Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8447 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (212 journals)
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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (330 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 330 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal  
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AORTA     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access  
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Cardiology Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Cardiology Review     Full-text available via subscription  
JACC : Basic to Translational Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JACC : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
JACC : Heart Failure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
JMIR Cardio     Open Access  
Jornal Vascular Brasileiro     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Arrhythmia     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.037
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 6  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 15 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2047-4873 - ISSN (Online) 2047-4881
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1087 journals]
  • Editor’s Presentation. Secondary prevention: First of all, address
           the basics
    • Authors: Massimo F Piepoli
      Pages: 227 - 230
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 227-230, February 2020.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-06T12:10:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904919
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Impact of preventive screening and lifestyle interventions in women with a
           history of preeclampsia: A micro-simulation study
    • Authors: GR Lagerweij, L Brouwers, GA De Wit, KGM Moons, L Benschop, AHEM Maas, A Franx, MJH Wermer, JE Roeters van Lennep, BB van Rijn, H Koffijberg
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundPreeclampsia is a female-specific risk factor for the development of future cardiovascular disease. Whether early preventive cardiovascular disease risk screenings combined with risk-based lifestyle interventions in women with previous preeclampsia are beneficial and cost-effective is unknown.MethodsA micro-simulation model was developed to assess the life-long impact of preventive cardiovascular screening strategies initiated after women experienced preeclampsia during pregnancy. Screening was started at the age of 30 or 40 years and repeated every five years. Data (initial and follow-up) from women with a history of preeclampsia was used to calculate 10-year cardiovascular disease risk estimates according to Framingham Risk Score. An absolute risk threshold of 2% was evaluated for treatment selection, i.e. lifestyle interventions (e.g. increasing physical activity). Screening benefits were assessed in terms of costs and quality-adjusted-life-years, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared with no screening.ResultsExpected health outcomes for no screening are 27.35 quality-adjusted-life-years and increase to 27.43 quality-adjusted-life-years (screening at 30 years with 2% threshold). The expected costs for no screening are €9426 and around €13,881 for screening at 30 years (for a 2% threshold). Preventive screening at 40 years with a 2% threshold has the most favourable incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, i.e. €34,996/quality-adjusted-life-year, compared with other screening scenarios and no screening.ConclusionsEarly cardiovascular disease risk screening followed by risk-based lifestyle interventions may lead to small long-term health benefits in women with a history of preeclampsia. However, the cost-effectiveness of a lifelong cardiovascular prevention programme starting early after preeclampsia with risk-based lifestyle advice alone is relatively unfavourable. A combination of risk-based lifestyle advice plus medical therapy may be more beneficial.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T04:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898021
       
  • Lower diabetes rate in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia: What
           is the link'
    • Authors: Klaus G Parhofer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T04:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903158
       
  • Cardiac remodelling and exercise: What happens with ultra-endurance
           exercise'
    • Authors: Cameron Dockerill, Winok Lapidaire, Adam J Lewandowski, Paul Leeson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904511
       
  • Alternative aerobic training session in coronary artery disease patients
           in cardiac rehabilitation. A new stone thrown in the pond
    • Authors: Ugo Corrà
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901062
       
  • High prevalence of physical inactivity after heart valve surgery and its
           association with long-term mortality: A nationwide cohort study
    • Authors: Sun-Hyung Kim, Seungwoo Cha, Seongmin Kang, Kyungdo Han, Nam-Jong Paik, Won-Seok Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPhysical activity (PA) and systematic efforts, such as cardiac rehabilitation, are recommended by several national guidelines for those who have received heart valve surgery. However, only a few studies have demonstrated real-world situations, such as changes in the PA level after heart valve surgery, and their effects on long-term outcomes. We designed this study to investigate the changes in PA after heart valve surgery and their associations with mortality using nationwide representative data.MethodsThis study was performed using the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. We included patients who received heart valve surgery from 2009 to 2015 and underwent regular health checkups before and after surgery. Subjects were grouped according to their PA level before and after the surgery. Information on all-cause mortality was obtained until 31 December 2016, with a maximum follow-up period of 5 years.ResultsOf the 6587 subjects, 3258 (49.5%) were physically inactive after surgery. Among patients who were physically active (n = 3070), 1196 (39.0%) became inactive after surgery. The postoperative ‘inactive’ group showed higher mortality than the ‘active’ group (hazard ratio (HR): 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–1.83). The ‘inactive/inactive’ group showed the highest risk of mortality (HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.19–2.40) compared with the ‘active/active’ group.ConclusionsInsufficient PA level after heart valve surgery is associated with higher risk of mortality. However, maintaining sufficient PA after heart valve surgery may be challenging for many patients. Therefore, systematic efforts, such as cardiac rehabilitation, should be considered in those who received heart valve surgery.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903877
       
  • On the use of models to estimate the total risk of developing
           atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Guy G De Backer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902747
       
  • Risk scores, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and the crystal ball
    • Authors: Pier Luigi Temporelli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T01:43:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903157
       
  • Atrial fibrillation and obesity: Long-term incidence and outcomes after
           bariatric surgery
    • Authors: Osama Moussa, Maddalena Ardissino, Christian Eichhorn, Rohin K Reddy, Omar Khan, Paul Ziprin, Ara Darzi, Peter Collins, Sanjay Purkayastha
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904515
       
  • Editorial: From MACH15 to MACH0 – a missed opportunity to understand the
           health effects of moderate alcohol intake
    • Authors: Lindsay M Miller, Cheryl AM Anderson, Joachim H Ix
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904230
       
  • Novel prediction equation for appendicular skeletal muscle mass estimation
           in patients with heart failure: Potential application in daily clinical
           practice
    • Authors: Satoshi Katano, Toshiyuki Yano, Katsuhiko Ohori, Nobutaka Nagano, Suguru Honma, Kanako Shimomura, Tomoyuki Ishigo, Ayako Watanabe, Remi Honma, Takefumi Fujito, Masayuki Koyama, Hidemichi Kouzu, Akiyoshi Hashimoto, Masaki Katayose, Tetsuji Miura
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904236
       
  • Prevalence and risk factors associated with stroke in China: A nationwide
           survey of 726,451 adults
    • Authors: Yong Gan, Heng Jiang, Robin Room, Yiqiang Zhan, Liqing Li, Kai Lu, Chao Wang, Shanquan Chen, Jianxin Liu, Yudi Yang, Hongbin Xu, Zhiqiang Nie, Yuanyuan Chang, Changan Gong, Shuran Tan, Wei Hu, Wei Yue, Feng Yan, Zhihong Wang, Zuxun Lu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902324
       
  • Why do we keep asking, do we still need cardiac rehabilitation'
    • Authors: Scott A Lear, Susie Cartledge
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902745
       
  • Association of short-term exposure to air pollution with myocardial
           infarction with and without obstructive coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Masanobu Ishii, Tomotsugu Seki, Koichi Kaikita, Kenji Sakamoto, Michikazu Nakai, Yoko Sumita, Kunihiro Nishimura, Yoshihiro Miyamoto, Teruo Noguchi, Satoshi Yasuda, Koshiro Kanaoka, Satoshi Terasaki, Yoshihiko Saito, Hiroyuki Tsutsui, Issei Komuro, Hisao Ogawa, Kenichi Tsujita, Koji Kawakami
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAir pollution including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction. However, whether short-term exposure to PM2.5 triggers the onset of myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries, compared with myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease, has not been elucidated. This study aimed to estimate the association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and admission for acute myocardial infarction, myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease, and myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries.DesignThis was a time-stratified case-crossover study and multicenter validation study.MethodsThis study used a nationwide administrative database in Japan between April 2012–March 2016. Of 137,678 acute myocardial infarction cases, 123,633 myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease and 14,045 myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries were identified by a validated algorithm combined with International Classification of Disease (10th revision), diagnostic, and procedure codes. Air pollutants and meteorological data were obtained from the monitoring station nearest to the admitting hospital.ResultsIn spring (March–May), the short-term increase of 10 µg/m3 in PM2.5 2 days before admission was significantly associated with admission for acute myocardial infarction, myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries, and myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease after adjustment for meteorological variables (odds ratio 1.060, 95% confidence interval 1.038–1.082; odds ratio 1.151, 1.079–1.227; odds ratio 1.049, 1.026–1.073, respectively), while the association was not significant in other variables. These associations were also observed after adjustment for other co-pollutants. The risk for myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (vs myocardial infarction with coronary artery disease) was associated with an even lower concentration of PM2.5 under the current environmental standards.ConclusionsThis study showed the seasonal difference of acute myocardial infarction risk attributable to PM2.5 and the difference in the threshold of triggering the onset of acute myocardial infarction subtype.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904641
       
  • Exercise intolerance and fatigue in chronic heart failure: is there a role
           for group III/IV afferent feedback'
    • Authors: Luca Angius, Antonio Crisafulli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Exercise intolerance and early fatiguability are hallmark symptoms of chronic heart failure. While the malfunction of the heart is certainly the leading cause of chronic heart failure, the patho-physiological mechanisms of exercise intolerance in these patients are more complex, multifactorial and only partially understood. Some evidence points towards a potential role of an exaggerated afferent feedback from group III/IV muscle afferents in the genesis of these symptoms. Overactivity of feedback from these muscle afferents may cause exercise intolerance with a double action: by inducing cardiovascular dysregulation, by reducing motor output and by facilitating the development of central and peripheral fatigue during exercise. Importantly, physical inactivity appears to affect the progression of the syndrome negatively, while physical training can partially counteract this condition. In the present review, the role played by group III/IV afferent feedback in cardiovascular regulation during exercise and exercise-induced muscle fatigue of healthy people and their potential role in inducing exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure patients will be summarised.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906919
       
  • Added value of subjective assessed functional capacity before non-cardiac
           surgery in predicting postoperative myocardial injury
    • Authors: Marije Marsman, Judith AR van Waes, Remco B Grobben, Corien SA Weersink, Wilton A van Klei
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundFunctional capacity is used as an indicator for cardiac testing before non-cardiac surgery and is often performed subjectively. However, the value of subjectively estimated functional capacity in predicting cardiac complications is under debate. We determined the predictive value of subjectively assessed functional capacity on postoperative cardiac complications and mortality.DesignAn observational cohort study in patients aged 60 years and over undergoing elective inpatient non-cardiac surgery in a tertiary referral hospital.MethodsSubjective functional capacity was determined by anaesthesiologists. The primary outcome was postoperative myocardial injury. Secondary outcomes were postoperative inhospital myocardial infarction and one year mortality. Logistic regression analysis and area under the receiver operating curves were used to determine the added value of functional capacity.ResultsA total of 4879 patients was included; 824 (17%) patients had a poor subjective functional capacity. Postoperative myocardial injury occurred in 718 patients (15%). Poor functional capacity was associated with myocardial injury (relative risk (RR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–2.0; P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T04:51:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320906918
       
  • Risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by cardiovascular health
           metric categories in approximately 1 million patients
    • Authors: Jamal S Rana, Jennifer Y Liu, Howard H Moffet, Andrew J Karter, Khurram Nasir, Matthew D Solomon, Marc G Jaffe, Andrew P Ambrosy, Alan S Go, Stephen Sidney
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-10T04:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905025
       
  • Energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index scores predict long-term
           cardiovascular disease mortality and other causes of death in an
           ecological analysis of the Seven Countries Study
    • Authors: Paolo E Puddu, Nitin Shivappa, Alessandro Menotti, James R Hébert, Hanna Tolonen, Anthony Kafatos, Hisashi Adachi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the Seven Countries Study of Cardiovascular Diseases, the first study to conduct international comparisons of men in different European, USA, and Japanese cohorts, we examined the effect of diet-associated inflammation on prediction of coronary heart disease-, other major cardiovascular disease- and all-cause mortality after 50-years of follow-up. The energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index was used to quantify the effect of diet on systemic inflammation. Positive linear correlations were observed between the cohort-average energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index score and both overall death rates (R = 0.61, p = 0.0114) and major cardiovascular disease mortality rates (R = 0.51, p = 0.0337) but not cancer. Correlations for all-cause mortality were higher when the Belgrade outlier cohort was omitted (R = 0.72, p = 0.0024) or when analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic status (R = 0.67, p = 0.0065). There was also a significant reverse correlation between energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index score and age at death (R = –0.50 to –0.68, p = 0.0480 to 0.0012). Adjusting for systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking habits did not modify these correlations that were still significant. With control for these covariates a significant correlation emerged for coronary heart disease. Results obtained using a 25-year follow-up to allow unprojected data from all cohorts were similar. Results from this long-term follow-up study are consistent with a recommendation to increase consuming an anti-inflammatory diet characterized by high concentrations of fruits and vegetables and low consumption of simple carbohydrates and fats.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903866
       
  • LDL-cholesterol lowering with evolocumab, and outcomes according to age
           and sex in patients in the FOURIER Trial
    • Authors: Peter Sever, Ioanna Gouni-Berthold, Anthony Keech, Robert Giugliano, Terje R Pedersen, KyungAh Im, Huei Wang, Beat Knusel, Marc S Sabatine, Michelle L O’Donoghue
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsSome trials have reported diminished efficacy for statins in the elderly, and in women compared with men. We examined the efficacy and safety of evolocumab by patient age and sex in the FOURIER trial, the first major cardiovascular outcome trial of a PCSK9 inhibitor.Methods and resultsFOURIER was a randomised, double blind trial, comparing evolocumab with placebo in 27,564 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease receiving statin therapy (median follow-up 2.2 years). The primary endpoint was cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalisation for unstable angina or coronary revascularisation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the efficacy of evolocumab versus placebo stratified by quartiles of patient age and by sex. There were small variations in the cardiovascular event rate across the age range (for the primary endpoint, Kaplan–Meier at 3 years 15.6%,>69 years, vs. 15.1%, ≤56 years, P = 0.45); however, the relative efficacy of evolocumab was consistent regardless of patient age (for the primary endpoint (Q1 hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) 0.83, 0.72–0.96, Q2 0.88, 0.76–1.01, Q3 0.82, 0.71–0.95, Q4 0.86, 0.74–1.00; Pinteraction = 0.91), and the key secondary endpoint (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke) (Q1 0.74 (0.61–0.89), Q2 0.83 (0.69–1.00), Q3 0.78 (0.65–0.94), Q4 0.82 (0.69–0.98)); Pinteraction = 0.81). Women had a lower primary endpoint rate than men (Kaplan–Meier at 3 years 12.5 vs. 15.3%, respectively, P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902750
       
  • New risk prediction models in England may lead to targeted PCSK9 inhibitor
           treatment, for patients with established cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Taavi Tillmann
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904513
       
  • Heart failure is a common complication after acute myocardial infarction
           in patients with diabetes: A nationwide study in the SWEDEHEART registry
    • Authors: Viveca Ritsinger, Thomas Nyström, Nawsad Saleh, Bo Lagerqvist, Anna Norhammar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSeveral glucose lowering drugs with preventive effects on heart failure and death have entered the market, however, still used in low proportions after acute myocardial infarction. We explored the complication rates of heart failure and death after acute myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes.MethodsAll patients (N = 73,959) with acute myocardial infarction admitted for coronary angiography included in the SWEDEHEART registry during the years 2012–2017 were followed for heart failure (until 31 December 2017) and mortality (until 30 June 2018); mean follow-up time 1223 (SD ± 623) days.ResultsMean age was 69 years (SD ± 12), 69% were male and 24% had diabetes. Heart failure occurred more often in diabetes (22% vs. 12% if no diabetes), especially if previous MI (33% vs. 23%). Patients with diabetes had increased risk of HF regardless of previous myocardial infarction (MI); with previous MI adjusted hazard ratio 2.09 (95% confidence interval 1.96–2.20) and without MI 1.52 (1.44–1.61) respectively when non-diabetes patients with first MI served as reference. In patients with no previous heart failure or MI and discharged with left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50% the risk of heart failure was particularly high in those with diabetes (1.56; 1.39–1.76) when compared with those without. Similar findings were seen for death and combined event (heart failure and death).ConclusionsHeart failure is a common complication after acute myocardial infarction in diabetes, increasing the risk by 50–60% regardless of previous heart failure or MI. This risk is present even with normal reported left ventricular ejection fraction, indicating the existence of a large diabetes population at heart failure risk after acute myocardial infarction.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901063
       
  • First European guideline for exercise testing – a historical note
    • Authors: Herbert Löllgen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900873
       
  • Early cardiovascular structural and functional abnormalities as a guide to
           future morbid events
    • Authors: Daniel A Duprez, Sue Duval, Lynn Hoke, Natalia Florea, Gregory Grandits, Claire Carlson, Joy Lee, Jay N Cohn
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsOur aim was to evaluate the predictive value of a battery of 10 non-invasive tests of cardiovascular structural and functional health on the future risk of cardiovascular morbid events.Methods and ResultsA total of 1900 asymptomatic adults concerned about their risk for cardiovascular disease underwent non-invasive assessment with 10 tests of vascular and cardiac structure and function. A disease score (DS) was calculated for each individual based on these 10 tests. Follow-up (mean 9.2 years) for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality was available for 1442 individuals (mean age 53.2 years, 48.2% women). Those in the lowest DS tertile (0–2) experienced 0.16 cardiovascular events per 100 patient-years (PY), those in the middle tertile (3–5) experienced 0.86 events per 100 PY, and those in the highest tertile (6+) experienced 1.3 events per 100 PY (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320901416
       
  • The pre-HFpEF stage: a new entity that requires proper phenotyping for
           better management
    • Authors: Antoni Bayes-Genis, Domingo Pascual-Figal, Julio Núñez
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902326
       
  • Virtual genetic diagnosis for familial hypercholesterolemia powered by
           machine learning
    • Authors: Ana Pina, Saga Helgadottir, Rosellina Margherita Mancina, Chiara Pavanello, Carlo Pirazzi, Tiziana Montalcini, Roberto Henriques, Laura Calabresi, Olov Wiklund, M Paula Macedo, Luca Valenti, Giovanni Volpe, Stefano Romeo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsFamilial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common genetic disorder of lipid metabolism. The gold standard for FH diagnosis is genetic testing, available, however, only in selected university hospitals. Clinical scores – for example, the Dutch Lipid Score – are often employed as alternative, more accessible, albeit less accurate FH diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to obtain a more reliable approach to FH diagnosis by a “virtual” genetic test using machine-learning approaches.Methods and resultsWe used three machine-learning algorithms (a classification tree (CT), a gradient boosting machine (GBM), a neural network (NN)) to predict the presence of FH-causative genetic mutations in two independent FH cohorts: the FH Gothenburg cohort (split into training data (N = 174) and internal test (N = 74)) and the FH-CEGP Milan cohort (external test, N = 364). By evaluating their area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves, we found that the three machine-learning algorithms performed better (AUROC 0.79 (CT), 0.83 (GBM), and 0.83 (NN) on the Gothenburg cohort, and 0.70 (CT), 0.78 (GBM), and 0.76 (NN) on the Milan cohort) than the clinical Dutch Lipid Score (AUROC 0.68 and 0.64 on the Gothenburg and Milan cohorts, respectively) in predicting carriers of FH-causative mutations.ConclusionIn the diagnosis of FH-causative genetic mutations, all three machine-learning approaches we have tested outperform the Dutch Lipid Score, which is the clinical standard. We expect these machine-learning algorithms to provide the tools to implement a virtual genetic test of FH. These tools might prove particularly important for lipid clinics without access to genetic testing.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898951
       
