Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8665 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (218 journals)
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    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (338 journals)
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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (338 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 338 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal  
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AORTA     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiac Failure Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 103)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Cardiology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access  
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Cardiology Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Cardiology Review     Open Access  
JACC : Basic to Translational Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JACC : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
JACC : Heart Failure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.037
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 6  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 5 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2047-4873 - ISSN (Online) 2047-4881
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1089 journals]
  • Editor’s presentation: ‘Les liaisones dangerouses. The heart in the
           time of COVID-19’
    • Authors: Massimo F Piepoli
      Pages: 1011 - 1013
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Volume 27, Issue 10, Page 1011-1013, July 2020.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-25T12:00:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320936413
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Exercise prescription in cardiac rehabilitation needs to be more accurate
    • Authors: Wei-guang Li, Zheng Huang, Xin-an Zhang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-07-01T05:07:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320936021
       
  • Temporal trends and predictors of inhospital death in patients
           hospitalised for heart failure in Germany
    • Authors: Karsten Keller, Lukas Hobohm, Mir A Ostad, Sebastian Göbel, Mareike Lankeit, Stavros Konstantinides, Thomas Münzel, Philip Wenzel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsWe investigated trends in incidence, case fatality rate, patient characteristics and adverse inhospital events of patients hospitalised for heart failure in Germany.Methods and resultsThe German nationwide inpatient sample (2005–2016) was used for this analysis. Patients hospitalised due to heart failure were selected for analysis. Temporal trends in the incidence of hospitalisations, case fatality rate and treatments were analysed and predictors of inhospital death were identified. The analysis comprised a total number of 4,539,140 hospitalisations (52.0% women, 81.0% aged ≥70 years) due to heart failure. Although hospitalisations increased from 381 (2005) to 539 per 100,000 population (2016) (β estimate 0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06 to 0.07, P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-07-01T05:07:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320936020
       
  • Recommendations for participation in leisure-time physical activity and
           competitive sports in patients with arrhythmias and potentially
           arrhythmogenic conditions: Part 1: Supraventricular arrhythmias. A
           position statement of the Section of Sports Cardiology and Exercise from
           the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC) and the European
           Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), both associations of the European Society
           of Cardiology
    • Authors: Hein Heidbuchel, Paolo E Adami, Matthias Antz, Frieder Braunschweig, Pietro Delise, Daniel Scherr, Erik E Solberg, Matthias Wilhelm, Antonio Pelliccia
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Symptoms attributable to arrhythmias are frequently encountered in clinical practice. Cardiologists and sport physicians are required to identify high-risk individuals harbouring such conditions and provide appropriate advice regarding participation in regular exercise programmes and competitive sport. The three aspects that need to be considered are: (a) the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias by participating in sports; (b) control of symptoms due to arrhythmias that are not life-threatening but may hamper performance and/or reduce the quality of life; and (c) the impact of sports on the natural progression of the underlying arrhythmogenic condition. In many cases, there is no unequivocal answer to each aspect and therefore an open discussion with the athlete is necessary, in order to reach a balanced decision. In 2006 the Sports Cardiology and Exercise Section of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology published recommendations for participation in leisure-time physical activity and competitive sport in individuals with arrhythmias and potentially arrhythmogenic conditions. More than a decade on, these recommendations are partly obsolete given the evolving knowledge of the diagnosis, management and treatment of these conditions. The present document presents a combined effort by the Sports Cardiology and Exercise Section of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology and the European Heart Rhythm Association to offer a comprehensive overview of the most updated recommendations for practising cardiologists and sport physicians managing athletes with supraventricular arrhythmias, and provides pragmatic advice for safe participation in recreational physical activities, as well as competitive sport at amateur and professional level. A companion text on recommendations in athletes with ventricular arrhythmias, inherited arrhythmogenic conditions, pacemakers and implantable defibrillators is published as Part 2 in Europace.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T10:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925635
       
  • Added sugar intake is associated with pericardial adipose tissue volume
    • Authors: So-Yun Yi, Lyn M Steffen, James G Terry, David R Jacobs, Daniel Duprez, Brian T Steffen, Xia Zhou, James M Shikany, Lisa Harnack, John J Carr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimThe purpose of this study was to determine the relationships of pericardial adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue volume with added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverage intakes. We hypothesized that both added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages were positively associated with pericardial adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue volumes in black and white men and women enrolled in the prospective Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.Methods and resultsDietary intake was assessed by diet history at baseline, year 7 and year 20 examinations in 3070 participants aged 18-30 and generally healthy at baseline. After 25 years follow-up, participants underwent a computed tomography scan of chest and abdomen; the computed tomography scans were read, and pericardial adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes were calculated. Quintiles were created for the average of baseline, year 7 and year 20 added sugar and for the average of sugar-sweetened beverages. General linear regression analysis evaluated the associations of pericardial adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue volumes across quintiles of added sugar and across quintiles of sugar-sweetened beverage intakes adjusted for potential confounding factors. In a multivariable model, pericardial adipose tissue volume was higher across increasing quintiles of added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverage intakes (ptrend = 0.001 and ptrend 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-28T11:05:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931303
       
  • Overweight and obesity: time to reconsider their role in heart failure
    • Authors: Christos A Papanastasiou, George Giannakoulas
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T09:10:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320933738
       
  • Role of cardiorespiratory fitness in cancer development: time for an
           update
    • Authors: Maxime Boidin, Gregory YH Lip, Dick Thijssen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T09:10:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320935228
       
  • Not only the status of body weight and metabolic health matters for
           cardiovascular events, but also the temporal changes
    • Authors: Georgios A Christou
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T09:10:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320937489
       
  • Are heart failure observational studies still useful' ‘No need
           to argue’*
    • Authors: Andrea Salzano, Toru Suzuki, Iain B Squire, Antonio Cittadini
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-25T05:39:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932258
       
  • Echocardiography in the pre-participation evaluation of asymptomatic
           athletes: the never-ending story
    • Authors: Øyunn Kleiven, Thor Edvardsen, Stein Ørn
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-25T05:39:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932269
       
  • Efficacy and safety of bempedoic acid in patients with
           hypercholesterolemia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized
           controlled trials
    • Authors: Lei Dai, Yuyue Zuo, Qiqi You, Hesong Zeng, Shiyi Cao
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimBempedoic acid is a novel oral drug, which has been increasingly researched to play an important role in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia recently. However, results from original studies were inconsistent and inconclusive. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to quantitatively appraise the efficacy and safety of bempedoic acid.MethodsPubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Scopus were searched from inception to 30 January 2020. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the efficacy and safety of bempedoic acid with placebo in patients with hypercholesterolemia. Results from trials were presented as mean differences or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and were pooled by random or fixed effects model. The risk of bias and heterogeneity among trials were also assessed and analyzed.ResultsPooled analysis of 10 eligible trials showed that bempedoic acid treatment resulted in greater lowering of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level than the placebo group (mean difference –23.16%, 95% CI –26.92% to –19.04%). We also found that improvements in lipid parameters and biomarkers were still maintained at weeks 24 and 52 from the long-term trials. As for safety, bempedoic acid did not increase the risk of overall adverse events (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.18). However, the incidence of adverse events leading to discontinuation was higher in the bempedoic acid group (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.82).ConclusionsAvailable evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that bempedoic acid provides a well-tolerated and effective therapeutic option for lipid lowering in patients with hyperlipidemia
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-17T11:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320930585
       
  • Screening for coronary artery calcium in a high-risk population: the
           ROBINSCA trial
    • Authors: Sabine JAM Denissen, Carlijn M van der Aalst, Marleen Vonder, Jan Willem C Gratama, Henk J Adriaansen, Dirkjan Kuijpers, Jeanine E Roeters van Lennep, Rozemarijn Vliegenthart, Pim van der Harst, Richard L Braam, Paul RM van Dijkman, Matthijs Oudkerk, Harry J de Koning
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-17T11:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932263
       
  • Prescribing, dosing and titrating exercise in patients with hypertrophic
           cardiomyopathy for prevention of comorbidities: Ready for prime time
    • Authors: Luna Cavigli, Iacopo Olivotto, Francesco Fattirolli, Nicola Mochi, Silvia Favilli, Sergio Mondillo, Marco Bonifazi, Flavio D’Ascenzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      The benefits of physical activity are well established, leading to both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular benefits, improving quality of life and reducing mortality. Despite such striking body of evidence, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are often discouraged by health professionals to practice physical activity and personalised exercise prescription is an exception rather than the rule. As a result, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients are on average less active and spend significantly less time at work or recreational physical activity than the general population. Exercise restriction derives from the evidence that vigorous exercise may occasionally trigger life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, while participation in competitive sports should be prudentially denied, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients can benefit from the positive effects of regular physical activity, aimed to reduce the risk of comorbidities and improve the quality of life. Based on this rationale, exercise should be prescribed and titrated just like a drug in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients, considering individual characteristics, symptoms, past medical history, objective individual response to exercise, previous training experience and stage of disease. Type, frequency, duration, and intensity should be defined on a personal basis. Yet exercise prescription in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and its long-term effects represent major gaps in our current knowledge and require extensive research. We here review existing evidence regarding benefits and hazards of physical activity, with specific focus on viable modalities for tailored and safe exercise prescription in these patients, highlighting future developments and relevant research targets.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-17T11:15:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320928654
       
  • COVID-19 and risk of pulmonary fibrosis: the importance of planning ahead
    • Authors: Francesco Gentile, Alberto Aimo, Francesco Forfori, Giosuè Catapano, Alberto Clemente, Filippo Cademartiri, Michele Emdin, Alberto Giannoni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-17T11:15:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932695
       
  • Exaggerated blood pressure reaction to exercise in subjects with and
           without systemic hypertension
    • Authors: Cesare de Gregorio, Francesco Giallauria, Giuseppe Lantone, Francesca Bellomo, Mariapaola Campisi, Giorgio Firetto, Paolo Mazzone, Crescenzo Testa, Patrizia Grimaldi, Matteo Casale, Iacopo Ciccarelli, Filippo Maria Sarullo, Angela Alibrandi, Alessandro Migliorato
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-17T11:15:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320934912
       
  • Sport and exercise during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic
    • Authors: Tee Joo Yeo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T03:54:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320933260
       
  • Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk and elevated lipoprotein(a)
           among young adults with myocardial infarction: The Partners YOUNG-MI
           Registry
    • Authors: Adam N Berman, David W Biery, Avinainder Singh, Wanda Y Wu, Sanjay Divakaran, Ersilia M DeFilippis, Jon Hainer, Michael J Blaha, Christopher Cannon, Donna M Polk, Jorge Plutzky, Pradeep Natarajan, Khurram Nasir, Marcelo F Di Carli, Deepak L Bhatt, Ron Blankstein
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T02:40:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931296
       
  • Statins association with calcification in coronary plaque and heart
           valves: a possible different clinical significance: Montignoso HEart and
           Lung Project (MHELP) study preliminary data in primary cardiovascular
           prevention
    • Authors: Annamaria Mazzone, Alberto Clemente, Silverio Sbrana, Daniele Della Latta, Sara Chiappino, Sergio Berti, Dante Chiappino, Cristina Vassalle
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T02:40:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932330
       
  • Acute effect of lipoprotein apheresis on coronary flow velocity reserve
           evaluated by the cold pressure test
    • Authors: Francesco Sbrana, Emilio M Pasanisi, Beatrice Dal Pino, Federico Bigazzi, Andrea Ripoli, Tiziana Sampietro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T02:40:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931622
       
  • Predicting cardiovascular involvement in systemic sclerosis for a timely
           and better treatment approach
    • Authors: Maria Maddalena Sirufo, Lia Ginaldi, Massimo De Martinis
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T02:40:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932256
       
  • Treatment gaps and mortality among patients with familial
           
    • Authors: Elad Shemesh, Ameer Azaiza, Barak Zafrir
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T02:40:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932329
       
  • Determinants of aortic root dilatation over time in patients with
           essential hypertension: The Campania Salute Network
    • Authors: Grazia Canciello, Costantino Mancusi, Raffaele Izzo, Carmine Morisco, Teresa Strisciuglio, Emanuele Barbato, Bruno Trimarco, Nicola De Luca, Giovanni de Simone, Maria Angela Losi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundDeterminants of changes of aortic root dimension over time are not well defined.DesignWe investigated whether specific phenotype and treatment exist predicting changes in aortic root dimension in hypertensive patients from the Campania Salute Network.MethodsN = 4856 participants (age 53 ± 11 years, 44% women) were included. At first and last available echocardiograms, we measured aortic root and a z-score of aortic root (AOz) was generated as the difference between measured and predicted aortic root, derived from a healthy reference population. Aortic root dilatation (ARD) was defined as AOz>75th percentile of distribution.ResultsAt baseline, 3642 patients (75%) exhibited normal aortic root, and 1214 (25%) ARD. After a follow-up of 6.1 years (interquartile range 3.0–8.8 years), 366 (11%) patients with initial normal aortic root exhibited ARD, whereas 457(38%) with initial ARD exhibited normal aortic root. At multivariate analysis patients with incident ARD were most likely to be women, obese, with left ventricular hypertrophy, lower systolic but higher diastolic blood pressure and stroke volume index at baseline, and higher average value of diastolic blood pressure during follow-up (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-12T10:17:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931630
       
  • The use of cardiac imaging in the evaluation of athletes in the clinical
           practice: A survey by the Sports Cardiology and Exercise Section of the
           European Association of Preventive Cardiology and University of Siena, in
           collaboration with the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging, the
           European Heart Rhythm Association and the ESC Working Group on Myocardial
           and Pericardial Diseases
    • Authors: Flavio D’Ascenzi, Francesca Anselmi, Sergio Mondillo, Gherardo Finocchiaro, Stefano Caselli, María Sanz-De La Garza, Christian Schmied, Paolo Emilio Adami, Maurizio Galderisi, Yehuda Adler, Antonis Pantazis, Josef Niebauer, Hein Heidbuchel, Michael Papadakis, Paul Dendale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPre-participation evaluation (PPE) is recommended to prevent sudden cardiac death in athletes. Although imaging is not advocated as a first-line screening tool, there is a growing interest in the use of echocardiography in PPE of athletes. This survey aimed to map the use of imaging in the setting of PPE and explore physician beliefs and potential barriers that may influence individual practices.MethodsAn international survey of healthcare professionals was performed across ESC Member Countries. Percentages were reported based on the number of respondents per question.ResultsIn total, 603 individuals from 97 countries participated in the survey. Two-thirds (65%) of respondents use echocardiography always or often as part of PPE of competitive athletes and this practice is not influenced by the professional or amateur status of the athlete. The majority (81%) of respondents who use echocardiography as a first-line screening tool perform the first echocardiogram during adolescence or at the first clinical evaluation, and 72% repeat it at least once in the athletes’ career, at 1–5 yearly intervals. In contrast, cardiac magnetic resonance is reserved as a second-line investigation of symptomatic athletes. The majority of the respondents did not report any barriers to echocardiography, while several barriers were identified for cardiac magnetic resonance.ConclusionsEchocardiography is frequently used as a first-line screening tool of athletes. In the absence of scientific evidence, before such practice is recommended, large studies using echocardiography in the PPE setting are necessary.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-12T10:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932018
       
  • Inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias: are they correctly reported'
    • Authors: Tiziana Sampietro, Srefania Pieroni, Sabrina Molinaro, Francesco Sbrana, Beatrice Dal Pino, Federico Bigazzi, Massimiliano Ruscica, Cesare R Sirtori, Michela Franchini
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-12T10:17:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320930308
       
  • Sinus bradycardia in paediatric athletes
    • Authors: Leonel Diaz-Gonzalez, Vanesa Bruña, Pedro L Valenzuela, Jesús Velásquez-Rodriguez, Araceli Boraita, Alejandro Lucia, Manuel Martinez-Sellés
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932254
       
  • Cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with muscular dystrophies:
           strengthening the data
    • Authors: Chrysovalantou Nikolaidou, Theodoros D Karamitsos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320932693
       
  • Managing the complexities of cardiac amyloidosis: a path for success
    • Authors: Clement Eiswirth, Hector O Ventura
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320928178
       
  • Midlife crisis' Keep running against the vascular aging clock!
    • Authors: Andreas B Gevaert, Emeline M Van Craenenbroeck, Christiaan J Vrints
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320930870
       
  • Pre-participation sport screening: Don’t miss focus
    • Authors: Silvia Castelletti, Erik E Solberg
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931641
       
  • Is it time to treat women differently in the world of heart failure'
    • Authors: Sabha Bhatti
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931318
       
  • C3 polymorphisms represent an important immunological confounder on the
           spread and outcome of COVID-19
    • Authors: Xiaofeng Dai
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:21:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931999
       
  • Bempedoic acid: Everything with a place and purpose
    • Authors: Jan Westerink
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-06T05:08:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320929779
       
  • Optimising implementation of European guidelines on cardiovascular disease
           prevention in clinical practice: what is needed'
    • Authors: Izabella Uchmanowicz, Arno Hoes, Joep Perk, Gabrielle McKee, Margrét Hrönn Svavarsdóttir, Katarzyna Czerwińska-Jelonkiewicz, Arne Janssen, Anna Oleksiak, Paul Dendale, Ian M Graham
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Cardiovascular disease is a model example of a preventable condition for which practice guidelines are particularly important. In 2016, the joint task force created by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) together with 10 other societies released the new version of the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention. To facilitate the implementation of the ESC guidelines, a dedicated prevention implementation committee has been established within the European Association of Preventive Cardiology. The paper will first explore potential barriers to the guidelines’ implementation. It then develops a discussion that seeks to inform the future development of the committee’s work, including a new definition of the guidelines’ stakeholders (health policy-makers, healthcare professionals and health educators, patient organisations, entrepreneurs and the general public), future activities within four specific areas: strengthening awareness of the guidelines among stakeholders; supporting organisational changes to facilitate the guidelines’ implementation; motivating stakeholders to utilise the guidelines; and present ideas on new implementation strategies. Providing multifaceted cooperation between healthcare professionals, healthcare management executives and health policy-makers, the novel approach proposed in this paper should contribute to a wider use of the 2016 ESC guidelines and produce desired effects of less cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the solutions presented within the paper may constitute a benchmark for the implementation of practice guidelines in other medical disciplines.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T03:39:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320926776
       
  • Obesity and cardiovascular risk management is a critical way to reduce
           healthcare resource pressure
    • Authors: Li Chen, Guang Hao
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T03:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320929248
       
  • A call for universal criteria of high-intensity interval training in
           cardiac rehabilitation
    • Authors: Wei-guang Li, Zheng Huang, Tao Chen, Xin-an Zhang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320927618
       
  • Body mass index and outcomes in ischaemic versus non-ischaemic heart
           failure across the spectrum of ejection fraction
    • Authors: Francesco Gentile, Paolo Sciarrone, Elisabet Zamora, Marta De Antonio, Evelyn Santiago, Mar Domingo, Alberto Aimo, Alberto Giannoni, Claudio Passino, Pau Codina, Antoni Bayes-Genis, Josep Lupon, Michele Emdin, Giuseppe Vergaro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsObesity is related to better prognosis in heart failure with either reduced (HFrEF; left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320927610
       
  • Susceptibility to ischaemic heart disease: Focusing on genetic variants
           for ATP-sensitive potassium channel beyond traditional risk factors
    • Authors: Paolo Severino, Andrea D’Amato, Lucrezia Netti, Mariateresa Pucci, Marco V Mariani, Sara Cimino, Lucia I Birtolo, Fabio Infusino, Paolo De Orchi, Raffaele Palmirotta, Domenica Lovero, Franco Silvestris, Viviana Caputo, Antonio Pizzuti, Fabio Miraldi, Viviana Maestrini, Massimo Mancone, Francesco Fedele
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsIschaemic heart disease is classically associated with coronary artery disease. Recent evidences showed the correlation between coronary microvascular dysfunction and ischaemic heart disease, even independently of coronary artery disease. Ion channels represent the final effectors of blood flow regulation mechanisms and their genetic variants, in particular of Kir6.2 subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP), are reported to be involved in ischaemic heart disease susceptibility. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the role of KATP channel and its genetic variants in patients with ischaemic heart disease and evaluate whether differences exist between coronary artery disease and coronary microvascular dysfunction.MethodsA total of 603 consecutive patients with indication for coronary angiography due to suspected myocardial ischaemia were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups: coronary artery disease (G1), coronary microvascular dysfunction (G2) and normal coronary arteries (G3). Analysis of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs5215, rs5216, rs5218 and rs5219) of the KCNJ11 gene encoding for Kir6.2 subunit of the KATP channel was performed.Resultsrs5215 A/A and G/A were significantly more represented in G1, while rs5215 G/G was significantly more represented in G3, rs5216 G/G and C/C were both more represented in G3, rs5218 C/C was more represented in G1 and rs5219 G/A was more represented in G1, while rs5219 G/G was significantly more represented in G2. At multivariate analysis, single nucleotide polymorphism rs5215_G/G seems to represent an ischaemic heart disease independent protective factor.ConclusionsThese results suggest the potential role of KATP genetic variants in ischaemic heart disease susceptibility, as an independent protective factor. They may lead to a future perspective for gene therapy against ischaemic heart disease.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320926780
       
