Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8447 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (212 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (119 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (330 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (230 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (291 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (163 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (120 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (41 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (183 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (135 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (153 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (167 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (98 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2307 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (360 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (206 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (379 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (137 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (164 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (81 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (97 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (272 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (154 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (818 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (191 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (102 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (75 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (79 journals)
    - SURGERY (399 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (152 journals)

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (330 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 330 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal  
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AORTA     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access  
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Cardiology Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Cardiology Review     Full-text available via subscription  
JACC : Basic to Translational Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JACC : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
JACC : Heart Failure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
JMIR Cardio     Open Access  
Jornal Vascular Brasileiro     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Arrhythmia     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Cardiology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.2
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0167-5273 - ISSN (Online) 1874-1754
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Should we predict post-operative atrial fibrillation with atrial
           cardiomyopathy biomarkers'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Charles Guenancia, Audrey Sagnard, Olivier Bouchot, Luc Lorgis
       
  • Health economic evaluation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in
           hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Peter Magnusson, Anders Wimo BackgroundHypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous disease in which an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) effectively prevents sudden cardiac death in at-risk individuals. Nevertheless, the cost-effectiveness of ICDs in this specific patient group has not been evaluated.MethodsA Markov cohort model was constructed to simulate the course of identified adult persons with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with and without an ICD over the course of 12 years based on Swedish disease-specific unit costs. The age distribution was based on empirical data from the nationwide cohort of HCM patients with ICDs (mean age at the time of implant was 51.8 years). The outcomes were costs per saved life and cost per gained quality adjusted life year (QALY).ResultsOf 1000 simulated patients, 402 lives were saved after 12 years with an ICD at a cost of 646,000 Swedish krona (SEK), which corresponds to 57,118 Euro per saved life from the health care sector viewpoint. The cost per gained QALY (the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER)) was 171,000 SEK (15,119 Euro). From a societal viewpoint, including effects on productivity losses, the use of an ICD was absolutely dominant (both cheaper and better, and thus an ICER is of no interest). Both the one-way sensitivity analyses and the probabilistic sensitivity analyses supported the findings in the base option.ConclusionFor identified patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy deemed at high risk of sudden cardiac death, the use of an ICD is extremely cost effective, both in terms of the cost for saved lives and gained QALY.
       
  • Electrocardiographic sex-related differences in patients with atrial
           fibrillation: Do they allow a better risk stratification'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Sotirios Nedios, Dobromir Dobrev
       
  • Transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the balloon-expandable SAPIEN
           3 valve: Impact of calcium score on valve performance and clinical
           outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Leonardo Guimarães, Alfredo Nunes Ferreira-Neto, Marina Urena, Luis Nombela-Franco, Jerome Wintzer-Wehekind, Marie-Helene Levesque, Dominique Himbert, Quentin Fischer, German Armijo, Rafael Vera, Dimitri Kalavrouziotis, Josep Rodés-Cabau BackgroundAortic valve calcification severity has been associated with higher rates of aortic regurgitation (AR) following TAVR, but scarce data exist on its impact with the use of newer generation transcatheter heart valves.MethodsThis was a multicenter study including 626 patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR with the SAPIEN 3 valve. Patients were divided in 2 groups according to the median index calcium score (iCS) for each sex: high CS (HCS, iCS ≥ median), and low iCS (LCS, iCS 75th percentile for each sex). Clinical and echocardiographic data were collected prospectively in a dedicated database.ResultsThe mean CS was 3758 ± 1417 AU and 1616 ± 691 AU in the HCS and LCS groups, respectively (p 
       
  • Microvascular function, diabetes and coronary risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Enrique Gutiérrez
       
  • Body mass index and in-hospital outcomes in patient's ≥80 years with
           ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction. Results from low income country
           without coronary intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Miguel Alejandro Rodríguez-Ramos, Dayani Arteaga-Guerra, Michel Guillermo-Segredo, Leonel Simancas-Broche BackgroundIn most scenarios from low/middle income countries, pharmacological approach for ST elevation Myocardial Infarction is still use. In these setting and increase proportion of elderly patients is awaited. So it is also expected to have older patients with suboptimal treatment and risk stratification.ObjectiveTo investigate the impact of the body mass index (BMI) on in-hospital outcomes in a cohort of elderly (≥80 years) patients, from a center without coronary intervention.MethodsPatient's ≥80 years of age admitted to our institution between June 2014 and May 2019 with STEMI, were divided according BMI tertiles (BMI tertile 1: ≪22.36 kg/m2, BMI tertile2: 22.36–25.71 kg/m2, and BMI tertile 3: ≫25.71 kg/m2). The primary endpoint was all-cause in-hospital mortalityResultsOut of 118 patients, 41 (34.74%) were women. Median age was 84.4 ± 3.5 years and median BMI 24.1 ± 3.7 kg/m2. Women had a higher BMI than men (24.4 ± 4.0 vs 24.0 ± 3.6; p: 0.535). All-cause mortality was 33.3%, 2.5%, and 15% for lower, middle, and higher BMI tertiles (p=0.002). To belong to BMI tertile 1 was associated with an increased all-cause mortality (OR: 5.15, 95% CI 1.84–14.28, p = 0.001); and in patients without administration of streptokinase (OR: 9.52, 95% CI 2.34–38.45, p = 0.001).ConclusionThis study reports association between lower BMI values and increased mortality in elderly patients with and without pharmacological reperfusion with streptokinase.
       
  • Transition protocol from subcutaneous treprostinil to intravenous
           epoprostenol in deteriorating patients with pulmonary arterial
           hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Sophia Anastasia Mouratoglou, Anthoula Patsiala, Christos Feloukidis, Haralambos Karvounis, George Giannakoulas BackgroundDespite advantages in the treatment options of pulmonary arterial hypertension, continuous parenteral prostanoid administration, although often complicated by serious side effects, remains the treatment of choice for patients with advanced disease. The need of transitioning from one parenteral prostanoid agent to the other is often faced in the daily clinical practise. Up to today, there is no established transition protocol from subcutaneous treprostinil to intravenous epoprostenol.MethodsA staggered approach to subcutaneous treprostinil down-titration with simultaneous epoprostenol up-titration is described. Subcutaneous treprostinil is down-titrated by 5 ng/kg/min every 5 h while intravenous epoprostenol is up-titrated by 2 ng/kg/min every 2 h.ResultsThe designed protocol was implemented in 4 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (3 women, median age 70.5 (range 38–79) years). Median starting subcutaneous treprostinil dose was 44.5 (range 37–100) ng/kg/min and median treprostinil down-titration time was 32.5 (range 25–85) hours. The median maximal epoprostenol dose was 36 (range 28–90) ng/kg/min, achieved in 36 (range 30–90) hours. Only mild prostanoid-related side effects were reported.ConclusionsThe proposed staggered transition protocol from subcutaneous treprostinil to intravenous epoprostenol was safe in a limited number of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.
       
  • Corrigendum to “Assessment of myocardial tissue characterization in
           hypertension with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction” [Int. J.
           Cardiol., 297S (2019) 7–8]
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): H.A. Zainal Abidin, H. Zhou, L. Arcari, C. Arendt, E. Nagel, V.O. Puntmann
       
  • Coronary anomalies in tetralogy of Fallot – A meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Claire J. Koppel, Monique R.M. Jongbloed, Philippine Kiès, Mark G. Hazekamp, Bart J.A. Mertens, Martin J. Schalij, Hubert W. Vliegen BackgroundAn anomalous coronary artery is reported in 2% to 23% of patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Knowledge of coronary anatomy prior to corrective surgery is vital to avoid damage to vessels crossing the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). A meta-analysis on the prevalence of anomalous coronary arteries in TOF is lacking to date. Here, an overview of coronary anomalies in TOF is provided and implications for patient management are discussed.MethodsPubMed, Embase and Web of Science were searched. Analysis was done using Revman 5.3 (Cochrane Community, London). The primary analysis focused on the origin and proximal course of the right and left coronary arteries. In addition, the prevalence of large conus arteries and coronary arteriovenous fistulas (CAVF) was calculated.ResultsTwenty-eight studies, encompassing 6956 patients, were included; 6% of TOF patients have an anomalous coronary artery. Hereof, 72% cross the RVOT; the majority of the remaining 28% courses behind the aorta. Six percent of patients have a large conus artery and 4% a CAVF. Other coronary anomalies include a left or right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, an accessory left anterior descending artery, coronary tree hypoplasia and anastomoses between coronary and bronchial arteries.ConclusionsThe prevalence of coronary anomalies in TOF is 4–6%. In patients with an anomalous coronary artery, 72% cross the RVOT. The combined risk of encountering an anomalous coronary artery or a large conus artery crossing the RVOT is 10.3%. Coronary anatomy should be defined before surgery and the surgical approach adapted accordingly.Graphical abstractUnlabelled Image
       