  • Response to statin therapy in the real world
    • Authors: Armin Attar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320905718
       
  • Impact of cardiorespiratory fitness on survival in men with low
           socioeconomic status
    • Authors: Sae Young Jae, Sudhir Kurl, Kanokwan Bunsawat, Barry A Franklin, Jina Choo, Setor K Kunutsor, Jussi Kauhanen, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsAlthough both low socioeconomic status (SES) and poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with increased chronic disease and heightened mortality, it remains unclear whether moderate-to-high levels of CRF are associated with survival benefits in low SES populations. This study evaluated the hypothesis that SES and CRF predict all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality and that moderate-to-high levels of CRF may attenuate the association between low SES and increased mortality.MethodsThis study included 2368 men, who were followed in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Study cohort. CRF was directly measured by peak oxygen uptake during progressive exercise testing. SES was characterized using self-reported questionnaires.ResultsDuring a 25-year median follow-up, 1116 all-cause mortality and 512 cardiovascular disease mortality events occurred. After adjusting for potential confounders, men with low SES were at increased risks for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.30–1.71) and cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio1.38, 1.13–1.69). Higher levels of CRF were associated with lower risks of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.54, 0.45–0.64) and cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio 0.53, 0.40–0.69). In joint associations of SES and CRF with mortality, low SES-unfit had significantly higher risks of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.15, 1.78–2.59) and cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio 1.95, 1.48-2.57), but low SES-fit was not associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease mortality (hazard ratio 1.09, 0.80-1.48) as compared with their high SES-fit counterparts.ConclusionBoth SES and CRF were independently associated with subsequent mortality; however, moderate-to-high levels of CRF were not associated with an excess risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in men with low SES.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901057
       
  • Exercise stress test methodology and safety in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Pawel P Dimitrow, Renata Rajtar-Salwa, Tomasz Tokarek
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901059
       
  • Cardiovascular event rates increase after each recurrence and associate
           with poor statin adherence
    • Authors: Mariann I Lassenius, Iiro Toppila, Susanne Bergius, Julia Perttilä, KE Juhani Airaksinen, Mikko Pietilä
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe study evaluated the quality of cardiovascular prevention in real-world clinical practice. The recurrence of up to five cardiovascular events was assessed, as data on recurrence beyond the first event and interindividual variations in event rates past the second event have been sparse. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and lipid-lowering therapy use were investigated.MethodsThis retrospective register-based study included adult patients with an incident cardiovascular event between 2004 and 2016 treated in the hospital district of southwest Finland. Patients were followed for consecutive cardiovascular events or cardiovascular death, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and statin purchases. The timing of event recurrence was evaluated, and predictive factors were assessed.ResultsA wide interindividual variation in cardiovascular event recurrence was observed, each additional event caused an increased risk, the median time of recurrence decreased from 7 to one year for the second and fifth event. Event rates increased correspondingly from 12 to 43/100 patient-years and were most pronounced in the first years following the previous event. The low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal (
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320904334
       
  • Exploring the determinants of the cardiac changes after ultra-long
           duration exercise: The echocardiographic Spartathlon study
    • Authors: Georgios A Christou, Efstathios D Pagourelias, Maria A Anifanti, Panagiota G Sotiriou, Nikolaos A Koutlianos, Maria P Tsironi, Panagiotis I Andriopoulos, Konstantinos A Christou, Evangelia J Kouidi, Asterios P Deligiannis
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimThe investigation of the pathophysiological determinants of cardiac changes following ultra-long duration exercise.MethodsTwenty-seven runners who finished a 246 km running race were examined both before and after the finish of the race. Examinations included echocardiography and measurement of body weight and blood biochemical parameters.ResultsExercise increased left ventricular end-diastolic interventricular septum thickness (LVIVSd) (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898782
       
  • Oxidative stress and inflammation in heart failure: The best is yet to
           come
    • Authors: Ivan Milinković, Marija Polovina, Dejan S Simeunović, Milika Ašanin, Petar M Seferović
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900294
       
  • Tell me the name of your sport and I will tell you the size of your aorta
    • Authors: Xavier Galloo, Bernard Cosyns
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901042
       
  • Integrating natriuretic peptides and diastolic dysfunction to predict
           adverse events in high-risk asymptomatic subjects
    • Authors: Mauro Gori, Carolyn SP Lam, Emila D’Elia, Anna M Iorio, Alice Calabrese, Paolo Canova, Giovanni Cioffi, Renata De Maria, Arianna Ghirardi, Attilio Iacovoni, Aurelia Grosu, Alessandra Fontana, Paola Ferrari, Gianfranco Parati, Antonello Gavazzi, Michele Senni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundNatriuretic peptides and diastolic dysfunction have prognostic value in asymptomatic subjects at risk for heart failure. Their integration might further refine the risk stratification process in this setting. Aim of this paper was to explore the possibility to predict heart failure and death combining diastolic dysfunction and natriuretic peptides in an asymptomatic population at risk for heart failure.MethodsAmong 4047 subjects aged ≥55/≤80 years followed by 10 general practitioners in Italy, the DAVID-Berg study prospectively enrolled 623 asymptomatic outpatients at increased risk for heart failure. Baseline evaluation included electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and natriuretic peptides collection. Based on diastolic dysfunction and natriuretic peptides, subjects were classified in four groups: control group (no diastolic dysfunction/normal natriuretic peptides, 57%), no diastolic dysfunction/high natriuretic peptides (9%), diastolic dysfunction/normal natriuretic peptides (24%), and diastolic dysfunction/high natriuretic peptides (11%). We applied Cox multivariable and Classification and Regression Tree analyses.ResultsThe mean age of the population was 69 ± 7 years, 44% were women, mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 61%, and 35% had diastolic dysfunction. During a median follow-up of 5.7 years, 95 heart failure/death events occurred. Overall, diastolic dysfunction and natriuretic peptides were predictive of adverse events (respectively, hazard ratio 1.91, confidence interval 1.19–3.05, padjusted = 0.007, and hazard ratio 2.25, confidence interval 1.35–3.74, padjusted = 0.002) with Cox analysis. However, considering the four study subgroups, only the group with diastolic dysfunction/high natriuretic peptides had a significantly worse prognosis compared to the control group (hazard ratio 4.48, confidence interval 2.31–8.70, padjusted 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:45:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899618
       
  • Leisure-time cross-country skiing and risk of atrial fibrillation and
           stroke: A prospective cohort study
    • Authors: Setor K Kunutsor, Jari A Laukkanen, Sudhir Kurl, Timo H Mäkikallio, Hassan Khan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901040
       
  • Smoking status and mortality outcomes following percutaneous coronary
           intervention
    • Authors: Sathish Parasuraman, Azfar G Zaman, Mohaned Egred, Alan Bagnall, Paul A Broadhurst, Javed Ahmed, Richard Edwards, Raj Das, Deepak Garg, Ian Purcell, Awsan Noman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to assess the impact of smoking on short (30-day) and intermediate (30-day to 6-month) mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).BackgroundThe effect of smoking on mortality post-PCI is lacking in the modern PCI era.MethodsThis was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data comparing short- and intermediate-term mortality amongst smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers.ResultsThe study cohort consisted of 12,656 patients: never-smokers (n = 4288), ex-smokers (n = 4806) and current smokers (n = 3562). The mean age (±standard deviation) was 57 (±11) years in current smokers compared with 67 (±11) in ex-smokers and 67 (±12) in never-smokers; p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902325
       
  • Sex differences in optimal medical therapy following myocardial infarction
           according to left ventricular ejection fraction
    • Authors: Michael Hay, Julia Stehli, Catherine Martin, Angela Brennan, Diem T Dinh, Jeffrey Lefkovits, Sarah Zaman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900875
       
  • Impact of bedtime dosing of antihypertensives compared to morning therapy:
           A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
    • Authors: Rahul Gupta, Aaqib H Malik, Tarun Popli, Purva Ranchal, Srikanth Yandrapalli, Wilbert S Aronow
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320903611
       
  • Octogenarians in interventional cardiology: Feasibility and safety of
           functional and nutritional assessments for a new patient group in cardiac
           rehabilitation
    • Authors: Sarah Eichler, Miralem Hadzic, Heinz Völler, Annett Salzwedel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899194
       
  • Prolonged and strenuous exercise does not influence serum relaxin levels
           in healthy male athletes
    • Authors: Julia Schoenfeld, Bernhard Haller, Mario Weichenberger, Elke S Lorenz, Viola Grabs, Martin Halle, Johannes Scherr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902329
       
  • Beyond LDL-C levels, does remnant cholesterol estimation matter'
    • Authors: Angela Pirillo, Giuseppe D Norata, Alberico L Catapano
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899622
       
  • Psychometrics assessment of HeartQoL questionnaire: A Rasch analysis
    • Authors: Wan Ling Lee, Karuthan Chinna, Bambang Sumintono
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320902322
       
  • Association of four lipid components with mortality, myocardial
           infarction, and stroke in statin-naïve young adults: A nationwide cohort
           study
    • Authors: Heesun Lee, Jun-Bean Park, In-Chang Hwang, Yeonyee E Yoon, Hyo Eun Park, Su-Yeon Choi, Yong-Jin Kim, Goo-Yeong Cho, Kyungdo Han, Hyung-Kwan Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsDyslipidaemia is a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor with prognostic implications. Current strategies for lipid management in young adults are largely based on expert recommendations. We investigated the risks of death and cardiovascular disease in relation to each lipid component to establish evidence for primary prevention in young adults.MethodsIn this nationwide population-based cohort study, we analysed 5,688,055 statin-naïve subjects, aged 20–39 years, undergoing general health check-ups between 2009 and 2014. The endpoint was a composite of clinical events including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke. We compared the incidence and risk of clinical events according to each lipid variable.ResultsDuring follow-up (median 7.1 years), clinical events occurred in 30,330 subjects (0.53%): 16,262 deaths (0.29%), 8578 MIs (0.15%), and 5967 strokes (0.10%). The risk of clinical events gradually increased with increasing total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides and decreasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), largely driven by MI. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) had a J-shaped association with clinical events, showing the lowest risk for LDL-C of 84–101 mg/dL. Among lipid variables, triglycerides remained the sole independent predictor (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.20; p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898571
       
  • The link between cardiovascular risk and cardiorespiratory fitness in
           individuals with a low socioeconomic status: An indisputable call for more
           action
    • Authors: Marco Guazzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487320901408
       
  • Trends in peripheral arterial disease incidence and mortality in EU15+
           countries 1990–2017
    • Authors: Richard Goodall, Justin D Salciccioli, Alun Huw Davies, Dominic Marshall, Joseph Shalhoub
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim was to assess trends in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) incidence and mortality rates in European Union(15+) countries between 1990 and 2017.Methods and ResultsThis observational study used data obtained from the 2017 Global Burden of Disease study.Age-standardised mortality and incidence rates from PAD were extracted from the Global Health Data Exchange for EU15+ countries for the years 1990–2017. Trends were analysed using Joinpoint regression analysis.Between 1990 and 2017, the incidence of PAD decreased in all 19 EU15+ countries for females, and in 18 of 19 countries for males. Increasing PAD incidence was observed only for males in the United States (+1.4%). In 2017, the highest incidence rates were observed in Denmark and the United States for males (213.6 and 202.3 per 100,000, respectively) and in the United States and Canada for females (194.8 and 171.1 per 100,000, respectively). There was a concomitant overall trend for increasing age-standardised mortality rates in all EU15+ countries for females, and in 16 of 19 EU15+ countries for males between 1990 and 2017. Italy (–25.1%), Portugal (–1.9%) and Sweden (–0.6%) were the only countries with reducing PAD mortality rates in males. The largest increases in mortality rates were observed in the United Kingdom (males +140.4%, females +158.0%) and the United States (males +125.7%, females +131.2%).ConclusionsWe identify shifting burden of PAD in EU15+ countries, with increasing mortality rates despite reducing incidence. Strong evidence supports goal-directed medical therapy in reducing PAD mortality – population-wide strategies to improve compliance to optimal goal-directed medical therapy are warranted.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T04:44:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899626
       
  • Acute exposure to diesel affects inflammation and vascular function
    • Authors: Dimitris Tousoulis, Petros Fountoulakis, Evangelos Oikonomou, Charalambos Antoniades, Gerasimos Siasos, Sotirios Tsalamandris, Georgios Georgiopoulos, Zoi Pallantza, Efthimia Pavlou, Antigoni Milliou, Margarita N Assimakopoulos, Nikolaos Barmparesos, Ioannis Giannarakis, Pinelopi Siamata, Juan C Kaski
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundDiesel exhaust fumes represent one of the most common toxic pollutants. The prolonged effects of acute exposure to this pollutant on inflammatory status and vascular properties are unknown.MethodsDuring a 2-h session, 40 healthy subjects were exposed to diesel exhaust fumes and/or filtered air. Endothelial function was assessed with flow mediated dilation, arterial stiffness with pulse wave velocity and reflected waves with augmentation index. C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, protein C levels and protein S activity were also measured. Standard deviation of normal to normal R–R intervals (SDNN) was used to assess heart rate variability. Measurements were assessed before exposure and 2 and 24 h after diesel exposure.ResultsCompared with filtered air, exposure to diesel exhaust fumes decreased flow mediated dilation and increased pulse wave velocity and augmentation index up to 24 h after the exposure (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T12:11:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898020
       
  • Triglyceride-containing lipoprotein sub-fractions and risk of coronary
           heart disease and stroke: A prospective analysis in 11,560 adults

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Roshni Joshi, S Goya Wannamethee, Jorgen Engmann, Tom Gaunt, Deborah A Lawlor, Jackie Price, Olia Papacosta, Tina Shah, Therese Tillin, Nishi Chaturvedi, Mika Kivimaki, Diana Kuh, Meena Kumari, Alun D Hughes, Juan P Casas, Steve Humphries, Aroon D Hingorani, A Floriaan Schmidt
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsElevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, there is uncertainty about the role of total triglycerides and the individual triglyceride-containing lipoprotein sub-fractions. We measured 14 triglyceride-containing lipoprotein sub-fractions using nuclear magnetic resonance and examined associations with coronary heart disease and stroke.MethodsTriglyceride-containing sub-fraction measures were available in 11,560 participants from the three UK cohorts free of coronary heart disease and stroke at baseline. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association of each sub-fraction with coronary heart disease and stroke expressed as the odds ratio per standard deviation increment in the corresponding measure.ResultsThe 14 triglyceride-containing sub-fractions were positively correlated with one another and with total triglycerides, and inversely correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Thirteen sub-fractions were positively associated with coronary heart disease (odds ratio in the range 1.12 to 1.22), with the effect estimates for coronary heart disease being comparable in subgroup analysis of participants with and without type 2 diabetes, and were attenuated after adjustment for HDL-C and LDL-C. There was no evidence for a clear association of any triglyceride lipoprotein sub-fraction with stroke.ConclusionsTriglyceride sub-fractions are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease but not stroke, with attenuation of effects on adjustment for HDL-C and LDL-C.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T04:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899621
       
  • ECG criteria for the detection of high-risk cardiovascular conditions in
           master athletes

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Nicole M Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Hein J Wellens, André LM Verbeek, Harald T Jørstad, Joep RLM Smeets, Ron JG Peters
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveStructured electrocardiography (ECG) analysis is used to screen athletes for high-risk cardiovascular conditions (HRCC) to prevent sudden cardiac death. ECG criteria have been specified and recommended for use in young athletes ≤ 35 years. However, it is unclear whether these ECG criteria can also be applied to master athletes>35 years.AimThe purpose of this study was to test whether the existing ECG criteria for detecting HRCC in young athletes can be applied to master athletes.MethodsWe conducted a cross-sectional study among athletes>35 years screened for HRCC between 2006 and 2010. We performed a blinded retrospective analysis of master athletes’ ECGs, separately applying European Society of Cardiology (ESC)-2005, Seattle, and International criteria. HRCC were defined using recommendations from the international cardiac societies American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology, and ESC, based on ECG screening and cardiovascular evaluation (CVE).ResultsWe included 2578 master athletes in the study, of whom 494 had initial screening abnormalities mandating CVE. Atrial enlargement (109, 4.1%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (98, 3.8%) were the most common ECG abnormalities found using the ESC-2005 or Seattle criteria. Applying the International criteria, ST-segment deviation (66, 2.6%), and T-wave inversion (58, 2.2%) were most frequent. The ESC-2005 criteria detected more HRCC (46, 1.8%) compared with the Seattle (36, 1.4%) and International criteria (33, 1.3%). The most frequently detected HRCC was coronary artery disease (24, 0.9%).ConclusionECG criteria recommended for use in young athletes can be applied to master athletes’ ECGs to detect HRCC. The ESC-2005 criteria had the highest sensitivity for detecting HRCC among master athletes.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T04:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901060
       
  • Are neural networks the ultimate risk prediction models in patients at
           high risk of acute myocardial infarction'
    • Authors: Marius Roman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-29T05:40:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890972
       
  • The proper care for elderly cardiac patients before rehabilitation
    • Authors: Iana I Simova, Silvia Pavlova, Iveta Tasheva
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900869
       
  • Need more attention to peripheral arterial diseases, especially in women
    • Authors: Yoshihiro Fukumoto
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898308
       
  • Estimation of the increased risk associated with recurrent events or
           
    • Authors: Mark D Danese, Peter Pemberton-Ross, David Catterick, Guillermo Villa
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aims of this study were to re-estimate the international REduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) risk equation using United Kingdom data and to distinguish different relative hazards for specific atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event histories.Methods and resultsPatients in the UK Clinical Research Practice Datalink (CPRD) were included as of 1 January 2005 if they were 40 years or older, had 2 or more years of prior data, received one or more moderate or high-intensity statin in the previous year, and had a history of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Patients were followed until a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular death, loss to follow-up, or end of observation. We re-estimated the REACH risk equation hazard ratios (HRs) using CPRD data (re-estimated REACH model). Our event history model replaced the REACH vascular bed variables with more specific event histories. There were 60,838 patients with 5.25 years of mean follow-up. In the validation model, HRs were in the same direction, and generally greater than REACH. In the event history model, HRs compared to other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease alone included: recurrent myocardial infarction (HR 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.34), recurrent ischemic stroke (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03–1.80), myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.23–1.38), ischemic stroke and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.23–1.60), myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.23–3.04), and myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.47–2.54).ConclusionA detailed cardiovascular event history may be useful for estimating the relative risk of future cardiovascular events.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899212
       
  • Metabolically healthy obesity and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in 1077
           statin-treated individuals: A six-year retrospective study
    • Authors: Fotios Barkas, George Liamis, Moses Elisaf, Georgia Anastasiou, Evangelos Liberopoulos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899191
       