  • Lifelong changes in physical activity behaviour through phase II cardiac
           rehabilitation' Still steps to take!
    • Authors: J Claes, R Buys, A Avila, N Cornelis, K Goetschalckx, VA Cornelissen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320929451
       
  • Leisure time physical activity is associated with improved HDL
           functionality in high cardiovascular risk individuals: a cohort study
    • Authors: Álvaro Hernáez, Maria Trinidad Soria-Florido, Olga Castañer, Xavier Pintó, Ramón Estruch, Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Dolores Corella, Ángel Alonso-Gómez, Miguel Ángel Martínez-González, Helmut Schröder, Emilio Ros, Lluis Serra-Majem, Miquel Fiol, José Lapetra, Enrique Gomez-Gracia, Montserrat Fitó, Camille Lassale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPhysical activity has consistently been shown to improve cardiovascular health and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. However, only small and heterogeneous studies have investigated the effect of exercise on high-density lipoprotein functions. Our aim is to evaluate, in the largest observational study to date, the association between leisure time physical activity and a range of high-density lipoprotein functional traits.MethodsThe study sample consisted of 296 Spanish adults at high cardiovascular risk. Usual leisure time physical activity and eight measures of high-density lipoprotein functionality were averaged over two measurements, one year apart. Multivariable linear regression models were used to explore the association between leisure time physical activity (exposure) and each high-density lipoprotein functional trait (outcome), adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors.ResultsHigher levels of leisure time physical activity were positively and linearly associated with average levels over one year of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I, paraoxonase-1 antioxidant activity, high-density lipoprotein capacity to esterify cholesterol and cholesterol efflux capacity in individuals free of type 2 diabetes only. The increased cholesterol esterification index with increasing leisure time physical activity reached a plateau at around 300 metabolic equivalents.min/day. In individuals with diabetes, the relationship with cholesteryl ester transfer protein followed a U-shape, with a decreased cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity from 0 to 300 metabolic equivalents.min/day, but increasing from there onwards. Increasing levels of leisure time physical activity were associated with poorer high-density lipoprotein vasodilatory capacity.ConclusionsIn a high cardiovascular risk population, leisure time physical activity was associated not only with greater circulating levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, but also with better markers of high-density lipoprotein functionality, namely cholesterol efflux capacity, the capacity of high-density lipoprotein to esterify cholesterol and paraoxonase-1 antioxidant activity in individuals free of diabetes and lower cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925625
       
  • Socioeconomic status matters: How can we individualize cardiac
           rehabilitation according to different socioeconomic needs'
    • Authors: David Niederseer, Christian Schmied
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931309
       
  • The bi- (or multi-) phasic response of cardiac remodelling to endurance
           exercise related to the article: ‘From talented child to elite athlete:
           The development of cardiac morphology and function in a cohort of
           endurance athletes from age 12 to 18’ by Bjerring and colleagues
    • Authors: Martin Burtscher
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320929245
       
  • Impact of environmental pollution and weather changes on the incidence of
           ST-elevation myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai, Giacomo Frati, Achille Gaspardone, Enrica Mariano, Alessandro D Di Giosa, Andrea Bolignano, Angela Dei Giudici, Simone Calcagno, Massimiliano Scappaticci, Sebastiano Sciarretta, Valentina Valenti, Rebecca Casati, Giuseppe Visconti, Maria Penco, Maria B Giannico, Mariangela Peruzzi, Elena Cavarretta, Simone Budassi, Joseph Cosma, Massimo Federici, Leonardo Roever, Francesco Romeo, Francesco Versaci
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundEnvironmental pollution and weather changes unfavorably impact on cardiovascular disease. However, limited research has focused on ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the most severe yet distinctive form of acute coronary syndrome.Methods and resultsWe appraised the impact of environmental and weather changes on the incidence of STEMI, analysing the bivariate and multivariable association between several environmental and atmospheric parameters and the daily incidence of STEMI in two large Italian urban areas. Specifically, we appraised: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NOX), ozone, particulate matter smaller than 10 μm (PM10) and than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity and rainfall. A total of 4285 days at risk were appraised, with 3473 cases of STEMI. Specifically, no STEMI occurred in 1920 (44.8%) days, whereas one or more occurred in the remaining 2365 (55.2%) days. Multilevel modelling identified several pollution and weather predictors of STEMI. In particular, concentrations of CO (p=0.024), NOX (p=0.039), ozone (p=0.003), PM10 (p=0.033) and PM2.5 (p=0.042) predicted STEMI as early as three days before the event, as well as subsequently, and NO predicted STEMI one day before (p = 0.010), as well as on the same day. A similar predictive role was evident for temperature and atmospheric pressure (all p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320928450
       
  • Clinical correlates and outcome of the patterns of premature ventricular
           beats in Olympic athletes: a long-term follow-up study
    • Authors: Antonio Pelliccia, Lorena De Martino, Cristian Borrazzo, Andrea Serdoz, Erika Lemme, Alessandro Zorzi, Domenico Corrado
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe pattern of premature ventricular beats, as a clue to site of origin, may help identify underlying cardiac diseases.AimTo assess the value of premature ventricular beat patterns in managing athletes with ventricular arrhythmias.MethodsAthletes with 50 or more isolated premature ventricular beats/24 hours, and/or multifocal and/or repetitive premature ventricular beats at baseline, and/or exercise, and/or 24-hour electrocardiograms were selected for this analysis. Premature ventricular beats were defined as ‘common’ (outflow tract or fascicular origin), or ‘uncommon’ (other morphologies and/or multifocal or repetitive).ResultsFrom 4595 athletes consecutively examined, 205 (4%, 24.6 ± 6.9 years, 67% men) were included, 118 (58%) with uncommon and 87 (42%) with common premature ventricular beats. In particular, 81 (39%) showed complex patterns; 63 (31%) right/left ventricular outflow tract origin; 24 (12%) fascicular origin; 20 (10%) right bundle branch block pattern, intermediate/superior axis, wide QRS; and 17 (8%) left bundle branch block pattern, intermediate/superior axis. Uncommon premature ventricular beat patterns were predominant among men (62% vs. 38%; P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320928452
       
  • Reference values for systolic blood pressure at upright bicycle exercise
           tests
    • Authors: Alfred Hager
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922924
       
  • Overcoming challenges in preventive cardiology research
    • Authors: Eugenia Gianos, Karina W Davidson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320928175
       
  • Balancing cardiac rehabilitation for elderly
    • Authors: Tim Kambic, Mitja Lainscak
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T11:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320930867
       
  • Exercise in the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2
           (SARS-CoV-2) era: A Question and Answer session with the experts Endorsed
           by the section of Sports Cardiology & Exercise of the European Association
           of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC)
    • Authors: Raghav T Bhatia, Sarandeep Marwaha, Aneil Malhotra, Zafar Iqbal, Christopher Hughes, Mats Börjesson, Josef Niebauer, Antonio Pelliccia, Christian Schmied, Luis Serratosa, Michael Papadakis, Sanjay Sharma
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Regular exercise has multiple benefits for physical and mental health, including the body’s ability to combat infections. The current COVID-19 pandemic and the social distancing measures employed to curtail the impact of the infection are likely to reduce the amount of usual physical activity being performed by most individuals, including habitual exercisers. The uncertainties relating to the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 virus on the heart may cause increased anxiety, particularly in athletes who need to sustain a vigorous exercise regime in order to maintain their skills and fitness in preparation for return to competition after a short re-training period. The aim of this document is to provide practical answers to pertinent questions being posed by the sporting community, in an attempt to offer reassurance, promote safe participation in exercise during as well as after the COVID-19 pandemic and provide a framework of management for physicians caring for athletes.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T08:48:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320930596
       
  • Standardization and quality improvement of secondary prevention through
           cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes in Europe: The avenue towards
           EAPC accreditation programme: A position statement of the Secondary
           Prevention and Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of
           Preventive Cardiology (EAPC)
    • Authors: Ana Abreu, Ines Frederix, Paul Dendale, Arne Janssen, Patrick Doherty, Massimo F Piepoli, Heinz Völler, Constantinos H Davos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the proven efficacy and cost-effectiveness of contemporary cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes, the referral to/uptake of and adherence to cardiovascular rehabilitation remains inadequate. In addition, heterogeneity persists amongst different cardiovascular rehabilitation centres in Europe, despite the available scientific documents describing the evidence-based rehabilitation format/content. This position statement was elaborated by the Secondary Prevention and Rehabilitation (SP/CR) section of EAPC. It defines the minimal and optimal cardiovascular rehabilitation standards. In addition, it describes the relevant quality indicators of cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes to date. Compliance of European cardiovascular rehabilitation centres with these standards will improve cardiovascular rehabilitation process standardization in Europe and hence increase the quality of cadiovascular rehabilitation programmes.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T08:22:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320924912
       
  • Age matters: differences in exercise-induced cardiovascular remodelling in
           young and middle aged healthy sedentary individuals
    • Authors: Camilla Torlasco, Andrew D’Silva, Anish N Bhuva, Andrea Faini, Joao B Augusto, Kristopher D Knott, Giulia Benedetti, Siana Jones, Jet Van Zalen, Paul Scully, Ilaria Lobascio, Gianfranco Parati, Guy Lloyd, Alun D Hughes, Charlotte H Manisty, Sanjay Sharma, James C Moon
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsRemodelling of the cardiovascular system (including heart and vasculature) is a dynamic process influenced by multiple physiological and pathological factors. We sought to understand whether remodelling in response to a stimulus, exercise training, altered with healthy ageing.MethodsA total of 237 untrained healthy male and female subjects volunteering for their first time marathon were recruited. At baseline and after 6 months of unsupervised training, race completers underwent tests including 1.5T cardiac magnetic resonance, brachial and non-invasive central blood pressure assessment. For analysis, runners were divided by age into under or over 35 years (U35, O35).ResultsInjury and completion rates were similar among the groups; 138 runners (U35: n = 71, women 49%; O35: n = 67, women 51%) completed the race. On average, U35 were faster by 37 minutes (12%). Training induced a small increase in left ventricular mass in both groups (3 g/m2, P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T05:31:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320926305
       
  • Aspirin-free strategy versus standard term dual antiplatelet therapy in
           patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a meta-analysis of
           randomized controlled trials
    • Authors: Mohammad Saud Khan, Abdelmoniem Moustafa, Abdullah Zoheb Azhar, Abdur Rahman Khan, Sohail Ikram
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-29T06:30:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925623
       
  • Obesity, cardiovascular risk and healthcare resource utilization in the UK
    • Authors: Carel W le Roux, Niels V Hartvig, Christiane Lundegaard Haase, Rikke Baastrup Nordsborg, Anne Helene Olsen, Altynai Satylganova
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsObesity and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) often co-occur, likely increasing the intensity of healthcare resource utilization (HCRU). This retrospective, observational database study examined the joint effect of obesity and cardiovascular risk status on HCRU and compared HCRU between body mass index (BMI) categories and CVD-risk categories in the UK.MethodsPatient demographics and data on CVD and BMI were obtained from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cardiovascular risk status, calculated using the Framingham Risk Equation, was used to categorize people into high-risk and low-risk groups, while a CVD diagnosis was used to define the established CVD group. Patients were split into BMI categories using the standard World Health Organization classifications. For each CVD and BMI category, mean number and costs of general practitioner contacts, hospital admissions and prescriptions were estimated.ResultsThe final study population included 1,600,709 patients. Data on CVD status were available on just over one-quarter of the sample (28.6%) and BMI data for just less than half (43.2%). The number of general practitioner contacts and prescriptions increased with increasing BMI category for each of the three CVD-risk groups. The group with established CVD had the greatest utilization of all components of healthcare resource, followed by high CVD risk then low CVD-risk groups.ConclusionIncreasing BMI category and CVD-risk status both affected several HCRU components. These findings highlight the importance of timely obesity management and treatment of CVD-risk factors as a means of preventing increasing HCRU.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-28T06:33:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925639
       
  • Traffic-related air pollution and the coronavirus pandemia: shadows and
           lights
    • Authors: Pier Mannuccio Mannucci
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-28T06:33:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320928451
       
  • Cardiology practice in the COVID-19 era
    • Authors: Jean-Jacques Monsuez
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-28T06:33:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320929780
       
  • C3 and ACE1 polymorphisms are more important confounders in the spread and
           outcome of COVID-19 in comparison with ABO polymorphism
    • Authors: Joris R Delanghe, Marc L De Buyzere, Marijn M Speeckaert
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-28T06:33:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320931305
       
  • Lipoprotein(a) reduction with proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type
           9 inhibitors: An unsolved mystery
    • Authors: Evangelos Liberopoulos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-23T06:07:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320926777
       
  • Comparison of cardiovascular metabolic characteristics and impact on
           COVID-19 and MERS
    • Authors: Bo Li, Xiaodong Jin, Tongtong Zhang, Yan Zhao, Feng Tian, Yuhua Li, Jing Yang, Faming Zhao, Bin Li
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-19T06:44:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925218
       
  • Physical activity/inactivity and COVID-19
    • Authors: Antonio Crisafulli, Pasquale Pagliaro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-19T06:44:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320927597
       
  • Effect of coronavirus infection on the human heart: A scoping review
    • Authors: Jamie SY Ho, Paul A Tambyah, Andrew FW Ho, Mark YY Chan, Ching-Hui Sia
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe global coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has highlighted the importance of understanding the cardiovascular implications of coronavirus infections, with more severe disease in those with cardiovascular co-morbidities, and resulting cardiac manifestations such as myocardial injury, arrhythmias, and heart failure.DesignA systematic review of the current knowledge on the effects of coronavirus infection on the cardiovascular system in humans was performed and results were summarized.MethodsDatabases such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, Chinese Knowledge Resource Integrated Database and Chinese Clinical Trial Registry were searched on 20 March 2020.ResultsIn total, 135 studies were included, involving severe acute respiratory syndrome, Middle East respiratory syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019 and other coronaviruses. Most were case reports, case series and cohort studies of poor to fair quality. In post-mortem examinations of subjects who died from infection, around half had virus identified in heart tissues in severe acute respiratory syndrome, but none in Middle East respiratory syndrome and coronavirus disease 2019. Cardiac manifestations reported include tachycardia, bradycardia, arrhythmias, and myocardial injury, secondary to both systemic infection and treatment. Cardiac injury and arrhythmias are more prevalent in coronavirus disease 2019, and elevated cardiac markers are associated with intensive care unit admission and death. In severe acute respiratory syndrome, Middle East respiratory syndrome, and coronavirus disease 2019, comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and heart disease are associated with intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, and mortality. There were cases of misdiagnosis due to overlapping presentations of cardiovascular diseases and coronavirus infections, leading to hospital spread and delayed management of life-threatening conditions.ConclusionThis review highlighted the ways in which coronaviruses affect cardiovascular function and interacts with pre-existing cardiovascular diseases.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-19T06:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925965
       
  • Personalized screening intervals for measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type
           natriuretic peptide improve efficiency of prognostication in patients with
           chronic heart failure
    • Authors: Anne-Sophie Schuurman, Anirudh Tomer, K Martijn Akkerhuis, Jasper J Brugts, Alina A Constantinescu, Jan van Ramshorst, Victor A Umans, Eric Boersma, Dimitris Rizopoulos, Isabella Kardys
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922639
       
  • Cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with muscular dystrophies
    • Authors: Chrysanthos Grigoratos, Alberto Aimo, Andrea Barison, Vincenzo Castiglione, Giancarlo Todiere, Giulia Ricci, Gabriele Siciliano, Michele Emdin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Muscular dystrophies are inherited disorders sharing similar clinical features and dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common inherited muscle disease of childhood, and Becker muscular dystrophy is a milder allelic variant with a slightly lower prevalence. Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent form in adults. Cardiac magnetic resonance is the gold standard technique for the quantification of cardiac chamber volumes and function, and also enables a characterisation of myocardial tissue. Most cardiac magnetic resonance studies in the setting of muscular dystrophy were carried out at single centres, evaluated small numbers of patients and used widely heterogeneous protocols. Even more importantly, those studies analysed more or less extensively the patterns of cardiac involvement, but usually did not try to establish the added value of cardiac magnetic resonance to standard echocardiography, the evolution of cardiac disease over time and the prognostic significance of cardiac magnetic resonance findings. As a result, the large and heterogeneous amount of information on cardiac involvement in muscular dystrophies cannot easily be translated into recommendations on the optimal use of cardiac magnetic resonance. In this review, whose targets are cardiologists and neurologists who manage patients with muscular dystrophy, we try to summarise cardiac magnetic resonance findings in patients with muscular dystrophy, and the results of studies evaluating the role of cardiac magnetic resonance as a tool for diagnosis, risk stratification and follow-up. Finally, we provide some practical recommendations about the need and timing of cardiac magnetic resonance examination for the management of patients with muscular dystrophy.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923052
       
  • Cardiac patient care during a pandemic: how to reorganise a heart failure
           unit at the time of COVID-19
    • Authors: Piergiuseppe Agostoni, Massimo Mapelli, Edoardo Conte, Andrea Baggiano, Emilio Assanelli, Anna Apostolo, Marina Alimento, Giovanni Berna, Marco Guglielmo, Manuela Muratori, Francesca Susini, Pietro Palermo, Beatrice Pezzuto, Elisabetta Salvioni, Anna Sudati, Carlo Vignati, Luca Merlino
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Still it was not absolutely the plague; the use of the word was prohibited, it was a pestilential fever, the adjective was preferred to the substantive, – then, not the true plague, – that is to say, the plague, but only in a certain sense, – and further, combined with poison and witchcraft. Such is the absurd trifling with which men seek to blind themselves, wilfully abstaining from a sound exercise of judgment to arrive at the truth.Alessandro Manzoni, The Betrothed
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925632
       
  • A window of opportunity on cardiovascular prevention: pre-eclampsia and
           fetal growth restriction
    • Authors: Edoardo Sciatti, Rossana Orabona
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925646
       
  • Personalised rehabilitation for cardiac and pulmonary patients with
           multimorbidity: Time for implementation'
    • Authors: Rod S Taylor, Sally Singh
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320926058
       
  • Short-term mortality risk of different plasma potassium levels in patients
           treated with combination antihypertensive therapy
    • Authors: Maria L Krogager, Christian Torp-Pedersen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925220
       
  • How do General Practitioners assess physical activity and prescribe
           exercise in patients with different cardiovascular diseases' An
           Italian pilot study
    • Authors: Giulia Foccardi, Dominique Hansen, Giulia Quinto, Claudia Favero, Karin Coninx, Gustavo Rovelo Ruiz, Paul Dendale, Josef Niebauer, Andrea Ermolao, Daniel Neunhaeuserer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925221
       
  • Physical activity, sports and risk of atrial fibrillation: umbrella review
           of meta-analyses
    • Authors: Pedro L Valenzuela, Alejandro Santos-Lozano, Javier S Morales, Susana López-Ortiz, José Pinto-Fraga, Adrián Castillo-García, Juan Martín-Hernández, Julián P Villacastín, Araceli Boraita, Alejandro Lucia
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T09:00:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923183
       
  • Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of the MyoVasc study: A
           prospective cohort study investigating development and progression of
           heart failure
    • Authors: Sebastian Göbel, Jürgen H Prochaska, Sven-Oliver Tröbs, Marina Panova-Noeva, Christine Espinola–Klein, Matthias Michal, Karl J Lackner, Tommaso Gori, Thomas Münzel, Philipp S Wild
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHeart failure (HF) is a poly-aetiological syndrome with large heterogeneity regarding clinical presentation, pathophysiology, clinical outcome and response to therapy. The MyoVasc study (NCT04064450) is an epidemiological cohort study investigating the development and progression of HF.MethodsThe primary objective of the study is (a) to improve the understanding of the pathomechanisms of HF across the full spectrum of clinical presentation, (b) to investigate the current clinical classifications of HF, and (c) to identify and characterize homogeneous subgroups regarding disease development using a systems-oriented approach. Worsening of HF, that is, the composite of transition from asymptomatic to symptomatic HF, hospitalization due to HF, or cardiac death, was defined as the primary endpoint of the study. During a six-year follow-up period, all study participants receive a highly standardized, biannual five-hour examination in a dedicated study centre, including detailed cardiovascular phenotyping and biobanking of various biomaterials. Annual follow-up examinations are conducted by computer-assisted telephone interviews recording comprehensively the participants´ health status, including subsequent validation and adjudication of adverse events.ResultsIn total, 3289 study participants (age range: 35 to 84 years; female sex: 36.8%) including the full range of HF stages were enrolled from 2013 to 2018. Approximately half of the subjects (n=1741) presented at baseline with symptomatic HF (i.e. HF stage C/D). Among these, HF with preserved ejection fraction was the most frequent phenotype.ConclusionsBy providing a large-scale, multi-dimensional biodatabase with sequential, comprehensive medical-technical (sub)clinical phenotyping and multi-omics characterization (i.e. genome, transcriptome, proteome, lipidome, metabolome and exposome), the MyoVasc study will help to advance our knowledge about the heterogeneous HF syndrome by a systems-oriented biomedicine approach.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov; NCT04064450.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-15T03:59:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320926438
       