  • Early cardio-renal interactions among apparently healthy individuals
           undergoing coronary CT
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Zach Rozenbaum, Lilian Atlan, Philippe Taieb, Tamar Shalmon, Shlomo Berliner, Yaron Arbel, Galit Aviram BackgroundPreviously we found that cardiac chambers' volumes correlate with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of hospitalized patients. Currently we aimed to demonstrate this relation among apparently healthy individuals.MethodsAmbulatory participants who underwent electrocardiography-gated cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) were included. Subjects with an eGFR90 ml/min/1.73m2. Participants with a low calcium score showed an increase in LAVI only when eGFR was reduced from normal (>90 ml/min/1.73m2) to 70-80 ml/min/1.73m2 (and not to 80-90 ml/min/1.73m2), revealing a percentage increase of 24.7% (95%CI 5.5–47.4%, p = .011).ConclusionsRenal function is closely related to LA volume even in the absence of overt renal failure, demonstrating that minor changes in eGFR instigate an increase in volumes. Risk factors for this interaction should be identified and treated prior to the development of cardio-renal syndrome.
       
  • Temporal changes in left ventricular ejection fraction and their
           prognostic impacts in patients with Stage B heart failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Hajime Aoyanagi, Kotaro Nochioka, Yasuhiko Sakata, Masanobu Miura, Takashi Shiroto, Ruri Abe, Shintaro Kasahara, Masayuki Sato, Takahide Fujihashi, Shinsuke Yamanaka, Hideka Hayashi, Koichiro Sugimura, Jun Takahashi, Satoshi Miyata, Hiroaki Shimokawa, CHART-2 Investigators BackgroundWe have recently demonstrated that left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) dynamically changes over time with prognostic impacts in Stage C/D patients, namely, those who have a current or past history of heart failure (HF). However, it is unknown whether this is also the case in asymptomatic Stage B patients, namely, those who have a risk of HF, but do not have a history of HF.MethodsIn our CHART-2 Study (N = 10,219), we enrolled 4005 Stage B and divided them into 3 groups by LVEF; preserved EF (pEF, LVEF ≥50%, N = 3526), mid-range EF (mrEF, LVEF 41–49%, N = 302), and reduced EF (rEF, LVEF ≤40%, N = 177). We examined the prognostic impacts of LVEF transitions among the 3 groups in comparison with 4477 patients with Stage C/D HF.ResultsStage B were characterized by less severe clinical status and better prognosis compared with Stage C/D. Stage B in mrEF and rEF at baseline dynamically transitioned to other groups at 1-year, whereas those in pEF unchanged; at 1-year, mrEF transitioned to pEF/rEF by 50/16%, and rEF transitioned to pEF/mrEF by 25/31%, respectively, whereas pEF transitioned to mrEF/rEF by only 3.6/0.7%, respectively, which were consistent with findings in findings with Stage C/D. Although LVEF decrease was directly associated with all-cause mortality in both the Stage B and Stage C/D with pEF, factors related to LVEF changes were different between the 2 groups.ConclusionsIn Stage B, LVEF dynamically changes with prognostic impacts as in Stage C/D, whereas different determination factors may be involved in the 2 stages.Clinical trial registration: Chronic Heart Failure Analysis and Registry in the Tohoku District (CHART)-2 (NCT00418041).
       
  • Strain predicts left ventricular functional recovery after acute
           myocardial infarction with systolic dysfunction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Ahmed Ben Driss, Caroline Ben Driss Lepage, Anis Sfaxi, Maher Hakim, Simon Elhadad, Jean Yves Tabet, Ahmed Salhi, Virginie Brandao Carreira, Madjid Hattab, Philippe Meurin, Hélène Weber, Phalla Ou, Jean François Quignodon, Guillaume Jondeau, Jean Pierre Laissy ObjectiveRegional and global longitudinal strain (RLS-GLS) are considered reliable indexes of myocardial viability in chronic ischemic patients and prediction of left ventricular (LV) functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction (MI) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We tested in the present study whether RLS and GLS could also identify transmural extent of myocardial scar and predict LV functional recovery and remodeling in patients with reduced LVEF after acute MI.MethodsEchocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) were performed in 71 patients with reduced LVEF (≤45%) after acute MI treated with acute percutaneous coronary intervention. At 8-month follow-up, echocardiography was repeated to determine global LV functional recovery and remodeling.ResultsRLS was worse in transmural than in non-transmural infarcted segments (−6.6 ± 6.1% vs −10.3 ± 5.9%, p 
       
  • Serpina3 in myocardial infarction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Lei Zhao, Mulei Chen, Xinchun Yang
       
  • Validation of the long-term prognostic capability of the SYNTAX score II
           in patients undergoing biodegradable polymer-based Sirolimus-eluting
           stents: 2-years outcomes from the PANDA III trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Ying Song, Changdong Guan, Xuebin Cao, Lei Qin, Yi Li, Zhanquan Li, Shaoping Nie, Shuang Hou, Min Zhang, Runlin Gao, Jinqing Yuan, Bo Xu, the PANDA III Investigators BackgroundThis study aimed to assess the prognostic ability of SYNTAX (Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery) Score II (SS-II) in LM and/or 3VD patients undergoing biodegradable polymer-based drug-eluting stents (BP-DES) in the multi-central randomized PANDA III trial.MethodsA total of 723 patients in PANDA III population were enrolled in this study. According to SS-II tertiles, patients were stratified as follow: SS-II ≤ 23 (n = 224), 23  31 (n = 244). The predictive ability for 2-year cardiac death were compared between angiographic scores and scores combining both angiographic and clinical variables.ResultsMean anatomic SS was 20.6 ± 9.4, SS-II was 28.7 ± 8.6. During 2-year follow up, cardiac death (0.00% vs. 1.7% vs. 4.3%, p = 0.003) and target lesion failure (5.9% vs. 9.1% vs. 13.6%, p = 0.020) was significantly higher in the upper tertile group than in intermedian and low tertile. At multivariate analysis, SS-II for PCI was an independent risk factor of cardiac death (Hazard ratio: 2.41, 95%CI: 1.47–3.97, p 
       
  • Long-term outcomes after second-generation cryoballoon ablation of
           paroxysmal atrial fibrillation – Feasibility of a single short freeze
           strategy without bonus applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Satoshi Hara, Shinsuke Miyazaki, Hitoshi Hachiya, Takatsugu Kajiyama, Tomonori Watanabe, Hiroaki Nakamura, Hiroshi Tada, Yoshito Iesaka BackgroundA paucity of data exists about long-term outcomes after second-generation cryoballoon ablation (2nd-CBA), and the feasibility of short freeze strategies remains under debate. We assessed the long-term follow-up outcomes.MethodsThis study included 186 paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) patients (62 ± 11 years, 136 men) who underwent 2nd-CBAs with a 28-mm balloon and single 3-min freeze strategy without bonus applications. Fourteen-day consecutive monitoring was performed to detect early AF recurrences (ERAFs).ResultsOverall, 713/736(96.9%) PVs were isolated with CBs. The total number of applications/patient was 5.3 ± 1.5. The total procedure and fluoroscopic times were 79.9 ± 28.1 and 24.4 ± 14.2 min. Asymptomatic right phrenic nerve injury occurred in 11 patients, however, all recovered during the follow-up. A total of 76(41.7%) patients experienced ERAFs. During a median 45.0 [30.0–51.0] month follow-up, the single procedure AF freedom was 76.1, 73.5, 70.5, and 63.7% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively. At a median of 7.0 [4.0–12.0] months after the initial procedure, 35 (18.8%) patients underwent second procedures, and 106/137 (77.4%) PVs were still isolated. The multiple procedure AF freedom was 91.7, 89.3, 86.8, and 81.3% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively. A Cox's proportional hazards model determined that the presence of ERAF was associated with a greater risk of recurrence after the last procedure (Hazard ratio = 2.830; 95% confidence interval = 1.173–6.833; p = 0.021). The percentage of continuation of anticoagulation therapy after the initial procedure was 33.1, 23.5, 21.7, and 21.7% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively.ConclusionsOur long-term follow-up data demonstrated the feasibility of a single short freeze strategy in PAF patients.
       