  • High-intensity interval training is effective and superior to moderate
           continuous training in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection
           fraction: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Anderson Donelli da Silveira, Juliana Beust de Lima, Diogo da Silva Piardi, Débora dos Santos Macedo, Maurice Zanini, Rosane Nery, Jari Antero Laukkanen, Ricardo Stein
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHeart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a prevalent syndrome, with exercise intolerance being one of its hallmarks, contributing to worse quality of life and mortality. High-intensity interval training is an emerging training option, but its efficacy in HFpEF patients is still unknown.DesignSingle-blinded randomized clinical trial.MethodsSingle-blinded randomized clinical trial with exercise training 3 days per week for 12 weeks. HFpEF patients were randomly assigned to high-intensity interval training or moderate continuous training. At baseline and after 12 week follow-up, patients underwent clinical assessment, echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET).ResultsMean age was 60 ± 9 years and 63% were women. Both groups (N = 19) showed improved peak oxygen consumption (VO2), but high-intensity interval training patients (n = 10) had a significantly higher increase, of 22%, compared with 11% in the moderate continuous training (n = 9) individuals (3.5 (3.1 to 4.0) vs. 1.9 (1.2 to 2.5) mL·kg−1·min−1, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319901206
       
  • The sick right ventricle in endurance athletes: What is the contribution
           of the pulmonary vascular bed'
    • Authors: Marcus Dörr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898955
       
  • Fine particulate matter: An underestimated cardiovascular risk factor'
    • Authors: Ralf Erkens, Malte Kelm
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T06:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899122
       
  • Predictors of exercise capacity following septal myectomy in patients with
           hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Joshua R Smith, Veronica Layrisse, Jose R Medina-Inojosa, Jessica D Berg, Steve R Ommen, Thomas P Olson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPatients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) have impaired exercise capacity. The gold standard therapy for patients with HOCM is septal myectomy surgery; however, changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2peak) following myectomy are variable, with VO2peak decreasing in some patients. Therefore, we evaluated changes in VO2peak following surgical myectomy to determine clinical predictors of those exhibiting decreased VO2peak post-myectomy.MethodsHOCM patients (N = 295) who performed symptom limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to and following surgical myectomy were included for analysis. The VO2peak non-responder group (n = 128) was defined as
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T01:52:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898106
       
  • The heart and the waist: Relationship between abdominal fat and recurrent
           events after myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Daniel Matos, António M Ferreira
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T12:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900862
       
  • Abdominal obesity and the risk of recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular
           disease after myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Hanieh Mohammadi, Joel Ohm, Andrea Discacciati, Johan Sundstrom, Kristina Hambraeus, Tomas Jernberg, Per Svensson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe association between abdominal obesity and recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease after myocardial infarction remains unknown.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal obesity and its association with recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients after a first myocardial infarction.Design and methodsIn this register-based observational cohort, 22,882 patients were identified from the national Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) registry at a clinical revisit 4–10 weeks after their first myocardial infarction 2005–2014. Patients were followed for recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease defined as non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, non-fatal or fatal ischaemic stroke. Univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals in quintiles of waist circumference as well as three categories of body mass index including normal weight, overweight and obesity.ResultsThe majority of patients had abdominal obesity. During a median follow-up time of 3.8 years, 1232 men (7.3%) and 469 women (7.9%) experienced a recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event. In the univariate analysis, risk was elevated in the fifth quintile (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.39) compared with the first. In the multivariable-adjusted analysis, risk was elevated in the fourth and fifth quintiles (hazard ratio 1.21, confidence interval 1.03–1.43 and hazard ratio 1.25, confidence interval 1.04–1.50), respectively. Gender-stratified analyses showed similar associations in men, while U-shaped associations were observed in women and the body mass index analyses.ConclusionsAbdominal obesity was common in post-myocardial infarction patients and larger waist circumference was independently associated with recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, particularly in men. We recommend utilising waist circumference to identify patients at increased risk of recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease after myocardial infarction.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T12:05:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898019
       
  • Reply from the authors: Moving forward to identify those highly-trained
           athletes with potentially worse adaptation to intense exercise
    • Authors: Blanca Domenech-Ximenos, Maria Sanz-de la Garza, Susanna Prat-Gonzalez, Ana Garcia-Alvarez, Marta Sitges
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T05:17:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897458
       
  • Heritability analyses of resting heart rate: Is it relevant'
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Fariba Ahmadizar, Maryam Kavousi, Pim van der Harst
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T05:11:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319900056
       
  • Obesity and the heart: The impact of obesity beyond the body mass index
    • Authors: AG Vos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-17T05:49:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897170
       
  • Worrisome trends in the incidence of CHD events among young individuals
    • Authors: Veikko Salomaa
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-16T08:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896051
       
  • Efficacy of extended, comprehensive outpatient cardiac rehabilitation on
           cardiovascular risk factors: A nationwide registry
    • Authors: Bernhard Reich, Werner Benzer, Hanns Harpf, Peter Hofmann, Karl Mayr, Helmuth Ocenasek, Andrea Podolsky, Rochus Pokan, Michael Porodko, Christoph Puelacher, Mahdi Sareban, Heimo Traninger, Wolfgang Ziegelmeyer, Josef Niebauer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimCardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a key component of the treatment of cardiac diseases. The Austrian outpatient CR model is unique, as it provides patients with an extended professionally supervised, multidisciplinary program of 4–6 weeks of phase II (OUT-II) and 6–12 months of phase III (OUT-III) CR. The aim of this analysis was to assess the efficacy of the Austrian outpatient CR model using a nationwide registry.MethodsData of all consecutive patients (N = 7560) who completed OUT-II and/or OUT-III between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015 were entered prospectively into a registry. OUT-III patients were analyzed separately according to whether the preceding phase II was performed as outpatient (OUT-II/OUT-III, N = 2403) or in-patient (IN-II/OUT-III, N = 2789). All patients underwent assessment of anthropometry, resting blood pressure, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, exercise capacity, quality of life, anxiety and depression.ResultsDuring OUT-II, patients significantly improved their metabolic risk factor profile and increased exercise capacity by 14.3%. OUT-II/OUT-III patients achieved an additional increase in exercise capacity by 10%, further improvement in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and stabilization of the remaining risk factors. IN-II/OUT-III patients increased their maximal exercise capacity by 18.4% and there was improvement in blood pressure, HDL, low-density lipoprotein and glucose levels.ConclusionExtended, professionally supervised, multidisciplinary outpatient CR in a large nationwide registry of consecutive patients consistently improved maximal exercise capacity and relevant modifiable cardiovascular risk factors beyond effects seen after IN- or OUT-II alone.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-15T03:05:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898958
       
  • Associations of anger, vital exhaustion, anti-depressant use, and poor
           social ties with incident atrial fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in
           Communities Study
    • Authors: Parveen K Garg, J’Neka S Claxton, Elsayed Z Soliman, Lin Y Chen, Tené T Lewis, Thomas Mosley, Alvaro Alonso
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundWe examined the relationships of anger, vital exhaustion, anti-depressant use, and poor social ties with incident atrial fibrillation in a biracial cohort of middle and older-aged adults.MethodsThis analysis included 11,445 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study participants who were free of atrial fibrillation at baseline in 1990–1992. Vital exhaustion was assessed at baseline and defined as a score in the highest quartile on the 21-item Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire. Baseline anti-depressant use was self-reported. The Spielberger Trait Anger Scale to assess anger and both the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List and the Lubben Social Network Scale to assess social ties were also administered at baseline. The primary outcome was incident atrial fibrillation throughout 2016, identified by electrocardiogram, hospital discharge coding of atrial fibrillation, and death certificates.ResultsA total of 2220 incident atrial fibrillation cases were detected over a median follow-up of 23.4 years. After adjusting for age, race-center, sex, education, and height, participants in the 4th Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire quartile (referent = 1st Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire quartile) and those reporting anti-depressant use were at increased risk for atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.29–1.64 for Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire; hazard ratio = 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.69 for anti-depressant use). The increased atrial fibrillation risk observed for 4th Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire quartile participants remained significant after additional adjustment for relevant comorbidities (hazard ratio = 1.20; confidence interval 1.06–1.35). No significant associations were observed for anger or poor social ties with development of atrial fibrillation.ConclusionsVital exhaustion is associated with an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T12:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897163
       
  • Psychological stress and incidence of atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Christoph Herrmann-Lingen, Rolf Wachter
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T12:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319898022
       
  • Obesity as a modifiable risk factor for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Berglind Adalsteinsdottir
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-13T04:50:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897164
       
  • The ‘heart’ of preventive cardiology: Lifestyle medicine for the
           treatment of cardiometabolic diseases

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Katharina Lechner, Elke Lorenz, Jonathan A Drezner
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-13T04:50:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899107
       
  • The cost-effectiveness of icosapent ethyl in combination with statin
           therapy compared with statin alone for cardiovascular risk reduction
    • Authors: Zanfina Ademi, Richard Ofori-Asenso, Ella Zomer, Alice Owen, Danny Liew
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness, from the perspective of the Australian public healthcare system, of icosapent ethyl in combination with statin therapy compared with statin alone for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.Methods and resultsA Markov model populated with data from the Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with Icosapent Ethyl–Intervention Trial was designed to predict the effectiveness and costs of icosapent ethyl in combination with statins compared with statins alone over a 20-year time horizon. Data inputs for costs and utilities were sourced from published sources. The annual costs of icosapent ethyl were assumed to be AUD1637 (USD2907) per person. All future costs and outcomes were discounted annually by 5%. The main outcome of interest was incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in terms of cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained and per year of life saved (YoLS). Over a 20-year time horizon, compared with statin alone, icosapent ethyl in combination with statin was estimated to cost an additional AUD$13,022 per person, but led to 0.338 YoLS and 0.289 QALYs gained (all discounted). These equated to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of AUD45,036 per QALY gained and AUD38,480 per YoLS. Sub-analyses for primary and secondary prevention were AUD96,136 and AUD35,935 per QALY gained, respectively. The results were sensitive to time-horizon, age related trends and the acquisition price of icosapent ethyl.ConclusionCompared with statin alone, icosapent ethyl in combination with statin therapy is likely to be cost-effective in the prevention of cardiovascular disease assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of AUD50,000 per QALY gained, especially in the secondary preventive setting.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-11T05:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896648
       
  • Tea consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and
           all-cause mortality: The China-PAR project
    • Authors: Xinyan Wang, Fangchao Liu, Jianxin Li, Xueli Yang, Jichun Chen, Jie Cao, Xigui Wu, Xiangfeng Lu, Jianfeng Huang, Ying Li, Liancheng Zhao, Chong Shen, Dongsheng Hu, Ling Yu, Xiaoqing Liu, Xianping Wu, Shouling Wu, Dongfeng Gu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe role of tea consumption in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains unclear in cohort studies. This prospective cohort study aimed to investigate the associations of tea consumption with the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality.MethodsWe included 100,902 general Chinese adults from the project of Prediction for ASCVD Risk in China (China-PAR) in 15 provinces across China since 1998. Information on tea consumption was collected through standardized questionnaires. Outcomes were identified by interviewing study participants or their proxies, and checking hospital records and/or death certificates. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals related to tea consumption.ResultsDuring a median follow-up of 7.3 years, 3683 atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease events, 1477 atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease deaths, and 5479 all-cause deaths were recorded. Compared with never or non-habitual tea drinkers, the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval among habitual tea drinkers was 0.80 (0.75–0.87), 0.78 (0.69–0.88), and 0.85 (0.79–0.90) for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease incidence, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality, respectively. Habitual tea drinkers had 1.41 years longer of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease-free years and 1.26 years longer of life expectancy at the index age of 50 years. The observed inverse associations were strengthened among participants who kept the habit during the follow-up period.ConclusionTea consumption was associated with reduced risks of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, especially among those consistent habitual tea drinkers.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T05:09:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894685
       
  • Editorial: ‘Tea consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic
           cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: The China-PAR project’
    • Authors: Vanessa Bianconi, Massimo R Mannarino, Matteo Pirro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T05:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319899206
       
  • The sale of antihypertensive drugs by online pharmacies in China: A
           nationwide cross-sectional survey
    • Authors: Nan Jiang, Xiaoxv Yin, Zhenyuan Chen, Hui Li, Jing Wang, Jia Zhang, Xing Xu, Wei Liu, Mengdie Wang, Yanhong Gong
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T04:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896678
       
  • Behavioural cardiovascular risk factors and prevalence of diabetes in
           subjects with familial hypercholesterolaemia
    • Authors: Sofia Perez-Calahorra, Fernando Civeira, Pilar Guallar-Castillón, Xavier Pinto, José R Banegas, Juan Pedro-Botet, Manuel Suarez-Tembra, Marta Mauri, Cristina Soler, Fernando Rodriguez-Artalejo, Martín Laclaustra
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      A low prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported in familial hypercholesterolaemia. Whether a healthier lifestyle could explain it has not been explored. This cross-sectional study determines the prevalence of lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HeFH) from the Dyslipidaemia Registry of the Spanish Atherosclerosis Society and in the ENRICA study, a representative sample of the adult Spanish general population, weighted to match the age and sex distribution of the HeFH sample. A total of 2185 HeFH patients and 11,856 individuals from ENRICA were included. HeFH had lower body mass index and fewer of them were smokers than in the reference population. A model adjusted for age, sex and body mass index showed that HeFH more frequently had cardiovascular disease (odds ratio (OR) 23.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) 18.40–31.23) and hypertension (OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.07–1.35), and took anti-hypertensive medication (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.18–1.56) and anti-diabetic medication (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.00–1.56), but less frequently were smokers (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.71–0.89). In a HeFH subsample (n = 513) with complete blood glucose information, those patients without cardiovascular disease showed lower prevalence of smoking and type 2 diabetes mellitus, lower body mass index and glucose, and higher diastolic blood pressure than the Spanish population. The differences in type 2 diabetes mellitus were justified mostly by the difference in body mass index. Body mass index adjustment also showed higher prevalence of hypertension and use of anti-hypertensive drugs in HeFH. In summary, HeFH patients had lower body mass index, which may contribute to explaining the lower prevalence of diabetes, and lower current smoking but higher hypertension.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T01:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896138
       
  • Pre-participation screening in young elite athletes: Towards a new
           algorithm'
    • Authors: Stephan Gerling
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T01:04:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897334
       
  • Pre-participation cardiovascular evaluation of young athletes: Should they
           sweat or not'
    • Authors: Matthias Wilhelm
      First page: 308
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T01:04:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897445
       
  • Smoking is the strongest modifiable risk factor for mortality post
           coronary revascularisation
    • Authors: Jenni Aittokallio, Joonatan Palmu, Teemu Niiranen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-20T08:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894883
       
  • Association of prevalence of active transport to work and incidence of
           myocardial infarction: A nationwide ecological study
    • Authors: Theresa Munyombwe, Robin Lovelace, Mark Green, Paul Norman, Sarah Walpole, Marlous Hall, Adam Timmis, Phil Batin, Alistair Brownlee, Jonathan Brownlee, Ged Oliver, Chris P Gale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThere is a paucity of population-based geospatial data about the association between active transport and myocardial infarction. We investigated the association between active transport to work and incidence of myocardial infarction.DesignThis ecological study of 325 local authorities in England included 43,077,039 employed individuals aged 25–74 years (UK Census, 2011), and 117,521 individuals with myocardial infarction (Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project, 2011–2013).MethodsBayesian negative binomial regression models were used to investigate the association of active transport to work and incidence of myocardial infarction adjusting for local levels of deprivation, obesity, smoking, diabetes and physical activity.ResultsIn 2011, the prevalence of active transportation to work for people in employment in England aged 25–74 years was 11.4% (4,531,182 active transporters; 8.6% walking and 2.8% cycling). Active transport in 2011 was associated with a reduced incidence of myocardial infarction in 2012 amongst men cycling to work (incidence rate ratio (95% credible interval) 0.983 (0.967–0.999); and women walking to work (0.983 (0.967–0.999)) after full adjustments. However, the prevalence of active transport for men and women was not significantly associated with the combined incidence of myocardial infarction between 2011–2013 after adjusting for physical activity, smoking and diabetes.ConclusionsIn England, the prevalence of active transportation was associated with a reduced incidence of myocardial infarction for women walking and men cycling to work in corresponding local geographic areas. The overall association of active transport with myocardial infarction was, however, explained by local area levels of smoking, diabetes and physical activity.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876228
       
  • Aortic root remodelling in competitive athletes
    • Authors: Marc Abulí, Gonzalo Grazioli, Maria Sanz de la Garza, Silvia Montserrat, Bàrbara Vidal, Adelina Doltra, Georgia Sarquella-Brugada, Montserrat Bellver, Ramon Pi, Daniel Brotons, David Oxborough, Marta Sitges
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundControversy remains about the cut-off limits for detecting aortic dilatation in athletes, particularly in large-sized individuals. The allometric scaling model has been used to obtain size-independent measurements in cardiovascular structures in the general population.AimThe purpose of this study was to validate the use of allometric scaling in the measurement of the aortic root for competitive athletes and to offer reference values.MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study that analyses the dimensions of aortic root found in the echocardiogram performed as part of pre-participation sports screening in competitive athletes between 2012–2015. Beta exponents were calculated for height and body surface area in the whole cohort. In order to establish whether a common exponent could be used in both genders the following model was assessed y = axb*exp(c*sex). If a common exponent could not be applied then sex-specific beta exponents were calculated.ResultsTwo thousand and eighty-three athletes (64% men) were included, from a broad spectrum of 44 different sports disciplines, including basketball, volleyball and handball. The mean age was 18.2 ± 5.1 years (range 12–35 years) and all athletes were Caucasian, with a training load of 12.5 ± 5.4 h per week. Indexed aortic root dimension showed a correlation with ratiometric scaling by body surface area (r: −0.419) and generated size independence values with a very light correlation with height (r: −0.084); and with the allometric scaling by body surface area (r: −0.063) and height (r: −0.070). The absolute value of aortic root was higher in men than in women (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T05:30:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894882
       
  • The interplay of endothelial dysfunction, cardiovascular disease, and
           cancer: What we should know beyond inflammation and oxidative stress
    • Authors: Farzad Masoudkabir, Nizal Sarrafzadegan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T05:30:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319895415
       