  • The reward of understanding risk in atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Zak Loring, Jonathan P Piccini
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:45:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925215
       
  • Is the novel LDL-cholesterol goal
    • Authors: John Munkhaugen, Elise Sverre, Kari Peersen, Oscar Kristiansen, Erik Gjertsen, Lars Gullestad, Jan Erik Otterstad
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T02:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923187
       
  • Impact of sex-specific target dose in chronic heart failure patients with
           reduced ejection fraction
    • Authors: Jesse F Veenis, Hans-Peter Brunner-La Rocca, Gerard CM Linssen, Ayten Erol-Yilmaz, Arjen CB Pronk, Domien JM Engelen, Rob M van Tooren, Hetty JJ Koornstra-Wortel, Rudolf A de Boer, Peter van der Meer, Arno W Hoes, Jasper J Brugts
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsA recent study suggested that women with heart failure and heart failure reduced ejection fraction might hypothetically need lower doses of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers ( = renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors) and β-blockers than men to achieve the best outcome. We assessed the current medical treatment of heart failure reduced ejection fraction in men and women in a large contemporary cohort and address the hypothetical impact of changing treatment levels in women.MethodsThis analysis is part of a large contemporary quality of heart failure care project which includes 5320 (64%) men and 3003 (36%) women with heart failure reduced ejection fraction. Detailed information on heart failure therapy prescription and dosage were collected.ResultsWomen less often received renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors (79% vs 83%, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T02:59:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923185
       
  • Preexisting coronary heart disease and susceptibility to long-term effects
           of traffic-related air pollution: A matched cohort analysis
    • Authors: Gali Cohen, David M Steinberg, Lital Keinan-Boker, Yuval, Ilan Levy, Shimon Chen, Rakefet Shafran-Nathan, Noam Levin, Tal Shimony, Guy Witberg, Tamir Bental, Tamar Shohat, David M Broday, Ran Kornowski, Yariv Gerber
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundIndividuals with coronary heart disease are considered susceptible to traffic-related air pollution exposure. Yet, cohort-based evidence on whether preexisting coronary heart disease modifies the association of traffic-related air pollution with health outcomes is lacking.AimUsing data of four Israeli cohorts, we compared associations of traffic-related air pollution with mortality and cancer between coronary heart disease patients and matched controls from the general population.MethodsSubjects hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome from two patient cohorts (inception years: 1992–1993 and 2006–2014) were age- and sex-matched to coronary heart disease-free participants of two cycles of the Israeli National Health and Nutrition Surveys (inception years: 1999–2001 and 2005–2006). Ambient concentrations of nitrogen oxides at the residential place served as a proxy for traffic-related air pollution exposure across all cohorts, based on a high-resolution national land use regression model (50 m). Data on all-cause mortality (last update: 2018) and cancer incidence (last update: 2016) were retrieved from national registries. Cox-derived stratum-specific hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated, adjusted for harmonized covariates across cohorts, including age, sex, ethnicity, neighborhood socioeconomic status, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, prior stroke and prior malignancy (the latter only in the mortality analysis). Effect-modification was examined by testing nitrogen oxides-by-coronary heart disease interaction term in the entire matched cohort.ResultsThe cohort (mean (standard deviation) age 61.5 (14) years; 44% women) included 2393 matched pairs, among them 2040 were cancer-free at baseline. During a median (25th–75th percentiles) follow-up of 13 (10–19) and 11 (7–17) years, 1458 deaths and 536 new cancer cases were identified, respectively. In multivariable-adjusted models, a 10-parts per billion nitrogen oxides increment was positively associated with all-cause mortality among coronary heart disease patients (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.05–1.22), but not among controls (hazard ratio = 1.00, 0.93–1.08) (pinteraction = 0.003). A similar pattern was seen for all-cancer incidence (hazard ratioCHD = 1.19 (1.03–1.37), hazard ratioCHD-Free = 0.93 (0.84–1.04) (pinteraction = 0.01)). Associations were robust to multiple sensitivity analyses.ConclusionsCoronary heart disease patients might be at increased risk for traffic-related air pollution-associated mortality and cancer, irrespective of their age and sex. Patients and clinicians should be more aware of the adverse health effects on coronary heart disease patients of chronic exposure to vehicle emissions.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-09T12:42:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320921987
       
  • Risk of osteoporotic fracture in older patients under antihypertensive
           treatment
    • Authors: Oh Kyung Kwon, Sun-Hwa Kim, Si-Hyuck Kang, Young-Kyun Lee, Chang-Hwan Yoon, Hae-Young Lee, Tae-Jin Youn, In-Ho Chae, Cheol-Ho Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-09T12:42:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923054
       
  • Extracellular vesicle species differentially affect endothelial cell
           functions and differentially respond to exercise training in patients with
           chronic coronary syndromes
    • Authors: Nicolle Kränkel, Elisabeth Strässler, Madlen Uhlemann, Maja Müller, Sylvie Briand-Schumacher, Roland Klingenberg, P Christian Schulze, Volker Adams, Gerhard Schuler, Thomas F Lüscher, Sven Möbius-Winkler, Ulf Landmesser
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AbstractBackgroundExtracellular vesicles are released upon cellular activation and mediate inter-cellular communication. Individual species of extracellular vesicles might have divergent roles in vascular homeostasis and may show different responses to therapies such as exercise training.AimsWe examine endothelial effects of medium-size and small extracellular vesicles from the same individual with or without chronic coronary syndrome, and in chronic coronary syndrome patients participating in a four-week high-intensity interval training intervention.MethodsHuman aortic endothelial cells were exposed to medium-size extracellular vesicles and small extracellular vesicles isolated from plasma samples of study participants. Endothelial cell survival, activation and re-endothelialisation capacity were assessed by respective staining protocols. Extracellular vesicles were quantified by nanoparticle tracking analysis and flow cytometry. Extracellular vesicle microRNA expression was quantified by realtime-quantitative polymerase chain reaction.ResultsIn patients with chronic coronary syndrome (n = 25), plasma counts of leukocyte-derived medium-size extracellular vesicles were higher than in age-matched healthy controls (n = 25; p = 0.04) and were reduced by high-intensity interval training (n = 15; p = 0.01 vs baseline). Re-endothelialisation capacity was promoted by medium-size extracellular vesicles from controls, but not by medium-size extracellular vesicles from chronic coronary syndrome patients. High-intensity interval training for 4 weeks enhanced medium-size extracellular vesicle-mediated support of in vitro re-endothelialisation. Small extracellular vesicles from controls or chronic coronary syndrome patients increased endothelial cell death and reduced repair functions and were not affected by high-intensity interval training.ConclusionThe present study demonstrates that medium-size extracellular vesicles and small extracellular vesicles differentially affect endothelial cell survival and repair responses. This equilibrium is unbalanced in patients with chronic coronary syndrome where leukocyte-derived medium-size extracellular vesicles are increased leading to a loss of medium-size extracellular vesicle-mediated endothelial repair. High-intensity interval training partially restored medium-size extracellular vesicle-mediated endothelial repair, underlining its use in cardiovascular prevention and therapy to improve endothelial function.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-08T01:59:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919894
       
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome as a novel risk factor for atrial fibrillation:
           results from a national Danish registry cohort study
    • Authors: Clare Oliver-Williams, Ditte Vassard, Anja Pinborg, Lone Schmidt
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-07T12:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922927
       
  • Cardiovascular risk profile and events before and after treatment with
           anti-VEGF drugs in the setting of a structured cardio-oncologic program
    • Authors: Giacomo Tini, Matteo Sarocchi, Davide Sirello, Roberto Murialdo, Giuseppe Fornarini, Giulia Buzzatti, Francesco Boccardo, Eleonora Arboscello, Italo Porto, Pietro Ameri, Paolo Spallarossa
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-07T01:34:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923056
       
  • Workload-indexed blood pressure response to a maximum exercise test among
           professional indoor athletes
    • Authors: Pascal Bauer, Lutz Kraushaar, Oliver Dörr, Holger Nef, Christian W Hamm, Astrid Most
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundExercise testing is performed regularly in professional athletes. However, the blood pressure response (BPR) to exercise is rarely investigated in this cohort, and normative upper thresholds are lacking. Recently, a workload-indexed BPR (increase in systolic blood pressure per increase in metabolic equivalent of task (SBP/MET slope)) was evaluated in a general population and was compared with mortality. We sought to evaluate the SBP/MET slope in professional athletes and compare it with performance.DesignThis was a cross-sectional study.MethodsA total of 142 male professional indoor athletes (age 26 ± 5 years) were examined. Blood pressure was measured at rest and during a standardized, graded cycle ergometer test. We assessed the BPR during exercise, the workload, and the metabolic equivalent of task (MET). Athletes were divided into groups according to their SBP/MET slope quartiles (I 6.2–9; IV>9 mmHg/MET) and compared regarding systolic BP (sBP) and workload achieved.ResultsAthletes in group I (n = 42) had the lowest maximum sBP (180 ± 13 mmHg) but achieved the highest relative workload (4.2 ± 1 W/kg). With increasing SBP/MET slope, the maximum sBP increased (II (n = 56): 195 ± 15 mmHg; III (n = 44): 216 ± 16 mmHg) and the workload achieved decreased (II: 3.9 ± 0.7 W/kg; III: 3.3 ± 0.5 W/kg). The differences in sBP between these groups were significant (p 9 mmHg/MET).ConclusionAthletes in the lowest SBP/MET slope quartile displayed the lowest maximum sBP but achieved a higher workload than athletes classified into the other SBP/MET slope groups. This simple, novel metric might help to distinguish a normal from an exaggerated BPR to exercise, to identify athletes at risk of developing hypertension.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-07T01:34:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922043
       
  • Prevalence and determinants of the precursor stages of heart failure:
           results from the population-based STAAB cohort study
    • Authors: Caroline Morbach, Götz Gelbrich, Theresa Tiffe, Felizitas A Eichner, Martin Christa, Renate Mattern, Margret Breunig, Vladimir Cejka, Martin Wagner, Peter U Heuschmann, Stefan Störk
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPrevention of heart failure relies on the early identification and control of risk factors. We aimed to identify the frequency and characteristics of individuals at risk of heart failure in the general population.Methods and ResultsWe report cross-sectional data from the prospective Characteristics and Course of Heart Failure Stages A–B and Determinants of Progression (STAAB) cohort study investigating a representative sample of residents of Würzburg, Germany. Sampling was stratified 1:1 for sex and 10:27:27:27:10 for age groups of 30–39/40–49/50–59/60–69/70–79 years. Heart failure precursor stages were defined according to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association: stage A (risk factors for heart failure), stage B (asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction). The main results were internally validated in the second half of the participants. The derivation sample comprised 2473 participants (51% women) with a distribution of 10%/28%/25%/27%/10% in respective age groups. Stages A and B were prevalent in 42% and 17% of subjects, respectively. Of stage B subjects, 31% had no risk factor qualifying for stage A (group ‘B-not-A’). Compared to individuals in stage B with A criteria, B-not-A were younger, more often women, and had left ventricular dilation as the predominant B qualifying criterion (all P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-07T01:34:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922636
       
  • ECG screening in master athletes: ‘Medical science has made such
           tremendous progress that there is hardly a healthy human left.’
    • Authors: Alain Braillon
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-06T02:12:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922634
       
  • Big data, social determinants of coronary heart disease and barriers for
           data access
    • Authors: Abraham IJ Gajardo, Fabián Henríquez, Marcelo Llancaqueo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-04T02:45:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922366
       
  • Authors’ reply to ‘Reference values for systolic blood pressure at
           upright bicycle exercise tests’ by Alfred Hager
    • Authors: Kristofer Hedman, Thomas Lindow, Viktor Elmberg, Lars Brudin, Magnus Ekström
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T04:55:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923055
       
  • Non-invasive estimation of stroke volume during exercise from oxygen in
           heart failure patients
    • Authors: Emanuele Accalai, Carlo Vignati, Elisabetta Salvioni, Beatrice Pezzuto, Mauro Contini, Christian Cadeddu, Luigi Meloni, Piergiuseppe Agostoni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsIn heart failure, oxygen uptake and cardiac output measurements at peak and during exercise are important in defining heart failure severity and prognosis. Several cardiopulmonary exercise test-derived parameters have been proposed to estimate stroke volume during exercise, including the oxygen pulse (oxygen uptake/heart rate). Data comparing measured stroke volume and the oxygen pulse or stroke volume estimates from the oxygen pulse at different stages of exercise in a sizeable population of healthy individuals and heart failure patients are lacking.MethodsWe analysed 1007 subjects, including 500 healthy and 507 heart failure patients, who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with stroke volume determination by the inert gas rebreathing technique. Stroke volume measurements were made at rest, submaximal (∼50% of exercise) and peak exercise. At each stage of exercise, stroke volume estimates were obtained considering measured haemoglobin at rest, predicted exercise-induced haemoconcentration and peripheral oxygen extraction according to heart failure severity.ResultsA strong relationship between oxygen pulse and measured stroke volume was observed in healthy and heart failure subjects at submaximal (R2 = 0.6437 and R2 = 0.6723, respectively), and peak exercise (R2 = 0.6614 and R2 = 0.5662) but not at rest. In healthy and heart failure subjects, agreement between estimated and measured stroke volume was observed at submaximal (–3 ± 37 and –11 ± 72 ml, respectively) and peak exercise (1 ± 31 and 6 ± 29 ml, respectively) but not at rest.ConclusionIn heart failure patients, stroke volume estimation and oxygen pulse during exercise represent stroke volume, albeit with a relevant individual data dispersion so that both can be used for population studies but cannot be reliably applied to a single subject. Accordingly, whenever needed stroke volume must be measured directly.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-29T01:32:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920755
       
  • Abdominal aortic calcification: from ancient friend to modern foe
    • Authors: Jonas W Bartstra, Willem PThM Mali, Wilko Spiering, Pim A de Jong
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAbdominal aortic calcifications were already ubiquitous in ancient populations from all continents. Although nowadays generally considered as an innocent end stage of stabilised atherosclerotic plaques, increasing evidence suggests that arterial calcifications contribute to cardiovascular risk. In this review we address abdominal aortic calcification from an evolutionary perspective and review the literature on histology, prevalence, risk factors, clinical outcomes and pharmacological interventions of abdominal aortic calcification.DesignThe design of this study was based on a literature review.MethodsPubmed and Embase were systematically searched for articles on abdominal aortic calcification and its synonyms without language restrictions. Articles with data on histology, prevalence, risk factors clinical outcomes and/or pharmacological interventions were selected.ResultsAbdominal aortic calcification is highly prevalent in the general population and prevalence and extent increase with age. Prevalence and risk factors differ between males and females and different ethnicities. Risk factors include traditional cardiovascular risk factors and decreased bone mineral density. Abdominal aortic calcification is shown to contribute to arterial stiffness and is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Several therapies to inhibit arterial calcification have been developed and investigated in small clinical trials.ConclusionsAbdominal aortic calcification is from all eras and increasingly acknowledged as an independent contributor to cardiovascular disease. Large studies with long follow-up must be carried out to show whether inhibition of abdominal aortic calcification will further reduce cardiovascular risk.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-29T01:32:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919895
       
  • The effect of cardiovascular fitness in men with cancer and cardiovascular
           disease
    • Authors: Erlinda The
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-29T01:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922925
       
  • From talented child to elite athlete: The development of cardiac
           morphology and function in a cohort of endurance athletes from age 12 to
           18
    • Authors: Anders W Bjerring, Hege EW Landgraff, Svein Leirstein, Kristina H Haugaa, Thor Edvardsen, Sebastian I Sarvari, Jostein Hallén
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAdult athletes undergo cardiac adaptions in what is known as the “athlete’s heart”. Cardiac adaptations in young athletes have not been described in longitudinal studies but have previously been believed to be uniform in nature.MethodsSeventy-six cross-country skiers were assessed at age 12. Forty-eight (63%) completed the first follow-up at age 15 and 36 (47%) the second follow-up at age 18. Comprehensive exercise data were collected. Echocardiography with three-dimensional measurements and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed at all time points. The cohort was divided into active and former endurance athletes, with an eight hours of weekly endurance exercise cut-off at age 18.ResultsThe athletes underwent eccentric remodelling between ages 12 and 15, and concentric remodelling between ages 15 and 18. At age 18, the active endurance athletes had greater increases in inter-ventricular wall thickness (1.8 ± 1.4 Δmm vs 0.6 ± 1.0 Δmm, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-29T01:32:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320921317
       
  • Correspondence to the EJPC in response to position paper by Ambrosetti M
           et al. 2020: Cardiovascular rehabilitation and COVID-19: The need to
           maintain access to evidence-based services from the safety of home
    • Authors: Hasnain Dalal, Rod S Taylor, Colin Greaves, Patrick J Doherty, Sinead TJ McDonagh, Samantha B van Beurden, Carrie Purcell
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T08:52:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320923053
       
  • Increased functional capacity after 12 weeks of exercise training does not
           transform into improved skeletal muscle metabolism or ultrastructure in
           heart failure patients on modern optimal medical therapy
    • Authors: Torstein Valborgland, Kjetil Isaksen, Arne Yndestad, Sigurd Lindal, Kate Myreng, Peter Scott Munk, Alf Inge Larsen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T03:36:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919863
       
  • Lipid-lowering statin therapy is beneficial in elderly female patients
           with hypercholesterolaemia and diabetic retinopathy
    • Authors: Yoshihiro Saito, Atsuko Nakayama, Tatsuyuki Sato, Hiroyuki Morita, Takuya Kawahara, Hiroshi Itoh, Issei Komuro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T03:36:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920761
       
  • Greater burden of risk factors and less effect of cardiac rehabilitation
           in elderly with low educational attainment: The Eu-CaRE study
    • Authors: Ingunn E Kjesbu, Nicolai Mikkelsen, Kirstine L Sibilitz, Matthias Wilhelm, Carlos Pena-Gil, Violeta González-Salvado, Marie Christine Iliou, Uwe Zeymer, Esther P Meindersma, Diego Ardissino, Astrid E van der Velde, Arnoud WJ Van ‘t Hof, Ed P de Kluiver, Eva Prescott
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T03:36:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320921485
       
  • Impact of smoking on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable
           coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Nadia Bouabdallaoui, Nathan Messas, Nicola Greenlaw, Roberto Ferrari, Ian Ford, Kim M Fox, Michal Tendera, Datshana P Naidoo, Christian Hassager, P Gabriel Steg, Jean-Claude Tardif
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T03:36:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320918728
       
  • Acute effect of heat-not-burn versus standard cigarette smoking on
           arterial stiffness and wave reflections in young smokers
    • Authors: Nikolaos Ioakeimidis, Eleni Emmanouil, Dimitrios Terentes-Printzios, Ioanna Dima, Konstantinos Aznaouridis, Dimitris Tousoulis, Charalambos Vlachopoulos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T03:36:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320918365
       
  • ABO blood group predisposes to COVID-19 severity and cardiovascular
           diseases
    • Authors: Xiaofeng Dai
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T02:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922370
       
  • Humans are not meant to live alone
    • Authors: Andreas Hoffmann
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-27T04:47:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920757
       
  • Future-proofing cardiac rehabilitation: Transitioning services to
           telehealth during COVID-19
    • Authors: Emma Thomas, Robyn Gallagher, and Sherry L Grace
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-23T12:48:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320922926
       
  • Improvements in exercise capacity of older adults during cardiac
           rehabilitation
    • Authors: Walter Bierbauer, Urte Scholz, Tania Bermudez, Dries Debeer, Michael Coch, Ruth Fleisch-Silvestri, Claude-Alain Nacht, Hansueli Tschanz, Jean-Paul Schmid, Matthias Hermann
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-23T02:19:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914736
       
  • Coffee consumption and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and total
           mortality: Does the brewing method matter'
    • Authors: Aage Tverdal, Randi Selmer, Jacqueline M Cohen, Dag S Thelle
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-22T11:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914443
       
  • Filtered, not unfiltered, coffee in cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Yoshihiro Fukumoto
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-22T11:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920415
       
  • Cardiac rehabilitation expands into the elderly
    • Authors: Werner Benzer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-22T05:04:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919229
       
  • Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis: ‘early diagnosis–early
           management’ approach
    • Authors: Paolo Calabrò, Arturo Cesaro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-21T06:13:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919235
       
  • Achieving post-percutaneous coronary intervention low-density
           lipoprotein-cholesterol goals: Science versus reality
    • Authors: Lale Tokgozoglu, Duygu Kocyigit
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-21T03:26:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919867
       
  • Adverse events with sacubitril/valsartan in the real world: emerging
           signals to target preventive strategies from the FDA adverse event
           reporting system
    • Authors: Milo Gatti, Ippazio Cosimo Antonazzo, Igor Diemberger, Fabrizio De Ponti, Emanuel Raschi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-21T03:26:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915663
       
  • Physical activity and cardiovascular risk: No such thing as ‘Too
           little, too late’
    • Authors: Scott T Chiesa, Marietta Charakida
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-19T11:29:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920765
       
