and manifestation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) suggest the involvement of sex hormones in disease pathogenesis. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) and its progression, measured by non-contrast cardiac computed tomography, are markers of subclinical atherosclerosis and predict CVD, even among low-risk women. We hypothesized that sex hormone levels were associated with CAC progression among women in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.MethodsWe studied 2759 post-menopausal women (age 65 ± 9 years), free of baseline CVD, with baseline serum sex hormones and CAC measured at Exam 1 (2000–2002). Of this sample, 2427 had ≥1 follow-up CAC measurement through Exam 5 (2010–2012). Using mixed effects linear regression methods, we tested change in log[CAC+1] score by log[sex hormone] levels (continuous, comparing the 90th versus 10th percentiles). Models adjusted for demographics, lifestyle factors, cardiovascular risk factors, hormone therapy, and years since menopause.ResultsAt baseline, we found no associations between sex hormones and prevalent CAC. Over a median of 4.7 years, in fully-adjusted models, women with higher free testosterone levels had relatively greater CAC progression [Ratio 1.26 (95% CI 1.01–1.56)], whereas higher sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was associated with lower progression risk [0.80 (0.64–0.99). No associations were seen for total testosterone, estradiol, or dehydroepiandrosterone.ConclusionA more androgenic hormone profile of higher free testosterone and lower SHBG is associated with a greater CAC progression up to 10-years in post-menopausal women. Sex hormone levels may help identify women at increased risk for CVD who may benefit from additional risk-reducing strategies.
       
  • Computer simulated “Virtual TAVR” to guide TAVR in the presence of a
           previous Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Daniel R. Obaid, David Smith, Michael Gilbert, Saeed Ashraf, Alexander ChaseAbstractBackgroundWe evaluated the utility of the HeartNavigator III software (Philips Healthcare, Netherlands) to create a patient specific three-dimensional model using ECG-gated CT images to plan Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) in a patient with previous Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis.MethodsA patient with a previous Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis considered too high risk for conventional surgery required TAVR. It was uncertain whether this would be possible whilst avoiding the complication of the aortic prosthesis interacting with the high-profile Starr-Edwards cage and ball valve mechanism. To ensure it would be feasible and aid in the planning of the procedure a patient specific three-dimensional model was created from ECG-gated CT images using HeartNavigator III software (Philips Healthcare, Netherlands).ResultsThe patient specific model allowed simulated “virtual” TAVR implantations to be performed with different models and sizes of aortic prosthesis. These pre-implant simulations allowed a safe and feasible implant strategy to be chosen. The images were also co-registered with fluoroscopy to guide deployment.ConclusionUsing a patient-specific CT simulation technique we performed TAVR with a high level of precision, achieving a clear margin between a Portico (Abbot Vascular, US) TAVR and the Starr-Edwards cage.
       
  • Impact of diabetes on coronary artery plaque volume by coronary CT
           angiography and subsequent adverse cardiac events
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Simon Deseive, Ramona Straub, Maximilian Kupke, Alexander Broersen, Pieter H. Kitslaar, Thomas J. Stocker, Steffen Massberg, Martin Hadamitzky, Jörg HausleiterAbstractBackgroundTo investigate the impact of diabetes on coronary artery total plaque volume (TPV) and adverse events in long-term follow-up.MethodsOne-hundred-and-eight diabetic patients were matched to 324 non-diabetic patients, with respect to age, sex, body-mass index, hypertension, smoking habits, LDL and HDL cholesterol, family history for CAD as well as aspirin and statin medication. In all patients, TPV was quantified from coronary CT angiographies (CTA) using dedicated software. All-cause mortality, acute coronary syndrome and late revascularisation (>90 days) served as combined endpoint.ResultsPatients were followed for 5.6 years. The endpoint occurred in 18 (16.7%) diabetic and 26 (8.0%) non-diabetic patients (odds ratio 2.3, p = 0.03). Diabetic patients had significantly higher TPV than non-diabetic patients (55.1 mm³ [IQR: 6.2 and 220.4 mm³] vs. 24.9 mm³ [IQR: 0 and 166.7 mm³], p = 0.02). A TPV threshold of 110.5 mm³ provided good separation of diabetic and non-diabetic patients at higher and lower risk for adverse events. Noteworthy, diabetic and non-diabetic patients with a TPV110.5 mm³ had significantly higher incidence of adverse events (hazard ratio 2.3, p = 0.03) compared to non-diabetic patients with TPV>110.5 mm³. There was incremental prognostic value in diabetic and non-diabetic patients over the Framingham Risk Score (Integrated Discrimination Improvement: 0.052 and 0.012, p for both
       