  • Predictors of pre-rehabilitation exercise capacity in elderly European
           cardiac patients – The EU-CaRE study
    • Authors: Thimo Marcin, Prisca Eser, Eva Prescott, Nicolai Mikkelsen, Leonie F Prins, Evelien K Kolkman, Óscar Lado-Baleato, Carmen Cardaso-Suaréz, Wendy Bruins, Astrid E van der Velde, Carlos Peña Gil, Marie Christine Iliou, Diego Ardissino, Uwe Zeymer, Esther P Meindersma, Arnoud WJ Van’t Hof, Ed P de Kluiver, Matthias Wilhelm
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsFunctional capacity is an important endpoint for therapies oriented to older adults with cardiovascular diseases. The literature on predictors of exercise capacity is sparse in the elderly population. In a longitudinal European study on effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation of seven European countries in elderly (>65 years) coronary artery disease or valvular heart disease patients, predictors for baseline exercise capacity were determined, and reference ranges for elderly cardiac patients provided.MethodsMixed models were performed in 1282 patients (mean age 72.9 ± 5.4 years, 79% male) for peak oxygen consumption relative to weight (peak VO2; ml/kg per min) with centre as random factor and patient anthropometric, demographic, social, psychological and nutritional parameters, as well as disease aetiology, procedure, comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors as fixed factors.ResultsThe most important predictors for low peak VO2 were coronary artery bypass grafting or valve surgery, low resting forced expiratory volume, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, nephropathy and peripheral arterial disease. Each cumulative comorbidity or cardiovascular risk factors reduced exercise capacity by 1.7 ml/kg per min and 1.1 ml/kg per min, respectively. Males had a higher peak VO2 per body mass but not per lean mass. Haemoglobin was significantly linked to peak VO2 in both surgery and non-surgery patients.ConclusionsSurgical procedures, cumulative comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors were the factors with the strongest relation to reduced exercise capacity in the elderly. Expression of peak VO2 per lean mass rather than body mass allows a more appropriate comparison between sexes. Haemoglobin is strongly related to peak VO2 and should be considered in studies assessing exercise capacity, especially in studies on patients after cardiac surgery.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T05:30:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894676
       
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease: A still
           debated liaison
    • Authors: Paola Dongiovanni, Massimiliano Ruscica
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T05:30:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319895402
       
  • Current cardiovascular scoring systems only tell part of the story
    • Authors: Rolanda Lister, Cornelia Graves, Wonder Drake
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T05:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319895870
       
  • Walking pace: Don’t hurry, be active
    • Authors: Sanne Verhoog, Hugo Saner
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T05:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319895872
       
  • Time-based measures of comparative efficacy and safety in ARISTOTLE:
           Methodological remarks and clinical implications
    • Authors: Sergio Buccheri
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T05:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894876
       
  • Metabolic syndrome severity score is associated with diastolic dysfunction
           and low-grade inflammation in a community-based cohort
    • Authors: Ricardo Ladeiras-Lopes, Pedro Teixeira, Ana Azevedo, Adelino Leite-Moreira, Nuno Bettencourt, Ricardo Fontes-Carvalho
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T05:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319895400
       
  • Prolonged QRS associated with left bundle branch conduction defect is a
           prognostic red flag in asymptomatic patients at risk for heart failure
           (ACCF/AHA stages A and B): Insights from the DAVID-Berg study
    • Authors: Andrea Pozzi, Mauro Gori, Annamaria Iorio, Attilio Iacovoni, Alessandra Carobbio, Giovanni Cioffi, Renata De Maria, Aurelia Grosu, Alessandra Fontana, Paolo Angelo Canova, Alice Calabrese, Paola Ferrari, Gianfranco Parati, Ferdinando Luca Lorini, Michele Senni, Antonello Gavazzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T05:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896431
       
  • Aortic regurgitation in athletes: Pieces of the puzzle we have so far
           omitted
    • Authors: E Cavarretta, G Frati, L Sciarra, M Peruzzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T05:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319897343
       
  • Prediction of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events in young and
           middle-aged healthy workers: The IberScore model
    • Authors: Carlos Fernández-Labandera, Eva Calvo-Bonacho, Pedro Valdivielso, Luis Quevedo-Aguado, Paloma Martínez-Munoz, Carlos Catalina-Romero, Luis M Ruilope, Miguel A Sánchez-Chaparro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsOur primary objective was to improve risk assessment for fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events in a working population, mostly young and healthy.MethodsWe conducted a prospective cohort study to derive a survival model to predict fatal and non-fatal 10-year cardiovascular risk. We recruited 992,523 workers, free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease at entry, over six years, from 2004–2009. We divided the sample into two independent cohorts: a derivation one (626,515 workers; from 2004–2006) and a temporal validation one (366,008 workers; over 2007–2009). Then, we followed both cohorts over 10 years and registered all fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. We built a new risk calculator using an estimation of cardiovascular biological age as a predictor and named it IberScore. There were remarkable differences between this new model and Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) (in both the specification and the equation).ResultsOver the 10-year follow-up, we found 3762 first cardiovascular events (6‰) in the derivation cohort. Most of them (80.3%) were non-fatal ischaemic events. If we had been able to use our model at the beginning of the study, we had classified in the ‘high-risk’ or ‘very high-risk’ groups 82% of those who suffered a cardiovascular event during the follow-up. All the post-estimation tests showed superior performance (true positive rate: 81.8% vs 11.8%), higher discrimination power and better clinical utility (standardised net benefit: 58% vs 13%) for IberScore when compared to SCORE.ConclusionRisk assessment of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events in young and healthy workers was improved when compared to the previously used model (SCORE). The latter was not reliable to predict cardiovascular risk in our sample. The new model showed superior clinical utility and provided four useful measures for risk assessment. We gained valuable insight into cardiovascular ageing and its predictors.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T01:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894880
       
  • When should cardiovascular prevention begin' The importance of
           antenatal, perinatal and primordial prevention
    • Authors: Flavio D’Ascenzi, Carlotta Sciaccaluga, Matteo Cameli, Annagrazia Cecere, Marco M Ciccone, Simona Di Francesco, Antonello Ganau, Egidio Imbalzano, Riccardo Liga, Pietro Palermo, Pasquale Palmiero, Gianfranco Parati, Roberto Pedrinelli, Piero Scicchitano, Annapaola Zito, Anna V Mattioli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Cardiovascular diseases represent a major health problem, being one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, in this scenario, cardiovascular prevention plays an essential role although it is difficult to establish when promoting and implementing preventive strategies. However, there is growing evidence that prevention should start even before birth, during pregnancy, aiming to avoid the onset of cardiovascular risk factors, since events that occur early in life have a great impact on the cardiovascular risk profile of an adult. The two pillars of this early preventive strategy are nutrition and physical exercise, together with prevention of cardio-metabolic diseases during pregnancy. This review attempts to gather the growing evidence of the benefits of antenatal, perinatal and primordial prevention, discussing also the possibility to reverse or to mitigate the cardiovascular profile developed in the initial stages of life. This could pave the way for future research, investigating the optimal time and duration of these preventing measures, their duration and maintenance in adulthood, and the most effective interventions according to the different age and guiding in the next years, the best clinical practice and the political strategies to cope with cardiovascular disease.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T08:00:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319893832
       
  • Antenatal, perinatal, and primordial cardiovascular prevention: What is
           known, what is happening, and future directions
    • Authors: Roberto FE Pedretti
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T08:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319896142
       
  • Exercise capacity and septal myectomy in hypertrophic cardiomyopthy:
           Predicting clinical response
    • Authors: Christopher John Boos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T03:56:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894874
       
  • Free cholesterol transfer to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) upon
           triglyceride lipolysis underlies the U-shape relationship between
           HDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Ma Feng, Maryam Darabi, Emilie Tubeuf, Aurélie Canicio, Marie Lhomme, Eric Frisdal, Sandrine Lanfranchi-Lebreton, Lucrèce Matheron, Fabiana Rached, Maharajah Ponnaiah, Carlos V Serrano, Raul D Santos, Fernando Brites, Gerard Bolbach, Emmanuel Gautier, Thierry Huby, Alain Carrie, Eric Bruckert, Maryse Guerin, Philippe Couvert, Philippe Giral, Philippe Lesnik, Wilfried Le Goff, Isabelle Guillas, Anatol Kontush
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundLow concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) represent a well-established cardiovascular risk factor. Paradoxically, extremely high HDL-C levels are equally associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, resulting in the U-shape relationship of HDL-C with cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms underlying this association are presently unknown. We hypothesised that the capacity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to acquire free cholesterol upon triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TGRL) lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase underlies the non-linear relationship between HDL-C and cardiovascular risk.MethodsTo assess our hypothesis, we developed a novel assay to evaluate the capacity of HDL to acquire free cholesterol (as fluorescent TopFluor® cholesterol) from TGRL upon in vitro lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase.ResultsWhen the assay was applied to several populations markedly differing in plasma HDL-C levels, transfer of free cholesterol was significantly decreased in low HDL-C patients with acute myocardial infarction (−45%) and type 2 diabetes (–25%), and in subjects with extremely high HDL-C of>2.59 mmol/L (>100 mg/dL) (−20%) versus healthy normolipidaemic controls. When these data were combined and plotted against HDL-C concentrations, an inverse U-shape relationship was observed. Consistent with these findings, animal studies revealed that the capacity of HDL to acquire cholesterol upon lipolysis was reduced in low HDL-C apolipoprotein A-I knock-out mice and was negatively correlated with aortic accumulation of [3H]-cholesterol after oral gavage, attesting this functional characteristic as a negative metric of postprandial atherosclerosis.ConclusionsFree cholesterol transfer to HDL upon TGRL lipolysis may underlie the U-shape relationship between HDL-C and cardiovascular disease, linking HDL-C to triglyceride metabolism and atherosclerosis.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T03:56:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894114
       
  • Impact of cardiac rehabilitation participation on patient-reported
           lifestyle changes one year after myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Matthias Hermann, Fabienne Witassek, Paul Erne, Franz Eberli, Olivier Muller, Marco Roffi, Marco Maggiorini, Dragana Radovanovic, Hans Rickli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319895429
       
  • Neutrophil to platelet ratio: A novel prognostic biomarker in ST-elevation
           myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary
           intervention
    • Authors: Alberto Somaschini, Stefano Cornara, Andrea Demarchi, Alessandro M Mirizzi, Federico Fortuni, Gabriele Crimi, Marco Ferlini, Rita Camporotondo, Massimiliano Gnecchi, Luigi O Visconti, Gaetano M De Ferrari
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:15:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894103
       
  • Atrial fibrillation is associated with impaired exercise capacity and
           adverse prognosis in patients with heart failure with mid-range ejection
           fraction
    • Authors: Yu Sato, Akiomi Yoshihisa, Yusuke Kimishima, Tetsuro Yokokawa, Satoshi Abe, Takeshi Shimizu, Tomofumi Misaka, Shinya Yamada, Takamasa Sato, Takashi Kaneshiro, Masayoshi Oikawa, Atsushi Kobayashi, Takayoshi Yamaki, Hiroyuki Kunii, Yasuchika Takeishi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:15:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894106
       
  • The new Primary Care and Risk Factor Management (PCRFM) nucleus of the
           European Association of Preventive Cardiology: A call for action

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Monika Hollander, Christi Deaton, Irene Gibson, Donata Kurpas, Frans Rutten, Henner Hanssen, Maria Antonopoulou, Paul Dendale, Diederick E Grobbee
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:15:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894107
       
  • Myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease: Treatment patterns
           and long-term outcome in men and women results from a Swedish nationwide
           study
    • Authors: B Sigvant, P Hasvold, M Thuresson, T Jernberg, M Janzon, J Nordanstig
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundDifferences in comorbidity, pharmacotherapy, cardiovascular (CV) outcome, and mortality between myocardial infarction (MI) patients and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients are not well documented.AimThe aim of this study was to compare comorbidity, treatment patterns, CV outcome, and mortality in MI and PAD patients, focusing on sex differences.MethodsThis observational, population-based study used data retrieved from mandatory Swedish national registries. The risks of MI and death were assessed by Kaplan–Meier analysis. Secondary preventive drug use was characterized. Cox proportional risk hazard modelling was used to determine the risk of specific events.ResultsOverall, 91,808 incident MI patients and 52,408 PAD patients were included. CV mortality for MI patients at 12, 24, and 36 months after index was 12.3%, 19.3%, and 25.4%, and for PAD patients it was 15.5%, 23.4%, and 31.0%. At index, 89% of MI patients and 65% of PAD patients used aspirin and 74% and 53%, respectively, used statins. Unlike MI women, women with PAD had a lower rate of other CV-related comorbidities and a lower risk of CV events (age-adjusted hazard ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.79‒0.84), CV death (0.78, 0.75‒0.82), and all-cause death (0.78, 0.76‒0.80) than their PAD male counterparts.ConclusionPAD patients were less intensively treated and had a higher CV mortality than MI patients. Women with PAD were less likely than men to present with established polyvascular disease, whereas the opposite was true of women with MI. This result indicates that the lower-limb vasculature may more often be the index site for atherosclerosis in women.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319893046
       
  • No causal effects of plasma homocysteine levels on the risk of coronary
           heart disease or acute myocardial infarction: A Mendelian randomization
           study
    • Authors: Liu Miao, Guo-Xiong Deng, Rui-Xing Yin, Rong-Jun Nie, Shuo Yang, Yong Wang, Hui Li
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAlthough many observational studies have shown an association between plasma homocysteine levels and cardiovascular diseases, controversy remains. In this study, we estimated the role of increased plasma homocysteine levels on the etiology of coronary heart disease and acute myocardial infarction.MethodsA two-sample Mendelian randomization study on disease was conducted, i.e. “coronary heart disease” (n = 184,305) and “acute myocardial infarction” (n = 181,875). Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms, which were genome-wide significantly associated with plasma homocysteine levels in 57,644 subjects from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) plus The Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium genome-wide association study and were known to be associated at p  0.05 for all). Mendelian randomization analysis revealed no causal effects of plasma homocysteine levels, either on coronary heart disease (inverse variance weighted; odds ratio = 1.015, 95% confidence interval = 0.923–1.106, p = 0.752) or on acute myocardial infarction (inverse variance weighted; odds ratio = 1.037, 95% confidence interval = 0.932–1.142, p = 0.499). The results were consistent in sensitivity analyses using the weighted median and Mendelian randomization-Egger methods, and no directional pleiotropy (p = 0.213 for coronary heart disease and p = 0.343 for acute myocardial infarction) was observed. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that plasma homocysteine levels were not significantly associated with coronary heart disease or acute myocardial infarction.ConclusionsThe findings from this Mendelian randomization study indicate no causal relationship between plasma homocysteine levels and coronary heart disease or acute myocardial infarction. Conflicting findings from observational studies might have resulted from residual confounding or reverse causation.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:15:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894679
       
  • Influence of abnormal lipid components in statin-naive young adults: Is
           there any gap'
    • Authors: Jamol Uzokov
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-16T02:15:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319894693
       
  • Cardiac rehabilitation programmes: Cost-effective and a potential
           instrument against health inequalities
    • Authors: Ana Barradas-Pires
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-13T12:35:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887829
       
  • Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol target value attainment based on 2019
           ESC/EAS guidelines and lipid-lowering therapy titration for patients with
           acute coronary syndrome
    • Authors: Ioannis Farmakis, Stefanos Zafeiropoulos, Areti Pagiantza, Aristi Boulmpou, Alexandra Arvanitaki, Athina Tampaki, Diamantis Kosmidis, Vassileios Nevras, Eleftherios Markidis, Ioannis Papadimitriou, Haralambos Karvounis, George Giannakoulas
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-10T01:01:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891780
       
  • Influence of vitamin B deficiency on PM2.5-induced cardiac autonomic
           dysfunction
    • Authors: Youn-Hee Lim, Hye Yin Park, Seung-Muk Yi, EunHa Park, Bo-Eun Lee, Se-Young Oh, Yun-Chul Hong
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T08:00:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888595
       
  • Pulmonary transit of contrast during exercise is related to improved
           cardio-pulmonary performance in highly trained endurance athletes
    • Authors: María Sanz-de la Garza, Antonia Vaquer-Seguí, Karina Durán, Isabel Blanco, Felip Burgos, Xavier Alsina, Susanna Prat-González, Bart Bijnens, Marta Sitges
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe mechanisms underlying the high interindividual variability demonstrated for right-ventricular (RV) adaptation to exercise have not yet been identified, but different pulmonary vascular adaptations among individuals could be involved. Pulmonary transit of agitated saline (PTAS) during exercise has been demonstrated to be a good estimator of vascular reserve.AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of PTAS among endurance athletes (EAs) of both sexes and its influence on RV adaptation to exercise.MethodsA total of 100 highly trained EAs performed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Bi-ventricular functional and structural characteristics as well as PTAS were evaluated at baseline and at peak exercise. Athletes were distributed between two groups based on the amount of PTAS during exercise as high (HTPAS;>12 bubbles) and low (LPTAS; ≤12 bubbles).ResultsOverall, 11 EAs exhibited an intra-cardiac shunt at rest and 1 met the criteria for chronic pulmonary disease and were excluded from the study. Among the remaining 88 EAs (51% women), 47 (53%) athletes were classified as HPTAS and 41 (47%) as LPTAS. HPTAS capability was associated with significantly larger RV contractile reserve, larger pulmonary vascular reserve and an enhanced maximal exercise capacity. On multivariate analysis, females were the only independent correlate of the HPTAS capability.ConclusionIn highly trained endurance athletes, a HPTAS capability during exercise corresponded to an increase in pulmonary vascular and RV contractile reserves as well as an enhanced maximal exercise capacity. The long-term clinical or performance implications of the absence or presence of pulmonary shunting, and the subsequent RV afterload increase while performing exercise, remains to be determined.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-05T12:23:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891779
       
  • Impact of cardiorespiratory fitness changes in cardiac rehabilitation
    • Authors: Giovanni Grazzi, Jonathan Myers, Giorgio Chiaranda
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-05T12:23:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319892122
       
  • Women, obesity, and the incidence of heart failure: An uncertainty that
           has begun to be solved
    • Authors: Manuel F Jiménez-Navarro, Maria G Crespo-Leiro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-05T12:23:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891603
       
  • Improving high-density lipoprotein function by exercise: Does workout
           intensity matter'
    • Authors: Nikolaos Pagonas, Timm H Westhoff
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-05T12:23:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891782
       
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a new and growing risk indicator for
           cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Arne Janssen, Diederick E Grobbee, Paul Dendale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-05T12:23:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891783
       
  • Cathepsin B expression is associated with arterial stiffening and
           atherosclerotic vascular disease
    • Authors: Alexia Mareti, Chrysoula Kritsioti, Georgios Georgiopoulos, Nikolaos I Vlachogiannis, Dimitris Delialis, Marco Sachse, Kateryna Sopova, Athanasios Koutsoukis, Christos Kontogiannis, Raphael Patras, Simon Tual-Chalot, Andreas Koureas, Aikaterini Gatsiou, Konstantinos Stellos, Kimon Stamatelopoulos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-05T12:23:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319893042
       
  • Implications of the UK Biobank prognostic study for preventive cardiology
    • Authors: Michael Jelinek, Margarite Vale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891518
       
  • Quantifying the evil for a more effective fight against tobacco
    • Authors: Jacques Blacher, Alexandre Cinaud, Vincent Blachier, Alexandre Vallée, Emmanuel Sorbets
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319892400
       
  • Cardiac rehabilitation guidelines informing Universal Health Coverage
    • Authors: Jennifer Sumner
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890777
       