  • Subclinical progression of systemic sclerosis-related cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Giulia Stronati, Lucia Manfredi, Alessia Ferrarini, Lucia Zuliani, Marco Fogante, Nicolò Schicchi, Alessandro Capucci, Andrea Giovagnoni, Antonio Dello Russo, Armando Gabrielli, Federico Guerra
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-19T11:29:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320916591
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of rivaroxaban plus aspirin (dual pathway inhibition)
           for prevention of ischaemic events in patients with cardiovascular
           disease: on top optimisation of secondary prevention medication in the
           context of COVID-19 pandemia
    • Authors: Bernhard Rauch
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-17T09:53:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920754
       
  • Management of complications of cardiac amyloidosis: 10 questions and
           answers
    • Authors: Alberto Aimo, Claudio Rapezzi, Giuseppe Vergaro, Alberto Giannoni, Valentina Spini, Claudio Passino, Michele Emdin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-17T02:06:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920756
       
  • Amiodarone as a possible therapy for coronavirus infection
    • Authors: Alberto Aimo, Aldo Baritussio, Michele Emdin, Carlo Tascini
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-16T07:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320919233
       
  • ECG in the athlete, QRS voltage value never matters, really'
    • Authors: François Carré, Frédéric Schnell
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-16T01:59:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920045
       
  • Association between estimated pulse wave velocity and the risk of
           cardiovascular outcomes in men
    • Authors: Sae Young Jae, Kevin S Heffernan, Jeong Bae Park, Sudhir Kurl, Setor K Kunutsor, Jang-Young Kim, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-16T01:59:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320920767
       
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection,
           angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and treatment with angiotensin-converting
           enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers
    • Authors: Riccardo Sarzani, Federico Giulietti, Chiara Di Pentima, Piero Giordano, Francesco Spannella
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-15T07:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320918421
       
  • HDL-C is associated with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease
           and cancer in a J-shaped dose-response fashion: a pooled analysis of 37
           prospective cohort studies
    • Authors: Guo-Chao Zhong, Su-Qun Huang, Yang Peng, Lun Wan, You-Qi-Le Wu, Tian-Yang Hu, Jie-Jun Hu, Fa-Bao Hao
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-14T07:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914756
       
  • Chemoreceptor hyperactivity in heart failure: Is lactate the culprit'
    • Authors: Andrea Segreti, Francesco Grigioni, Jeness Campodonico, Alessandra Magini, Denise Zaffalon, Gianfranco Sinagra, Germano Di Sciascio, Erik Richard Swenson, Piergiuseppe Agostoni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915548
       
  • Discordant responses of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and
           lipoprotein(a) to alirocumab: A pooled analysis from 10 ODYSSEY Phase 3
           studies
    • Authors: Tahir Mahmood, Jessica Minnier, Matthew K Ito, Qian H Li, Andrew Koren, Ivy W Kam, Sergio Fazio, Michael D Shapiro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915803
       
  • Bereavement in the year before a first myocardial infarction: Impact on
           prognosis
    • Authors: Dang Wei, Imre Janszky, Rickard Ljung, Karin Leander, Hua Chen, Fang Fang, Jiong Li, Krisztina D László
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320916958
       
  • Long-term cumulative blood pressure in young adults and incident heart
           failure, coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease: The
           CARDIA study
    • Authors: Chike C Nwabuo, Duke Appiah, Henrique T Moreira, Henrique D Vasconcellos, Yuichiro Yano, Jared P Reis, Ravi V Shah, Venkatesh L Murthy, Norrina B Allen, Stephen Sidney, Paul Muntner, Cora E Lewis, Donald M Lloyd-Jones, Pamela J Schreiner, Samuel S Gidding, João AC Lima
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915342
       
  • Physical activity attenuates cardiovascular risk and mortality in men and
           women with and without the metabolic syndrome – a 20-year follow-up of a
           population-based cohort of 60-year-olds
    • Authors: Elin Ekblom-Bak, Mats Halldin, Max Vikström, Andreas Stenling, Bruna Gigante, Ulf de Faire, Karin Leander, Mai-Lis Hellénius
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320916596
       
  • Non-genetic risk factors for atrial fibrillation are equally important in
           both young and old age: A nationwide population-based study
    • Authors: Yun Gi Kim, Kyung-Do Han, Jong-Il Choi, Yun Young Choi, Ha Young Choi, Ki Yung Boo, Do Young Kim, Kwang-No Lee, Jaemin Shim, Jin-Seok Kim, Yong Gyu Park, Young-Hoon Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915664
       
  • Rays of light into the ‘black-box’ of exercise hypertension
    • Authors: Birna Bjarnason-Wehrens, Hans-Georg Predel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320918343
       
  • The results are in: Cardiovascular benefits of glucagon-like peptide-1
           receptor agonists – a trial sequential analysis
    • Authors: Jeffrey Shi Kai Chan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320918722
       
  • Imaging subclinical atherosclerosis in cardiovascular risk stratification
    • Authors: Michaela Kozakova, Carlo Palombo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320916589
       
  • After surviving cancer, cardiovascular prevention should not be forgotten
    • Authors: Jakub J Regieli, Marcel ThB Twickler
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-11T06:20:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320918426
       
  • The Coronary ARteriogenesis with combined Heparin and EXercise therapy in
           chronic refractory Angina (CARHEXA) trial: A double-blind, randomized,
           placebo-controlled stress echocardiographic study
    • Authors: Marija T Petrovic, Ana Djordjevic-Dikic, Vojislav Giga, Nikola Boskovic, Vladan Vukcevic, Vladimir Cvetic, Ana Mladenovic, Oliver Radmili, Zeljko Markovic, Milan Dobric, Srdjan Aleksandric, Milorad Tesic, Stefan Juricic, Biljana Nedeljkovic Beleslin, Sinisa Stojkovic, Miodrag C Ostojic, Branko Beleslin, Eugenio Picano
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-09T02:07:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915661
       
  • Impact of diesel exposure on human health: the saga
           continues …
    • Authors: Jürgen H Prochaska, Felix Müller, Philipp S Wild
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-09T02:07:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915335
       
  • The Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health Trial (MACH15): Design and
           methods for a randomized trial of moderate alcohol consumption and
           cardiometabolic risk
    • Authors: Donna Spiegelman, Laura C Lovato, Polyna Khudyakov, Trine L Wilkens, Clement A Adebamowo, Sally N Adebamowo, Lawrence J Appel, Joline WJ Beulens, Janelle W Coughlin, Lars Ove Dragsted, Howard J Edenberg, Jane N Eriksen, Ramon Estruch, Diederick E Grobbee, Pablo E Gulayin, Vilma Irazola, John H Krystal, Mariana Lazo, Margaret M Murray, Eric B Rimm, Ilse C Schrieks, Jeff D Williamson, Kenneth J Mukamal
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-06T01:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912376
       
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness and cancer in men with cardiovascular disease:
           Analysis from the Veterans Exercise Testing Study
    • Authors: Baruch Vainshelboim, Khin Chan, Zhongming Chen, Jonathan Myers
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T01:33:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320916595
       
  • EUROASPIRE V and uncontrolled risk factors in primary prevention:
           Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in the making
    • Authors: Raul D Santos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T01:33:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915662
       
  • EAPC’s ‘Country of the Month’ prevention web section
           going global
    • Authors: Arne Janssen, Joep Perk, Arno Hoes, Paul Dendale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T01:33:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915808
       
  • Cardiovascular complications of obesity during early pregnancy:
           methodological and practical implications
    • Authors: Alex Dregan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T01:33:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915809
       
  • Crouching tiger, hidden dragon: insulin resistance and the risk of atrial
           fibrillation
    • Authors: Marija Polovina, Gordana Krljanac, Milika Ašanin, Petar M Seferović
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T01:33:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912626
       
  • PCSK9 inhibitors: Going forward and beyond
    • Authors: Armin Attar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T01:33:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320916964
       
  • Achievement of European guideline-recommended lipid levels
           post-percutaneous coronary intervention: A population-level observational
           cohort study
    • Authors: Daniel E Harris, Arron Lacey, Ashley Akbari, Fatemeh Torabi, Dave Smith, Geraint Jenkins, Daniel Obaid, Alex Chase, Mike Gravenor, Julian Halcox
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-01T01:18:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914115
       
  • Managing refractory angina – is exercise with co-administered
           heparin the solution'
    • Authors: Attila Kardos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-01T01:18:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915346
       
  • Association between ideal cardiovascular health and risk of sudden cardiac
           death and all-cause mortality among middle-aged men in Finland
    • Authors: Nzechukwu M Isiozor, Setor K Kunutsor, Ari Voutilainen, Sudhir Kurl, Jussi Kauhanen, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-04-01T01:18:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915338
       
  • Profile and treatment of chronic coronary syndromes in European Society of
           Cardiology member countries: The ESC EORP CICD-LT registry
    • Authors: Michel Komajda, Francesco Cosentino, Roberto Ferrari, Mathieu Kerneis, Elena Kosmachova, Cécile Laroche, Aldo P Maggioni, Harald Rittger, Philippe G Steg, Hanna Szwed, Luigi Tavazzi, Marco Valgimigli, Chris P Gale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T07:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912491
       
  • Low QRS voltages in Olympic athletes: Prevalence and clinical correlates
    • Authors: Federica Mango, Stefano Caselli, Andreas Luchetti, Antonio Pelliccia
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914758
       
  • We need better data on how to manage myocarditis in athletes
    • Authors: Paul D Thompson, G William Dec
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915545
       
  • Predicting 10-year mortality in older adults using VO2max, oxygen uptake
           efficiency slope and frailty class
    • Authors: Erik Fung, Leong Ting Lui, Finn Gustafsson, Forrest CF Yau, Jason CS Leung, Petri Wiklund, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Peter S Macdonald, Jean Woo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914435
       
  • The Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health Trial: Public health
           advocates should support good science, not undermine it
    • Authors: William DeJong
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915802
       
  • How research on depression could now fundamentally change preventive
           cardiology
    • Authors: Maximilian Andreas Storz
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915804
       
  • Exercise cardiac power and the risk of myocardial infarction and fatal
           coronary heart disease events in men
    • Authors: Sudhir Kurl, Sae Young Jae, Timo H Mäkikallio, Magnus J Hagnäs, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914734
       
  • The Admit-AF risk score: A clinical risk score for predicting hospital
           admissions in patients with atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Pascal Meyre, Stefanie Aeschbacher, Steffen Blum, Michael Coslovsky, Jürg H Beer, Giorgio Moschovitis, Nicolas Rodondi, Oliver Baretella, Richard Kobza, Christian Sticherling, Leo H Bonati, Matthias Schwenkglenks, Michael Kühne, Stefan Osswald, David Conen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:23:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320915350
       
  • Secondary prevention through comprehensive cardiovascular rehabilitation:
           From knowledge to implementation. 2020 update. A position paper from the
           Secondary Prevention and Rehabilitation Section of the European
           Association of Preventive Cardiology
    • Authors: Marco Ambrosetti, Ana Abreu, Ugo Corrà, Constantinos H Davos, Dominique Hansen, Ines Frederix, Marie C Iliou, Roberto FE Pedretti, Jean-Paul Schmid, Carlo Vigorito, Heinz Voller, Mathias Wilhelm, Massimo F Piepoli, Birna Bjarnason-Wehrens, Thomas Berger, Alain Cohen-Solal, Veronique Cornelissen, Paul Dendale, Wolfram Doehner, Dan Gaita, Andreas B Gevaert, Hareld Kemps, Nicolle Kraenkel, Jari Laukkanen, Miguel Mendes, Josef Niebauer, Maria Simonenko, Ann-Dorthe Olsen Zwisler
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320913379
       
  • Rivaroxaban plus aspirin for the prevention of ischaemic events in
           patients with cardiovascular disease: a cost-effectiveness study
    • Authors: Svenja Petersohn, Xavier Pouwels, Bram Ramaekers, Arina ten Cate-Hoek, Manuela Joore
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T04:36:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320913380
       
  • Alcohol and heart health: The need for a randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Dag S Thelle
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T04:36:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914433
       
  • Are statins back for patients on hemodialysis'
    • Authors: Zaid I Almarzooq, Deepak L Bhatt
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T04:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912074
       
  • Cardiac rehabilitation: Challenges and strategies for the day after
    • Authors: Alexandros Stefanidis
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T04:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914098
       
  • Facing a new paradigm: Not retreating but advancing in another direction
    • Authors: Gabriel L de Oliveira Salvador
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912899
       
  • Women and cardiac rehabilitation: Moving beyond barriers to solutions'
    • Authors: Faye Forsyth, Christi Deaton
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911843
       
  • Circulating cell-free DNA levels are associated with adverse outcomes in
           heart failure: testing liquid biopsy in heart failure
    • Authors: Andrea Salzano, Muhammad Zubair Israr, Daniel Fernandez Garcia, Laura Middleton, Roberta D’Assante, Alberto M Marra, Michele Arcopinto, Yoshiyuki Yazaki, Dennis Bernieh, Shabana Cassambai, Karen Page, Giuseppe Rengo, Eduardo Bossone, Antonio Cittadini, Jacqueline A Shaw, Toru Suzuki
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912375
       
  • Physical inactivity after valve surgery is associated with increased
           mortality. Where do we go from here'
    • Authors: Véronique A Cornelissen, Roselien Buys
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912897
       
  • The determinant effect of competing events in the analysis of heart
           failure incidence after myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Alberto Cordero, Vicente Bertomeu-González, José Ramón González-Juanatey
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320913183
       
  • Subjective assessment of functional capacity to predict postoperative
           myocardial injury and death: Hope or hype'
    • Authors: Leonardo Roever, Tong Liu, Gary Tse, Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912624
       
  • ‘Fishing’ for therapies to ‘net’ cost-effective
           benefits
    • Authors: M Wesley Milks
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320913812
       
  • Cardiovascular risk factors in American young adults: The need for general
           population health examination surveys
    • Authors: Susana Sans Menéndez
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320910860
       
  • Exercise intolerance and skeletal muscle metaboreflex activity in chronic
           heart failure: Do we need to recruit more muscle in exercise training'
           
    • Authors: Ioannis D Laoutaris
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912623
       
  • Quantifying the impact of delayed delivery of cardiac rehabilitation on
           patients’ health
    • Authors: Sebastian Hinde, Alexander Harrison, Laura Bojke, Patrick Doherty
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912625
       
  • Socioeconomic disparities in the management of coronary heart disease in
           438 general practices in Australia
    • Authors: George Mnatzaganian, Crystal Man Ying Lee, Suzanne Robinson, Freddy Sitas, Clara K Chow, Mark Woodward, Rachel R Huxley
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912087
       
  • Short-term prognosis of normalising serum potassium following an episode
           of hypokalaemia in patients with chronic heart failure
    • Authors: Mette Aldahl, Christoffer Polcwiartek, Line Davidsen, Kristian Kragholm, Peter Søgaard, Christian Torp-Pedersen, Maria L Krogager
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Background/aimIt is well known that patients with chronic heart failure and hypokalaemia have increased mortality risk. We investigated the impact of normalising serum potassium following an episode of hypokalaemia on short-term mortality among patients with chronic heart failure.Methods and resultsWe identified 1673 patients diagnosed with chronic heart failure who had a serum potassium measurement under 3.5 mmol/l within 14 days and one year after initiated medical treatment with both loop diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers. A second serum potassium measurement was required 8–30 days after the episode of hypokalaemia. All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality was examined within 90 days from the second serum potassium measurement. Mortality was examined according to six predefined potassium groups derived from the second measurement:
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T04:04:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911154
       
  • High awareness of diabetes as a key cardiovascular risk factor among
           healthcare professionals but suboptimal treatment: Results from a survey
           of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology
    • Authors: Dominique Hansen, Linda Mellbin, Francesco Cosentino, Dirk De Bacquer, Diederick Grobbee, Lisa Van Ryckeghem, Eberhard Standl, Joline WJ Beulens
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-25T02:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911845
       
  • Early cardiovascular structural and functional abnormalities as a guide to
           future morbid events
    • Authors: Juhani S Koskinen, Olli T Raitakari
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-25T02:00:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908700
       
  • Left ventricular hypertrophy in athletes: How to differentiate between
           hypertensive heart disease and athlete’s heart
    • Authors: Flavio D’Ascenzi, Caterina Fiorentini, Francesca Anselmi, Sergio Mondillo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-25T02:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911850
       
  • Hypokalemia in heart failure: A low or a high point'
    • Authors: Jonathan W Cunningham, Mandeep R Mehra
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-22T02:25:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914745
       
  • Primary prevention efforts are poorly developed in people at high
           cardiovascular risk: A report from the European Society of Cardiology
           EURObservational Research Programme EUROASPIRE V survey in 16 European
           countries
    • Authors: Kornelia Kotseva, Guy De Backer, Dirk De Bacquer, Lars Rydén, Arno Hoes, Diederick Grobbee, Aldo Maggioni, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Catriona Jennings, Ana Abreu, Carlos Aguiar, Jolita Badariene, Jan Bruthans, Renata Cifkova, Kairat Davletov, Mirza Dilic, Maryna Dolzhenko, Dan Gaita, Nina Gotcheva, Hosam Hasan-Ali, Piotr Jankowski, Christos Lionis, Silvia Mancas, Davor Milićić, Erkin Mirrakhimov, Rafael Oganov, Nana Pogosova, Željko Reiner, Duško Vulić, David Wood
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundEuropean Action on Secondary and Primary Prevention by Intervention to Reduce Events (EUROASPIRE) V in primary care was carried out by the European Society of Cardiology EURObservational Research Programme in 2016–2018. The main objective was to determine whether the 2016 Joint European Societies’ guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in people at high cardiovascular risk have been implemented in clinical practice.MethodsThe method used was a cross-sectional survey in 78 centres from 16 European countries. Patients without a history of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease either started on blood pressure and/or lipid and/or glucose lowering treatments were identified and interviewed ≥ 6 months after the start of medication.ResultsA total of 3562 medical records were reviewed and 2759 patients (57.6% women; mean age 59.0 ± 11.6 years) interviewed (interview rate 70.0%). The risk factor control was poor with 18.1% of patients being smokers, 43.5% obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) and 63.8% centrally obese (waist circumference ≥88 cm for women, ≥102 cm for men). Of patients on blood pressure lowering medication 47.0% reached the target of
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-20T03:42:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908698
       
  • Non-HDL cholesterol series: PCSK9 inhibitor new season!
    • Authors: Dan Gaita, Laura Gaita, Adelina Mihaescu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T05:12:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320913375
       
  • Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease: A neglected and dangerous
           liaison
    • Authors: Edoardo Sciatti, Claudio Ceconi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T05:12:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320913381
       
  • New perspective on the risk markers for left atrial thrombosis in patients
           with atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Xuan Zhang, Mengjie Hu, Xiying Wang, Chi Zhang, Wanwan Chen, Songzan Chen, Jintao Zhou, Yuxiao Chen, Lian Lou, Guoping Chen, Fanghong Dong, Shenjiang Hu, Liangrong Zheng, Jian Yang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T05:12:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912084
       
  • Is caffeine or coffee consumption a risk for new-onset atrial
           fibrillation' A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Chayakrit Krittanawong, Anusith Tunhasiriwet, Zhen Wang, Ann M Farrell, Sakkarin Chirapongsathorn, HongJu Zhang, Takeshi Kitai, Davendra Mehta
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-18T08:00:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908385
       
  • Attenuation of peri-vascular fat at computed tomography to measure
           inflammation in ascending aorta aneurysms
    • Authors: Nicola Gaibazzi, Daniele Sartorio, Domenico Tuttolomondo, Fiorenza Napolitano, Carmine Siniscalchi, Bruno Borrello, Anselmo Alessandro Palumbo, Francesco Nicolini
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-18T04:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911846
       
  • Molecular imaging of active coronary micro-calcification with 18F-NaF and
           PET: emergence of a new biomarker of the vulnerable atherosclerotic
           plaque'
    • Authors: Thomas H Schindler, Brittany Varney, Sudhir Jain
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-18T04:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320912627
       
  • Age- and gender-specific upper limits and reference equations for
           workload-indexed systolic blood pressure response during bicycle ergometry
           
    • Authors: Kristofer Hedman, Thomas Lindow, Viktor Elmberg, Lars Brudin, Magnus Ekström
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundGuidelines recommend considering workload in interpretation of the systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to exercise, but reference values are lacking.DesignThis was a retrospective, consecutive cohort study.MethodsFrom 12,976 subjects aged 18–85 years who performed a bicycle ergometer exercise test at one centre in Sweden during the years 2005–2016, we excluded those with prevalent cardiovascular disease, comorbidities, cardiac risk factors or medications. We extracted SBP, heart rate and workload (watt) from ≥ 3 time points from each test. The SBP/watt-slope and the SBP/watt-ratio at peak exercise were calculated. Age- and sex-specific mean values, standard deviations and 90th and 95th percentiles were determined. Reference equations for workload-indexed and peak SBP were derived using multiple linear regression analysis, including sex, age, workload, SBP at rest and anthropometric variables as predictors.ResultsA final sample of 3839 healthy subjects (n = 1620 female) were included. While females had lower mean peak SBP than males (188 ± 24 vs 202 ± 22 mmHg, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-10T10:35:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320909667
       