  • Risk stratification in Brugada syndrome - Significance of ECG and
           depolarization abnormality
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Satoshi Nagase
       
  • Corrigendum to “Patient-specific in vivo right ventricle material
           parameter estimation for patients with tetralogy of fallot using MRI-Based
           models with different zero-load diastole and systole morphologies” [Int.
           J. Cardiol. 276 (2019) 93–99]
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Han Yu, Pedro J. del Nido, Tal Geva, Chun Yang, Alexander Tang, Zheyang Wu, Rahul H. Rathod, Xueying Huang, Kristen L. Billiar, Dalin Tang
       
  • Stroke in pulmonary hypertension: Is it predictable or preventable'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Lingdan Chen, Wenjun He, Fei Liu, Tao Wang
       
  • The association between pulmonary hypertension and stroke: a systematic
           review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Trushil G. Shah, Jaini M. Sutaria, Manav V. Vyas
       
  • Cardiologists – What do they know'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Mark Dayer
       
  • Improving risk prediction in patients undergoing TEVAR for Type B Aortic
           dissection
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Rolf Alexander Jánosi, Tienush Rassaf
       
  • Should the distribution of valve lesion be considered in the autoimmune
           response of rheumatic heart disease'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Yue Zhong, Ying Peng, Li Rao
       
  • MicroRNA-122 in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction:
           Epiphenomenon or causal'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Aldo Bonaventura, Alessandra Vecchié, Sarah Costantino, Francesco Paneni
       
  • Resident inflammatory cells in the myocardium of children: On the way to
           set histologic reference standards to differentiate normal myocardium from
           myocarditis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Enrico Ammirati, Juan Pablo Kaski
       
  • Lead extraction in non-cardiac surgery centers: Easier said than done
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Ruben Casado Arroyo, Shingo Maeda, Juan Pablo Abugattas, Alejandro Jimenez Restrepo
       
  • Is it possible to predict and prevent sudden cardiac death as a first
           manifestation of cardiac disease'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Heikki V. Huikuri, M. Juhani Junttila
       
  • Cardiac autonomic nerve system and epicardial fat in atrial fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Lei Zhao, Paul A. Gould, Arnold C.T. Ng, William Y.S. Wang
       
  • Liver-specific microRNA-122 as prognostic biomarker in patients with
           chronic systolic heart failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Stefan Stojkovic, Lorenz Koller, Patrick Sulzgruber, Martin Hülsmann, Kurt Huber, Manuel Mayr, Christian Hengstenberg, Johann Wojta, Alexander Niessner BackgroundCirculating microRNAs (miRs) have been proposed as potential diagnostic biomarkers in heart failure. Studies investigating the prognostic value of circulating miRs in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HFrEF) are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of circulating miRs in patients with HFrEF.Methods and resultsA pathway-focused microRNA array was performed in derivation case-control cohort of 40 patients with HFrEF who died during the follow-up (cases) and 36 survivors (controls). MicroRNA expression profiling revealed significant differential expression of miR-122, miR-126 and miR-423 between cases and controls. In a validation cohort, circulating levels of these 3 miRs were assessed using qPCR in 234 patients with HFrEF. Primary study endpoints were all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. During a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, 76 patients (32.5%) died. Only miR-122 and miR-423 were independent predictors of the primary endpoint with respective hazard ratios per increase of one standard deviation (HR per 1-SD) of 1.14 (95% CI: 1.02–1.29, p = 0.021) and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.09–1.41, p = 0.001). Adding miR-122 to multivariable model including clinical risk factors and NT-proBNP improved net reclassification index (NRI) by 40.4% (p = 0.004), whereas miR-423 improved NRI by 35.3% (p = 0.012). Adding miR-122, but not miR-423, to the same model improved Harrell's C index from 0.78 (95% CI: 0.73–0.83) to 0.81 (95% CI: 0.76–0.86, p = 0.030).ConclusionCirculating miR-122 as a biomarker is predicting all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and improved risk stratification of HFrEF patients. Thus, miR-122 might be a new biomarker for risk assessment in HFrEF.Graphical abstractUnlabelled Image
       
  • Catheter ablation or surgery to eliminate longstanding persistent atrial
           fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Rajan L. Shah, Junaid A.B. Zaman, Sanjiv M. Narayan
       
  • Are cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and epicardial adipose tissue
           associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation in
           patients without heart failure'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Masato Kawasaki, Takahisa Yamada, Yoshio Furukawa, Takashi Morita, Shunsuke Tamaki, Hirota Kida, Yasushi Sakata, Masatake Fukunami BackgroundCardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) are known to be major determinants in the progression of atrial fibrillation (AF).ObjectiveThe aim was to investigate the relationship between the combination of CSNA and EAT, and AF recurrence (AFR) following 3 months after the index catheter ablation (CA) in patients without heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsSixty-four paroxysmal AF patients without HF were studied. Cardiac metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy was performed at baseline and 3 months post-ablation. In MIBG imaging, the MIBG washout rate (WR) was calculated. The volumes of the total EAT and periatrial EAT surrounding the left atrium were measured by computed tomography before CA, and the periatrial to total EAT volume ratio (P/T) was obtained. During the follow-up period of 11 ± 4 months, AFR was observed in 14 patients. The WR change from baseline to 3 months after CA (dWR) and P/T were significantly greater in patients with than without AFR. Greater dWR and P/T determined by ROC curve analysis were independently associated with AFR. Patients with both greater dWR (≥6.9%) and P/T (≥17.1%) had a higher risk of AFR than those with either and none of them. Periatrial EAT volume showed a significant correlation with the baseline WR.ConclusionsThe combination of dWR and P/T was associated with AFR in patients without HF. Thus, both of CSNA and EAT might be related to development of AF.
       
  • First paediatric cohort for the evaluation of inflammation in
           endomyocardial biopsies derived from congenital heart surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Franziska Degener, Aida Salameh, Tatiana Manuylova, Thomas Pickardt, Martin Kostelka, Ingo Daehnert, Felix Berger, Daniel Messroghli, Stephan Schubert, Karin Klingel BackgroundEndomyocardial biopsies (EMB) are the gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis in children and adults. The existing WHO/ISFC criteria for lymphocytic cell infiltrates by are based on the myocardium of adults. The aim of this study was to present a paediatric control cohort for the evaluation of inflammation in EMB of children.MethodsIn this study endomyocardial tissue from 62 children under 4 years of age was investigated, being collected during a planned open heart surgery with routine resection from ventricular site. Patients had no history of infection or myocardial inflammation. The heart tissue was formalin fixed and embedded in paraffin. Four μm thick tissue sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome, and Giemsa. Immunohistochemical stainings included quantitative evaluation of CD3+ T cells, CD20+ B cells, CD68+ macrophages and MHCII expression.ResultsThe myocardium was obtained in 96.8% (n = 60) of the cases from the right and in 3.2% (n = 2) from the left ventricle. The median age (interquartile range) at biopsy was 0.5 years (0.3–0.9), 66.1% male. Within this cohort, a median of 2.5/mm2 (1.0–4.0) CD3+ T cells, 0.5/mm2 (0.0–0.6) CD20+ B cells and 4.0/mm2 (2.5–6.0) CD68+ macrophages were detected. The MHC II grade was 0 in 71.0% (n = 44) and 1 in 29.0% (n = 18).ConclusionThis is the first paediatric control cohort being relevant for the correct interpretation of inflammatory heart diseases in EMB. The lymphocytic cell numbers in children needing congenital heart surgery without myocardial inflammation are below the existing values in adults.
       