  • Sex differences in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Time to tailor risk
           stratification and therapy'
    • Authors: Andrew Constantine, Konstantinos Dimopoulos, Isma Rafiq, Ali Vazir
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890996
       
  • Do we really need more new biomarkers for cardiovascular risk
           prediction'
    • Authors: Peter M Nilsson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319893050
       
  • Fuster-BEWAT score versus cardiovascular health score to predict
           subclinical target organ damage: Insights from a large-scale Asian
           population
    • Authors: Hao-Yu Wang, Ke-Fei Dou, Ying-Xian Sun
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891781
       
  • Aortic regurgitation in competitive athletes: The role of multimodality
           imaging for clinical decision-making
    • Authors: Alexios S Antonopoulos, George Lazaros, Evi Papanikolaou, Evangelos Oikonomou, Charalambos Vlachopoulos, Dimitris Tousoulis
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319892112
       
  • Influence of visceral adiposity accumulation on adverse left and right
           ventricular mechanics in the community
    • Authors: Naoko Sawada, Koki Nakanishi, Masao Daimon, Yuriko Yoshida, Jumpei Ishiwata, Megumi Hirokawa, Tomoko Nakao, Hiroyuki Morita, Marco R Di Tullio, Shunichi Homma, Issei Komuro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsObesity carries significant risk for unfavorable ventricular remodeling and subsequent heart failure (HF) development, although the association between abdominal fat distribution and subclinical ventricular dysfunction is unclear. This study aimed to compare the subcutaneous and visceral abdominal adiposity with the risk of decreased ventricular strain.MethodsWe included 340 participants without overt cardiac disease who underwent laboratory testing, abdominal computed tomographic examination, and speckle-tracking echocardiography. Abdominal adiposity was quantitatively assessed as visceral fat area (VFA) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) at the level of the umbilicus. Speckle-tracking echocardiography was performed to assess left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LVGLS) and right ventricular free-wall longitudinal strain (RVLS).ResultsMean age was 56 ± 9 years, and 244 of the participants (72%) were male. The mean LVGLS and RVLS were −19.1 ± 3.0% and −25.0 ± 4.1%, respectively. Both VFA and SFA correlated with LVGLS (r = 0.46 and r = 0.15, both p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891286
       
  • The effects of mental health on myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Faiza Cheema, Mahira Ilyas, Qudsia Mehwish
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-04T05:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891784
       
  • Residential greenness and increased physical activity in patients after
           coronary artery bypass graft surgery
    • Authors: Maya Sadeh, Michael Brauer, Alexandra Chudnovsky, Arnona Ziv, Rachel Dankner
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPhysical activity is a fundamental component of rehabilitation following coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery. Proximity to neighbourhood green spaces may encourage physical activity. We investigated the association between residential greenness and exercise-related physical activity post-CABG surgery.MethodsParticipants in a prospective cohort study of 846 patients (78% men) who underwent CABG surgery at seven cardiothoracic units during the time period 2004–2007 were interviewed regarding their physical activity habits one day before and one year after surgery. Exposure to residential neighbourhood greenness (within a 300 m buffer around their place of residence) was measured using the Normalized Difference Vegetative Index. Participation in exercise-related physical activity (yes/no), weekly duration of exercise-related physical activity and the change in exercise-related physical activity between baseline and follow-up were examined for associations with residential greenness, adjusting for socio-demographic factors, propensity score adjusted participation in cardiac rehabilitation and health-related covariates after multiple imputation for missing variables.ResultsLiving in a higher quartile of residential greenness was associated with a 52% greater odds of being physically active (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.22–1.90). This association persisted only (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.35–2.27) among patients who did not participate in cardiac rehabilitation following surgery and was stronger in women (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.40–4.07) than in men (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.07–1.75). Participants who lived in greener areas were more likely to increase their post-surgical physical activity than those who lived in less green areas (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.25–2.01).ConclusionsResidential greenness appears to be beneficial in increasing exercise-related physical activity in cardiac patients, especially those not particpating in cardiac rehabilitation after CABG surgery.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T08:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886017
       
  • Heritability of a resting heart rate in a 20-year follow-up family cohort
           with GWAS data: Insights from the STANISLAS cohort
    • Authors: Constance Xhaard, Claire Dandine-Roulland, Pierre de Villemereuil, Edith Le Floch, Delphine Bacq-Daian, Jean-Loup Machu, Joao Pedro Ferreira, Jean-François Deleuze, Faiez Zannad, Patrick Rossignol, Nicolas Girerd
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe association between resting heart rate (HR) and cardiovascular outcomes, especially heart failure, is now well established. However, whether HR is mainly an integrated marker of risk associated with other features, or rather a genetic origin risk marker, is still a matter for debate. Previous studies reported a heritability ranging from 14% to 65%.DesignWe assessed HR heritability in the STANISLAS family-study, based on the data of four visits performed over a 20-year period, and adjusted for most known confounding effects.MethodsThese analyses were conducted using a linear mixed model, adjusted on age, sex, tea or coffee consumption, beta-blocker use, physical activity, tobacco use, and alcohol consumption to estimate the variance captured by additive genetic effects, via average information restricted maximum likelihood analysis, with both self-reported pedigree and genetic relatedness matrix (GRM) calculated from genome-wide association study data.ResultsBased on the data of all visits, the HR heritability (h2) estimate was 23.2% with GRM and 24.5% with pedigree. However, we found a large heterogeneity of HR heritability estimations when restricting the analysis to each of the four visits (h2 from 19% to 39% using pedigree, and from 14% to 32% using GRM). Moreover, only a little part of variance was explained by the common household effect (
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T05:18:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890763
       
  • Does tooth brushing protect from atrial fibrillation and heart
           failure'
    • Authors: Pascal Meyre, David Conen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T05:05:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886413
       
  • Improved oral hygiene care is associated with decreased risk of occurrence
           for atrial fibrillation and heart failure: A nationwide population-based
           cohort study
    • Authors: Yoonkyung Chang, Ho Geol Woo, Jin Park, Ji Sung Lee, Tae-Jin Song
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPoor oral hygiene can provoke transient bacteremia and systemic inflammation, a mediator of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. This study aims to investigate association of oral hygiene indicators with atrial fibrillation and heart failure risk in Korea.MethodsWe included 161,286 subjects from the National Health Insurance System-Health Screening Cohort who had no missing data for demographics, past history, or laboratory findings. They had no history of atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or cardiac valvular diseases. For oral hygiene indicators, presence of periodontal disease, number of tooth brushings, any reasons of dental visit, professional dental cleaning, and number of missing teeth were investigated.ResultsDuring median follow-up of 10.5 years, 4911 (3.0%) cases of atrial fibrillation and 7971 (4.9%) cases of heart failure occurred. In multivariate analysis after adjusting age, sex, socioeconomic status, regular exercise, alcohol consumption, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, current smoking, renal disease, history of cancer, systolic blood pressure, blood and urine laboratory findings, frequent tooth brushing (≥3 times/day) was significantly associated with attenuated risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval (0.83–0.98)) and heart failure (0.88, (0.82–0.94)). Professional dental cleaning was negatively (0.93, (0.88–0.99)), while number of missing teeth ≥22 was positively (1.32, (1.11–1.56)) associated with risk of heart failure.ConclusionImproved oral hygiene care was associated with decreased risk of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Healthier oral hygiene by frequent tooth brushing and professional dental cleaning may reduce risk of atrial fibrillation and heart failure.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T05:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886018
       
  • Expanding the evidence for effective therapies in recurrent pericarditis
    • Authors: Bettina Heidecker
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T04:06:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887462
       
  • Sleep deprivation and increased cardiovascular risk: A wake-up call!
    • Authors: Emeline M Van Craenenbroeck
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T04:06:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890765
       
  • Non-linear is not superior to linear aerobic training periodization in
           coronary heart disease patients
    • Authors: Maxime Boidin, Lukas-Daniel Trachsel, Anil Nigam, Martin Juneau, Jonathan Tremblay, Mathieu Gayda
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundWe aimed to compare: (1) two different periodized aerobic training protocols (linear (LP) versus non-linear (NLP)) on the cardiopulmonary exercise response in patients with coronary heart disease; (2) the proportion of responders between both training protocols.DesignA randomized controlled trial.MethodsA total of 39 coronary heart disease patients completed either LP (n = 20, 65 ± 10 years) or NLP (n = 19, 66 ± 5 years). All patients completed a cardiopulmonary exercise testing with gas exchange measurements. Patients underwent a 12-week supervised exercise program including an isoenergetic aerobic periodized training and a similar resistance training program, 3 times/week. Weekly energy expenditure was constantly increased in the LP group for the aerobic training, while it was deeply increased and intercepted with a recovery week each fourth week in the NLP group. Peak oxygen uptake (peak V̇O2), oxygen uptake efficiency slope, ventilatory efficiency slope (V̇E/V̇CO2 slope), V̇O2 at the first (VT1) and second (VT2) ventilatory thresholds, and oxygen pulse (O2 pulse) were measured. Responders were determined according the median value of the Δpeak V̇O2 (mL.min−1.kg−1).ResultsWe found similar improvement for peak V̇O2 (LP: +8.1%, NLP: +5.3%, interaction: p = 0.37; time: p  0.05; time: p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T04:06:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319891778
       
  • Home-based exercise with telemonitoring guidance in patients with coronary
           artery disease: Does it improve long-term physical fitness'
    • Authors: Andrea Avila, Jomme Claes, Roselien Buys, May Azzawi, Luc Vanhees, Veronique Cornelissen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHome-based interventions might facilitate the lifelong uptake of a physically active lifestyle following completion of a supervised phase II exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Yet, data on the long-term effectiveness of home-based exercise training on physical activity and exercise capacity are scarce.ObjectiveThe purpose of the TeleRehabilitation in Coronary Heart disease (TRiCH) study was to compare the long-term effects of a short home-based phase III exercise programme with telemonitoring guidance to a prolonged centre-based phase III programme in coronary artery disease patients. The primary outcome was exercise capacity. Secondary outcomes included physical activity behaviour, cardiovascular risk profile and health-related quality of life.MethodsNinety coronary artery disease patients (80 men) were randomly assigned to 3 months of home-based (30), centre-based (30) or a control group (30) on a 1:1:1 basis after completion of their phase II ambulatory cardiac rehabilitation programme. Outcome measures were assessed at discharge of the phase II programme and after one year.ResultsEighty patients (72 (91%) men; mean age 62.6 years) completed the one-year follow-up measurements. Exercise capacity and secondary outcomes were preserved in all three groups (Ptime > 0.05 for all), irrespective of the intervention (Pinteraction > 0.05 for all). Eighty-five per cent of patients met the international guidelines for physical activity (Ptime 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T04:06:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319892201
       
  • Reply to commentary on: Prediction of VO2peak by an endurance test and
           prognostic value of the FRIEND equation
    • Authors: Giovanni Grazzi, Jonathan Myers, Ross Arena, Leonard Kaminsky, Gianni Mazzoni, Giorgio Chiaranda
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T04:06:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319892121
       
  • Obesity and metabolic health status are determinants for the clinical
           expression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Jun-Bean Park, Da Hye Kim, Heesun Lee, In-Chang Hwang, Yeonyee E Yoon, Hyo Eun Park, Su-Yeon Choi, Yong-Jin Kim, Goo-Yeong Cho, Kyungdo Han, Steve R Ommen, Hyung-Kwan Kim
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsWe sought to investigate the association of obesity and metabolic health status with the incidence of clinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) diagnosis in the general population. Our goal was to identify modifiable risk factors to attenuate clinical expression of HCM, enabling management evolution from a mostly passive strategy of risk stratification to a proactive strategy of modifying disease expression.MethodsUsing nationwide population-based data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service, 28,679,891 people who were free of prevalent HCM and who underwent health examinations between 2009 and 2015 were followed until 31 December 2016. The primary outcome was clinical HCM that was defined as incident diagnosis of HCM during the follow-up, after a blanking period of 12 months.ResultsOver a median follow-up of 5.2 years, 0.027% (n = 7851) of the study participants were diagnosed as incident HCM. The incidence rate per 1000 person-years was 0.059. A significant association was found between body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of clinical HCM after multivariate adjustment, with a hazard ratio per 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI of 1.063 (95% confidence interval 1.051–1.075). Metabolically unhealthy participants had a greater incidence of HCM than metabolically healthy participants, regardless of obesity status. The effect of BMI was more pronounced in several subgroups, including participants with no hypertension, those aged less than 65 years and men.ConclusionWe found that individuals with obesity and/or metabolic abnormalities had a significantly higher incidence of clinical HCM diagnosis than their counterparts. Efforts to manage obesity and metabolic abnormalities may be important in modifying clinical expression of HCM.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T04:06:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319889714
       
  • Superior cardiac mechanics without structural adaptations in
           pre-adolescent soccer players
    • Authors: Alexander Beaumont, David Oxborough, Keith George, Thomas W Rowland, Nicholas Sculthorpe, Rachel Lord, Viswanath B Unnithan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThis study aimed to evaluate left ventricular structure, function and mechanics, in highly-trained, pre-adolescent soccer players compared with age- and sex-matched controls.DesignThe study design was a prospective, cross-sectional comparison of left ventricular structure, function and mechanics.MethodsTwenty-two male soccer players from two professional youth soccer academies (age: 12.0 ± 0.3 years) and 22 recreationally active controls (age: 11.7 ± 0.3 years) were recruited. Two-dimensional conventional and speckle tracking echocardiography were used to quantify left ventricular structure, function and peak/temporal values for left ventricular strain and twist, respectively.ResultsEnd-diastolic volume index was larger in soccer players (51 ± 8 mm/(m2)1.5 vs. 45 ± 6 mm/(m2)1.5; p = 0.007) and concentricity was lower in soccer players (4.3 ± 0.7 g/(mL)0.667 vs. 4.9 ± 1.0 g/(mL)0.667; p = 0.017), without differences in mean wall thickness between groups (6.0 ± 0.4 mm vs. 6.1 ± 0.5 mm; p = 0.754). Peak circumferential strain at the base (–22.2% ± 2.5% vs. –20.5% ± 2.5%; p = 0.029) and papillary muscle levels (–20.1% ± 1.5% vs. –18.3% ± 2.5%; p = 0.007) were greater in soccer players. Peak left ventricular twist was larger in soccer players (16.92° ± 7.55° vs. 12.34° ± 4.99°; p = 0.035) and longitudinal early diastolic strain rate was greater in soccer players (2.22 ± 0.40 s–1 vs. 2.02 ± 0.46 s–1; p = 0.025).ConclusionsHighly-trained soccer players demonstrated augmented cardiac mechanics with greater circumferential strains, twist and faster diastolic lengthening in the absence of differences in wall thickness between soccer players and controls.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-29T05:11:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890177
       
  • Physical exercise: Another tool in the fight against cancer and its
           treatment side effects'
    • Authors: María Sanz-de la Garza, Marta Sitges
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-29T05:11:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890173
       
  • Inequality in the world of sports: Differences of pre-participation
           examination in athletes in high- versus low-income countries
    • Authors: Herbert Löllgen, Petra Zupet
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-28T04:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887471
       
  • Are healthy workers made equal to the general young to middle-aged
           population in Spain, a southern European country'
    • Authors: Paolo E Puddu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-28T04:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887472
       
  • A large Italian cohort on proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9
           inhibitors
    • Authors: Francesco Sbrana, Beatrice Dal Pino, Federico Bigazzi, Andrea Ripoli, Elisabetta Volpi, Maria Pia Fogliaro, Giuseppa L Surdo, Mascia Pianelli, Roberta Luciani, Stefania Biagini, Tiziana Sampietro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-26T05:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888059
       
  • Multimodal prehabilitation as a promising strategy for preventing physical
           deconditioning on the heart transplant waiting list
    • Authors: Elena Gimeno-Santos, Miquel Coca-Martinez, Maria J Arguis, Ricard Navarro, Antonio Lopez-Hernandez, Maria A Castel, Barbara Romano, Manuel Lopez-Baamonde, Elena Sandoval, Marta Farrero, Maria Sanz, Ana Bofill, Graciela Martinez-Palli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-26T05:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319889709
       
  • Anti-inflammatory medications and coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Charulata Jindal, Ashesh N Buch, Jimmy T Efird
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-26T05:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319889719
       
  • Trends in long-term cardiovascular and renal burdens of the 2017 clinical
           practice guideline for hypertension in US adults, 1998–2016
    • Authors: Dingyun You, Liyuan Han, Jingjing Liu, Lian Li, Qunhong Wu, Fangfang Zeng
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-23T12:00:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888593
       
  • PCSK9 as predictor for recurrent cardiovascular disease in familial
           hypercholesterolemia

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Laurens F Reeskamp, Tycho R Tromp, G Kees Hovingh
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-22T06:42:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886140
       
  • A Bayesian meta-analysis on early tobacco exposure and vascular health:
           From childhood to early adulthood
    • Authors: Georgios Georgiopoulos, Dimitrios Oikonomou, Konstantinos Pateras, Stefano Masi, Nikolaos Magkas, Dimitrios Delialis, Erold Ajdini, Victoria Vlachou, Kimon Stamatelopoulos, Marietta Charakida
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSmoking has been consistently associated with increased cardiovascular risk in adults. Although exposure to tobacco products often starts in early life, evidence for the possible adverse effects on the cardiovascular system of the young is scarce. We sought to derive pooled estimates of smoking effects on indices of early vascular damage in children and adolescents.Design and methodsWe performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical studies involving young individuals up to 21 years old that provided data on smoking exposure (active or passive) and flow-mediated dilatation, carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity and maximum carotid intima-media thickness. We employed three distinct methodologies of random-effects data synthesis, including the Sidik-Jonkman estimator, the Hartung and Knapp correction and a Bayesian method with a well-informed prior on the level of between-study variance.ResultsIn 12 studies and 5279 individuals in total, smoking exposure was related to deterioration in all three outcomes (mean adjusted flow-mediated dilatation decrease: −0.77%, 95% confidence interval −1.38–−0.15, mean adjusted pulse wave velocity increase: 0.1 m/s, 95% confidence interval 0.02–0.17 and mean adjusted carotid intima-media thickness increase: 0.35 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.16–0.55, for the Sidik-Jonkman estimator). No difference was established between active and passive smoking on associations with arterial damage.ConclusionsExposure to tobacco products is associated with subclinical vascular damage early in life, even from childhood. Public health initiatives should target these very young age groups to prevent early smoking exposure and associated arterial damage and its sequelae.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-21T08:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319883557
       
  • Acupuncture for stable angina pectoris: A few noteworthy additions
    • Authors: Kai Zhang, Yan Li, Qilin Tang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-20T07:19:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319889721
       