  • Replacing physical with virtual genetic tests: The importance of conscious
           methodological decisions
    • Authors: Wouter B van Dijk, Ewoud Schuit
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-10T09:24:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904525
       
  • Lessons learned from community- and home-based physical activity programs:
           A narrative review of factors influencing women’s participation in
           cardiac rehabilitation
    • Authors: Sol Vidal-Almela, Brenna Czajkowski, Stephanie A Prince, Daniele Chirico, Kimberley L Way, Andrew L Pipe, Jennifer L Reed
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundCardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in women. Despite the well-known benefits of cardiac rehabilitation, it remains underutilized, especially among women. Physical activity programs in the community, however, attract a large female population, suggesting that they overcome barriers to physical activity encountered by women. The characteristics of interventions that extend beyond the traditional cardiac rehabilitation model and promote physical activity merit examination.ObjectivesThis narrative review aimed to: (a) summarize women’s barriers to attend cardiac rehabilitation; (b) examine the characteristics of community- and home-based physical activity or lifestyle coaching interventions; and (c) discuss which barriers may be addressed by these alternative programs.MethodsStudies were included if they: (a) were published within the past 10 years; (b) included ≥70% women with a mean age ≥45 years; (c) implemented a community- or home-based physical activity intervention or a lifestyle education/behavioral coaching program; and (d) aimed to improve physical activity levels or physical function.ResultsMost interventions reported high (≥70%) participation rates and significant increases in physical activity levels at follow-up; some improved physical function and/or cardiovascular disease risk factors. Community- and home-based interventions address women’s cardiac rehabilitation barriers by: implementing appealing modes of physical activity (e.g. dancing, group-walking, technology-based balance exercises); adapting the program to meet participants’ needs; offering flexible options regarding timing and setting (e.g. closer to home, the workplace or faith-based institutions); and promoting social interactions.ConclusionCardiac rehabilitation can be enhanced by understanding the specific needs of women; novel elements such as program offerings, convenient settings and opportunities for socialization should be considered when designing cardiac rehabilitation programs.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-08T12:05:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320907748
       
  • Persistence and adherence to antihypertensive drugs in newly treated
           hypertensive patients according to initial prescription
    • Authors: Su-Min Jeong, Shinhye Kim, Dong Wook Shin, Kyungdo Han, Sang Hyun Park, Sang Hyuk Kim, Yul-Hee Kim, Yong-Chol Kwon
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-06T08:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900326
       
  • How to prevent cardiovascular events from recurring
    • Authors: Katharina Lechner, Clemens von Schacky
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T05:11:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320909943
       
  • Cardiovascular screening and prevention strategies in women with history
           of preeclampsia: One size does not fit all
    • Authors: Marija Glisic, Taulant Muka, Oscar H Franco
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T05:11:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908977
       
  • Caffeinated coffee consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation in two
           Spanish cohorts
    • Authors: P Bazal, A Gea, AM Navarro, J Salas-Salvadó, D Corella, A Alonso-Gómez, M Fitó, C Muñoz-Bravo, R Estruch, M Fiol, J Lapetra, L Serra-Majem, E Ros, J Rekondo, MA Muñoz, J Basora, JV Sorlí, E Toledo, MA Martínez-González, M Ruiz-Canela
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe association between caffeinated coffee consumption and atrial fibrillation remains unclear. Recent studies suggest an inverse association only between a moderate caffeinated coffee consumption and atrial fibrillation, but others have reported no association. The aim of our study was to prospectively assess the association between caffeinated coffee consumption and atrial fibrillation in two Spanish cohorts, one of adults from a general population and another of elderly participants at high cardiovascular risk.Methods and resultsWe included 18,983 and 6479 participants from the ‘Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra’ (SUN) and ‘Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea’ (PREDIMED) cohorts, respectively. Participants were classified according to their caffeinated coffee consumption in three groups: ≤3 cups/month, 1–7 cups/week, and>1 cup/day. We identified 97 atrial fibrillation cases after a median follow-up of 10.3 years (interquartile range 6.5–13.5), in the SUN cohort and 250 cases after 4.4 years median follow-up (interquartile range 2.8–5.8) in the PREDIMED study. No significant associations were observed in the SUN cohort although a J-shaped association was suggested. A significant inverse association between the intermediate category of caffeinated coffee consumption (1–7 cups/week) and atrial fibrillation was observed in PREDIMED participants with a multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 0.53 (95% confidence interval 0.36–0.79) when compared with participants who did not consume caffeinated coffee or did it only occasionally. No association was found for higher levels of caffeinated coffee consumption (>1 cup per day), hazard ratio = 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.49–1.28). In the meta-analysis of both PREDIMED and SUN studies, the hazard ratio for intermediate consumption of caffeinated coffee was 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.44–0.82) without evidence of heterogeneity. Similar findings were found for the association between caffeine intake and atrial fibrillation risk.ConclusionIntermediate levels of caffeinated coffee consumption (1–7 cups/week) were associated with a reduction in atrial fibrillation risk in two prospective Mediterranean cohorts.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T05:11:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320909065
       
  • High intensity interval training for heart failure with preserved ejection
           fraction: High hopes for intense exercise
    • Authors: Paul J Beckers, Andreas B Gevaert
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T05:11:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320910294
       
  • Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation estimated risk and prevalent
           subclinical atherosclerosis in coronary and carotid arteries: A
           population-based cohort analysis from the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage
           Study
    • Authors: Carl J Östgren, Stefan Söderberg, Karin Festin, Oskar Angerås, Göran Bergström, Anders Blomberg, John Brandberg, Kerstin Cederlund, Mats Eliasson, Gunnar Engström, David Erlinge, Erika Fagman, Emil Hagström, Lars Lind, Maria Mannila, Ulf Nilsson, Jonas Oldgren, Ellen Ostenfeld, Anders Persson, Jonas Persson, Margaretha Persson, Annika Rosengren, Johan Sundström, Eva Swahn, Jan E Engvall, Tomas Jernberg
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundIt is not clear if the European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation algorithm is useful for identifying prevalent subclinical atherosclerosis in a population of apparently healthy individuals. Our aim was to explore the association between the risk estimates from Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation and prevalent subclinical atherosclerosis.DesignThe design of this study was as a cross-sectional analysis from a population-based study cohort.MethodsFrom the general population, the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study randomly invited individuals aged 50–64 years and enrolled 13,411 participants mean age 57 (standard deviation 4.3) years; 46% males between November 2013–December 2016. Associations between Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation risk estimates and coronary artery calcification and plaques in the carotid arteries by using imaging data from a computed tomography of the heart and ultrasonography of the carotid arteries were examined.ResultsCoronary calcification was present in 39.5% and carotid plaque in 56.0%. In men, coronary artery calcium score>0 ranged from 40.7–65.9% and presence of carotid plaques from 54.5% to 72.8% in the age group 50–54 and 60–65 years, respectively. In women, the corresponding difference was from 17.1–38.9% and from 41.0–58.4%. A doubling of Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation was associated with an increased probability to have coronary artery calcium score>0 (odds ratio: 2.18 (95% confidence interval 2.07–2.30)) and to have>1 carotid plaques (1.67 (1.61–1.74)).ConclusionSystematic Coronary Risk Evaluation estimated risk is associated with prevalent subclinical atherosclerosis in two major vascular beds in a general population sample without established cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. Thus, the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation risk chart may be of use for estimating the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-04T05:22:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320909300
       
  • Myocarditis in athletes: A clinical perspective
    • Authors: Martin Halle, Leonhard Binzenhöfer, Heiko Mahrholdt, Michael Johannes Schindler, Katrin Esefeld, Carsten Tschöpe
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Myocarditis is an important cause of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) in both physically active individuals and athletes. Elite athletes seem to have an increased risk for viral infection and subsequent myocarditis due to increased exposure to pathogens (worldwide traveling/international competition) or impaired immune system (continuing training during infections/resuming training early thereafter, strenuous exercise training or competition, and exercising in extreme weather conditions). Initial clinical presentation is variable, but athletes characteristically express non-specific symptoms of fatigue, muscle soreness, increased heart rate at rest, as well as during exercise and reduced overall exercise capacity. Beyond resting electrocardiogram (ECG), cardiac biomarkers, echocardiography, and 24-hour Holter ECG, diagnostic work-up should include cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) assessing inflammation, oedema, and fibrosis by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), respectively, as these measures are crucial for prognosis and sports eligibility. For patients with insufficient cardiac recovery, endomyocardial biopsy is recommended to clarify differential diagnoses and initiate specific treatment options. In uncomplicated cases with normal left ventricular function during acute phase and absent LGE, eligibility for sports can be attested to three months after clinical recovery. In those with persistent pathological findings, even after six months, the risk for SCD remains increased and resuming exercise beyond recreational activities can only be recommended individually based on course of disease, left ventricular function, arrhythmias, pattern of LGE in CMR, as well as intensity and volume of exercise performed during training and competition. For all athletes, follow-up examination should be performed yearly.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-04T05:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320909670
       
  • Glittre Activities Daily Living Test: Physiological responses in patients
           with heart failure
    • Authors: Miguel P Almeida, Tiago Montanha, Marta Marques, Pedro M Silva, Sofia Viamonte, Fernando Ribeiro, Mário Santos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-04T05:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911173
       
  • Efficacy of mobile health cardiovascular risk-reduction strategies in
           cancer survivors
    • Authors: Alexandra C Murphy, Anoop N Koshy, Johanna Mousley, Georgina Meehan, Phelia Kunniardy, David Clark, Leighton Kearney, Belinda Yeo, Omar Farouque, Matias B Yudi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320907548
       
  • Leisure-time cross-country skiing and the risk of venous thromboembolism:
           A prospective cohort study
    • Authors: Setor K Kunutsor, Timo A Lakka, Sudhir Kurl, Timo H Mäkikallio, Sae Young Jae, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908978
       
  • Underperformance of clinical risk scores in identifying vascular
           
    • Authors: George C Drosos, George Konstantonis, Petros P Sfikakis, Maria G Tektonidou
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to assess the performance of eight clinical risk prediction scores to identify individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, as defined by the presence of atherosclerotic plaques.MethodsCVD risk was estimated in 210 eligible SLE patients without prior CVD or diabetes mellitus (female: 93.3%, mean age: 44.8 ± 12 years) using five generic (Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), Framingham Risk Score (FRS), Pooled Cohort Risk Equations (ASCVD), Globorisk, Prospective Cardiovascular Münster Study risk calculator (PROCAM)) and three ‘SLE-adapted’ (modified-SCORE, modified-FRS, QRESEARCH risk estimator, version 3 (QRISK3)) CVD risk scores, as well as ultrasound examination of the carotid and femoral arteries. Calibration, discrimination and classification measures to identify high CVD risk based on the presence of atherosclerotic plaques were assessed for all risk models. CVD risk reclassification was applied for all scores by incorporating ultrasound results.ResultsModerate calibration (p-value range from 0.38 to 0.63) and discrimination (area under the curve 0.73–0.84), and low-to-moderate sensitivity (8.3–71.4%) and classification ability (Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) 0.25–0.47) were observed for all risk models to identify patients with plaques at any arterial site as high-risk. MCC was improved for modified-FRS versus FRS (0.43 vs 0.36), but not for modified-SCORE versus SCORE (0.25 vs 0.25). Based on plaque presence, CVD risk was upgraded to high-risk in 10%, 16.1%, 20.5%, 21.5%, 24%, 28.2% and 28.6% of cases classified as non-high-risk by QRISK3, modified-FRS, Globorisk, FRS/PROCAM, ASCVD, modified-SCORE and SCORE, respectively.ConclusionsMost of the five generic and three ‘SLE-adapted’ clinical risk scores underestimated high CVD risk defined by atherosclerotic plaque presence in patients with SLE.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906650
       
  • Acute effects of high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity
           continuous training on arterial stiffness in young obese women
    • Authors: Karin Hortmann, Pierre Boutouyrie, João C Locatelli, Gustavo H de Oliveira, Caroline F Simões, Victor H de Souza Mendes, Higor B Reck, Rogério TP Okawa, Wendell A Lopes
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320909302
       
  • Are the existing athlete’s ECG interpretation criteria also valid when
           screening master athletes'
    • Authors: Luis Serratosa
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320907745
       
  • How to remedy the heterogeneity of exercise prescription for
           cardiovascular disease patients
    • Authors: Wei-guang Li, Pei-liang Liu, Xin-an Zhang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908077
       
  • One step behind – although incidence decreases, mortality in patients
           with lower-extremity arterial disease (LEAD) lags behind cardiovascular
           disease
    • Authors: Jean-Paul Schmid
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320910292
       
  • Association between insulin resistance and risk of atrial fibrillation in
           non-diabetics
    • Authors: Yonggu Lee, Sung Joo Cha, Jung-Hwan Park, Jeong-Hun Shin, Young-Hyo Lim, Hwan-Cheol Park, Jinho Shin, Chun Ki Kim, Jin-Kyu Park
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPrevious studies from Western countries have been unable to demonstrate a relationship between insulin resistance and new-onset atrial fibrillation. We aimed to evaluate this relationship in the nondiabetic Asian population.MethodsBetween 2001–2003, 8175 adults (mean age 51.5 years, 53% women) without both existing atrial fibrillation and diabetes and with insulin resistance measures at baseline were enrolled and were followed by biennial electrocardiograms thereafter until 2014. We constructed multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models for risk of incident atrial fibrillation.ResultsOver a median follow-up of 12.3 years, 136 participants (1.89/1000 person-years) developed atrial fibrillation. Higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was independently associated with newly developed atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.14–2.28). Atrial fibrillation development increased at the HOMA-IR levels approximately between 1–2.5, and then plateaued afterwards (p = 0.031).ConclusionThere is a significant relationship between insulin resistance and atrial fibrillation development independent of other known risk factors, including obesity in a nondiabetic Asian population.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908706
       
  • Obesity, overweight and risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality in
           young women
    • Authors: Pigi Dikaiou, Lena Björck, Martin Adiels, Christina E Lundberg, Zacharias Mandalenakis, Karin Manhem, Annika Rosengren
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to investigate the relation between body mass index (BMI) in young women, using weight early in pregnancy as a proxy for pre-pregnancy weight, and risk for early cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality.Methods and resultsIn this prospective, registry-based study, we used weight data in early pregnancy from women, registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, and who gave birth between 1982 and 2014 (n = 1,495,499; median age 28.3 years). Of the women, 118,212 (7.9%) were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and 29,630 (2.0%) severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2). After a follow-up of median 16.3 years, we identified 3295 and 4375 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and ischemic stroke (IS) corresponding to 13.4 and 17.8 per 100,000 observation years, respectively, occurring at mean ages of 49.8 and 47.3 years. Compared to women with a BMI 20–
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908983
       
  • Activation of invariant natural killer T cells by alpha-galactosylceramide
           ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice
    • Authors: Yoshikuni Obata, Naoki Ishimori, Akimichi Saito, Shintaro Kinugawa, Takashi Yokota, Shingo Takada, Ippei Nakano, Naoya Kakutani, Katsuma Yamanashi, Toshihisa Anzai
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901208
       
  • Increased awareness, inadequate treatment, and poor control of
           cardiovascular risk factors in American young adults: 2005–2016
    • Authors: Rajat Kalra, Vibhu Parcha, Nirav Patel, Anirudh Bhargava, Katherine S Booker, Garima Arora, Pankaj Arora
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThere are little contemporary data about cardiovascular risk factors among young adults. We defined trends in diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia in American adults aged 18–44 years.MethodsThe National Health and Nutrition Examination Study serial cross-sectional surveys were used to define three time periods: 2005–2008, 2009–2012, and 2013–2016. Age-adjusted weighted trends of prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of DM, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia were calculated by linear regression modelling in the overall sample, males, and females. Trends were calculated after adjustment for age, race, body mass index, smoking status, education attainment, income, insurance status, and number of healthcare visits.ResultsFrom 2005–2008 to 2013–2016, 15,171 participants were identified. DM prevalence was stable ∼3%, hypertension prevalence was stable ∼11.0%, and hypercholesterolemia prevalence declined from 11.5% to 9.0% (ptrend = 0.02). DM awareness stayed stable between 61.1 and 74.1%, hypertension awareness increased from 68.7 to 77.7% (ptrend = 0.05), and hypercholesterolemia awareness was stable between 46.8 and 54.1%. DM and hypertension treatment improved markedly (ptrend 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905190
       
  • Locking and loading the bullet against micro-calcification
    • Authors: Alexandru Florea, Agnieszka Morgenroth, Jan Bucerius, Leon J Schurgers, Felix M Mottaghy
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsDespite recent medical advances, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. As (micro)-calcification is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, this review will elaborately discuss advantages of sodium fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) as a reliable cardiovascular imaging technique for identifying the early onset of vascular calcification (i.e. locking onto the target). We assess state-of-the-art meta-analysis and clinical studies of possible treatment options and evaluate the concept of vitamin K supplementation to preserve vascular health (i.e. loading the bullet).Methods and resultsAfter a structured PubMed search, we identified 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) PET as the most suitable technique for detecting micro-calcification. Presenting the pros and cons of available treatments, vitamin K supplementation should be considered as a possible safe and cost-effective option to inhibit vascular (micro)-calcification.ConclusionThis review demonstrates need for more extensive research in the concept of vitamin K supplementation (i.e. loading the bullet) and recommends monitoring the effects on vascular calcification using 18F-NaF PET (i.e. locking onto the target).
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320911138
       
  • Association of adherence to antiretroviral therapy with economic burden of
           cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected population
    • Authors: Chia-Te Liao, Chun-Ting Yang, Pin-Hao Chen, Han Siong Toh, Shihchen Kuo, Zhih-Cherng Chen, Huang-Tz Ou, Nai-Ying Ko, Jung-Der Wang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThere is a lack of studies that rigorously and systematically assess the economic burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) related to the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We aimed to assess the association between adherence to ART and economic burden of CVDs in an HIV-infected population.MethodsTaiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database 2000–2011 was utilized for analyzing 18,071 HIV-infected patients free of CVDs before HIV diagnosis. The level of adherence to ART was measured by the medication possession ratio (MPR). Generalized estimating equations analysis was applied to estimate the cost impact of a variety of CVDs. All costs were presented in 2018 US dollars.ResultsThe incidence of CVDs ranged from 0.17/1000 person-years (cardiogenic shock) to 2.60/1000 person-years (ischemic heart diseases (IHDs)). The mean annual medical cost for a base-case patient without CVDs was US$3000. Having cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infarction, heart failure, arrhythmia, and IHDs increased annual costs by 41%, 33%, 30%, 16%, and 14%, respectively. The cost impact of incident CVDs in years with high adherence to ART (MPR ≥ 0.8) was significantly lower than that in years with low adherence (MPR 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-03-03T04:48:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320908085
       
  • Long-term follow-up with a smartphone application improves exercise
           capacity post cardiac rehabilitation: A randomized controlled trial

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Pernille Lunde, Asta Bye, Astrid Bergland, Jostein Grimsmo, Even Jarstad, Birgitta Blakstad Nilsson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundMobile health interventions, especially smartphone applications (apps), have been proposed as promising interventions for supporting adherence to healthy behaviour in patients post cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The overall aim of the study was to examine the effect of individualized follow-up with an app for one year on peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in patients completing CR.DesignThe study was designed as a single-blinded multicentre randomized controlled trial.MethodsThe intervention group (IG) received individualized follow-up enabled with an app for one year, while the control group (CG) received usual care. The primary outcome was difference in VO2peak. Secondary outcomes included exercise performance (time to exhaustion, peak incline (%) and peak velocity (km/h)), bodyweight, resting blood pressure, lipid profile, triglycerides, exercise habits, health-related quality of life, health status and self-perceived goal achievement.ResultsIn total, 113 patients completing CR (73.4% with coronary artery disease, 16.8% after valve surgery and 9.8% with other heart diseases) were randomly allocated to the IG or CG. Intention to treat analyses showed a statistically significant difference in VO2peak between the groups at follow-up of 2.2 ml/kg/min, 95% confidence interval 0.9–3.5 (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-28T08:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905717
       
  • Cardiac rehabilitation of elderly patients in eight rehabilitation units
           in western Europe: Outcome data from the EU-CaRE multi-centre
           observational study
    • Authors: Eva Prescott, Prisca Eser, Nicolai Mikkelsen, Annette Holdgaard, Thimo Marcin, Matthias Wilhelm, Carlos Peña Gil, José R González-Juanatey, Feriel Moatemri, Marie Christine Iliou, Steffen Schneider, Eike Schromm, Uwe Zeymer, Esther P Meindersma, Antonio Crocamo, Diego Ardissino, Evelien K Kolkman, Leonie F Prins, Astrid E van der Velde, Arnoud WJ Van’t Hof, Ed P de Kluiver
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe European Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Elderly (EU-CaRE) HORIZON 2020 project compares the sustainable effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in elderly patients.Methods and resultsA total of 1633 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or heart valve replacement (HVR), with or without revascularization, aged 65 or above, who participated in CR were included. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), smoking, body mass index, diet, physical activity, serum lipids, psychological distress and medication were assessed before and after CR (T0 and T1) and after 12 months (T2). Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery or surgical HVR had lower VO2peak at T0 and a greater increase to T1 and T2 (2.8 and 4.4 ml/kg/min, respectively) than CAD patients undergoing percutaneous or no revascularization (1.6 and 1.4 ml/kg/min, respectively). After multivariable adjustment, earlier CR uptake was associated with greater improvements in VO2peak. The proportion of CAD patients with three or more uncontrolled risk factors declined from 58.4% at T0 to 40.1% at T2 (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-27T05:33:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903869
       