  • Serial cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking indicates early
           worsening of cardiac function in Fontan patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Sophie L. Meyer, Floris-Jan S. Ridderbos, Djoeke Wolff, Graziella Eshuis, Joost P. van Melle, Tjark Ebels, Rolf M.F. Berger, Tineke P. Willems BackgroundIn Fontan patients, attrition of ventricular function is well recognized, but early detection of ventricular dysfunction is difficult. The aim of this study is to longitudinally assess ventricular strain in Fontan patients using a new method for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) feature tracking, and to investigate the relationship between ventricular strain and cardiac systolic function.Methods and resultsIn this prospective, standardized follow-up study in 51 Fontan patients, age ≥ 10 years, CMR and concomitant clinical assessment was done at the start of the study and after 2 years. CMR feature tracking was done combining the dominant and hypoplastic ventricles. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) (−17.3% versus −15.9%, P = 0.041) and global circumferential strain (GCS) (−17.7 versus −16.1, P = 0.047) decreased over 2 years' time. Ejection fraction (EF) (57%), cardiac index (CI) (2.7 l/min/m2) and NYHA functional class (97% in class I/II) were preserved. The strain values of the combined dominant and hypoplastic ventricles were significantly worse compared to those of the dominant ventricle only (GLS −16.8 (−19.5 to −14.0) versus −18.8 (−21.3 to −15.3) respectively, P = 0.001, GCS −18.3 (−22.1 to −14.8) versus −22.5 (−26.3 to −19.4) respectively, P 
       
  • Worsening of mitral regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve
           replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Teruhiko Imamura
       
  • Orbital atherectomy versus rotational atherectomy: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Sunny Goel, Ravi Teja Pasam, Srilekha Chava, Joseph Gotesman, Abhishek Sharma, Bilal Ahmad Malik, Robert Frankel, Jacob Shani, Umesh Gidwani, Azeem Latib BackgroundCoronary artery calcification is associated with poor outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Atheroablative techniques such as orbital atherectomy (OA) and rotational atherectomy (RA) are routinely utilized to treat these calcified lesions in order to optimize lesion preparation and facilitate stent delivery.ObjectivesThe purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to compare the performance of OA versus RA in patients with calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing PCI.MethodsWe conducted an electronic database search of all published data for studies that compared OA versus RA in patients with calcified coronary artery disease undergoing PCI and reported on outcomes of interest. Event rates were compared using a forest plot of odds ratios using a random-effects model assuming interstudy heterogeneity.ResultsA total of five observational studies (total number of patients = 1872; OA = 535, RA = 1337) were included in the final analysis. On pooled analysis, OA compared to RA was associated with a significant reduction in fluoroscopy times (OR = −6.33; 95% CI = −9.90 to −2.76; p 
       
  • Assessment of area at risk and infarct size in acute STEMI: How much
           information does the ECG really provide'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Martin Reindl, Bernhard Metzler, Sebastian J. Reinstadler
       
  • Validation of contemporary electrocardiographic indices of area at risk
           and infarct size in acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Yang Timothy Du, Sivabaskari Pasupathy, Tracy Air, Christopher Neil, John F. Beltrame BackgroundElectrocardiographic (ECG) methods to assess area at risk (AAR) and infarct size (IS) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have been previously established but not validated against contemporary benchmark Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) measures. We compared ECG-determined and CMR-determined measures for (a) AAR, (b) IS, and (c) myocardial salvage.MethodsSixty patients with ECG evidence of STEMI and CMR imaging performed within 13 days were included. The ECG-determined (a) AAR scores (Aldrich and Wilkins), (b) IS (Selvester score), and (c) myocardial salvage (i.e. [AAR-IS] / AAR × 100%), were compared with CMR-determined measures.ResultsCompared with CMR-determined AAR, both the Wilkins & Aldrich scores underestimated AAR, although the Wilkins (r = 0.72, p 
       
  • Corrigendum to “Age and thyroid hormone replacement delays the recovery
           from amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism” [Int. J. Cardiol. 202 (2016)
           561–563]
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 303Author(s): Jen-Hung Huang, Yung-Kuo Lin, Ming-Hsiung Hsieh, Wan-Chun Chiu, Yi-Jen Chen
       
  • National prevalence, trends and outcomes of takotsubo syndrome in
           hospitalizations with prior history of mediastinal/intrathoracic cancer
           and radiation therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Rupak Desai, Aakash Desai, Shabber A. Abbas, Upenkumar Patel, Snehal Bansod, Nanush Damarlapally, Rajkumar Doshi, Sejal Savani, Kishorbhai Gangani, Rajesh Sachdeva, Gautam Kumar BackgroundRadiation therapy (RT) for cancers in thoracic/mediastinal region has been linked with heart damage following years of radiation exposure. However, prevalence of takotsubo syndrome (TTS) in patients with prior intrathoracic/mediastinal malignancies treated with RT has never been analyzed on a large scale.MethodsWe identified adult hospitalizations with prior mediastinal/intrathoracic cancer and RT and TTS using ICD-9 CM codes and the National Inpatient Sample (2007–2014) after excluding current admissions for chemotherapy. We then assessed the prevalence, odds, trends and in-hospital outcomes of TTS-related admissions in patients with vs. without prior intrathoracic cancer and RT.ResultsWe identified a total of 5,991,314 hospitalizations with prior intrathoracic/mediastinal malignancies and RT (~73 yrs., 85.2% female), of which 7663 (0.13%, 128 per 100,000) were diagnosed with TTS (~74 yrs., 95.8% females, 88.1% white). Higher odds and rising trends in TTS per 100,000 hospitalizations (from 31 to 241) were seen among patients with prior intrathoracic malignancies and RT as compared to those without (from 19 to 104) (ptrend 
       
  • Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and contrast-induced acute kidney
           injury: A new chapter of the cardio-renal saga
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Lorenzo Azzalini
       
  • Left atrial appendage mechanical dispersion provides incremental value for
           thromboembolic risk stratification over CHA2DS2-VASc Score in nonvalvular
           atrial fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Yankai Mao, Mingming Ma, Yuan Yang, Chan Yu, Yunhe Wang, Ruhong Jiang, Chenyang Jiang BackgroundLeft atrial appendage (LAA) dysfunction is associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events. However, little is known about LAA mechanical dispersion (MD) would provide additional information toward thromboembolism over the CHA2DS2-VASc score. The aim of this study was to determine the association of LAA mechanics as assessed by speckle-tracking imaging with thromboembolic events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fbrillation (AF).MethodsA total of 116 consecutive patients with AF referred for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) were prospectively enrolled. Of these, 17(14.6%) patients had prior embolic events. Using speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE), we measured the LAA strain in each of 24 segments in mid-esophageal TEE views obtained at 0°, 45°, 90° and 135°. LAA MD was defined as the standard deviation (SD) of time to peak positive strain corrected by the R-R interval.ResultsPatients with embolism had lower LAA global longitudinal strain (GLS) (8.56 ± 2.62% vs 11.40 ± 5.56%, p = 0.043) and higher LAA MD (16.90 ± 6.67% vs 12.11 ± 3.96%; P = 0.001) than those without embolism. LAA MD>13.1% differentiated patients with embolism from controls, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.709(p = 0.004). LAA MD was independently associated with the presence of thromboembolism in multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–1.42; P = 0.002). The model based on CHA2DS2-VASc score for discrimination of patients with embolism was significantly improved by adding LAA MD (P 
       
  • Is risk stratification with the Larissa Heart Failure Risk Score useful in
           Japanese acute heart failure patients'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Kyeong-Hyeon Chun, Seok-Min Kang
       
  • The extent and location of late gadolinium enhancement predict
           defibrillator shock and cardiac mortality in patients with non-ischaemic
           dilated cardiomyopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Andrea Barison, Alberto Aimo, Gianluca Mirizzi, Vincenzo Castiglione, Andrea Ripoli, Luca Panchetti, Andrea Rossi, Alberto Giannoni, Umberto Startari, Giovanni Donato Aquaro, Michele Emdin, Marcello Piacenti BackgroundIn non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM), it is uncertain which late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) pattern, extent and location predict ventricular arrhythmias.MethodsWe analysed 183 NIDCM patients (73% men, median age 66 years) receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for primary prevention, undergoing cardiac magnetic resonance within 1 month before implantation. The primary endpoint was appropriate ICD shock, the secondary endpoint was a composite of appropriate ICD shock and cardiac death.ResultsLGE was found in 116 patients (63%), accounting for 9% of LV mass (5–13%). Over a 30-month follow-up (10–65), 20 patients (11%) experienced the primary and 30 patients (16%) the secondary endpoint. LGE presence, inferior wall LGE, diffuse (≥2 wall) LGE, the number of segments with LGE, the number of segments with 50–75% transmural LGE, and percent LGE mass were univariate predictors of both endpoints. Also septal LGE predicted the primary, and lateral LGE predicted the secondary endpoint. LGE limited to right ventricular insertion points did not predict any endpoint.Percent LGE mass had an area under the curve of 0.734 for the primary endpoint, with 13% as the best cut-off (55% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 32% PPV, 94% NPV), conferring a 7-fold higher risk compared to patients with no LGE or LGE
       