  • Pre-procedural fit-testing of TAVR valves using parametric modeling and 3D
           printing
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Ahmed Hosny, Joshua D. Dilley, Tatiana Kelil, Moses Mathur, Mason N. Dean, James C. Weaver, Beth RipleyAbstractBackgroundSuccessful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) requires an understanding of how a prosthetic valve will interact with a patient's anatomy in advance of surgical deployment. To improve this understanding, we developed a benchtop workflow that allows for testing of physical interactions between prosthetic valves and patient-specific aortic root anatomy, including calcified leaflets, prior to actual prosthetic valve placement.MethodsThis was a retrospective study of 30 patients who underwent TAVR at a single high volume center. By design, the dataset contained 15 patients with a successful annular seal (defined by an absence of paravalvular leaks) and 15 patients with a sub-optimal seal (presence of paravalvular leaks) on post-procedure transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). Patients received either a balloon-expandable (Edwards Sapien or Sapien XT, n = 15), or a self-expanding (Medtronic CoreValve or Core Evolut, n = 14, St. Jude Portico, n = 1) valve. Pre-procedural computed tomography (CT) angiograms, parametric geometry modeling, and multi-material 3D printing were utilized to create flexible aortic root physical models, including displaceable calcified valve leaflets. A 3D printed adjustable sizing device was then positioned in the aortic root models and sequentially opened to larger valve sizes, progressively flattening the calcified leaflets against the aortic wall. Optimal valve size and fit were determined by visual inspection and quantitative pressure mapping of interactions between the sizer and models.ResultsBenchtop-predicted “best fit” valve size showed a statistically significant correlation with gold standard CT measurements of the average annulus diameter (n = 30, p 
       
  • Computed tomography imaging in the context of transcatheter aortic valve
           implantation (TAVI) / transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): An
           expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed
           Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s): Philipp Blanke, Jonathan R. Weir-McCall, Stephan Achenbach, Victoria Delgado, Jörg Hausleiter, Hasan Jilaihawi, Mohamed Marwan, Bjarne L. Norgaard, Niccolo Piazza, Paul Schoenhagen, Jonathon A. Leipsic
       
  • Table of contents-4C
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Ct Based Assessment Of Global Longitudinal Strain
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Bálint Szilveszter, Anikó Ilona Nagy, Borbála Vattay, Márton Kolossváry, Andrea Bartykowszki, Attila Tóth, Ferenc Suhai, Astrid Apor, Béla Merkely, Pál Maurovich-Horvat
       
  • CT TAVR Assessment In The United Kingdom: Insights From A National
           BSCI/BSCCT Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Alastair J. Moss, Iwan Harris, Michelle C. Williams, Jonathan Weir-McCall, Katharine Vedwan, James Shambrook, Edward Nicol
       
  • Dual Antiplatelet Therapy To Inhibit Myocardial Injury In Patients With
           High-risk Coronary Artery Plaque: A Randomised Controlled Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Alastair J. Moss, Mhairi K. Doris, Jack Andrews, Marc R. Dweck, David Newby, Philip Adamson
       
  • Diagnostic Accuracy and Report Quality of Computed Tomography Coronary
           Angiography: Early Experience at our District General Hospital
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ynyr Edwards, Ahmed Farag
       
  • CT Coronary Angiogram For Interval Surveillance Of Coronary Artery
           Vasculopathy In Asymptomatic Patients Post Heart Transplant
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Katharine Tweed, Stephen Pettit, Anna Kydd, jayan Parameshwar, Clive Lewis, Sai Bhagra
       
  • Post 2016 UK NICE Guideline Cardiac CT Investigation of Chest Pain: To
           Investigate the Relationship Between Age, Presentation and Cardiac CT
           Results
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Abdel Yousif, Naman Bhatt, Mark Bishay, Rehaan Nensey, Subramanya Upadhyaya, Anthony D'Sa
       
  • The Results of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography over a 3 Years
           Period in a Busy Radiology Devision.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Signe H. Forsdahl, Ingrid Vognild, Amjid Iqbal
       
  • Method For Determining Optimal CT Reconstruction Parameters For
           Quantitative Anatomic Modeling Compared To An Invasive Standard
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Eric Gros, Julia Fox, Jorge Gonzalez, John Jackson, Souma Sengupta, Arjun Roy, Shawn Newlander, George E. Wesbey
       
  • Early experience of 18F-Sodium Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography/
           Computed Tomography in Aortic Dissections
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Maaz B.J. Syed, Alexander J. Fletcher, Rachael O. Forsythe, Marc R. Dweck, David E. Newby
       
  • Chest Pain In The Young: Not So NICE For All
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Nikolaos Karogiannis, Mirdita Gaxherri, Alexander Wilson, Ruby Fong, Ceri Davies, Emma Cheasty
       
  • Evaluation And Impact of FFR-CT Implementation in a UK Tertiary Cardiology
           Centre
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Michael Fitzpatrick, Mark Hamilton, Stephen Lyen, Nathan Manghat
       