  • Improvement in VO2peak predicts readmissions for cardiovascular disease
           and mortality in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation
    • Authors: Nicolai Mikkelsen, Carmen Cadarso-Suárez, Oscar Lado-Baleato, Carla Díaz-Louzao, Carlos P Gil, Jacob Reeh, Hanne Rasmusen, Eva Prescott
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundImprovement in exercise capacity is a main goal of cardiac rehabilitation but the effects are often lost at long-term follow-up and thus also the benefits on prognosis. We assessed whether improvement in VO2peak during a cardiac rehabilitation programme predicts long-term prognosis.Methods and resultsWe performed a retrospective analysis of 1561 cardiac patients completing cardiac rehabilitation in 2011–2017 in Copenhagen. Mean age was 63.6 (11) years, 74% were male and 84% had coronary artery disease, 6% chronic heart failure and 10% heart valve replacement. The association between baseline VO2peak and improvement after cardiac rehabilitation and being readmitted for cardiovascular disease and/or all-cause mortality was assessed with three different analyses: Cox regression for the combined outcome, for all-cause mortality and a multi-state model. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years, 167 readmissions for cardiovascular disease and 77 deaths occurred. In adjusted Cox regression there was a non-linear decreasing risk of the combined outcome with higher baseline VO2peak and with improvement of VO2peak after cardiac rehabilitation. A similar linear association was seen for all-cause mortality. Applying the multi-state model, baseline VO2peak and change in VO2peak were associated with risk of a cardiovascular disease readmission and with all-cause mortality but not with mortality in those having an intermediate readmission for cardiovascular disease.ConclusionVO2peak as well as change in VO2peak were highly predictive of future risk of readmissions for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The predictive value did not extend beyond the next admission for a cardiovascular event.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-20T07:19:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887835
       
  • Remnant cholesterol, coronary atheroma progression and clinical events in
           statin-treated patients with coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Mohamed B Elshazly, Preethi Mani, Steven Nissen, Danielle M Brennan, Donald Clark, Seth Martin, Steven R Jones, Renato Quispe, Eoin Donnellan, Stephen J Nicholls, Rishi Puri
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimRemnant cholesterol has been proposed to promote atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We aimed to study the association of remnant cholesterol with coronary atheroma progression and clinical events.MethodsWe analyzed data from 5754 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing serial intravascular ultrasonography who were enrolled in 10 trials examining various medical therapies. Remnant cholesterol was calculated as (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol – low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (estimated using the Hopkins–Martin equation)). Changes in percentage atheroma volume and 2-year major adverse cardiovascular events were compared across various levels of remnant cholesterol, and multivariable models were used to assess the independent relationship of remnant cholesterol with changes in percentage atheroma volume.ResultsThe mean age was 58.1 ± 9.2 years, 28% were women and 96% received a statin. Percentage atheroma volume progression (changes in percentage atheroma volume > 0) occurred in a linear fashion at on-treatment remnant cholesterol levels of 25 mg/dL or greater. The highest on-treatment remnant cholesterol quartile demonstrated greater percentage atheroma volume progression (+0.53 ± 0.26 vs. –0.15 ± 0.25%, P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-20T07:19:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887578
       
  • Hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases attributable to tobacco
           smoking in France in 2015
    • Authors: Christophe Bonaldi, Anne Pasquereau, Catherine Hill, Daniel Thomas, Elodie Moutengou, Viêt Nguyen Thanh, Valérie Olié
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsTobacco smoking is a major risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases. In France, the daily smoking prevalence is among the highest in high-income European countries. This study estimated the number of hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases attributable to smoking in France in 2015, and the number of stays that could have been avoided if there had been 10% less current smokers or if the prevalence of current smokers had been 20%.MethodsAge- and sex-specific attributable fractions were calculated by combining relative risks extracted from the literature with the prevalence of smoking estimated in the 2014 Health Barometer, a national representative survey. These fractions were applied to hospitalization stays with a primary diagnosis for a cardiovascular disease whose risk is known to increase with smoking.ResultsIn France in 2015, 250,813 hospital stays (95% uncertainty interval=234,869–269,807) related to a cardiovascular condition were estimated as attributable to smoking. This represented 21% of all stays for a cardiovascular condition. Ischemic heart disease accounted for the largest share of smoking-related stays (39%). If the number of current smokers had been 10% lower or if the prevalence of smoking in the population had dropped to below 20%, 5867 stays and 25,911 stays, respectively, would have been prevented.ConclusionsIn France, a large number of hospital stays for cardiovascular disease are attributable to tobacco smoking. A 10% reduction in smoking would avoid nearly 6000 hospital stays per year; more than 25,000 annual hospital stays if only 20% of the French population smoked.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-19T08:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885462
       
  • The Timed Up and Go test and the ageing heart: findings from a national
           health screening of 1,084,875 community-dwelling older adults
    • Authors: Francesco Giallauria
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-15T05:07:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888602
       
  • Prevalence and clinical implications of hyperhomocysteinaemia in patients
           with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and MTHFR C6777T polymorphism
    • Authors: Augusto Esposito, Emanuele Monda, Felice Gragnano, Fabiana De Simone, Arturo Cesaro, Francesco Natale, Claudia Concilio, Elisabetta Moscarella, Martina Caiazza, Vittorio Pazzanese, Marina Verrengia, Fabio Valente, Daniele Masarone, Francesco Pelliccia, Eduardo Bossone, Paolo Calabro', Giuseppe Pacileo, Giuseppe Limongelli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T07:24:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888596
       
  • High-intensity interval training has a greater effect on reverse
           cholesterol transport elements compared with moderate-intensity continuous
           training in obese male rats
    • Authors: Saleh Rahmati-Ahmadabad, Mohammad-Ali Azarbayjani, Parvin Farzanegi, Lida Moradi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe present study compares the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 18 min) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MIT; 1 h) on reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) elements in obese subjects.MethodsThirty adult male rats were induced high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. After four weeks, the rats were randomly divided into three groups while simultaneously continuing the HFD for the remaining eight weeks. Group specificities were HFD–control, HFD–MIT and HFD–HIIT. The rats were sacrificed 48 h after the last training session and the samples were collected. Analysis of variance and Pearson’s correlation test were used for the statistical analyses (significance level: p ≤ 0.05).ResultsThe results showed that both HIIT and MIT improved heart ABCA1, ABCG1, ABCG4, ABCG5, ABCG8, LXR-α and PPARγ gene expression as well as plasma Apo A1, LCAT, lipids and lipoproteins (p ≤ 0.05). Moreover, higher cardiac ABCA1, ABCG1, ABCG4, ABCG5, ABCG8 and PPARγ expression and plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p ≤ 0.05) concentrations were found in the HFD–HIIT group compared with the HFD–MIT group.ConclusionHIIT may have more cardioprotective effects than MIT against atherosclerosis, along with saving time, as supported by the changes observed in the main factors involved in the RCT process.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T07:23:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887828
       
  • Circulating biomarkers for long-term cardiovascular risk stratification in
           apparently healthy individuals from the MONICA 10 cohort
    • Authors: Charles Edward Frary, Marie Kofoed Blicher, Thomas Bastholm Olesen, Jacob Volmer Stidsen, Sara Vikström Greve, Julie KK Vishram-Nielsen, Susanne Lone Rasmussen, Michael Hecht Olsen, Manan Pareek
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to examine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) carried incremental prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality beyond traditional risk factors in apparently healthy individuals.Methods and resultsThis was a prospective population-based cohort study comprising 1951 subjects included in the 10-year follow-up of the MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease (MONICA) study, between 1993 and 1994. The principal endpoint was death from cardiovascular causes. Secondary endpoints were death from any cause, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and cerebrovascular disease. Predictive capabilities of each of the three biomarkers were tested using Cox proportional-hazards regression, Harrell’s concordance index (C-index), and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Study participants were aged 41, 51, 61, or 71 years, and equally distributed between the two sexes. During a median follow-up of 18.5 years (interquartile range: 18.1–19.0), 177 (9.1%) subjects died from a cardiovascular cause. Hs-CRP (adjusted standardized hazard ratio (HR): 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17–1.60), NT-proBNP (HR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.58–2.29), and suPAR (HR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17–1.57) were all significantly associated with cardiovascular deaths after adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T07:20:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885457
       
  • The emerging role of endothelial function in cardiovascular oncology
    • Authors: Nicola R Pugliese, Stefano Masi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T03:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888597
       
  • Prevalence of familial chylomicronemia syndrome in a quaternary care
           center
    • Authors: Vincent A Pallazola, Aparna Sajja, Robert Derenbecker, Oluseye Ogunmoroti, Jihwan Park, Vasanth Sathiyakumar, Seth S Martin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:12:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888054
       
  • Mortality risk comparing walking pace to handgrip strength and a healthy
           lifestyle: A UK Biobank study
    • Authors: Francesco Zaccardi, Paul W Franks, Frank Dudbridge, Melanie J Davies, Kamlesh Khunti, Thomas Yates
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsBrisk walking and a greater muscle strength have been associated with a longer life; whether these associations are influenced by other lifestyle behaviours, however, is less well known.MethodsInformation on usual walking pace (self-defined as slow, steady/average, or brisk), dynamometer-assessed handgrip strength, lifestyle behaviours (physical activity, TV viewing, diet, alcohol intake, sleep and smoking) and body mass index was collected at baseline in 450,888 UK Biobank study participants. We estimated 10-year standardised survival for individual and combined lifestyle behaviours and body mass index across levels of walking pace and handgrip strength.ResultsOver a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 3808 (1.6%) deaths in women and 6783 (3.2%) in men occurred. Brisk walkers had a survival advantage over slow walkers, irrespective of the degree of engagement in other lifestyle behaviours, except for smoking. Estimated 10-year survival was higher in brisk walkers who otherwise engaged in an unhealthy lifestyle compared to slow walkers who engaged in an otherwise healthy lifestyle: 97.1% (95% confidence interval: 96.9–97.3) vs 95.0% (94.6–95.4) in women; 94.8% (94.7–95.0) vs 93.7% (93.3–94.2) in men. Body mass index modified the association between walking pace and survival in men, with the largest survival benefits of brisk walking observed in underweight participants. Compared to walking pace, for handgrip strength there was more overlap in 10-year survival across lifestyle behaviours.ConclusionExcept for smoking, brisk walkers with an otherwise unhealthy lifestyle have a lower mortality risk than slow walkers with an otherwise healthy lifestyle.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-12T08:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885041
       
  • Modifiable lifestyle risk factors and C-reactive protein in patients with
           coronary artery disease: Implications for an anti-inflammatory treatment
           target population

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Christopher Blaum, Fabian J Brunner, Friederike Kröger, Julian Braetz, Thiess Lorenz, Alina Goßling, Francisco Ojeda, Lukas Koester, Mahir Karakas, Tanja Zeller, Dirk Westermann, Renate Schnabel, Stefan Blankenberg, Moritz Seiffert, Christoph Waldeyer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundModifiable lifestyle risk factors (modRF) of coronary artery disease (CAD) are associated with increased inflammation represented by elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Lifestyle changes may influence the inflammatory burden in patients with CAD, relevantly modifying the target population for emerging anti-inflammatory compounds.AimsThe aims of this study were to analyse the association of modRF and CRP levels in CAD patients, and to define a potential target population for anti-inflammatory treatment with and without the optimisation of modRF.MethodsWe included all patients with angiographically documented CAD from the observational cohort study INTERCATH. Patients with recent myocardial infarction, malignancy, infectious disease, and pre-existing immunosuppressive medication including a history of solid organ transplantation were excluded. Overweight (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2), smoking, lack of physical activity (PA;
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-11T05:08:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885458
       
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety in cardiovascular diseases and
           implantable devices: A cautionary note
    • Authors: Phillip J Tully
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T05:20:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319888594
       
  • Effects of apixaban compared with warfarin as gain in event-free time –
           a novel assessment of the results of the ARISTOTLE trial
    • Authors: Erik Berglund, Lars Wallentin, Jonas Oldgren, Henrik Renlund, John H Alexander, Christopher B Granger, Stefan H Hohnloser, Elaine M Hylek, Renato D Lopes, John JV McMurray, Per Lytsy
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundA novel approach to determine the effect of a treatment is to calculate the delay of event, which estimates the gain of event-free time. The aim of this study was to estimate gains in event-free time for stroke or systemic embolism, death, bleeding events, and the composite of these events, in patients with atrial fibrillation randomized to either warfarin or apixaban in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation trial (ARISTOTLE).DesignThe ARISTOTLE study was a randomized double-blind trial comparing apixaban with warfarin.MethodsLaplace regression was used to estimate the delay in time to the outcomes between the apixaban and the warfarin group in 6, 12, 18 and 22 months of follow-up.ResultsThe gain in event-free time for apixaban versus warfarin was 181 (95% confidence interval 76 to 287) days for stroke or systemic embolism and 55 (–4 to 114) days for death after 22 months of follow-up. The corresponding gains in event-free times for major and intracranial bleeding were 206 (130 to 281) and 392 (249 to 535) days, respectively. The overall gain for the composite of all these events was a gain of 116 (60 to 171) days.ConclusionsIn patients with atrial fibrillation, 22 months of treatment with apixaban, as compared with warfarin, provided gains of approximately 6 months in event-free time for stroke or systemic embolism, 7 months for major bleeding and 13 months for intracranial bleeding.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T05:18:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886959
       
  • Sex-related differences in exercise performance and outcome of patients
           with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Luca Ghiselli, Alberto Marchi, Carlo Fumagalli, Niccolò Maurizi, Andrea Oddo, Francesco Pieri, Francesca Girolami, Ethan Rowin, Francesco Mazzarotto, Mariantonietta Cicoira, Flavio Ribichini, Anna Arretini, Mattia Targetti, Silvia Passantino, Franco Cecchi, Niccolò Marchionni, Martin Maron, Fabio Mori, Iacopo Olivotto
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsExercise performance is known to predict outcome in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but whether sex-related differences exist is unresolved. We explored whether functional impairment, assessed by exercise echocardiography, has comparable predictive accuracy in females and males with HCM.MethodsWe retrospectively evaluated 292 HCM patients (46 ± 16 years, 72% males), consecutively referred for exercise echocardiography; 242 were followed for 5.9 ± 4.2 years.ResultsPeak exercise capacity was 6.5 ± 1.6 metabolic equivalents (METs). Sixty patients (21%) showed impaired exercise capacity (≤5 METs). Exercise performance was reduced in females, compared with males (5.6 ± 1.6 vs 6.9 ± 1.5 METs, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T05:18:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886961
       
  • Association of aortic and intracranial aneurysm: Tweedledum and
           Tweedledee'
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi, Yosuke Hari, Kouki Nakashima, Toshiki Kuno, Tomo Ando
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T05:18:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319886683
       
  • Ticagrelor versus prasugrel for secondary prevention after percutaneous
           coronary intervention: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Jawad Ahmed, Nimra Hasnain, Farheen Malik, Tariq Jamal Siddiqi, Muhammad Shariq Usman, Mohamad Alkhouli
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T05:18:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885194
       
  • Walking pace improves all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risk
           prediction: A UK Biobank prognostic study
    • Authors: Stavroula Argyridou, Francesco Zaccardi, Melanie J Davies, Kamlesh Khunti, Thomas Yates
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe purpose of this study was to quantify and rank the prognostic relevance of dietary, physical activity and physical function factors in predicting all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in comparison with the established risk factors included in the European Society of Cardiology Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE).MethodsWe examined the predictive discrimination of lifestyle measures using C-index and R2 in sex-stratified analyses adjusted for: model 1, age; model 2, SCORE variables (age, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol).ResultsThe sample comprised 298,829 adults (median age, 57 years; 53.5% women) from the UK Biobank free from cancer and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Over a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there were 2174 and 3522 all–cause and 286 and 796 cardiovascular deaths in women and men, respectively. When added to model 1, self-reported walking pace improved C-index in women and men by 0.013 (99% CI: 0.007–0.020) and 0.022 (0.017–0.028) respectively for all-cause mortality; and by 0.023 (0.005–0.042) and 0.034 (0.020–0.048) respectively for cardiovascular mortality. When added to model 2, corresponding values for women and men were: 0.008 (0.003–0.012) and 0.013 (0.009–0.017) for all-cause mortality; and 0.012 (–0.001–0.025) and 0.024 (0.013–0.035) for cardiovascular mortality. Other lifestyle factors did not consistently improve discrimination across models and outcomes. The pattern of results for R2 mirrored those for C-index.ConclusionA simple self-reported measure of walking pace was the only lifestyle variable found to improve risk prediction for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality when added to established risk factors.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T05:18:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887281
       
  • Marriage and mortality after acute coronary syndrome
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi, Yosuke Hari, Kouki Nakashima, Toshiki Kuno, Tomo Ando
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-06T08:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319881832
       
  • Body mass index in women aged 18 to 45 and subsequent risk of heart
           failure
    • Authors: Lena Björck, Christina Lundberg, Maria Schaufelberger, Lauren Lissner, Martin Adiels, Annika Rosengren
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe incidence of heart failure (HF) is decreasing in older ages, but increasing rates have been observed among younger persons in Sweden. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between risk of hospitalization for HF and body mass index (BMI).MethodsThis was a prospective registry-based cohort study. We included 1,374,031 women aged 18–45 years (mean age 27.9 years) who gave birth during 1982–2014, and were registered in the Medical Birth Register. Information on hospitalization because of HF was collected through linkage to the National Inpatient Register.ResultsCompared to women with a BMI of 20–
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-05T08:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882510
       
  • Long-term prevention after myocardial infarction in young patients ≤45
           years: the Intensive Prevention Program in the Young (IPP-Y) study
    • Authors: Andreas Fach, Rico Osteresch, Jeanette Erdmann, Matthias Munz, Luis Alberto Mata Marin, Stephan Michel, Tina Retzlaff, Tineke Wettwer, Johannes Schmucker, Rainer Hambrecht, Harm Wienbergen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-01T11:44:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319883960
       
  • Assessment of peripheral endothelial function predicts future risk of
           solid-tumor cancer
    • Authors: Takumi Toya, Jaskanwal D Sara, Michel T Corban, Riad Taher, Shigeo Godo, Joerg Herrmann, Lilach O Lerman, Amir Lerman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsCardiovascular health metrics predict the risk not only of cardiovascular diseases but also of several types of cancers. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction can predict future cardiovascular adverse events, but the predictive value of microvascular endothelial dysfunction for future risk of solid-tumor cancer has not been characterized.MethodsA total of 488 patients who underwent microvascular endothelial function assessment using reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry were included in this study. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction was defined as a reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index ≤2.0.ResultsOf 221 patients with a baseline reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index ≤2.0, 21 patients (9.5%) were diagnosed with incident solid-tumor cancer during follow-up, whereas of 267 patients with a baseline reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index>2.0, 10 patients (3.7%) were diagnosed with incident solid-tumor cancer during follow-up (p = 0.009). Patients with a reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index ≤2.0 had lower solid-tumor cancer-free survival compared to patients with a reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index>2.0 (log-rank p = 0.017) (median follow-up 6.0 (3.0–9.1) years). Cox proportional hazard analyses showed that a reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index ≤2.0 predicted the incidence of solid-tumor cancer, with a hazard ratio of 2.52 (95% confidence interval 1.17–5.45; p = 0.019) after adjusting for age, sex, and coronary artery disease, 2.83 (95% confidence interval 1.30–6.17; p = 0.009) after adjusting for diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking status, and body mass index>30 kg/m2, 2.79 (95% confidence interval 1.21–6.41; p = 0.016) after adjusting for fasting plasma glucose, systolic blood pressure, smoking status (current or former), and body mass index, and 2.43 (95% confidence interval 1.10–5.34; p = 0.028) after adjusting for Framingham risk score.ConclusionMicrovascular endothelial dysfunction, as defined by a reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry index ≤2.0, was associated with a greater than two-fold increased risk of solid-tumor cancer. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction may be a useful marker to predict the future risk of solid-tumor cancer, in addition to its known ability to predict cardiovascular disease. Further research is necessary to develop adequate cancer screening strategies for patients with microvascular endothelial dysfunction.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-31T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884246
       