  • Risk of sudden cardiac death in New York Heart Association class I
           patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: A competing risk analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Davide Stolfo, Stefano Albani, Gianluigi Savarese, Giulia Barbati, Federica Ramani, Marta Gigli, Federico Biondi, Matteo Dal Ferro, Massimo Zecchin, Marco Merlo, Gianfranco Sinagra AimsPrimary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is not generally recommended in New York Heart Association (NYHA) I class patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study sought to assess the competing risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in DCM patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% and NYHA I class.MethodsA total of 272 DCM patients with EF ≤35% and NYHA class I–III after ≥3 months of guideline-directed medical therapy were included. The risk of SCD and SCD/malignant ventricular arrhythmias (MVA) was assessed in NYHA I vs. NYHA II and NYHA III groups by competing risk analysis.ResultsNYHA I patients were younger, had higher EF and smaller left atrium, were less likely receiving mineral corticoid receptor antagonists. The cumulative incidence of SCD (p = 0.92) and SCD/MVA (p = 0.42) did not differ between NYHA I vs NYHA II–III classes. NYHA class did not influence the association between ICD and SCD risk (p for interaction = 0.125).ConclusionsIn this cohort of DCMs, patients with EF ≤35% and NYHA I class were exposed to a risk of SCD and life-threatening arrhythmias not different from NYHA II–III. Therefore, inclusion of asymptomatic patients with DCM and systolic dysfunction should be strongly considered in future randomized studies on primary prevention ICD.
       
  • Innovators in atherosclerosis research: A historical review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): L. Maximilian Buja This review presents a retrospective analysis of the significance of the contributions of pathologists and kindred investigators in the latter half of the twentieth century to the advancement of understanding of atherosclerosis, a major disease and affliction of humankind. These outstanding investigators contributed importantly to the development of a large body of evidence encompassing population-based autopsy studies, experimental animal studies and cell biological investigations that, coupled with insights from epidemiological studies, serve as the underpinning for the current dominant response to injury theory of atherogenesis. Their collective contributions have been highly meritorious and will remain seminally important into the future.
       
  • Effect of ranolazine on symptom and quality of life in patients with
           angina in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease: A case
           control study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2020Source: International Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Vedant S. Pargaonkar, Jennifer A. Tremmel, Ingela Schnittger, Abha Khandelwal BackgroundMore than 20% of patients presenting to the catheterization lab have no significant obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) despite having angina. Several occult coronary abnormalities, including endothelial dysfunction, microvascular dysfunction (MVD), and/or a myocardial bridge (MB), may explain their symptoms. We studied the effect of ranolazine on symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in these patients.MethodsWe retrospectively studied 53 patients prescribed with ranolazine, matched on sex and age, with 106 patients on standard of care who underwent comprehensive invasive testing. Endothelial dysfunction was defined as a decrease in luminal diameter of>20% after intracoronary acetylcholine, MVD as an index of microvascular resistance ≥25, and a MB as an echolucent half-moon sign and/or ≥10% systolic compression on intravascular ultrasound. A Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) and SF-12 questionnaire were completed at baseline and follow-up.ResultsMedian follow-up was 1.9 (1.7–2.2) years. Endothelial dysfunction was present in 109 (69%), MVD in 36 (23%), and an MB in 86 (54%). Both groups had significant improvement in all dimensions of the SF-12 and SAQ with the exception of treatment satisfaction. We found no significant difference in change in SAQ and SF-12 scores between the groups, although the ranolazine group had significantly lower baseline SAQ scores.ConclusionIn patients with angina and no obstructive CAD, ranolazine is no different than standard of care in symptomatic and QOL improvement. Further randomized trials are warrented to confirm our findings and identify novel medical therapies in this patient population.
       
  • Ventricular conduction delay as marker of risk in Brugada Syndrome.
           Results from the analysis of clinical and electrocardiographic features of
           a large cohort of patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Carla Giustetto, Giulia Nangeroni, Natascia Cerrato, Boris Rudic, Erol Tülümen, Elena Gribaudo, Daniela Francesca Giachino, Lorella Barbonaglia, Lorenza Michela Biava, Paula Carvalho, Laura Bergamasco, Martin Borggrefe, Fiorenzo Gaita BackgroundBrugada Syndrome is a genetic arrhythmogenic disease with a variable clinical spectrum. The role of clinical and ECG parameters in the risk stratification is still uncertain.AimsIn a large cohort of Brugada patients we analysed clinical and ECG features to determine the variables with prognostic value for the occurrence of a first documented arrhythmic event and for recurrences.MethodsWe enrolled 614 patients, subdivided into 3 groups according to their clinical presentation: 531 (88%) asymptomatic, 69 (10%) with previous unexplained syncope and 14 (2%) with aborted sudden death. We also compared the ECG characteristics of patients with a single documented arrhythmic event (either at presentation or at follow-up, 17 patients), with those of patients with arrhythmic recurrences (13 patients).ResultsThe event rate was 1.3% in the asymptomatic patients and 15% among patients with unexplained syncope (median follow-up 6 years), p 
       
  • Renal dysfunction as intrahospital prognostic indicator in acute pulmonary
           embolism
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Sonja Salinger-Martinovic, Zorica Dimitrijevic, Dragana Stanojevic, Stefan Momčilović, Tomislav Kostic, Goran Koracevic, Bojana Subotic, Boris Dzudovic, Branislav Stefanovic, Jovan Matijasevic, Milica Miric, Natasa Markovic-Nikolic, Maja Nikolic, Vladimir Miloradovic, Ljiljana Kos, Tamara Kovacevic-Preradovic, Ilija Srdanovic, Jelena Stanojevic, Slobodan Obradovic BackgroundAcute pulmonary embolism (PE), due to hemodynamic disturbances, may lead to multi-organ damage, including acute renal dysfunction. The aim of our study was to investigate the predictive role of renal dysfunction at admission regarding the short-term mortality and bleeding risk in hospitalized PE patients.MethodsThe retrospective cohort study included 1330 consecutive patients with PE. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using the serum creatinine value and Cocroft-Gault formula, at hospital admission. Primary outcomes were all-cause mortality and PE-related mortality in the 30 days following admission, as well as major bleeding events.ResultsBased on the estimated GFR, patients were divided into three groups: the first with GFR  60 mL/min. A multivariable analysis showed that GFR at admission was strongly associated with all-cause death, as well as with death due to PE. Patients in the first and second group had a significantly higher risk of 30-day all-cause mortality (HR 7.109, 95% CI 4.243–11.911, p 
       
  • Effect of metabolic syndrome on mean pulmonary arterial pressures in
           patients with acute pulmonary embolism treated with catheter-directed
           thrombolysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Lauren K. Stewart, Daren M. Beam, Thomas Casciani, Scott J. Cameron, Jeffrey A. Kline BackgroundMetabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with a procoagulant and hypofibrinolytic state. Current data exploring the role of MetS in venous thromboembolism (VTE) are limited. The objective was to measure the prevalence of MetS in patients with acute PE receiving catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) and to investigate its effect on mean pulmonary arterial pressure and overall treatment success.MethodsWe used a 3-year prospective registry of ED patients with acute PE with severity qualifying for activation of a PE response team (PERT). All patients had CDT with catheter-measured mPAP and angiography. The presence or absence of MetS components were extracted from chart review based on the following criteria: 1. body mass index (BMI)> 30 kg/m2; 2. diagnosed hypertension; 3. diabetes mellitus (including HbA1c> 6.5%) and; 4. dyslipidemia (including triglycerides> 150 mg/dL or high-density lipoprotein
       
  • To reply the letter by Zhong et al. entitled “Should the distribution of
           valve lesion be considered in the autoimmune response of rheumatic heart
           disease'”
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Maria Carmo P. Nunes, Adriana C. Diamantino Soares, Lívia S. Araújo Passos, Walderez O. Dutra
       
  • Unrevealing Takotsubo Syndrome: Appraising what has emerged from the
           International Journal of Cardiology contributions in 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Francesco Pelliccia, Paolo G. Camici
       