  • Stress Dynamic Computed Tomography Perfusion Versus Fractional Flow
           Reserve CT Derived In Suspected Coronary Artery Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Andrea Baggiano, Marco Guglielmo, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Laura Fusini, Margherita Soldi, Alberico Del Torto, Daniele Andreini, Saima Mushtaq, Edoardo Conte, Andrea Annoni, Alberto Formenti, Elisabetta Mancini, Andrea I. Guaricci, Antonio L. Bartorelli, Mauro Pepi, Gianluca Pontone
       
  • Pulmonary Artery Calcification in Eisenmenger Syndrome and Pulmonary
           Arterial Hypertension (ES-PAH): Correlation with Clinical Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Sobitha Sathianandan, Bhavin Rawal, Heba Nashat, Kostas Dimopoulos, Simon Padley, Stephen Wort, Edward Nicol, Tom Semple
       
  • The Role Of Computed Tomography In The Diagnosis Of Traumatic Aortic
           Transection And In The Planning And Follow Up Of Thoracic Endovascular
           Aortic Repair (TEVAR).
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Mark C. Murphy, Alexandra Murphy, Leo Lawler, Umer Salati, John Murray
       
  • Increased Pericoronary Adipose Tissue Attenuation Is Related To
           Progression Of Coronary Plaque Burden Quantified From Coronary Ct
           Angiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Markus Goeller, Balaji Tamarappoo, Alan Kwan, Sebastian Cadet, Frederic Commandeur, Aryabod Razipour, Piotr Slomka, Heidi Gransar, Xi Chen, Jane Cao, Moritz Albrecht, Daniel Bittner, Mohamed Marwan, Daniel Berman, Stephan Achenbach, Damini Dey
       
  • Particle Analysis of ex vivo Calcified Atherosclerotic Lesions: Does the
           Agatston Score Measure Up'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rachel M. Cahalane, Stephen P. Broderick, Michael T. Walsh, Julie M. O'Brien
       
  • Radiation Dose On A Novel Generation Purpose Built Single Heart Beat
           Cardiac Ct Scanner(GE CardiographeTm)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Hilary Brownlee, sarah mccausland, irim farooq, kerry filmer, jennifer mcknight
       
  • Single Dose Ivabradine 15mg Is Comparable To Oral Metoprolol 50mg In
           Reducing Heart Rate For Cardiovascular Ct Angiography (ccta)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Mudassar Baig, Hassaan Ahmed, Ammar Nazir, Amir Anwar, Yogesh Raja
       
  • Ge Cardiographe Image Quality Tools: Radiographers' Experience.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Volume 13, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Hilary Brownlee, Irim Farooq, Kerry Filmer, Jennifer McKnight, Sarah Mccausland
       
  • More than an atrial septal defect
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2018Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Ana Raquel Barbosa, Tiago Dias, Nuno Dias Ferreira, Marlene Fonseca, Pedro Braga
       
  • Image diagnosis: An anomalous origin of right pulmonary artery from the
           ascending aorta
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2018Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Haisong Bu, Xueyang Gong
       
  • Estimation of myocardial fibrosis in humans with dual energy CT
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2018Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Vidhya Kumar, Thura T. Harfi, Xin He, Beth McCarthy, Andrea Cardona, Orlando P. Simonetti, Subha V. RamanAbstractBackgroundThe current clinical standard for in vivo imaging of myocardial fibrosis is contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). We sought to validate a novel non-contrast dual energy computed tomography (DECT) method to estimate myocardial fibrosis in patients undergoing CMR with contrast.MethodsAll subjects underwent non-contrast, prospectively-triggered cardiac DECT on a single source scanner with interleaved acquisition between tube voltages of 80 and 140 kVp. Monochromatic images were reconstructed at 11 energies spanning 40–140 keV; a region of interest (ROI) was drawn in the mid-inferoseptal segment, recording mean attenuation value in the ROI, at each energy level. Comparison was made to data from single energy (70 keV) image data. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed to compare the predictive capability of single vs. multi-energy inferoseptal segment CT attenuation on myocardial fibrosis by both visually assessed LGE (absent/present fibrosis) and CMR T1 mapping-derived myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECV).ResultsThe multi-energy CT/LDA approach performed better than a single energy approach to discriminate among LGE-CMR classes of present/absence myocardial fibrosis severity, demonstrating correct classification rates of 89% and 71%, respectively. The multi-energy CT/LDA approach also performed better in correctly discriminating normal from elevated ECV, doing so in 89% of patients vs. correct distinction of normal/elevated ECV in only 70% using the single energy approach.ConclusionsNon-contrast cardiac DECT with multi-energy analysis better classifies myocardial fibrosis and extracellular volume compared to what is feasible with non-contrast single energy cardiac CT. These data support further evaluation of this approach to noninvasively assess myocardial fibrosis.
       
  • Giant coronary artery aneurysm: Cardiac gated CT as optimal exam
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2018Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed TomographyAuthor(s): Daniel Verdini, Sandeep Hedgire, Hugh Auchincloss, Eric Isselbacher, Thoralf Sundt, Brian Ghoshhajra
       
 
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