  • Heart failure: A likely horizon in the elderly that could be prevented by
           avoiding obesity in middle age
    • Authors: Regina Dalmau
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-31T08:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880360
       
  • Wind and coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi, Yosuke Hari, Kouki Nakashima, Toshiki Kuno, Tomo Ando
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-31T04:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885195
       
  • Neighborhood environments and risk of incident atrial fibrillation: The
           Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
    • Authors: Parveen K Garg, Neal Jorgensen, Kari Moore, Elsayed Z Soliman, Susan R Heckbert
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-29T12:55:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885196
       
  • Acupuncture: Could it be a treatment for angina pectoris'
    • Authors: Hiroki Teragawa, Chikage Oshita, Yuichi Orita, Yasuki Kihara
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-29T12:55:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885198
       
  • Do angiotensin receptor blockers prevent cardiac events in patients with
           Marfan syndrome'
    • Authors: Pei-Yu Su, Hsin-Hui Chiu, Yi-No Kang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-29T12:55:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885459
       
  • Sleep – the yet underappreciated player in cardiovascular diseases: A
           clinical review from the German Cardiac Society Working Group on Sleep
           Disordered Breathing
    • Authors: Jens Spiesshoefer, Dominik Linz, Erik Skobel, Michael Arzt, Stefan Stadler, Christoph Schoebel, Ingo Fietze, Thomas Penzel, Anil-Martin Sinha, Henrik Fox, Olaf Oldenburg, Olaf on behalf of the German Cardiac Society Working Group on Sleep Disordered Breathing (AG 35-Deutsche Gesellschaft für Kardiologie Herz und Kreislaufforschung e.V.)
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Patients with a wide variety of cardiovascular diseases, including arterial and pulmonary hypertension, arrhythmia, coronary artery disease and heart failure, are more likely to report impaired sleep with reduced sleep duration and quality, and also, sometimes, sleep interruptions because of paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea or arrhythmias. Overall, objective short sleep and bad sleep quality (non-restorative sleep) and subjective long sleep duration are clearly associated with major cardiovascular diseases and fatal cardiovascular outcomes. Sleep apnoea, either obstructive or central in origin, represents the most prevalent, but only one, of many sleep-related disorders in cardiovascular patients. However, observations suggest a bidirectional relationship between sleep and cardiovascular diseases that may go beyond what can be explained based on concomitant sleep-related disorders as confounding factors. This makes sleep itself a modifiable treatment target. Therefore, this article reviews the available literature on the association of sleep with cardiovascular diseases, and discusses potential pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, important limitations of the current assessment, quantification and interpretation of sleep in patients with cardiovascular disease, along with a discussion of suitable study designs to address future research questions and clinical implications are highlighted. There are only a few randomised controlled interventional outcome trials in this field, and some of the largest studies have failed to demonstrate improved survival with treatment (with worse outcomes in some cases). In contrast, some recent pilot studies have shown a benefit of treatment in selected patients with underlying cardiovascular diseases.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-29T08:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879526
       
  • Do we have simple and accurate predictors of health outcomes in apparently
           healthy populations other than estimated peak oxygen uptake'
    • Authors: Reizo Baba
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-26T04:29:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884381
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with coronary heart
           disease, chronic heart failure and associated risk factors: A systematic
           review of economic evaluations of randomized clinical trials
    • Authors: Neil Oldridge, Rod S Taylor
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPrescribed exercise is effective in adults with coronary heart disease (CHD), chronic heart failure (CHF), intermittent claudication, body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2, hypertension or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but the evidence for its cost-effectiveness is limited, shows large variations and is partly contradictory. Using World Health Organization and American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology value for money thresholds, we report the cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy, exercise training and exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.MethodsElectronic databases were searched for incremental cost-effectiveness and incremental cost–utility ratios and/or the probability of cost-effectiveness of exercise prescribed as therapy in economic evaluations conducted alongside randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1 July 2008 and 28 October 2018.ResultsOf 19 incremental cost–utility ratios reported in 15 RCTs in patients with CHD, CHF, intermittent claudication or BMI ≥25 kg/m2, 63% met both value for money thresholds as ‘highly cost-effective’ or ‘high value’, with 26% ‘not cost-effective’ or of ‘low value’. The probability of intervention cost-effectiveness ranged from 23 to 100%, probably due to the different populations, interventions and comparators reported in the individual RCTs. Confirmation with the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting checklist varied widely across the included studies.ConclusionsThe findings of this review support the cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with CHD, CHF, BMI ≥25 kg/m2 or intermittent claudication, but, with concerns about reporting standards, need further confirmation. No eligible economic evaluation based on RCTs was identified in patients with hypertension or T2DM.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-26T01:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319881839
       
  • Cardiac structure and function in response to a multi-stage marathon over
           4486 km
    • Authors: Christopher Klenk, Horst Brunner, Thomas Nickel, Florian Sagmeister, Atilgan Yilmaz, Denis Infanger, Christian Billich, Jürgen Scharhag, Michael Vogeser, Meinrad Beer, Uwe Schütz, Arno Schmidt-Trucksäss
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsTo investigate whether participation in the Trans Europe Foot Race 2009 (TEFR), an ultramarathon race held over 64 consecutive days and 4486 km, led to changes in cardiac structure and function.MethodsCardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 of 67 participating runners (two women; mean ± SD age 47.8 ± 10.4 years) at three time points (baseline scan at 294 ± 135 km (B), scan two at 1735 ± 86 km (T1) and scan three at 3370 ± 90 km (T2)) during the TEFR. Imaging included an assessment of left ventricular structure (mass) and function (strain). In parallel, cardiac troponin I, NT-pro-BNP, myostatin and GDF11 were determined in venous blood samples. A subsample of ten runners returned for a follow-up scan eight months after the race.ResultsLeft ventricular mass increased significantly (B, 158.5 ± 23.8 g; T1, 165.1 ± 23.2 g; T2, 167 ± 24.6 g; p 2 months in ultra-endurance runners results in a physiological structural adaptation with no sign of adverse cardiovascular remodelling.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-26T01:35:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885035
       
  • Risk prediction with blood pressure during physical activity: A METter of
           exercise'
    • Authors: Dominic Millenaar, Michael Böhm, Felix Mahfoud
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-26T01:35:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319885038
       
  • Smoking in childhood and early adolescence: A case of the early bird not
           catching the worm
    • Authors: Thomas D Gossios
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-26T01:32:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884372
       
  • Secondhand smoke and ischaemic heart disease: demographic characteristic
           of a worldwide healthcare problem
    • Authors: Giuseppe Lippi, Fabian Sanchis-Gomar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T07:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879532
       
  • Dangerous depression in cardiac patients: What can we do about it'
    • Authors: Gunilla Burell
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:15:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879787
       
  • Cardiovascular magnetic resonance to evaluate cardiopulmonary remodelling
           in endurance athletes: can we predict adaptation to exercise'
    • Authors: Jose F Rodriguez-Palomares
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:15:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882816
       
  • High-intensity, high-volume exercise in addition to school exercise
           classes reduces endothelial progenitor cells, inflammation and catabolism
           in adolescent boys
    • Authors: Magda Henriques, Raquel Fernandes, Ana Cristina Gonçalves, Ilda Patrícia Ribeiro, Rui Santos, Margarida Fardilha, Rita Ferreira, Fernando Ribeiro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:14:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884793
       
  • Red flags in cardiac amyloidosis
    • Authors: Chun Shing Kwok, Afshin Farzaneh-Far, Mamas A Mamas
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:14:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884371
       
  • Pulmonary vascular remodelling in athletes: an anti-concept to be proved
    • Authors: Andre La Gerche, Francesco Ferrara, Antonello D’Andrea, Eduardo Bossone
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:14:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884379
       
  • Angiopoietin-like 3 and subclinical peripheral arterial disease: Evidence
           from the Brisighella Heart Study
    • Authors: Massimiliano Ruscica, Chiara Macchi, Federica Fogacci, Nicola Ferri, Elisa Grandi, Elisabetta Rizzoli, Sergio D’Addato, Claudio Borghi, Arrigo FG Cicero
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:14:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884378
       
  • Efficacy of pre-participation cardiac evaluation recommendations among
           athletes participating in World Athletics Championships
    • Authors: Örjan Dahlström, Paolo Emilio Adami, Kristina Fagher, Jenny Jacobsson, Victor Bargoria, Håkan Gauffin, Per-Olof Hansson, Christer Andersson, Stéphane Bermon, Toomas Timpka
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAthletes competing in athletics (track and field) at international level may be participating with underlying undiagnosed life-threatening cardiovascular conditions. Our objective was to analyse variations in pre-participation cardiac evaluation prevalence among athletes participating in two International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Athletics Championships, with regard to the human developmental level and global region of their home countries, as well as athletes' age category, gender, event group and medical insurance type.DesignCross-sectional web-based survey.MethodsA total of 1785 athletes competing in the IAAF World Under 18 Championships Nairobi 2017 and World Championships London 2017 were invited to complete a pre-participation health questionnaire investigating the experience of a pre-participation cardiac examination.ResultsA total of 704 (39%) of the athletes participated. Among these, 59% (60% of women; 58% of men) reported that they had been provided at least one type of pre-participation cardiac evaluation. Athletes from very high income countries, Europe and Asia, showed a higher prevalence of at least one pre-participation cardiac evaluation.ConclusionsThe prevalence of pre-participation cardiac evaluation in low to middle income countries, and the African continent in particular, needs urgent attention. Furthermore, increases in evaluation prevalence should be accompanied by the development of cost-effective methods that can be adopted in all global regions.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:14:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884385
       
  • Antihypertensive drugs and the risks of cancer: More fakes than facts
    • Authors: Allegra Battistoni, Giuliano Tocci, Vivianne Presta, Massimo Volpe
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      In the last century, the diffusion of medical news to the public has been profoundly changed by the progressive spread of more pervasive, but at the same time often unreliable, means of communication. The misinterpretation of scientific evidence or fallacious presentation through social media could play as a great drawback to the success in the management of many diseases. This may become particularly alarming when concerning chronic diseases widely affecting the population. Arterial hypertension is still today one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in most countries, and its management generally requires chronic therapy lasting for decades. Therefore, a recent debate about the potential oncogenic effect of antihypertensive drugs has been made widely available to patients mostly through social media. Since this is a topic of great impact for millions of patients and of main relevance for the scientific community, it must not be contaminated by the spread of fake or twisted news. The objective of this article is to briefly discuss the almost complete lack of hard evidence about the potential oncogenic effect of the major classes of antihypertensive drugs as opposed to the exaggerated mediatic communication and impact of scattered and unconfirmed observations. We believe that it is of key importance to provide authoritative support for patients and clinicians from scientific societies and guidelines to balance an unopposed widespread penetration of twisted or even fake news.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-25T06:14:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884823
       
  • Supervised aquatic-based exercise for men with coronary artery disease: a
           meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
    • Authors: Lucia Cugusi, Andrea Manca, Pier Paolo Bassareo, Antonio Crisafulli, Franca Deriu, Giuseppe Mercuro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T07:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878109
       
  • Comparison of non-exercise cardiorespiratory fitness prediction equations
           in apparently healthy adults
    • Authors: James E Peterman, Mitchell H Whaley, Matthew P Harber, Bradley S Fleenor, Mary T Imboden, Jonathan Myers, Ross Arena, Leonard A Kaminsky
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsA recent scientific statement suggests clinicians should routinely assess cardiorespiratory fitness using at least non-exercise prediction equations. However, no study has comprehensively compared the many non-exercise cardiorespiratory fitness prediction equations to directly-measured cardiorespiratory fitness using data from a single cohort. Our purpose was to compare the accuracy of non-exercise prediction equations to directly-measured cardiorespiratory fitness and evaluate their ability to classify an individual's cardiorespiratory fitness.MethodsThe sample included 2529 tests from apparently healthy adults (42% female, aged 45.4 ± 13.1 years (mean±standard deviation). Estimated cardiorespiratory fitness from 28 distinct non-exercise prediction equations was compared with directly-measured cardiorespiratory fitness, determined from a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Analysis included the Benjamini–Hochberg procedure to compare estimated cardiorespiratory fitness with directly-measured cardiorespiratory fitness, Pearson product moment correlations, standard error of estimate values, and the percentage of participants correctly placed into three fitness categories.ResultsAll of the estimated cardiorespiratory fitness values from the equations were correlated to directly measured cardiorespiratory fitness (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T06:49:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319881242
       
  • Personalised exercise prescription: Finding the best for our patients
    • Authors: Vladimír Tuka, Aleš Linhart
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T06:49:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884376
       
  • Cardiac reinnervation influences exercise training outcomes in heart
           transplant patients
    • Authors: Claudio Gil S Araújo, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T06:49:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884374
       
  • Multiple cardiovascular risk factor control: still a challenge'
    • Authors: Ana Abreu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T06:49:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319883725
       
  • Lipoprotein (a) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in
           Mediterranean women (Progetto Atena)
    • Authors: Marco Gentile, Vittorio Simeon, Gabriella Iannuzzo, Amalia Mattiello, Maria Donata di Taranto, Salvatore Panico, Paolo Rubba
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T06:49:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884380
       
  • East-West divide in health-related quality of life across Europe: Results
           from the HeartQoL sub-study
    • Authors: Alexandra Huber, Stefan Höfer, Hugo Saner, Neil Oldridge
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-21T07:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876042
       
  • The Timed Up and Go test and the ageing heart: Findings from a national
           health screening of 1,084,875 community-dwelling older adults
    • Authors: Sohyun Chun, Dong Wook Shin, Kyungdo Han, Jin Hyung Jung, Bongseong Kim, Hee-Won Jung, Ki Young Son, Seung-Pyo Lee, Sang Chol Lee
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimThis study aimed to evaluate the relationship between Timed Up and Go test performance and the incidence of older adult heart diseases and mortality.MethodsThis was a retrospective cohort study of 1,084,875 older adults who participated in a national health screening program between 2009–2014 (all aged 66 years old). Participants free of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation at baseline were included and were divided into Group 1 (
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-21T04:58:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882118
       
  • Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®): A significant association between
           coronary heart disease and DII® in Armenian adults
    • Authors: Farhad Vahid, Reza Goodarzi, Nitin Shivappa, James R Hébert, Ezatollah Fazeli Moghadam
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-18T05:48:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880030
       
  • Colder is worse' Meteorology of acute aortic dissection
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi, Yosuke Hari, Kouki Nakashima, Toshiki Kuno, Tomo Ando
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-18T05:48:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319883726
       
  • Prognostic role of education levels after cardiac surgery and inhospital
           cardiac rehabilitation
    • Authors: Davide Lazzeroni, Pierluca Marazzi, Letizia Paglialonga, Matteo Bini, Umberto Camaiora, Filippo Pigazzani, Lorenzo Brambilla, Valerio Brambilla, Paolo Castiglioni, Paolo Coruzzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-18T05:48:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882815
       
  • Comparison of risk factors for coronary heart disease morbidity versus
           mortality
    • Authors: G David Batty, Mika Kivimäki, Steven Bell
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T05:32:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882512
       
  • Which should we eat, fruit or vegetables' The association with
           abdominal aortic aneurysm
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-16T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876227
       
  • Does depression and anxiety increase subclinical atherosclerosis more in
           dyslipidemic women than men'
    • Authors: Lale Tokgozoglu, Ugur Canpolat
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-16T06:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319883722
       
  • Evaluating statin effect on LDL-cholesterol: when predicted is not
           measured
    • Authors: Maurizio Giuseppe Abrignani
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-16T06:16:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882818
       
  • Independent cardioprotective effects of resistance and aerobic exercise
           training in adults
    • Authors: Maia P Smith
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880631
       
  • Walking or cycling to work to prevent myocardial infarction: Hope or
           hype'
    • Authors: Leonardo Roever, Gary Tse, Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880365
       
  • Prognostic impacts of nutritional status on long-term outcome in patients
           with acute myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Takuya Ando, Akiomi Yoshihisa, Yusuke Kimishima, Takatoyo Kiko, Takeshi Shimizu, Takayoshi Yamaki, Hiroyuki Kunii, Kazuhiko Nakazato, Yasuchika Takeishi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319883723
       
  • Lipid transfer to HDL, CETP and HDL composition in coronary artery disease
           patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Authors: Thauany M Tavoni, Marília CO Sprandel, Oscar G Laverdy, Célia MC Strunz, José AF Ramires, Roberto Kalil-Filho, Whady A Hueb, Raul C Maranhão
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880364
       
  • Anakinra for corticosteroid-dependent and colchicine-resistant
           pericarditis: The IRAP (International Registry of Anakinra for
           Pericarditis) study
    • Authors: Massimo Imazio, Alessandro Andreis, Gaetano Maria De Ferrari, Paul C Cremer, Vartan Mardigyan, Silvia Maestroni, Sushil Allen Luis, Giuseppe Lopalco, Giacomo Emmi, Dor Lotan, Renzo Marcolongo, George Lazaros, Marzia De Biasio, Luca Cantarini, Lorenzo Dagna, Andreja Cerne Cercek, Emanuele Pivetta, Beni Varma, Laeora Berkson, Enrico Tombetti, Florenzo Iannone, Domenico Prisco, Alida Linda P Caforio, Dimitrios Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios Tousoulis, Giacomo De Luca, Carla Giustetto, Mauro Rinaldi, Jae K Oh, Allan L Klein, Antonio Brucato, Yehuda Adler
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsNovel therapies are needed for recurrent pericarditis, particularly when corticosteroid dependent and colchicine resistant. Based on limited data, interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra may be beneficial. The aim of this multicentre registry was to evaluate the broader effectiveness and safety of anakinra in a ‘real world’ population.Methods and resultsThis registry enrolled consecutive patients with recurrent pericarditis who were corticosteroid dependent and colchicine resistant and treated with anakinra. The primary outcome was the pericarditis recurrence rate after treatment. Secondary outcomes included emergency department visits, hospitalisations, corticosteroid use and adverse events. Among 224 patients (46 ± 14 years old, 63% women, 75% idiopathic), the median duration of disease was 17 months (interquartile range 9–33). Most patients had elevated C-reactive protein (91%) and pericardial effusion (88%). After a median treatment of 6 months (3–12), pericarditis recurrences were reduced six-fold (2.33–0.39 per patient per year), emergency department admissions were reduced 11-fold (1.08–0.10 per patient per year), hospitalisations were reduced seven-fold (0.99–0.13 per patient per year). Corticosteroid use was decreased by anakinra (respectively from 80% to 27%; P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879534
       