  • RNA sequencing-based transcriptome profiling of cardiac tissue implicates
           novel putative disease mechanisms in FLNC-associated arrhythmogenic
           cardiomyopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Charlotte L. Hall, Priyatansh Gurha, Maria Sabater-Molina, Angeliki Asimaki, Marta Futema, Ruth C. Lovering, Mari Paz Suárez, Beatriz Aguilera, Pilar Molina, Esther Zorio, Cristian Coarfa, Matthew J. Robertson, Sirisha M. Cheedipudi, Keat-eng Ng, Paul Delaney, Juan Pedro Hernández, Francisco Pastor, Juan R. Gimeno, William J. McKenna, Ali J. Marian Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) encompasses a group of inherited cardiomyopathies including arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) whose molecular disease mechanism is associated with dysregulation of the canonical WNT signalling pathway. Recent evidence indicates that ARVC and ACM caused by pathogenic variants in the FLNC gene encoding filamin C, a major cardiac structural protein, may have different molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis. We sought to identify dysregulated biological pathways in FLNC-associated ACM.RNA was extracted from seven paraffin-embedded left ventricular tissue samples from deceased ACM patients carrying FLNC variants and sequenced.Transcript levels of 623 genes were upregulated and 486 genes were reduced in ACM in comparison to control samples. The cell adhesion pathway and ILK signalling were among the prominent dysregulated pathways in ACM. Consistent with these findings, transcript levels of cell adhesion genes JAM2, NEO1, VCAM1 and PTPRC were upregulated in ACM samples. Moreover, several actin-associated genes, including FLNC, VCL, PARVB and MYL7, were suppressed, suggesting dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of the transcriptome for dysregulated biological pathways predicted activation of inflammation and apoptosis and suppression of oxidative phosphorylation and MTORC1 signalling in ACM.Our data suggests dysregulated cell adhesion and ILK signalling as novel putative pathogenic mechanisms of ACM caused by FLNC variants which are distinct from the postulated disease mechanism of classic ARVC caused by desmosomal gene mutations. This knowledge could help in the design of future gene therapy strategies which would target specific components of these pathways and potentially lead to novel treatments for ACM.Graphical abstractDesign, methodology and main findings: analysis of transcriptome profiles of cardiac tissue from deceased ACM patients with FLNC variants.Unlabelled Image
       
  • Multiple genetic variants in adolescent patients with left ventricular
           noncompaction cardiomyopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Shenghua Liu, Yuanyuan Xie, Hongliang Zhang, Zongqi Feng, Jian Huang, Jie Huang, Shengshou Hu, Yingjie Wei BackgroundLeft ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is a primary cardiomyopathy with an unclear aetiology. The clinical symptoms range from asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This study aimed to characterize the genetic features and clinical outcomes of LVNC who underwent heart transplantation (HTx) to reveal the potential genetic pathogenesis.Methods and resultsWe recruited 16 cases who underwent HTx in our hospital. Exome-sequencing was performed to reveal genetic background. Clinical information and histopathology features of patients were investigated. Gene expression profiling of tissue fibrosis were evaluated by quantitative PCR. The median age of patients was 21 years. Of the 16 patients, 14 harboured multiple gene variants involved in LVNC. Ten of the patients harboured biallelic variants and/or truncating variants. Young patients (
       
  • Maternal administration of tadalafil improves fetal ventricular systolic
           function in a Hey2 knockout mouse model of fetal heart failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Takekazu Miyoshi, Takashi Hisamitsu, Hatsue Ishibashi-Ueda, Kenji Ikemura, Tomoaki Ikeda, Mikiya Miyazato, Kenji Kangawa, Yusuke Watanabe, Osamu Nakagawa, Hiroshi Hosoda BackgroundThere is no established transplacental treatment for heart failure (HF) in utero, and no animal models or experimental systems of fetal HF have been established. This study aimed to investigate the effect of maternal tadalafil administration on fetal cardiovascular function and uteroplacental circulation in a murine model of fetal HF.Methods and resultsWe first used an ultra-high-frequency ultrasound imaging system in utero and demonstrated that Hey2−/− embryos had worsening right ventricular hypoplasia and marked left ventricular (LV) dilatation as gestation progressed. In both ventricles, fractional shortening (FS) and the E/A ratio were significantly lower in Hey2−/− embryos than in wild-type embryos, indicating that the embryos can be used as a murine model of fetal HF. Subsequently, we evaluated the effect of tadalafil treatment (0.04 or 0.08 mg/ml; T0.04 or T0.08 groups, respectively) on fetoplacental circulation in Hey2−/− embryos. LV FS was significantly higher in the T0.04 group than in control (P 
       
  • Smart device-based detection of atrial fibrillation: Opportunities and
           challenges in the emerging world of digital health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Dobromir Dobrev, Tatjana S. Potpara
       
  • Effect of atrial pacing on post-operative atrial fibrillation following
           coronary artery bypass grafting: Pairwise and network meta-analyses
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Yongle Ruan, N. Bryce Robinson, Ajita Naik, Manuela Silva, Irbaz Hameed, Mohamed Rahouma, Christian Oakley, Antonino Di Franco, Vipin Zamvar, Leonard N. Girardi, Mario Gaudino BackgroundTo determine the effect of atrial pacing on the rate of post-operative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following coronary artery bypass grafting.MethodsAfter a systematic literature search, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing any combination of no pacing (NP), bi-atrial (BiA) pacing, left-atrial (LA) pacing and right-atrial (RA) pacing were included. Pairwise and network meta-analyses were performed using the generic inverse variance method. The primary outcome was POAF incidence. Secondary outcomes were postoperative bleeding, infection, and operative mortality. Leave-one-out and meta-regression were done.ResultsFourteen RCTs were included with a total of 1727 patients. Compared with NP, any form of atrial pacing was significantly associated with lower incidence of POAF (odds ratio [OR]: 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35–0.69). BiA pacing was associated with the larger risk reduction (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.20–0.64 vs. 0.59; 95% CI: 0.34–1.02 for LA and 0.64; 95% CI: 0.38–1.07 for RA). Secondary outcomes were similar between the no pacing and pacing groups. On meta-regression, age and the use of continuous monitoring were associated with lower reduction of the incidence of POAF. In the network meta-analysis, BiA pacing ranked the best strategy for the prevention of POAF (OR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.21–0.55).ConclusionsCompared to other pacing modalities, BiA pacing is associated with lower rates of POAF following CABG.
       
  • Double or triple antithrombotic therapy after coronary stenting and atrial
           fibrillation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical
           trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Giuseppe Andò, Francesco Costa AimsDouble or triple antithrombotic therapy (DAT/TAT) including or excluding aspirin in association with oral anticoagulant and P2Y12 inhibitor are currently two available options in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We evaluated efficacy and safety outcomes for DAT vs. TAT.Methods and resultsFour non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC)-based randomized controlled trials comparing DAT vs. TAT with a total of 10,938 patients were pooled. Bleeding events occurred more frequently than ischemic events. DAT as compared to TAT was associated to an increased risk of stent thrombosis (RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.10–2.14; p = 0.03), myocardial infarction (RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.04–1.46; p = 0.03) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01–1.19; p = 0.04) and to a reduced risk of ISTH major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.62–0.93; p = 0.03). A consistent effect was observed in all safety endpoints. Intracranial haemorrhage was numerically reduced by DAT. No difference for all-cause death was observed.ConclusionAntithrombotic treatment in patients with AF undergoing PCI represents a trade-off between ischemia and bleeding. A careful patient selection based on baseline ischemic and bleeding risk may optimize the net clinical balance in this population.
       
  • Prognostic impact of new-onset atrial fibrillation associated with
           worsening heart failure in aging patients with severely decompensated
           acute heart failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Kazutaka Kiuchi, Akihiro Shirakabe, Nobuaki Kobayashi, Hirotake Okazaki, Masato Matsushita, Yusaku Shibata, Hiroki Goda, Shota Shigihara, Kazuhiro Asano, Kenichi Tani, Noritake Hata, Kuniya Asai, Wataru Shimizu BackgroundsThe prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been increasing in aging societies. The prognostic impact of AF associated with worsening heart failure (HF) remains obscure.Methods and resultsWe analyzed 1170 acute heart failure (AHF) patients who required intensive care. Patients were assigned to two groups according to the prevalence of AF: no episode of AF (n = 940) and pre-existing AF (Group-1, n = 230). Patients with no episode of AF (n = 940) were further divided into two groups according to presence of new-onset of AF after admission (Group-2a, n = 258) or not (Group-2b, n = 682). Kaplan-Meier curve analysis showed that prognosis, including all-cause mortality and HF-events within 1000 days, was significantly poorer in the Group-1 compared to the Group-2b. However, a multivariate Cox regression model showed that the Group-1 was not an independent predictor of 1000-day mortality and HF-events. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier curve analysis showed that prognosis, including all-cause mortality and HF-events within 1000 days, was significantly poorer in the Group-2a than in the Group-2b. A multivariate Cox regression model revealed that the Group-2a was an independent predictor of 1000-day mortality (HR: 1.403, 95% CI: 1.018–1.934) and HF-events (HR: 1.352, 95% CI: 1.071–1.708). A multivariate logistic regression model showed that only age (≥75 years old) was independently associated with new-onset of AF after admission (odds ratio: 1.556, 95% CI: 1.130–2.143).ConclusionsNew-onset AF associated with worsening HF increases with age and is independently-associated with adverse outcome in patients with AHF.
       