  • Coronary heart disease incidence still decreased between 2006 and 2014 in
           France, except in young age groups: Results from the French MONICA
           registries
    • Authors: Aline Meirhaeghe, Michèle Montaye, Katia Biasch, Samantha Huo Yung Kai, Marie Moitry, Philippe Amouyel, Jean Ferrières, Jean Dallongeville
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundOver the past few decades decreases in coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality rates have been observed throughout the western world. We sought to determine whether the acute coronary event rates had decreased between 2006 and 2014 among French adults, and whether there were sex and age-specific differences.MethodsWe examined the French MONICA population-based registries monitoring the Lille urban area in northern France, the Bas-Rhin county in north-eastern France and the Haute Garonne county in south-western France. All acute coronary events among men and women aged 35–74 were collected.ResultsOver the study period, the age-standardised attack rates decreased in both men (annual percentage change −1.5%, P = 0.0006) and women (annual percentage change −2.1%, P = 0.002). Also, the age-standardised incidence rates decreased in both men (annual percentage change −0.9%, P = 0.03) and women (annual percentage change −1.8%, P = 0.002) due to decreases in the 65–74 year age group. In men, age-standardised mortality rates decreased by 3.5% per year (P = 0.0004), especially in the 55–64 and 65–74 year age groups. In women, these rates decreased by 4.3% per year (P = 0.0009), particularly in the 35–44 and 65–74 year age groups. We also observed significant decreases in case fatality among both men (annual percentage change −1.7%, P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-26T08:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899193
       
  • Diabetes and heart failure post-acute myocardial infarction: Important
           associations and need for evidence-based interventions
    • Authors: Justin Parizo, Kenneth W Mahaffey
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T12:13:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904232
       
  • The association between rotating night shift work and hypertension: A
           cross-sectional study among male workers
    • Authors: Masoud Khosravipour, Mostafa Shah Mohammadi, Hossein Valadi Athar, Iraj Jamebozorgi, Payam Khanlari, Faramarz Gharagozlou
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T12:13:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906921
       
  • Medication persistence and adherence: A key approach to improve
           hypertension management
    • Authors: Hyoung-Won Cho, Si-Hyuck Kang, Cheol-Ho Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T12:13:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905191
       
  • Association of smoking with coronary artery disease and myocardial
           infarction: A Mendelian randomization study
    • Authors: Yunlong Lu, Zhen Wang, Liangrong Zheng
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320907747
       
  • Status of dyslipidemia management and statin undertreatment in Korean
           cancer survivors: A Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination
           Survey study
    • Authors: Sujeong Shin, Dong Wook Shin, In Young Cho, Su-Min Jeong, Hyein Jung
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsDue to improving cancer treatment results, non-cancer mortality is an important issue for cancer survivors. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in Korea and globally. In addition to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease, the use of statins has led to an overall reduction in cancer mortality in recent observational studies. We investigated the status of current dyslipidemia management in cancer survivors with reference to 2018 guidelines.MethodsThe study is a cross-sectional analysis of 1460 cancer survivors aged from 40 to 75 years who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2016. Dyslipidemia management status among cancer survivors was assessed according to 2018 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines and Korean Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score guidelines.ResultsThe rate of treatment for dyslipidemia was 8.5% for males, 13.8% for females, and 11.9% overall. Among cancer survivors who were not receiving treatment for dyslipidemia, 59.6% of males, 34.2% of females and 43.9% of total cancer survivors would have been eligible for statin therapy under the 2018 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines and Korean Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score guidelines. The rate of undertreatment of dyslipidemia increased with age and length of time since cancer diagnosis.ConclusionNearly 50% of cancer survivors remain untreated although they are eligible for statin therapy. This emphasizes the need for more attention to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease among cancer survivors.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905722
       
  • The management of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia with high
           lipoprotein (a) and statin intolerance. The guidelines a mirage'
    • Authors: Beatrice Dal Pino, Federico Bigazzi, Francesco Sbrana, Tiziana Sampietro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905727
       
  • Triglyceride concentrations and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol
           goal attainment in the ODYSSEY phase 3 trials with alirocumab
    • Authors: Antonio J Vallejo-Vaz, Lawrence A Leiter, Stefano Del Prato, Marja-Riitta Taskinen, Dirk Müller-Wieland, Maja Bujas-Bobanovic, Alexia Letierce, Jonas Mandel, Rita Samuel, Kausik K Ray
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsGuidelines recommend targeting non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to reduce cardiovascular risk. We assessed the impact of baseline triglycerides on non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment in 10 phase 3 trials with alirocumab versus control (n = 4983).MethodsTrials were grouped into four pools based on alirocumab dose (75–150 mg every 2 weeks), control (placebo/ezetimibe) and statin use. Baseline triglyceride quintiles were built within each pool. Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment (very high risk:
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905185
       
  • A scoring system for predicting individual treatment effects of statins in
           type 2 diabetes patients on haemodialysis
    • Authors: Bernd Genser, Christoph Wanner, Winfried März
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsHaemodialysis patients have high cardiovascular disease risk. Although statins reduce this risk in chronic kidney disease, randomised trials in haemodialysis patients show no benefit. Post-hoc analyses of the German Diabetes Dialysis (4D) study identified patient-specific markers associated with heterogeneous treatment effects. We combined these markers to develop a score for predicting individual effects of statins in these patients.Methods and resultsWe used data from the 4D study, enrolling 1255 haemodialysis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, randomised to atorvastatin or placebo and followed for a composite cardiovascular endpoint. We calculated two scores: score 1 based on all 23 predictive markers and score 2 based on 17 clinically accessible markers. Groups stratified by score 1 showed differential treatment effects: for score 31 (466 patients; 38%), it was 0.43 (0.30–0.60), suggesting a benefit. Statins also significantly reduced all-cause mortality in the benefit group. Stratification by score 2 yielded similar results but a smaller group gaining benefit (360 patients).ConclusionStatin effects in haemodialysis patients can be predicted by markers associated with plausible relevant mechanisms including cholesterol metabolism, atherosclerosis, protein energy wasting, or competing risks. In clinical practice, the score could aid in risk stratification, not only to select patients who benefit from statins but also to identify those whom treatment could harm.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905721
       
  • Effectiveness of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in coronary artery
           disease patients treated according to contemporary evidence based
           medicine: Update of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study (CROS-II)
    • Authors: Annett Salzwedel, Katrin Jensen, Bernhard Rauch, Patrick Doherty, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Matthes Hackbusch, Heinz Völler, Jean-Paul Schmid, Constantinos H Davos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundDespite numerous studies and meta-analyses the prognostic effect of cardiac rehabilitation is still under debate. This update of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study (CROS II) provides a contemporary and practice focused approach including only cardiac rehabilitation interventions based on published standards and core components to evaluate cardiac rehabilitation delivery and effectiveness in improving patient prognosis.DesignA systematic review and meta-analysis.MethodsRandomised controlled trials and retrospective and prospective controlled cohort studies evaluating patients after acute coronary syndrome, coronary artery bypass grafting or mixed populations with coronary artery disease published until September 2018 were included.ResultsBased on CROS inclusion criteria out of 7096 abstracts six additional studies including 8671 patients were identified (two randomised controlled trials, two retrospective controlled cohort studies, two prospective controlled cohort studies). In total, 31 studies including 228,337 patients were available for this meta-analysis (three randomised controlled trials, nine prospective controlled cohort studies, 19 retrospective controlled cohort studies; 50,653 patients after acute coronary syndrome 14,583, after coronary artery bypass grafting 163,101, mixed coronary artery disease populations; follow-up periods ranging from 9 months to 14 years). Heterogeneity in design, cardiac rehabilitation delivery, biometrical assessment and potential confounders was considerable. Controlled cohort studies showed a significantly reduced total mortality (primary endpoint) after cardiac rehabilitation participation in patients after acute coronary syndrome (prospective controlled cohort studies: hazard ratio (HR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20–0.69; retrospective controlled cohort studies HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53–0.76; prospective controlled cohort studies odds ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.08–0.48), but the single randomised controlled trial fulfilling the CROS inclusion criteria showed neutral results. Cardiac rehabilitation participation was also associated with reduced total mortality in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting (retrospective controlled cohort studies HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.54–0.70, one single randomised controlled trial without fatal events), and in mixed coronary artery disease populations (retrospective controlled cohort studies HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.36–0.77; two out of 10 controlled cohort studies with neutral results).ConclusionCROS II confirms the effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation participation after acute coronary syndrome and after coronary artery bypass grafting in actual clinical practice by reducing total mortality under the conditions of current evidence-based coronary artery disease treatment. The data of CROS II, however, underscore the urgent need to define internationally accepted minimal standards for cardiac rehabilitation delivery as well as for scientific evaluation.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905719
       
  • Comparison of Swiss and European risk algorithms for cardiovascular
           prevention in Switzerland
    • Authors: Hadrien Beuret, Nadine Hausler, David Nanchen, Marie Méan, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Julien Vaucher
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundIn Switzerland, two distinct algorithms are recommended for cardiovascular prevention: (a) Arbeitsgruppe Lipide und Atherosklerose (AGLA); and (b) European Society of Cardiology (ESC). We validated and determined which algorithm better predicts incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and assessed statin eligibility in Switzerland.DesignA prospective population-based cohort.MethodsWe employed longitudinal data of the CoLaus study involving 6733 individuals, aged 35–75 years, with a 10-year follow-up. Using discrimination and calibration, we evaluated the predictive performance of the AGLA and ESC algorithms for the prediction of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.ResultsFrom the 6733 initial participants, 5529 were analysed with complete baseline and follow-up data. Mean age (SD) was 52.4 (10.6) years and 54% were women. During an average follow-up (SD) of 10.2 years (1.7), 370 (6.7%) participants developed an incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The sensitivity of AGLA and ESC algorithms to predict atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease was 51.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 46.4–56.8) and 58.6% (53.4–63.7), respectively. Discrimination and calibration were similar between the AGLA and ESC algorithms, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.78 (95% CI 0.76–0.80) and 0.79 (0.76–0.81), and Brier scores of 0.059 and 0.041, respectively. Among 370 individuals developing incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, only 278 (75%) were eligible for statin therapy at baseline, including 210 (57%) according to both algorithms, 4 (1%) to AGLA only and 64 (17%) to ESC only.ConclusionAGLA and ESC algorithms presented similar accuracy to predict atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Switzerland. A quarter of adults developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease were not identified by preventive algorithms to be eligible for statin therapy.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906305
       
  • Cardiovascular outcomes with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in
           patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Authors: Vishnu Priya Pulipati, Venkatesh Ravi, Priyanjali Pulipati
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundGlucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP1RAs) are relatively newer anti-hyperglycemic agents, which have demonstrated cardiovascular benefits in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.DesignWe performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the cardiovascular outcomes of GLP1RAs compared to placebo in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We performed an additional subgroup analysis to evaluate the role of GLP1RAs in patients with chronic kidney disease.MethodsMEDLINE, Cochrane and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched from inception to 15 July 2019. The authors extracted relevant information from articles and independently assessed the study quality.ResultsCompared to placebo, GLP1RAs demonstrated a significant reduction in all-cause mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82–0.95; P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T05:12:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903638
       
  • Cardiac rehabilitation in the modern interventional cardiology era
    • Authors: Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-20T05:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906304
       
  • Fitness for Richer, for Poorer
    • Authors: Peter Kokkinos, Jonathan Myers
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-19T05:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905024
       
  • Impact of preventive screening and lifestyle interventions in women with a
           history of preeclampsia: A micro-simulation study
    • Authors: GR Lagerweij, L Brouwers, GA De Wit, KGM Moons, L Benschop, AHEM Maas, A Franx, MJH Wermer, JE Roeters van Lennep, BB van Rijn, H Koffijberg
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundPreeclampsia is a female-specific risk factor for the development of future cardiovascular disease. Whether early preventive cardiovascular disease risk screenings combined with risk-based lifestyle interventions in women with previous preeclampsia are beneficial and cost-effective is unknown.MethodsA micro-simulation model was developed to assess the life-long impact of preventive cardiovascular screening strategies initiated after women experienced preeclampsia during pregnancy. Screening was started at the age of 30 or 40 years and repeated every five years. Data (initial and follow-up) from women with a history of preeclampsia was used to calculate 10-year cardiovascular disease risk estimates according to Framingham Risk Score. An absolute risk threshold of 2% was evaluated for treatment selection, i.e. lifestyle interventions (e.g. increasing physical activity). Screening benefits were assessed in terms of costs and quality-adjusted-life-years, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared with no screening.ResultsExpected health outcomes for no screening are 27.35 quality-adjusted-life-years and increase to 27.43 quality-adjusted-life-years (screening at 30 years with 2% threshold). The expected costs for no screening are €9426 and around €13,881 for screening at 30 years (for a 2% threshold). Preventive screening at 40 years with a 2% threshold has the most favourable incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, i.e. €34,996/quality-adjusted-life-year, compared with other screening scenarios and no screening.ConclusionsEarly cardiovascular disease risk screening followed by risk-based lifestyle interventions may lead to small long-term health benefits in women with a history of preeclampsia. However, the cost-effectiveness of a lifelong cardiovascular prevention programme starting early after preeclampsia with risk-based lifestyle advice alone is relatively unfavourable. A combination of risk-based lifestyle advice plus medical therapy may be more beneficial.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T04:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898021
       
  • Lower diabetes rate in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia: What
           is the link'
    • Authors: Klaus G Parhofer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T04:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903158
       
  • Cardiac remodelling and exercise: What happens with ultra-endurance
           exercise'
    • Authors: Cameron Dockerill, Winok Lapidaire, Adam J Lewandowski, Paul Leeson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904511
       
  • Alternative aerobic training session in coronary artery disease patients
           in cardiac rehabilitation. A new stone thrown in the pond
    • Authors: Ugo Corrà
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901062
       
  • High prevalence of physical inactivity after heart valve surgery and its
           association with long-term mortality: A nationwide cohort study
    • Authors: Sun-Hyung Kim, Seungwoo Cha, Seongmin Kang, Kyungdo Han, Nam-Jong Paik, Won-Seok Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPhysical activity (PA) and systematic efforts, such as cardiac rehabilitation, are recommended by several national guidelines for those who have received heart valve surgery. However, only a few studies have demonstrated real-world situations, such as changes in the PA level after heart valve surgery, and their effects on long-term outcomes. We designed this study to investigate the changes in PA after heart valve surgery and their associations with mortality using nationwide representative data.MethodsThis study was performed using the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. We included patients who received heart valve surgery from 2009 to 2015 and underwent regular health checkups before and after surgery. Subjects were grouped according to their PA level before and after the surgery. Information on all-cause mortality was obtained until 31 December 2016, with a maximum follow-up period of 5 years.ResultsOf the 6587 subjects, 3258 (49.5%) were physically inactive after surgery. Among patients who were physically active (n = 3070), 1196 (39.0%) became inactive after surgery. The postoperative ‘inactive’ group showed higher mortality than the ‘active’ group (hazard ratio (HR): 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–1.83). The ‘inactive/inactive’ group showed the highest risk of mortality (HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.19–2.40) compared with the ‘active/active’ group.ConclusionsInsufficient PA level after heart valve surgery is associated with higher risk of mortality. However, maintaining sufficient PA after heart valve surgery may be challenging for many patients. Therefore, systematic efforts, such as cardiac rehabilitation, should be considered in those who received heart valve surgery.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903877
       
  • On the use of models to estimate the total risk of developing
           atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Guy G De Backer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902747
       
  • Risk scores, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and the crystal ball
    • Authors: Pier Luigi Temporelli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903157
       
  • Atrial fibrillation and obesity: Long-term incidence and outcomes after
           bariatric surgery
    • Authors: Osama Moussa, Maddalena Ardissino, Christian Eichhorn, Rohin K Reddy, Omar Khan, Paul Ziprin, Ara Darzi, Peter Collins, Sanjay Purkayastha
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904515
       
  • Editorial: From MACH15 to MACH0 – a missed opportunity to understand the
           health effects of moderate alcohol intake
    • Authors: Lindsay M Miller, Cheryl AM Anderson, Joachim H Ix
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904230
       
  • Novel prediction equation for appendicular skeletal muscle mass estimation
           in patients with heart failure: Potential application in daily clinical
           practice
    • Authors: Satoshi Katano, Toshiyuki Yano, Katsuhiko Ohori, Nobutaka Nagano, Suguru Honma, Kanako Shimomura, Tomoyuki Ishigo, Ayako Watanabe, Remi Honma, Takefumi Fujito, Masayuki Koyama, Hidemichi Kouzu, Akiyoshi Hashimoto, Masaki Katayose, Tetsuji Miura
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904236
       
  • Prevalence and risk factors associated with stroke in China: A nationwide
           survey of 726,451 adults
    • Authors: Yong Gan, Heng Jiang, Robin Room, Yiqiang Zhan, Liqing Li, Kai Lu, Chao Wang, Shanquan Chen, Jianxin Liu, Yudi Yang, Hongbin Xu, Zhiqiang Nie, Yuanyuan Chang, Changan Gong, Shuran Tan, Wei Hu, Wei Yue, Feng Yan, Zhihong Wang, Zuxun Lu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902324
       
  • Why do we keep asking, do we still need cardiac rehabilitation'
    • Authors: Scott A Lear, Susie Cartledge
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902745
       
  • Association of short-term exposure to air pollution with myocardial
           infarction with and without obstructive coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Masanobu Ishii, Tomotsugu Seki, Koichi Kaikita, Kenji Sakamoto, Michikazu Nakai, Yoko Sumita, Kunihiro Nishimura, Yoshihiro Miyamoto, Teruo Noguchi, Satoshi Yasuda, Koshiro Kanaoka, Satoshi Terasaki, Yoshihiko Saito, Hiroyuki Tsutsui, Issei Komuro, Hisao Ogawa, Kenichi Tsujita, Koji Kawakami
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAir pollution including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction. However, whether short-term exposure to PM2.5 triggers the onset of myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries, compared with myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease, has not been elucidated. This study aimed to estimate the association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and admission for acute myocardial infarction, myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease, and myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries.DesignThis was a time-stratified case-crossover study and multicenter validation study.MethodsThis study used a nationwide administrative database in Japan between April 2012–March 2016. Of 137,678 acute myocardial infarction cases, 123,633 myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease and 14,045 myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries were identified by a validated algorithm combined with International Classification of Disease (10th revision), diagnostic, and procedure codes. Air pollutants and meteorological data were obtained from the monitoring station nearest to the admitting hospital.ResultsIn spring (March–May), the short-term increase of 10 µg/m3 in PM2.5 2 days before admission was significantly associated with admission for acute myocardial infarction, myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries, and myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease after adjustment for meteorological variables (odds ratio 1.060, 95% confidence interval 1.038–1.082; odds ratio 1.151, 1.079–1.227; odds ratio 1.049, 1.026–1.073, respectively), while the association was not significant in other variables. These associations were also observed after adjustment for other co-pollutants. The risk for myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (vs myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease) was associated with an even lower concentration of PM2.5 under the current environmental standards.ConclusionsThis study showed the seasonal difference of acute myocardial infarction risk attributable to PM2.5 and the difference in the threshold of triggering the onset of acute myocardial infarction subtype.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904641
       
  • Exercise intolerance and fatigue in chronic heart failure: is there a role
           for group III/IV afferent feedback'
    • Authors: Luca Angius, Antonio Crisafulli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Exercise intolerance and early fatiguability are hallmark symptoms of chronic heart failure. While the malfunction of the heart is certainly the leading cause of chronic heart failure, the patho-physiological mechanisms of exercise intolerance in these patients are more complex, multifactorial and only partially understood. Some evidence points towards a potential role of an exaggerated afferent feedback from group III/IV muscle afferents in the genesis of these symptoms. Overactivity of feedback from these muscle afferents may cause exercise intolerance with a double action: by inducing cardiovascular dysregulation, by reducing motor output and by facilitating the development of central and peripheral fatigue during exercise. Importantly, physical inactivity appears to affect the progression of the syndrome negatively, while physical training can partially counteract this condition. In the present review, the role played by group III/IV afferent feedback in cardiovascular regulation during exercise and exercise-induced muscle fatigue of healthy people and their potential role in inducing exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure patients will be summarised.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906919
       