  • Impact of hemoglobin concentration and platelet count on outcomes of
           patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: A subanalysis of the
           J-RHYTHM Registry
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Eitaro Kodani, Hiroshi Inoue, Hirotsugu Atarashi, Ken Okumura, Takeshi Yamashita, Hideki Origasa, J-RHYTHM Registry Investigators BackgroundTo clarify the influence of hemoglobin concentration and platelet count on adverse outcomes of Japanese patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), a post hoc analysis of the J-RHYTHM Registry was performed.MethodsA consecutive series of outpatients with atrial fibrillation were enrolled from 158 institutions and followed up for 2 years or until an event occurred (thromboembolism, major hemorrhage, or all-cause death). Among 7406 patients with NVAF, 6536 with complete blood count data (69.8 ± 9.9 years, 71.0% men) were divided into 4 groups according to the baseline hemoglobin level (
       
  • The unmeasured burden: Contribution of depression and psychological stress
           to patient-reported outcomes in atrial fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Brittany Gisi, Andrew D. Althouse, Abigail S. Mathier, Alexandra Pusateri, Bruce L. Rollman, Anna LaRosa, Jared W. Magnani IntroductionPatient-reported outcomes are routinely assessed in atrial fibrillation (AF) to evaluate efficacy of treatment and as clinical trial outcomes. The relation of depression to such measures has had limited study in AF.MethodsIn a cohort receiving treatment for AF, we assessed depression with the Patient Health Questionniare-9 (PHQ; 0–4, normal range; 5–9, mild depression; ≥10 moderate depression). We related depression to disease-specific quality of life with the AF Effect on QualiTy of life (AFEQT, range 0–100) and the Global Perceived Stress Scale (GPPS, range 0–24) in multivariable-adjusted models.ResultsIn 260 individuals (age 71.7 ± 10.1, 44.6% women) with AF, 51 (26.1%) had PHQ scores ≥5 and 17 (6.5%) ≥10. AFEQT scores decreased progressively with depression severity (normal range PHQ, 81.4 ± 14.1; mild depression, 65.8 ± 17.1; moderate depression, 50.6 ± 19.3). Individuals without depression had lower GPPS scores (3.0 ± 2.6) than those with mild (4.9 ± 2.5) or moderate (8.9 ± 4.0) depression. In multivariable-adjusted models mild depression was associated with a 12.1-point (95% confidence interval [CI], −17.2 to −6.9) decrease in AFEQT and 1.9-point (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.7) increase in GPSS, while moderate depression a 27.7-point (95% CI, −35.5 to −19.8) decrease in AFEQT and 5.5-point (95% CI, 4.2 to 6.8) increase in GPSS, relative to normal range PHQ. Regression analyses confirmed significant correlations between depression and AFEQT and GPPS scores in multivariable-adjusted models.ConclusionsWe determined that depression is associated with a step-wise, progressively adverse change in patient-centered outcomes in individuals with AF. Our findings suggest the importance of assessing depression in the evaluation of AF.Subject term list: health services, atrial fibrillation, risk factors
       
  • Interactions between metabolism regulator adiponectin and intrinsic
           cardiac autonomic nervous system: A potential treatment target for atrial
           fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Zhen Zhou, Shuyan Li, Xia Sheng, Zhihao Liu, Yanqiu Lai, Menglong Wang, Zhenya Wang, Liping Zhou, Guannan Meng, Hu Chen, Huixin Zhou, Xiaoya Zhou, Hong Jiang BackgroundPrevious studies indicated that inhibiting the cardiac autonomic nervous system (CANS) suppressed atrial fibrillation (AF). Clinical research revealed serum adiponectin (APN) exerted a beneficial influence on sympathetic and vagal tone in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of APN on CANS is unknown. This study aims to investigate whether APN could regulate CANS and suppress rapid atrial pacing (RAP)-induced AF.MethodsEighteen beagles were divided into the control group (saline plus sham RAP, N = 6), the RAP group (saline plus RAP, N = 6) and the APN + RAP group (APN plus RAP, N = 6). APN (10 μg, 0.1 μg/μL) or saline was microinjected into 4 major ganglionated plexi (GP) prior to RAP. Atrial electrophysiological parameters, anterior right GP (ARGP) function, neural activity and GP tissues were detected.ResultsCompared with the control treatment, RAP shortened effective refractory period (ERP) values at all sites and increased cumulative window of vulnerability (ΣWOV), ARGP function and neural activity, whereas APN injection reversed these changes. Mechanistically, APN ameliorated RAP-induced inflammatory response and down-regulated the expression of c-fos protein and nerve growth factor. Moreover, the APN receptors 1 and APN receptors 2 were detected both in neurons and in non-neuronal cells. APN pretreatment activated downstream adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, inhibited nuclear factor-kappa B signaling and promoted macrophage phenotype switching from proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory state.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that administration of APN into GP can suppress RAP-induced AF by regulating the CANS. APN signaling may provide a potential therapeutic target to AF.Graphical abstractSchematic diagram illustrating how adiponectin exerted anti-atrial fibrillation effect. Rapid atrial pacing (RAP) at the left atrial appendage activated the intrinsic cardiac autonomic system, resulted in the atrial ganglionated plexi (GP) remodeling, and increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in GP fat pads. However, Local injection of adiponectin inhibited the GP activity and decreased the atrial fibrillation inducibility via two different pathways. In the direct pathway, adiponectin directly acted on the GP neurons via adiponectin receptors (AdipoRs) and downstream pathway, ameliorated RAP induced neural remodeling. In the indirect pathway, adiponectin switched the macrophages around the GP to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, which further attenuated neuroinflammation in the GP fat pads and decreased GP activity, subsequently decreased atrial fibrillation inducibility.Unlabelled Image
       
  • Regional variation in clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients
           with atrial fibrillation: Findings from the ARISTOTLE trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): M. Cecilia Bahit, Christopher B. Granger, John H. Alexander, Hillary Mulder, Daniel M. Wojdyla, Michael Hanna, Shinya Goto, Denis Xavier, Freek W.A. Verheugt, Fernando Lanas, Ziad Hijazi, Lars Wallentin, Renato D. Lopes BackgroundVariation in patient characteristics and practice patterns may influence outcomes at a regional level.MethodsWe assessed differences in demographics, practice patterns, outcomes, and the effect of apixaban compared with warfarin in ARISTOTLE (n = 18,201) by prespecified regions: North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia Pacific. The primary outcomes were stroke/systemic embolism and major bleeding.ResultsCompared with other regions, patients from Asia Pacific were younger, more women were enrolled in Latin America. Coronary artery disease was more prevalent in Europe and Asia Pacific had the highest rate of prior stroke and renal impairment. Over 50% of patients in North America were taking ≥9 drugs at randomization, compared with 10% in Latin America. North America had the highest rates of temporary study drug discontinuation and procedures. Time in therapeutic range (INR 2.0–3.0) on warfarin was highest in North America and lowest in Asia Pacific. After adjustment and compared with Europe, patients in Asia Pacific had 2-fold higher risk of stroke/systemic embolism and 3-fold higher risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Patients in Latin America had 2-fold increased risk of all-cause death compared with Europe. The benefits of apixaban compared with warfarin were consistent across regions; there was a pronounced reduction in major bleeding in patients from Asia Pacific compared with other regions (p-interaction = 0.03).ConclusionsPatients with AF enrolled in prespecified regions in ARISTOTLE had differences in clinical baseline characteristics and practice patterns. After adjustment, patients in Asia Pacific and Latin America had worse outcomes than patients from other regions. The relative benefits of apixaban compared with warfarin were consistent across regions with an even greater treatment effect in the reduction of bleeding in patients from Asia Pacific.
       
  • One-year all-cause mortality risk among atrial fibrillation patients in
           Middle East with and without diabetes: The Gulf SAFE registry
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Magdalena Domek, Yan-Guang Li, Jakub Gumprecht, Nidal Asaad, Wafa Rashed, Alawi Alsheikh-Ali, Katarzyna Nabrdalik, Janusz Gumprecht, Mohammad Zubaid, Gregory Y.H. Lip BackgroundAtrial fibrillation (AF) poses a great risk of mortality, especially when associated with diabetes mellitus (DM).ObjectivesWe aimed to investigate the rate and risk factors for mortality among AF patients with and without DM in the population from the Middle East where it has never been investigated before.MethodsWe analyzed the Gulf-SAFE registry, involving patients with nonvalvular AF from the Middle East, for one-year all-cause mortality. The predictive capability of the CHA2DS2-VASc score for death was also investigated.ResultsAmong a total of 2043 AF patients 606 had DM. Patients with DM were older and had significantly higher prevalence of multiple comorbidities (p 
       
  • Comment on: Direct oral anticoagulants in adults with congenital heart
           disease – A single centre study
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Özge Turgay Yıldırım, Fatih Aydın, Ayşe Hüseyinoğlu Aydın, Ercan Akşit
       
  • Direct oral anticoagulants in adults with congenital heart disease –
           Role of chronic kidney disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Claudia Pujol, Mara Müssigmann, Peter Ewert, Oktay Tutarel
       
  • Can we avoid the complications of the Fontan operation in those with
           suboptimal anatomy'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Maria Ordonez, Robert Tulloh
       
  • Author's reply to: Worsening of mitral regurgitation following
           transcatheter aortic valve replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Eyal Ben-Assa, Simon Biner, Sammy Elmariah, Shmuel Banai, Ariel Finkelstein, Yan Topilsky
       
  • TAVI Care and Cure, the Rotterdam multidisciplinary program for patients
           undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Design and rationale
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Marjo J.A.G. De Ronde-Tillmans, Jeannette A. Goudzwaard, Nahid El Faquir, Nicolas M. van Mieghem, Francesco U.S. Mattace-Raso, Paul A. Cummins, Mattie J. Lenzen, Peter P.T. de Jaegere BackgroundThe capacity of TAVI-programs and numbers of sites performing TAVI has rapidly increased. This necessitated the initiation of the Rotterdam TAVI Care & Cure Program, aiming to improve patient-centered care during the TAVI pathway.MethodsConsenting patients with severe aortic stenosis and an indication for TAVI will be included. The TAVI Care & Cure program will facilitate prognostic contributions to improve outcomes, patient satisfaction and quality of life in patients with valvular heart disease who are treated with a transcatheter aortic valve implantation in collaboration with the departments of cardiology, cardio-thoracic surgery, anesthesiology and geriatrics.ConclusionWith a single center observational registry, we aim to assess the TAVI patient clinical pathway, focusing on pre, peri and post interventional variables including functional status and HRQoL. We will evaluate the patient's complexity by applying an extended multidisciplinary approach, which includes a systematic application of geriatric assessments of frailty and cognitive function.
       
  • The fallacies of fractional flow reserve
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Andrea Soares, David L. Brown
       
  • Sex-differential effect of frailty on long-term mortality in elderly
           patients after an acute coronary syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Julio Núñez, Patricia Palau, Clara Sastre, Giulio D'Ascoli, Vicente Ruiz, Clara Bonanad, Gema Miñana, Eduardo Núñez, Juan Sanchis BackgroundThe potential sex-differential effect of frailty in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has not been well-evaluated. We sought to examine the sex-differential association between frailty status on long-term mortality in elderly patients with an ACS.Methods and resultsThis is a prospective observational single-center study that included 488 elderly patients (>65 years) hospitalized for ACS who survived the index hospitalization. Multivariate Cox regression was used to determine the association among the exposures (interaction of sex with Fried score and sex with Fried ≥ 3) and all-cause mortality. The mean age of the sample was 78 ± 7 years; 41% were female and the median Fried score was higher in women [3 (2–3) vs. 2 (1–2) points, p 
       
  • Sex and gender-stratified risks of psychological factors for adverse
           clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic heart disease: A systematic
           review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Veerle R. Smaardijk, Angela H.E.M. Maas, Paul Lodder, Willem J. Kop, Paula M.C. Mommersteeg BackgroundPsychological factors are associated with adverse prognosis in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, it is unknown whether these risk factors differ between women and men.MethodsPubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched to identify studies assessing the risk of psychological factors for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in samples with IHD. Psychological factors included anger/hostility, anxiety, depression, psychological distress, social support, Type A behavior pattern, Type D personality, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).ResultsA total of 44 articles (64 separate reports) including 227,647 women and 321,894 men reporting confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) or relative risks (RRs) were included in the primary analysis. Results based on random-effects models showed that the association between psychological factors (all combined) and MACE was stronger in men (n = 321,236; 57 reports; HR = 1.37, 95%CI 1.27–1.48) than in women (n = 226,886; 56 reports; HR = 1.21, 95%CI 1.12–1.30; p = .017). A subset of the studies focusing on women showed significant associations between anger/hostility, depression, and distress with MACE. For men, statistically significant associations were found for anxiety, depression, and distress with MACE.ConclusionsPsychological factors are associated with MACE in samples with IHD in both women and men, with a small, but significant higher risk for men. Because of the limited number of studies on other psychological factors than depression and anxiety and the current major focus on MACE reflecting lesions in the major coronary arteries which is more typical in men than women, more research is needed to better identify sex and gender differences in IHD.
       
  • Early expressed circulating long noncoding RNA CHAST is associated with
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Xuehui Wang, Lei Wang, Zhiyuan Ma, Wanqian Liang, Jianhua Li, Yan Li, Yingying Gui, Sizhi Ai BackgroundThe mortality rate during the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) phase has substantially decreased, but post-AMI cardiac remodeling remains an important factor affecting patient prognosis. Several circulating long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are reportedly involved in the chronic pathological process of cardiac function and remodeling in cardiovascular diseases. However, the potential roles of these circulating lncRNAs as biomarkers of cardiac function and remodeling during early-stage AMI remain unclear.MethodsFifty-three patients with AMI and 90 controls without AMI were consecutively enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters and blood samples at different time points (i.e., 24 h and 3 days) were collected.ResultsCompared with the controls, the circulating levels of cardiac hypertrophy-associated transcript (CHAST) significantly increased in AMI patients, and the CHAST levels obviously decreased at 3 days. In AMI patients, the expression levels of CHAST at 24 h were positively associated with cardiac contractile function and measured as left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular short-axis shortening rate (all P 
       
  • Dietary measures among patients with coronary heart disease in Europe. ESC
           EORP Euroaspire V
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): Pedro Marques-Vidal, Piotr Jankowski, Dirk De Bacquer, Kornelia Kotseva, EUROASPIRE V collaborators ObjectiveAssess the dietary recommendations provided to patients hospitalized for a coronary heart disease (CHD) event.DesignCross-sectional, multicentre observational study (ESC EORP Euroaspire V).Methods8261 participants (25.8% women, 9.3% aged
       
  • Clinical outcomes of patients discharged from the Rapid Access Chest Pain
           Clinic with non-anginal chest pain: A retrospective cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 March 2020Source: International Journal of Cardiology, Volume 302Author(s): T.A. Kite, H. Gaunt, A.S. Banning, E. Roberts, J. Kovac, I. Hudson, A.H. Gershlick BackgroundThe Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic (RACPC) has become an important means of assessing patients who present with ischaemic or ischaemia-like symptoms of recent onset. Observations have shown that up to 70% are discharged with a diagnosis of non-anginal chest pain (NACP) and accordingly “reassured”. This study aims to describe the actual clinical outcomes of this cohort of patients discharged from the RACPC.MethodsWe undertook a single centre retrospective cohort study at a tertiary cardiac hospital. The outcomes of unselected patients diagnosed with NACP and discharged from the RACPC between April 2010 and March 2013 at University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) were recorded. Re-referrals to cardiology outpatient clinic and emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease within 6 months, and the mortality rate at 12 months, were determined.Results7066 patients were seen in the UHL RACPC during the 36-month period. 3253 (46.0%) were diagnosed with NACP and discharged. 7 (0.2%) were diagnosed with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 8 (0.25%) cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) identified during the review period. 11 (0.3%) patients died within 12 months of discharge from RACPC. No deaths were attributable to CAD.ConclusionsComprehensive assessment using risk-stratification criteria in a nurse practitioner-led RACPC can accurately identify patients who are at low-risk for subsequent CAD. Despite contemporary National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines that shift focus away from a clinical judgement based approach, this strategy appears to robustly predict favourable outcomes in patients diagnosed with NACP.
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.226.244.70
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-