  • Added value of subjective assessed functional capacity before non-cardiac
           surgery in predicting postoperative myocardial injury
    • Authors: Marije Marsman, Judith AR van Waes, Remco B Grobben, Corien SA Weersink, Wilton A van Klei
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundFunctional capacity is used as an indicator for cardiac testing before non-cardiac surgery and is often performed subjectively. However, the value of subjectively estimated functional capacity in predicting cardiac complications is under debate. We determined the predictive value of subjectively assessed functional capacity on postoperative cardiac complications and mortality.DesignAn observational cohort study in patients aged 60 years and over undergoing elective inpatient non-cardiac surgery in a tertiary referral hospital.MethodsSubjective functional capacity was determined by anaesthesiologists. The primary outcome was postoperative myocardial injury. Secondary outcomes were postoperative inhospital myocardial infarction and one year mortality. Logistic regression analysis and area under the receiver operating curves were used to determine the added value of functional capacity.ResultsA total of 4879 patients was included; 824 (17%) patients had a poor subjective functional capacity. Postoperative myocardial injury occurred in 718 patients (15%). Poor functional capacity was associated with myocardial injury (relative risk (RR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–2.0; P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906918
       
  • Risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by cardiovascular health
           metric categories in approximately 1 million patients
    • Authors: Jamal S Rana, Jennifer Y Liu, Howard H Moffet, Andrew J Karter, Khurram Nasir, Matthew D Solomon, Marc G Jaffe, Andrew P Ambrosy, Alan S Go, Stephen Sidney
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-10T04:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905025
       
  • Energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index scores predict long-term
           cardiovascular disease mortality and other causes of death in an
           ecological analysis of the Seven Countries Study
    • Authors: Paolo E Puddu, Nitin Shivappa, Alessandro Menotti, James R Hébert, Hanna Tolonen, Anthony Kafatos, Hisashi Adachi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the Seven Countries Study of Cardiovascular Diseases, the first study to conduct international comparisons of men in different European, USA, and Japanese cohorts, we examined the effect of diet-associated inflammation on prediction of coronary heart disease-, other major cardiovascular disease- and all-cause mortality after 50-years of follow-up. The energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index was used to quantify the effect of diet on systemic inflammation. Positive linear correlations were observed between the cohort-average energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index score and both overall death rates (R = 0.61, p = 0.0114) and major cardiovascular disease mortality rates (R = 0.51, p = 0.0337) but not cancer. Correlations for all-cause mortality were higher when the Belgrade outlier cohort was omitted (R = 0.72, p = 0.0024) or when analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic status (R = 0.67, p = 0.0065). There was also a significant reverse correlation between energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index score and age at death (R = –0.50 to –0.68, p = 0.0480 to 0.0012). Adjusting for systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking habits did not modify these correlations that were still significant. With control for these covariates a significant correlation emerged for coronary heart disease. Results obtained using a 25-year follow-up to allow unprojected data from all cohorts were similar. Results from this long-term follow-up study are consistent with a recommendation to increase consuming an anti-inflammatory diet characterized by high concentrations of fruits and vegetables and low consumption of simple carbohydrates and fats.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903866
       
  • LDL-cholesterol lowering with evolocumab, and outcomes according to age
           and sex in patients in the FOURIER Trial
    • Authors: Peter Sever, Ioanna Gouni-Berthold, Anthony Keech, Robert Giugliano, Terje R Pedersen, KyungAh Im, Huei Wang, Beat Knusel, Marc S Sabatine, Michelle L O’Donoghue
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsSome trials have reported diminished efficacy for statins in the elderly, and in women compared with men. We examined the efficacy and safety of evolocumab by patient age and sex in the FOURIER trial, the first major cardiovascular outcome trial of a PCSK9 inhibitor.Methods and resultsFOURIER was a randomised, double blind trial, comparing evolocumab with placebo in 27,564 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease receiving statin therapy (median follow-up 2.2 years). The primary endpoint was cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalisation for unstable angina or coronary revascularisation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the efficacy of evolocumab versus placebo stratified by quartiles of patient age and by sex. There were small variations in the cardiovascular event rate across the age range (for the primary endpoint, Kaplan–Meier at 3 years 15.6%,>69 years, vs. 15.1%, ≤56 years, P = 0.45); however, the relative efficacy of evolocumab was consistent regardless of patient age (for the primary endpoint (Q1 hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) 0.83, 0.72–0.96, Q2 0.88, 0.76–1.01, Q3 0.82, 0.71–0.95, Q4 0.86, 0.74–1.00; Pinteraction = 0.91), and the key secondary endpoint (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke) (Q1 0.74 (0.61–0.89), Q2 0.83 (0.69–1.00), Q3 0.78 (0.65–0.94), Q4 0.82 (0.69–0.98)); Pinteraction = 0.81). Women had a lower primary endpoint rate than men (Kaplan–Meier at 3 years 12.5 vs. 15.3%, respectively, P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902750
       
  • New risk prediction models in England may lead to targeted PCSK9 inhibitor
           treatment, for patients with established cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Taavi Tillmann
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904513
       
  • Heart failure is a common complication after acute myocardial infarction
           in patients with diabetes: A nationwide study in the SWEDEHEART registry
    • Authors: Viveca Ritsinger, Thomas Nyström, Nawsad Saleh, Bo Lagerqvist, Anna Norhammar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSeveral glucose lowering drugs with preventive effects on heart failure and death have entered the market, however, still used in low proportions after acute myocardial infarction. We explored the complication rates of heart failure and death after acute myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes.MethodsAll patients (N = 73,959) with acute myocardial infarction admitted for coronary angiography included in the SWEDEHEART registry during the years 2012–2017 were followed for heart failure (until 31 December 2017) and mortality (until 30 June 2018); mean follow-up time 1223 (SD ± 623) days.ResultsMean age was 69 years (SD ± 12), 69% were male and 24% had diabetes. Heart failure occurred more often in diabetes (22% vs. 12% if no diabetes), especially if previous MI (33% vs. 23%). Patients with diabetes had increased risk of HF regardless of previous myocardial infarction (MI); with previous MI adjusted hazard ratio 2.09 (95% confidence interval 1.96–2.20) and without MI 1.52 (1.44–1.61) respectively when non-diabetes patients with first MI served as reference. In patients with no previous heart failure or MI and discharged with left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50% the risk of heart failure was particularly high in those with diabetes (1.56; 1.39–1.76) when compared with those without. Similar findings were seen for death and combined event (heart failure and death).ConclusionsHeart failure is a common complication after acute myocardial infarction in diabetes, increasing the risk by 50–60% regardless of previous heart failure or MI. This risk is present even with normal reported left ventricular ejection fraction, indicating the existence of a large diabetes population at heart failure risk after acute myocardial infarction.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901063
       
  • First European guideline for exercise testing – a historical note
    • Authors: Herbert Löllgen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900873
       
  • Early cardiovascular structural and functional abnormalities as a guide to
           future morbid events
    • Authors: Daniel A Duprez, Sue Duval, Lynn Hoke, Natalia Florea, Gregory Grandits, Claire Carlson, Joy Lee, Jay N Cohn
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsOur aim was to evaluate the predictive value of a battery of 10 non-invasive tests of cardiovascular structural and functional health on the future risk of cardiovascular morbid events.Methods and ResultsA total of 1900 asymptomatic adults concerned about their risk for cardiovascular disease underwent non-invasive assessment with 10 tests of vascular and cardiac structure and function. A disease score (DS) was calculated for each individual based on these 10 tests. Follow-up (mean 9.2 years) for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality was available for 1442 individuals (mean age 53.2 years, 48.2% women). Those in the lowest DS tertile (0–2) experienced 0.16 cardiovascular events per 100 patient-years (PY), those in the middle tertile (3–5) experienced 0.86 events per 100 PY, and those in the highest tertile (6+) experienced 1.3 events per 100 PY (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320901416
       
  • The pre-HFpEF stage: a new entity that requires proper phenotyping for
           better management
    • Authors: Antoni Bayes-Genis, Domingo Pascual-Figal, Julio Núñez
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902326
       
  • Virtual genetic diagnosis for familial hypercholesterolemia powered by
           machine learning
    • Authors: Ana Pina, Saga Helgadottir, Rosellina Margherita Mancina, Chiara Pavanello, Carlo Pirazzi, Tiziana Montalcini, Roberto Henriques, Laura Calabresi, Olov Wiklund, M Paula Macedo, Luca Valenti, Giovanni Volpe, Stefano Romeo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsFamilial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common genetic disorder of lipid metabolism. The gold standard for FH diagnosis is genetic testing, available, however, only in selected university hospitals. Clinical scores – for example, the Dutch Lipid Score – are often employed as alternative, more accessible, albeit less accurate FH diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to obtain a more reliable approach to FH diagnosis by a “virtual” genetic test using machine-learning approaches.Methods and resultsWe used three machine-learning algorithms (a classification tree (CT), a gradient boosting machine (GBM), a neural network (NN)) to predict the presence of FH-causative genetic mutations in two independent FH cohorts: the FH Gothenburg cohort (split into training data (N = 174) and internal test (N = 74)) and the FH-CEGP Milan cohort (external test, N = 364). By evaluating their area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves, we found that the three machine-learning algorithms performed better (AUROC 0.79 (CT), 0.83 (GBM), and 0.83 (NN) on the Gothenburg cohort, and 0.70 (CT), 0.78 (GBM), and 0.76 (NN) on the Milan cohort) than the clinical Dutch Lipid Score (AUROC 0.68 and 0.64 on the Gothenburg and Milan cohorts, respectively) in predicting carriers of FH-causative mutations.ConclusionIn the diagnosis of FH-causative genetic mutations, all three machine-learning approaches we have tested outperform the Dutch Lipid Score, which is the clinical standard. We expect these machine-learning algorithms to provide the tools to implement a virtual genetic test of FH. These tools might prove particularly important for lipid clinics without access to genetic testing.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898951
       
  • Response to statin therapy in the real world
    • Authors: Armin Attar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905718
       
  • Impact of cardiorespiratory fitness on survival in men with low
           socioeconomic status
    • Authors: Sae Young Jae, Sudhir Kurl, Kanokwan Bunsawat, Barry A Franklin, Jina Choo, Setor K Kunutsor, Jussi Kauhanen, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsAlthough both low socioeconomic status (SES) and poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with increased chronic disease and heightened mortality, it remains unclear whether moderate-to-high levels of CRF are associated with survival benefits in low SES populations. This study evaluated the hypothesis that SES and CRF predict all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality and that moderate-to-high levels of CRF may attenuate the association between low SES and increased mortality.MethodsThis study included 2368 men, who were followed in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Study cohort. CRF was directly measured by peak oxygen uptake during progressive exercise testing. SES was characterized using self-reported questionnaires.ResultsDuring a 25-year median follow-up, 1116 all-cause mortality and 512 cardiovascular disease mortality events occurred. After adjusting for potential confounders, men with low SES were at increased risks for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.30–1.71) and cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio1.38, 1.13–1.69). Higher levels of CRF were associated with lower risks of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.54, 0.45–0.64) and cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio 0.53, 0.40–0.69). In joint associations of SES and CRF with mortality, low SES-unfit had significantly higher risks of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.15, 1.78–2.59) and cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio 1.95, 1.48-2.57), but low SES-fit was not associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio 1.09, 0.80-1.48) as compared with their high SES-fit counterparts.ConclusionBoth SES and CRF were independently associated with subsequent mortality; however, moderate-to-high levels of CRF were not associated with an excess risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in men with low SES.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901057
       
  • Exercise stress test methodology and safety in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Pawel P Dimitrow, Renata Rajtar-Salwa, Tomasz Tokarek
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901059
       
  • Cardiovascular event rates increase after each recurrence and associate
           with poor statin adherence
    • Authors: Mariann I Lassenius, Iiro Toppila, Susanne Bergius, Julia Perttilä, KE Juhani Airaksinen, Mikko Pietilä
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe study evaluated the quality of cardiovascular prevention in real-world clinical practice. The recurrence of up to five cardiovascular events was assessed, as data on recurrence beyond the first event and interindividual variations in event rates past the second event have been sparse. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and lipid-lowering therapy use were investigated.MethodsThis retrospective register-based study included adult patients with an incident cardiovascular event between 2004 and 2016 treated in the hospital district of southwest Finland. Patients were followed for consecutive cardiovascular events or cardiovascular death, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and statin purchases. The timing of event recurrence was evaluated, and predictive factors were assessed.ResultsA wide interindividual variation in cardiovascular event recurrence was observed, each additional event caused an increased risk, the median time of recurrence decreased from 7 to one year for the second and fifth event. Event rates increased correspondingly from 12 to 43/100 patient-years and were most pronounced in the first years following the previous event. The low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal (
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904334
       
  • Exploring the determinants of the cardiac changes after ultra-long
           duration exercise: The echocardiographic Spartathlon study
    • Authors: Georgios A Christou, Efstathios D Pagourelias, Maria A Anifanti, Panagiota G Sotiriou, Nikolaos A Koutlianos, Maria P Tsironi, Panagiotis I Andriopoulos, Konstantinos A Christou, Evangelia J Kouidi, Asterios P Deligiannis
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimThe investigation of the pathophysiological determinants of cardiac changes following ultra-long duration exercise.MethodsTwenty-seven runners who finished a 246 km running race were examined both before and after the finish of the race. Examinations included echocardiography and measurement of body weight and blood biochemical parameters.ResultsExercise increased left ventricular end-diastolic interventricular septum thickness (LVIVSd) (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898782
       
  • Tell me the name of your sport and I will tell you the size of your aorta
    • Authors: Xavier Galloo, Bernard Cosyns
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901042
       
  • Integrating natriuretic peptides and diastolic dysfunction to predict
           adverse events in high-risk asymptomatic subjects
    • Authors: Mauro Gori, Carolyn SP Lam, Emila D’Elia, Anna M Iorio, Alice Calabrese, Paolo Canova, Giovanni Cioffi, Renata De Maria, Arianna Ghirardi, Attilio Iacovoni, Aurelia Grosu, Alessandra Fontana, Paola Ferrari, Gianfranco Parati, Antonello Gavazzi, Michele Senni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundNatriuretic peptides and diastolic dysfunction have prognostic value in asymptomatic subjects at risk for heart failure. Their integration might further refine the risk stratification process in this setting. Aim of this paper was to explore the possibility to predict heart failure and death combining diastolic dysfunction and natriuretic peptides in an asymptomatic population at risk for heart failure.MethodsAmong 4047 subjects aged ≥55/≤80 years followed by 10 general practitioners in Italy, the DAVID-Berg study prospectively enrolled 623 asymptomatic outpatients at increased risk for heart failure. Baseline evaluation included electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and natriuretic peptides collection. Based on diastolic dysfunction and natriuretic peptides, subjects were classified in four groups: control group (no diastolic dysfunction/normal natriuretic peptides, 57%), no diastolic dysfunction/high natriuretic peptides (9%), diastolic dysfunction/normal natriuretic peptides (24%), and diastolic dysfunction/high natriuretic peptides (11%). We applied Cox multivariable and Classification and Regression Tree analyses.ResultsThe mean age of the population was 69 ± 7 years, 44% were women, mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 61%, and 35% had diastolic dysfunction. During a median follow-up of 5.7 years, 95 heart failure/death events occurred. Overall, diastolic dysfunction and natriuretic peptides were predictive of adverse events (respectively, hazard ratio 1.91, confidence interval 1.19–3.05, padjusted = 0.007, and hazard ratio 2.25, confidence interval 1.35–3.74, padjusted = 0.002) with Cox analysis. However, considering the four study subgroups, only the group with diastolic dysfunction/high natriuretic peptides had a significantly worse prognosis compared to the control group (hazard ratio 4.48, confidence interval 2.31–8.70, padjusted 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899618
       
  • Leisure-time cross-country skiing and risk of atrial fibrillation and
           stroke: A prospective cohort study
    • Authors: Setor K Kunutsor, Jari A Laukkanen, Sudhir Kurl, Timo H Mäkikallio, Hassan Khan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901040
       
  • Smoking status and mortality outcomes following percutaneous coronary
           intervention
    • Authors: Sathish Parasuraman, Azfar G Zaman, Mohaned Egred, Alan Bagnall, Paul A Broadhurst, Javed Ahmed, Richard Edwards, Raj Das, Deepak Garg, Ian Purcell, Awsan Noman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to assess the impact of smoking on short (30-day) and intermediate (30-day to 6-month) mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).BackgroundThe effect of smoking on mortality post-PCI is lacking in the modern PCI era.MethodsThis was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data comparing short- and intermediate-term mortality amongst smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers.ResultsThe study cohort consisted of 12,656 patients: never-smokers (n = 4288), ex-smokers (n = 4806) and current smokers (n = 3562). The mean age (±standard deviation) was 57 (±11) years in current smokers compared with 67 (±11) in ex-smokers and 67 (±12) in never-smokers; p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902325
       
  • Sex differences in optimal medical therapy following myocardial infarction
           according to left ventricular ejection fraction
    • Authors: Michael Hay, Julia Stehli, Catherine Martin, Angela Brennan, Diem T Dinh, Jeffrey Lefkovits, Sarah Zaman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900875
       
  • Impact of bedtime dosing of antihypertensives compared to morning therapy:
           A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
    • Authors: Rahul Gupta, Aaqib H Malik, Tarun Popli, Purva Ranchal, Srikanth Yandrapalli, Wilbert S Aronow
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903611
       
  • Octogenarians in interventional cardiology: Feasibility and safety of
           functional and nutritional assessments for a new patient group in cardiac
           rehabilitation
    • Authors: Sarah Eichler, Miralem Hadzic, Heinz Völler, Annett Salzwedel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899194
       
  • Prolonged and strenuous exercise does not influence serum relaxin levels
           in healthy male athletes
    • Authors: Julia Schoenfeld, Bernhard Haller, Mario Weichenberger, Elke S Lorenz, Viola Grabs, Martin Halle, Johannes Scherr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902329
       
  • Psychometrics assessment of HeartQoL questionnaire: A Rasch analysis
    • Authors: Wan Ling Lee, Karuthan Chinna, Bambang Sumintono
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902322
       
  • The link between cardiovascular risk and cardiorespiratory fitness in
           individuals with a low socioeconomic status: An indisputable call for more
           action
    • Authors: Marco Guazzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320901408
       
  • Trends in peripheral arterial disease incidence and mortality in EU15+
           countries 1990–2017
    • Authors: Richard Goodall, Justin D Salciccioli, Alun Huw Davies, Dominic Marshall, Joseph Shalhoub
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim was to assess trends in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) incidence and mortality rates in European Union(15+) countries between 1990 and 2017.Methods and ResultsThis observational study used data obtained from the 2017 Global Burden of Disease study.Age-standardised mortality and incidence rates from PAD were extracted from the Global Health Data Exchange for EU15+ countries for the years 1990–2017. Trends were analysed using Joinpoint regression analysis.Between 1990 and 2017, the incidence of PAD decreased in all 19 EU15+ countries for females, and in 18 of 19 countries for males. Increasing PAD incidence was observed only for males in the United States (+1.4%). In 2017, the highest incidence rates were observed in Denmark and the United States for males (213.6 and 202.3 per 100,000, respectively) and in the United States and Canada for females (194.8 and 171.1 per 100,000, respectively). There was a concomitant overall trend for increasing age-standardised mortality rates in all EU15+ countries for females, and in 16 of 19 EU15+ countries for males between 1990 and 2017. Italy (–25.1%), Portugal (–1.9%) and Sweden (–0.6%) were the only countries with reducing PAD mortality rates in males. The largest increases in mortality rates were observed in the United Kingdom (males +140.4%, females +158.0%) and the United States (males +125.7%, females +131.2%).ConclusionsWe identify shifting burden of PAD in EU15+ countries, with increasing mortality rates despite reducing incidence. Strong evidence supports goal-directed medical therapy in reducing PAD mortality – population-wide strategies to improve compliance to optimal goal-directed medical therapy are warranted.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899626
       
  • Acute exposure to diesel affects inflammation and vascular function
    • Authors: Dimitris Tousoulis, Petros Fountoulakis, Evangelos Oikonomou, Charalambos Antoniades, Gerasimos Siasos, Sotirios Tsalamandris, Georgios Georgiopoulos, Zoi Pallantza, Efthimia Pavlou, Antigoni Milliou, Margarita N Assimakopoulos, Nikolaos Barmparesos, Ioannis Giannarakis, Pinelopi Siamata, Juan C Kaski
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundDiesel exhaust fumes represent one of the most common toxic pollutants. The prolonged effects of acute exposure to this pollutant on inflammatory status and vascular properties are unknown.MethodsDuring a 2-h session, 40 healthy subjects were exposed to diesel exhaust fumes and/or filtered air. Endothelial function was assessed with flow mediated dilation, arterial stiffness with pulse wave velocity and reflected waves with augmentation index. C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, protein C levels and protein S activity were also measured. Standard deviation of normal to normal R–R intervals (SDNN) was used to assess heart rate variability. Measurements were assessed before exposure and 2 and 24 h after diesel exposure.ResultsCompared with filtered air, exposure to diesel exhaust fumes decreased flow mediated dilation and increased pulse wave velocity and augmentation index up to 24 h after the exposure (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T12:11:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898020
       
  • Triglyceride-containing lipoprotein sub-fractions and risk of coronary
           heart disease and stroke: A prospective analysis in 11,560 adults

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Roshni Joshi, S Goya Wannamethee, Jorgen Engmann, Tom Gaunt, Deborah A Lawlor, Jackie Price, Olia Papacosta, Tina Shah, Therese Tillin, Nishi Chaturvedi, Mika Kivimaki, Diana Kuh, Meena Kumari, Alun D Hughes, Juan P Casas, Steve Humphries, Aroon D Hingorani, A Floriaan Schmidt
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsElevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, there is uncertainty about the role of total triglycerides and the individual triglyceride-containing lipoprotein sub-fractions. We measured 14 triglyceride-containing lipoprotein sub-fractions using nuclear magnetic resonance and examined associations with coronary heart disease and stroke.MethodsTriglyceride-containing sub-fraction measures were available in 11,560 participants from the three UK cohorts free of coronary heart disease and stroke at baseline. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association of each sub-fraction with coronary heart disease and stroke expressed as the odds ratio per standard deviation increment in the corresponding measure.ResultsThe 14 triglyceride-containing sub-fractions were positively correlated with one another and with total triglycerides, and inversely correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Thirteen sub-fractions were positively associated with coronary heart disease (odds ratio in the range 1.12 to 1.22), with the effect estimates for coronary heart disease being comparable in subgroup analysis of participants with and without type 2 diabetes, and were attenuated after adjustment for HDL-C and LDL-C. There was no evidence for a clear association of any triglyceride lipoprotein sub-fraction with stroke.ConclusionsTriglyceride sub-fractions are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease but not stroke, with attenuation of effects on adjustment for HDL-C and LDL-C.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T04:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899621
       
  • ECG criteria for the detection of high-risk cardiovascular conditions in
           master athletes

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Nicole M Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Hein J Wellens, André LM Verbeek, Harald T Jørstad, Joep RLM Smeets, Ron JG Peters
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveStructured electrocardiography (ECG) analysis is used to screen athletes for high-risk cardiovascular conditions (HRCC) to prevent sudden cardiac death. ECG criteria have been specified and recommended for use in young athletes ≤ 35 years. However, it is unclear whether these ECG criteria can also be applied to master athletes>35 years.AimThe purpose of this study was to test whether the existing ECG criteria for detecting HRCC in young athletes can be applied to master athletes.MethodsWe conducted a cross-sectional study among athletes>35 years screened for HRCC between 2006 and 2010. We performed a blinded retrospective analysis of master athletes’ ECGs, separately applying European Society of Cardiology (ESC)-2005, Seattle, and International criteria. HRCC were defined using recommendations from the international cardiac societies American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology, and ESC, based on ECG screening and cardiovascular evaluation (CVE).ResultsWe included 2578 master athletes in the study, of whom 494 had initial screening abnormalities mandating CVE. Atrial enlargement (109, 4.1%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (98, 3.8%) were the most common ECG abnormalities found using the ESC-2005 or Seattle criteria. Applying the International criteria, ST-segment deviation (66, 2.6%), and T-wave inversion (58, 2.2%) were most frequent. The ESC-2005 criteria detected more HRCC (46, 1.8%) compared with the Seattle (36, 1.4%) and International criteria (33, 1.3%). The most frequently detected HRCC was coronary artery disease (24, 0.9%).ConclusionECG criteria recommended for use in young athletes can be applied to master athletes’ ECGs to detect HRCC. The ESC-2005 criteria had the highest sensitivity for detecting HRCC among master athletes.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T04:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901060
       
  • Are neural networks the ultimate risk prediction models in patients at
           high risk of acute myocardial infarction'
    • Authors: Marius Roman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-29T05:40:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890972
       
  • The proper care for elderly cardiac patients before rehabilitation
    • Authors: Iana I Simova, Silvia Pavlova, Iveta Tasheva
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900869
       
  • Need more attention to peripheral arterial diseases, especially in women
    • Authors: Yoshihiro Fukumoto
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898308
       
  • Estimation of the increased risk associated with recurrent events or
           
    • Authors: Mark D Danese, Peter Pemberton-Ross, David Catterick, Guillermo Villa
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aims of this study were to re-estimate the international REduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) risk equation using United Kingdom data and to distinguish different relative hazards for specific atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event histories.Methods and resultsPatients in the UK Clinical Research Practice Datalink (CPRD) were included as of 1 January 2005 if they were 40 years or older, had 2 or more years of prior data, received one or more moderate or high-intensity statin in the previous year, and had a history of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Patients were followed until a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular death, loss to follow-up, or end of observation. We re-estimated the REACH risk equation hazard ratios (HRs) using CPRD data (re-estimated REACH model). Our event history model replaced the REACH vascular bed variables with more specific event histories. There were 60,838 patients with 5.25 years of mean follow-up. In the validation model, HRs were in the same direction, and generally greater than REACH. In the event history model, HRs compared to other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease alone included: recurrent myocardial infarction (HR 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.34), recurrent ischemic stroke (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03–1.80), myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.23–1.38), ischemic stroke and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.23–1.60), myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.23–3.04), and myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.47–2.54).ConclusionA detailed cardiovascular event history may be useful for estimating the relative risk of future cardiovascular events.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899212
       
  • Metabolically healthy obesity and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in 1077
           statin-treated individuals: A six-year retrospective study
    • Authors: Fotios Barkas, George Liamis, Moses Elisaf, Georgia Anastasiou, Evangelos Liberopoulos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899191
       
  • High-intensity interval training is effective and superior to moderate
           continuous training in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection
           fraction: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Anderson Donelli da Silveira, Juliana Beust de Lima, Diogo da Silva Piardi, Débora dos Santos Macedo, Maurice Zanini, Rosane Nery, Jari Antero Laukkanen, Ricardo Stein
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHeart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a prevalent syndrome, with exercise intolerance being one of its hallmarks, contributing to worse quality of life and mortality. High-intensity interval training is an emerging training option, but its efficacy in HFpEF patients is still unknown.DesignSingle-blinded randomized clinical trial.MethodsSingle-blinded randomized clinical trial with exercise training 3 days per week for 12 weeks. HFpEF patients were randomly assigned to high-intensity interval training or moderate continuous training. At baseline and after 12 week follow-up, patients underwent clinical assessment, echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET).ResultsMean age was 60 ± 9 years and 63% were women. Both groups (N = 19) showed improved peak oxygen consumption (VO2), but high-intensity interval training patients (n = 10) had a significantly higher increase, of 22%, compared with 11% in the moderate continuous training (n = 9) individuals (3.5 (3.1 to 4.0) vs. 1.9 (1.2 to 2.5) mL·kg−1·min−1, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901206
       
  • The sick right ventricle in endurance athletes: What is the contribution
           of the pulmonary vascular bed'
    • Authors: Marcus Dörr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898955
       
  • Fine particulate matter: An underestimated cardiovascular risk factor'
    • Authors: Ralf Erkens, Malte Kelm
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899122
       
  • The heart and the waist: Relationship between abdominal fat and recurrent
           events after myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Daniel Matos, António M Ferreira
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T12:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900862
       
  • Abdominal obesity and the risk of recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular
           disease after myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Hanieh Mohammadi, Joel Ohm, Andrea Discacciati, Johan Sundstrom, Kristina Hambraeus, Tomas Jernberg, Per Svensson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe association between abdominal obesity and recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease after myocardial infarction remains unknown.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal obesity and its association with recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients after a first myocardial infarction.Design and methodsIn this register-based observational cohort, 22,882 patients were identified from the national Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) registry at a clinical revisit 4–10 weeks after their first myocardial infarction 2005–2014. Patients were followed for recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease defined as non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, non-fatal or fatal ischaemic stroke. Univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals in quintiles of waist circumference as well as three categories of body mass index including normal weight, overweight and obesity.ResultsThe majority of patients had abdominal obesity. During a median follow-up time of 3.8 years, 1232 men (7.3%) and 469 women (7.9%) experienced a recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event. In the univariate analysis, risk was elevated in the fifth quintile (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.39) compared with the first. In the multivariable-adjusted analysis, risk was elevated in the fourth and fifth quintiles (hazard ratio 1.21, confidence interval 1.03–1.43 and hazard ratio 1.25, confidence interval 1.04–1.50), respectively. Gender-stratified analyses showed similar associations in men, while U-shaped associations were observed in women and the body mass index analyses.ConclusionsAbdominal obesity was common in post-myocardial infarction patients and larger waist circumference was independently associated with recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, particularly in men. We recommend utilising waist circumference to identify patients at increased risk of recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease after myocardial infarction.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T12:05:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898019
       
  • Reply from the authors: Moving forward to identify those highly-trained
           athletes with potentially worse adaptation to intense exercise
    • Authors: Blanca Domenech-Ximenos, Maria Sanz-de la Garza, Susanna Prat-Gonzalez, Ana Garcia-Alvarez, Marta Sitges
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T05:17:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897458
       
  • Heritability analyses of resting heart rate: Is it relevant'
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Fariba Ahmadizar, Maryam Kavousi, Pim van der Harst
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T05:11:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900056
       
  • Obesity and the heart: The impact of obesity beyond the body mass index
    • Authors: AG Vos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-17T05:49:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897170
       
  • Worrisome trends in the incidence of CHD events among young individuals
    • Authors: Veikko Salomaa
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-16T08:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896051
       
  • Associations of anger, vital exhaustion, anti-depressant use, and poor
           social ties with incident atrial fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in
           Communities Study
    • Authors: Parveen K Garg, J’Neka S Claxton, Elsayed Z Soliman, Lin Y Chen, Tené T Lewis, Thomas Mosley, Alvaro Alonso
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundWe examined the relationships of anger, vital exhaustion, anti-depressant use, and poor social ties with incident atrial fibrillation in a biracial cohort of middle and older-aged adults.MethodsThis analysis included 11,445 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study participants who were free of atrial fibrillation at baseline in 1990–1992. Vital exhaustion was assessed at baseline and defined as a score in the highest quartile on the 21-item Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire. Baseline anti-depressant use was self-reported. The Spielberger Trait Anger Scale to assess anger and both the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List and the Lubben Social Network Scale to assess social ties were also administered at baseline. The primary outcome was incident atrial fibrillation throughout 2016, identified by electrocardiogram, hospital discharge coding of atrial fibrillation, and death certificates.ResultsA total of 2220 incident atrial fibrillation cases were detected over a median follow-up of 23.4 years. After adjusting for age, race-center, sex, education, and height, participants in the 4th Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire quartile (referent = 1st Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire quartile) and those reporting anti-depressant use were at increased risk for atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.29–1.64 for Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire; hazard ratio = 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.69 for anti-depressant use). The increased atrial fibrillation risk observed for 4th Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire quartile participants remained significant after additional adjustment for relevant comorbidities (hazard ratio = 1.20; confidence interval 1.06–1.35). No significant associations were observed for anger or poor social ties with development of atrial fibrillation.ConclusionsVital exhaustion is associated with an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T12:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897163
       
  • Psychological stress and incidence of atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Christoph Herrmann-Lingen, Rolf Wachter
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T12:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898022
       
  • Obesity as a modifiable risk factor for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Berglind Adalsteinsdottir
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-13T04:50:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897164
       
  • The ‘heart’ of preventive cardiology: Lifestyle medicine for the
           treatment of cardiometabolic diseases

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Katharina Lechner, Elke Lorenz, Jonathan A Drezner
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-13T04:50:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899107
       
  • The cost-effectiveness of icosapent ethyl in combination with statin
           therapy compared with statin alone for cardiovascular risk reduction
    • Authors: Zanfina Ademi, Richard Ofori-Asenso, Ella Zomer, Alice Owen, Danny Liew
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness, from the perspective of the Australian public healthcare system, of icosapent ethyl in combination with statin therapy compared with statin alone for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.Methods and resultsA Markov model populated with data from the Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with Icosapent Ethyl–Intervention Trial was designed to predict the effectiveness and costs of icosapent ethyl in combination with statins compared with statins alone over a 20-year time horizon. Data inputs for costs and utilities were sourced from published sources. The annual costs of icosapent ethyl were assumed to be AUD1637 (USD2907) per person. All future costs and outcomes were discounted annually by 5%. The main outcome of interest was incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in terms of cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained and per year of life saved (YoLS). Over a 20-year time horizon, compared with statin alone, icosapent ethyl in combination with statin was estimated to cost an additional AUD$13,022 per person, but led to 0.338 YoLS and 0.289 QALYs gained (all discounted). These equated to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of AUD45,036 per QALY gained and AUD38,480 per YoLS. Sub-analyses for primary and secondary prevention were AUD96,136 and AUD35,935 per QALY gained, respectively. The results were sensitive to time-horizon, age related trends and the acquisition price of icosapent ethyl.ConclusionCompared with statin alone, icosapent ethyl in combination with statin therapy is likely to be cost-effective in the prevention of cardiovascular disease assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of AUD50,000 per QALY gained, especially in the secondary preventive setting.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-11T05:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896648
       
  • Tea consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and
           all-cause mortality: The China-PAR project
    • Authors: Xinyan Wang, Fangchao Liu, Jianxin Li, Xueli Yang, Jichun Chen, Jie Cao, Xigui Wu, Xiangfeng Lu, Jianfeng Huang, Ying Li, Liancheng Zhao, Chong Shen, Dongsheng Hu, Ling Yu, Xiaoqing Liu, Xianping Wu, Shouling Wu, Dongfeng Gu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe role of tea consumption in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains unclear in cohort studies. This prospective cohort study aimed to investigate the associations of tea consumption with the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality.MethodsWe included 100,902 general Chinese adults from the project of Prediction for ASCVD Risk in China (China-PAR) in 15 provinces across China since 1998. Information on tea consumption was collected through standardized questionnaires. Outcomes were identified by interviewing study participants or their proxies, and checking hospital records and/or death certificates. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals related to tea consumption.ResultsDuring a median follow-up of 7.3 years, 3683 atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease events, 1477 atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease deaths, and 5479 all-cause deaths were recorded. Compared with never or non-habitual tea drinkers, the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval among habitual tea drinkers was 0.80 (0.75–0.87), 0.78 (0.69–0.88), and 0.85 (0.79–0.90) for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease incidence, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality, respectively. Habitual tea drinkers had 1.41 years longer of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease-free years and 1.26 years longer of life expectancy at the index age of 50 years. The observed inverse associations were strengthened among participants who kept the habit during the follow-up period.ConclusionTea consumption was associated with reduced risks of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, especially among those consistent habitual tea drinkers.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T05:09:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894685
       
  • Editorial: ‘Tea consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic
           cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: The China-PAR project’
    • Authors: Vanessa Bianconi, Massimo R Mannarino, Matteo Pirro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T05:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899206
       
  • The sale of antihypertensive drugs by online pharmacies in China: A
           nationwide cross-sectional survey
    • Authors: Nan Jiang, Xiaoxv Yin, Zhenyuan Chen, Hui Li, Jing Wang, Jia Zhang, Xing Xu, Wei Liu, Mengdie Wang, Yanhong Gong
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T04:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896678
       
  • Behavioural cardiovascular risk factors and prevalence of diabetes in
           subjects with familial hypercholesterolaemia
    • Authors: Sofia Perez-Calahorra, Fernando Civeira, Pilar Guallar-Castillón, Xavier Pinto, José R Banegas, Juan Pedro-Botet, Manuel Suarez-Tembra, Marta Mauri, Cristina Soler, Fernando Rodriguez-Artalejo, Martín Laclaustra
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      A low prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported in familial hypercholesterolaemia. Whether a healthier lifestyle could explain it has not been explored. This cross-sectional study determines the prevalence of lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HeFH) from the Dyslipidaemia Registry of the Spanish Atherosclerosis Society and in the ENRICA study, a representative sample of the adult Spanish general population, weighted to match the age and sex distribution of the HeFH sample. A total of 2185 HeFH patients and 11,856 individuals from ENRICA were included. HeFH had lower body mass index and fewer of them were smokers than in the reference population. A model adjusted for age, sex and body mass index showed that HeFH more frequently had cardiovascular disease (odds ratio (OR) 23.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) 18.40–31.23) and hypertension (OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.07–1.35), and took anti-hypertensive medication (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.18–1.56) and anti-diabetic medication (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.00–1.56), but less frequently were smokers (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.71–0.89). In a HeFH subsample (n = 513) with complete blood glucose information, those patients without cardiovascular disease showed lower prevalence of smoking and type 2 diabetes mellitus, lower body mass index and glucose, and higher diastolic blood pressure than the Spanish population. The differences in type 2 diabetes mellitus were justified mostly by the difference in body mass index. Body mass index adjustment also showed higher prevalence of hypertension and use of anti-hypertensive drugs in HeFH. In summary, HeFH patients had lower body mass index, which may contribute to explaining the lower prevalence of diabetes, and lower current smoking but higher hypertension.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T01:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896138
       
  • Pre-participation screening in young elite athletes: Towards a new
           algorithm'
    • Authors: Stephan Gerling
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T01:04:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897334
       
  • Les liaisons dangereuses and the danger of deductions: The interplay
           between cardiovascular disease and COVID-19
    • Authors: Edoardo Sciatti, Claudio Ceconi
      First page: 1015
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T04:44:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320925622
       
  • Cardiovascular disease and COVID-19: les liaisons dangereuses
    • Authors: Andrea Barison, Alberto Aimo, Vincenzo Castiglione, Chiara Arzilli, Josep Lupón, Pau Codina, Evelyn Santiago-Vacas, Germán Cediel, Michele Emdin, Antoni Bayes-Genis
      First page: 1017
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Patients with cardiovascular risk factors or established cardiovascular disease have an increased risk of developing coronavirus disease 19 and have a worse outcome when infected, but translating this notion into effective action is challenging. At present it is unclear whether cardiovascular therapies may reduce the likelihood of infection, or improve the survival of infected patients. Given the crucial importance of this issue for clinical cardiologists and all specialists dealing with coronavirus disease 19, we tried to recapitulate the current evidence and provide some practical recommendations.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-05-11T02:14:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320924501
       
  • Efficacy of extended, comprehensive outpatient cardiac rehabilitation on
           cardiovascular risk factors: A nationwide registry
    • Authors: Bernhard Reich, Werner Benzer, Hanns Harpf, Peter Hofmann, Karl Mayr, Helmuth Ocenasek, Andrea Podolsky, Rochus Pokan, Michael Porodko, Christoph Puelacher, Mahdi Sareban, Heimo Traninger, Wolfgang Ziegelmeyer, Josef Niebauer
      First page: 1026
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimCardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a key component of the treatment of cardiac diseases. The Austrian outpatient CR model is unique, as it provides patients with an extended professionally supervised, multidisciplinary program of 4–6 weeks of phase II (OUT-II) and 6–12 months of phase III (OUT-III) CR. The aim of this analysis was to assess the efficacy of the Austrian outpatient CR model using a nationwide registry.MethodsData of all consecutive patients (N = 7560) who completed OUT-II and/or OUT-III between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015 were entered prospectively into a registry. OUT-III patients were analyzed separately according to whether the preceding phase II was performed as outpatient (OUT-II/OUT-III, N = 2403) or in-patient (IN-II/OUT-III, N = 2789). All patients underwent assessment of anthropometry, resting blood pressure, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, exercise capacity, quality of life, anxiety and depression.ResultsDuring OUT-II, patients significantly improved their metabolic risk factor profile and increased exercise capacity by 14.3%. OUT-II/OUT-III patients achieved an additional increase in exercise capacity by 10%, further improvement in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and stabilization of the remaining risk factors. IN-II/OUT-III patients increased their maximal exercise capacity by 18.4% and there was improvement in blood pressure, HDL, low-density lipoprotein and glucose levels.ConclusionExtended, professionally supervised, multidisciplinary outpatient CR in a large nationwide registry of consecutive patients consistently improved maximal exercise capacity and relevant modifiable cardiovascular risk factors beyond effects seen after IN- or OUT-II alone.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-15T03:05:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898958
       
  • Predictors of exercise capacity following septal myectomy in patients with
           hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Joshua R Smith, Veronica Layrisse, Jose R Medina-Inojosa, Jessica D Berg, Steve R Ommen, Thomas P Olson
      First page: 1066
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPatients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) have impaired exercise capacity. The gold standard therapy for patients with HOCM is septal myectomy surgery; however, changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2peak) following myectomy are variable, with VO2peak decreasing in some patients. Therefore, we evaluated changes in VO2peak following surgical myectomy to determine clinical predictors of those exhibiting decreased VO2peak post-myectomy.MethodsHOCM patients (N = 295) who performed symptom limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to and following surgical myectomy were included for analysis. The VO2peak non-responder group (n = 128) was defined as
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T01:52:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898106
       
  • Beyond LDL-C levels, does remnant cholesterol estimation matter'
    • Authors: Angela Pirillo, Giuseppe D Norata, Alberico L Catapano
      First page: 1088
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899622
       
 
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