  • Physical activity and long-term prognosis in patients with stable coronary
           artery disease: How often, how intense, and how long'
    • Authors: Kazunori Shimada, Miho Nishitani-Yokoyma, Tetsuya Takahashi, Hiroyuki Daida
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319881238
       
  • Pregnancy, a risk multiplier
    • Authors: Valérie Tikhonoff, Edoardo Casiglia
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880029
       
  • Cardiac MRI in patients undergoing resynchronization therapy: Worth it
           all'
    • Authors: Francesco De Sensi, Alberto Cresti, Ugo Limbruno
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-12T12:34:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880990
       
  • Cardiac reinnervation affects cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise
           training in individuals with heart transplantation
    • Authors: Emmanuel G Ciolac, Rafael E Castro, Isabela R Marçal, Fernando Bacal, Edimar A Bocchi, Guilherme V Guimarães
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise in individuals with heart transplantation with evidence of cardiac reinnervation (cardiac reinnervation group) versus without evidence of cardiac reinnervation (no cardiac reinnervation group).MethodsSedentary individuals with heart transplantation (age = 45.5 ± 2.2 years; time elapsed since surgery = 6.7 ± 0.7 years) were divided into the cardiac reinnervation (n = 16) and no cardiac reinnervation (n = 17) groups according to their heart rate response to cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and cardiorespiratory fitness were assessed before and after 12 weeks of a thrice-weekly exercise program (five minutes of warm-up, 30 min of endurance exercise, one set of 10–15 reps in five resistance exercises, and five minutes of cool-down).ResultsThe cardiac reinnervation group had reduced (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-12T06:51:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880650
       
  • Exercise recommendations in athletes with coronary artery calcification
    • Authors: Katharina Lechner, Martin Halle, Johannes Scherr, Jonathan A Drezner
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-12T06:51:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319881700
       
  • Plasma proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 concentration and
           recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with familial
           hypercholesterolemia
    • Authors: Ye-Xuan Cao, Hui-Hui Liu, Jing-Lu Jin, Di Sun, Yuan-Lin Guo, Na-Qiong Wu, Cheng-Gang Zhu, Rui-Xia Xu, Jing Sun, Raul D Santos, Jian-Jun Li
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsFamilial hypercholesterolemia patients are characterized by early onset of coronary artery calcification and atherosclerosis, and high incidence of cardiovascular events. Plasma proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 was reported to be a predictor for cardiovascular risk in the general population. However, its prognostic value for predicting recurrent cardiovascular events in familial hypercholesterolemia patients remains undetermined.MethodsA total of 249 patients with molecularly and/or clinically (Dutch Lipid Clinic Network score> 6) defined familial hypercholesterolemia who had experienced a first cardiovascular event were consecutively included and plasma proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Coronary artery calcification was measured using Agatston method and coronary severity was assessed by Gensini score, respectively. All patients received standard lipid-lowering therapy and were followed-up for recurrent cardiovascular events. Univariate and multivariate regression and Cox analyses was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95% confidence interval.ResultsCirculating proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 concentrations were positively associated with coronary artery calcification scores and Gensini score by both univariate and multivariate analyses. During a mean follow-up of 43 ± 19 months, 29 (11.51%) recurrent cardiovascular events occurred. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with the highest proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 levels had the lowest event-free survival time. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 was independently associated with recurrent cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 1.45, 95% confidence interval: 1.11–1.88). The combination of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 to Cox prediction model led to an enhanced predictive value for recurrent cardiovascular events.ConclusionsIncreased level of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 was a significant risk factor of atherosclerosis and independently predicted future recurrent cardiovascular events in familial hypercholesterolemia patients receiving standard lipid-lowering treatment.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-12T06:51:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880985
       
  • Relation of maximal systolic blood pressure during exercise testing to the
           risk of sudden cardiac death in men with and without cardiovascular
           disease
    • Authors: Sae Young Jae, Sudhir Kurl, Setor K Kunutsor, Barry A Franklin, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-12T06:51:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880031
       
  • Burden of premature atrial beats in middle-aged endurance athletes with
           and without lone atrial fibrillation versus sedentary controls
    • Authors: Alberto Cipriani, Riccardo Vio, Giulio Mastella, Nicolò Ciarmatori, Alvise Del Monte, Domenico Trovato, Sabino Iliceto, Maurizio Schiavon, Emanuele Bertaglia, Domenico Corrado, Alessandro Zorzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe burden of premature atrial beats (PABs) at 24-h electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring correlates with the risk of atrial fibrillation. It is unknown whether prolonged and intense exercise increases the burden of PABs, thus contributing to the higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation observed in middle-aged athletes.MethodsWe compared the burden of PABs at 24-h ECG monitoring off therapy in 134 healthy middle-aged (30–60-year-old) competitive athletes who had practised 9 (7-11) h of endurance sports for 8 (4-15) consecutive years, 134 age- and gender-matched healthy sedentary individuals, and 66 middle-aged patients (20 athletes and 46 non-athletes) with ‘lone’ paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.ResultsMore than 50 PABs/24 h or ≥1 run of ≥3 PABs were recorded in 23/134 (17%) healthy athletes and in 29/134 (22%) sedentary controls (p = 0.61). Healthy athletes with frequent or repetitive PABs were older (median 50 years vs. 43 years, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-12T06:51:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880042
       
  • Risk prediction of maternal cardiovascular disease one year after
           hypertensive pregnancy complications or gestational diabetes mellitus
    • Authors: Kjartan Moe, Meryam Sugulle, Ralf Dechend, Anne Cathrine Staff
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundPrevious preeclampsia, gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus show a firm epidemiological association to maternal cardiovascular disease risk. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment is recommended in women after these pregnancy complications, but not offered in most countries. We therefore wanted to evaluate the applicability of currently recommended cardiovascular disease risk scores for women one-year postpartum of such pregnancy complications.Design and methodsWe tested applicability of three scoring systems, the Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD) score, the Joint British Societies for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease (JBS3) score and Framingham 30 year Risk Score-Cardiovascular Disease (FRS-CVD) in 235 women one-year postpartum (controls: 94, gestational hypertension: 35, preeclampsia: 81, gestational diabetes mellitus: 25). Statistical analysis was performed with Mann–Whitney U test for continuous and Fisher’s mid-corrected p and Pearson’s r for dichotomous variables. A value of p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-10T04:42:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879791
       
  • The prevalence and impact of depression and anxiety in cardiac
           rehabilitation: A longitudinal cohort study
    • Authors: A Rao, R Zecchin, PJ Newton, JL Phillips, M DiGiacomo, AR Denniss, LD Hickman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundCo-morbid depression and anxiety symptoms are frequently under-recognised and under-treated in heart disease and this negatively impacts self-management.AimsThe purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, correlates and predictors of depression and anxiety in cardiac rehabilitation programmes, the impact of cardiac rehabilitation on moderate depression, anxiety and stress symptoms, and the relationship between moderate depression, anxiety and stress symptoms and cardiac rehabilitation adherence.MethodsThis was a retrospective cohort study of 5908 patients entering cardiac rehabilitation programmes from 2006–2017, across two Sydney metropolitan teaching hospitals. Variables included demographics, diagnoses, cardiovascular risk factors, medication use, participation rates, health status (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36) and psychological health (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales) subscale scores.ResultsModerate depression, anxiety or stress symptoms were prevalent in 18%, 28% and 13% of adults entering cardiac rehabilitation programmes, respectively. Adults with moderate depression (24% vs 13%), anxiety (32% vs 23%) or stress (18% vs 10%) symptoms were significantly less likely to adhere to cardiac rehabilitation compared with those with normal-mild symptoms (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-10T04:00:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871716
       
  • The benefits of exercise in cancer patients and the criteria for exercise
           prescription in cardio-oncology
    • Authors: Flavio D’Ascenzi, Francesca Anselmi, Caterina Fiorentini, Roberta Mannucci, Marco Bonifazi, Sergio Mondillo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Cancer and cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in high-income countries. Cardiovascular complications can be found in cancer patients, being the result of so-called ‘cardio-toxicity’. Therefore, it becomes essential to thoroughly investigate the origin of cardiac damage and the strategy to prevent it or to reverse the negative remodelling associated with cardiotoxicity. In this review the beneficial effects of physical exercise in cancer patients were analysed, particularly to prevent cardio-toxicity before its clinical manifestation. According to the relevance of exercise, we suggest strategies for exercise prescription with a tailored approach in these patients. In conclusion, physical exercise seems to be a promising and effective treatment for cancer patients during and after therapy and seems to counteract the negative effects induced by drugs on the cardiovascular system. Exercise prescription should be tailored according to patient’s individual characteristics, to the drugs administered, to the personal history, and to his/her response to exercise, taking into account that different types of training can be prescribed according also to the patient’s choice. A cardiological evaluation including exercise testing is essential for an appropriate prescription of exercise in these patients.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-07T04:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874900
       
  • Prediction of peak oxygen uptake by an endurance test: A wish and a
           nightmare
    • Authors: Piergiuseppe Agostoni, Elisabetta Salvioni, Gaia Cattadori
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T11:48:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878799
       
  • Risk prediction of new AF: is there a role for artificial
           intelligence'
    • Authors: Jaspal S Taggar, Nadeem Qureshi, Stephen Weng
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:40:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879525
       
  • Neighbourhood environments and risk of incident atrial fibrillation:
           limitations and future directions
    • Authors: Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Koichiro Oka
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:40:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878378
       
  • Sacubitril-valsartan versus enalapril for acute decompensated heart
           failure: a cost-effectiveness analysis
    • Authors: Kanila Perera, Zanfina Ademi, Danny Liew, Ella Zomer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe Comparison of Sacubitril–Valsartan versus Enalapril on Effect on NT-proBNP in Patients Stabilised from an Acute Heart Failure Episode (PIONEER-HF) trial demonstrated significant reductions in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. Our study explored the cost-effectiveness of the use of sacubitril-valsartan versus enalapril in acute decompensated heart failure from the Australian healthcare perspective.MethodsA Markov model was designed using data from the PIONEER-HF trial to model the clinical progress and costs of patients over a lifetime time horizon. The model consisted of three health states: ‘alive and event-free’, ‘alive after non-fatal hospitalisation for acute decompensated heart failure’ or ‘dead’. Costs and utilities were estimated from published sources. The cost of sacubitril-valsartan (per the Australian pharmaceutical benefits schedule) was AU$7.08/day. Outcomes of interest were the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life year gained and cost per year of life saved. Cost and benefits were discounted at 5.0% per annum.ResultsCompared to enalapril, sacubitril-valsartan was estimated to cost an additional AU$7464 (discounted) per person, but lead to 0.127 years of life saved (discounted) and 0.096 quality-adjusted life years gained (discounted) over a lifetime analysis. These equated to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of AU$58,629/year of life saved (US$41,795, EU€58,629, GBP£32,001) and AU$77,889/quality-adjusted life year gained (US$55,526, EU€49,202, GBP£42,504). We have assumed a threshold of AU$50,000/quality-adjusted life year gained to suggest cost-effectiveness.ConclusionsAt its current acquisition price, sacubitril-valsartan in comparison to enalapril is not likely to be cost-effective in the management of acute decompensated heart failure in Australia. A price reduction of more than 25% would confer cost-effectiveness.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:40:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878953
       
  • Systematic review of cardiac rehabilitation guidelines: Quality and scope
    • Authors: Vrati M Mehra, Diann E Gaalema, Maureen Pakosh, Sherry L Grace
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive model of secondary prevention proven to reduce mortality and morbidity. The World Health Organization is developing a Package of Rehabilitation Interventions for implementation by ministries of health as part of universal healthcare across the continuum. Through a systematic review, we sought to identify the best-quality cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, and extract their recommendations for implementation by member states. A systematic search was undertaken of academic databases and guideline repositories, among other sources, through to April 2019, for English-language cardiac rehabilitation guidelines from the last 10 years, free from conflicts, and with strength of recommendations. Two authors independently considered all citations. Potentially eligible guidelines were rated for quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation tool, and for other characteristics such as being multi-professional, comprehensive and international in perspective; the latter criteria were used to inform selection of 3–5 guidelines meeting inclusion criteria. Equity considerations were also extracted. Altogether, 2076 unique citations were identified. Thirteen passed title and abstract screening, with six guidelines potentially eligible for inclusion in the Package of Rehabilitation Interventions and rated for quality; for two guidelines the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation tool ratings did not meet World Health Organization minimums. Of the four eligible guidelines, three were selected: the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (2016), National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (#172; 2013) and Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (#150; 2017). Extracted recommendations were comprehensive, but psychosocial recommendations were contradictory and diet recommendations were inconsistent. A development group of the World Health Organization will review and refine the recommendations which will then undergo peer review, before open source dissemination for implementation.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:40:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878958
       
  • Keys to early diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis: red flags from clinical,
           laboratory and imaging findings
    • Authors: Giuseppe Vergaro, Alberto Aimo, Andrea Barison, Dario Genovesi, Gabriele Buda, Claudio Passino, Michele Emdin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Cardiac involvement in systemic amyloidosis, due either to immunoglobulin light-chain or transthyretin amyloidosis, influences clinical presentation and is a strong predictor of unfavourable outcome. Until recently considered as a rare, incurable disease, cardiac amyloidosis, is still mis/underdiagnosed, although treatments effective in improving patient survival are now available for both subtypes, including chemotherapy regimens for immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis and tetramer stabiliser for transthyretin amyloidosis. Achieving a timely diagnosis allows initiating life-saving therapies and requires the early recognition of clinical, laboratory and imaging signs of cardiac involvement, some of them may be apparent well before the disease becomes clinically manifest. Given the systemic nature of amyloidosis, a close interaction among experts in multiple specialties is also required, including cardiologists, nephrologists, haematologists, neurologists, radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists and internists. As an increased awareness about disease presentation is required to ameliorate diagnostic performance, we aim to provide the clinician with a guide to the screening and early diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis, and to review the clinical, biohumoral and instrumental ‘red flags’ that should raise the suspicion of cardiac amyloidosis.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:39:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877708
       
  • No indication for right heart catheterisation for patients with isolated
           severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome according to a
           guideline-recommended approach
    • Authors: Roberta Miceli, Daniele Colombo, Riccardo Scagliola, Manrico Balbi, Fulvio Braido, Pietro Ameri
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:39:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878106
       
  • Towards a personalised approach in exercise-based cardiovascular
           rehabilitation: How can translational research help' A ‘call to
           action’ from the Section on Secondary Prevention and Cardiac
           Rehabilitation of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology
    • Authors: Andreas B Gevaert, Volker Adams, Martin Bahls, T Scott Bowen, Veronique Cornelissen, Marcus Dörr, Dominique Hansen, Hareld MC Kemps, Paul Leeson, Emeline M Van Craenenbroeck, Nicolle Kränkel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      The benefit of regular physical activity and exercise training for the prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases is undisputed. Many molecular mechanisms mediating exercise effects have been deciphered. Personalised exercise prescription can help patients in achieving their individual greatest benefit from an exercise-based cardiovascular rehabilitation programme. Yet, we still struggle to provide truly personalised exercise prescriptions to our patients. In this position paper, we address novel basic and translational research concepts that can help us understand the principles underlying the inter-individual differences in the response to exercise, and identify early on who would most likely benefit from which exercise intervention. This includes hereditary, non-hereditary and sex-specific concepts. Recent insights have helped us to take on a more holistic view, integrating exercise-mediated molecular mechanisms with those influenced by metabolism and immunity. Unfortunately, while the outline is recognisable, many details are still lacking to turn the understanding of a concept into a roadmap ready to be used in clinical routine. This position paper therefore also investigates perspectives on how the advent of ‘big data’ and the use of animal models could help unravel inter-individual responses to exercise parameters and thus influence hypothesis-building for translational research in exercise-based cardiovascular rehabilitation.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:39:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877716
       
  • Effects of diet combined with Nordic walking or walking programme on
           weight loss and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal overweight and obese
           women: The Walking and Aging Verona pilot study
    • Authors: Andrea P Rossi, Valentina Muollo, Francesco Fantin, Elena Masciocchi, Silvia Urbani, Miriam Taylor, Beatrice Caruso, Chiara Milanese, Carlo Capelli, Federico Schena, Mauro Zamboni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:39:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877712
       
  • Cardiovascular treatment and prevention of stroke: The problem of
           cross-disciplinary interaction
    • Authors: Mikhail Loukianov
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:38:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877707
       
  • Tailored oral anticoagulant prescription in patients with atrial
           fibrillation: Use and misuse of clinical risk prediction scores
    • Authors: Marco Proietti, Marco Vitolo, Giuseppe Boriani
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:38:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877469
       
  • To be, or not to be engaged in sport activities, that is the amletic
           question for patients with coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Silvia Castelletti, Lia Crotti
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:38:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877701
       
  • Association between height and lipid profile among Korean men: results
           from the 10-year Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    • Authors: In Cheol Hwang, Young Min Park, Woong Chol Kang, Jeonggeun Moon
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:38:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877055
       
  • Platelet-to-hemoglobin ratio as a novel predictor of long-term adverse
           outcomes in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention: A
           retrospective cohort study
    • Authors: Ying-Ying Zheng, Ting-Ting Wu, You Chen, Xian-Geng Hou, Yi Yang, Jin-Ying Zhang, Yi-Tong Ma, Xiang XIE
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-04T08:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319870346
       
  • Parental alcohol consumption and the risk of congenital heart diseases in
           offspring: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Senmao Zhang, Lesan Wang, Tubao Yang, Lizhang Chen, Lijuan Zhao, Tingting Wang, Letao Chen, Ziwei Ye, Zan Zheng, Jiabi Qin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to provide updated evidence to assess the association between parental alcohol consumption and the risk of total congenital heart diseases (CHDs) and specific CHD phenotypes in offspring, and explore the possible dose–response pattern.MethodsPubMed, Embase and Chinese databases were searched with an end-date parameter of July 24, 2019 to identify studies meeting pre-stated inclusion criteria. A random-effects model was used to calculate the overall combined risk estimates. A meta-analysis of the dose–response relationship was performed. Subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and Galbraith plot were conducted to explore potential heterogeneity moderators.ResultsA total of 55 studies involving 41,747 CHD cases and 297,587 controls were identified. Overall, both maternal (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.27) and paternal (OR = 1.44; 95% CI: 1.19–1.74) alcohol exposures were significantly associated with risk of total CHDs in offspring. Additionally, a nonlinear dose–response relationship between parental alcohol exposure and risk of total CHDs was observed. With an increase in parental alcohol consumption, the risk of total CHDs in offspring also gradually increases. For specific CHD phenotypes, a statistically significant association was found between maternal alcohol consumption and risk of tetralogy of fallot (OR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.08–1.33). Relevant heterogeneity moderators have been identified by subgroup analysis, and sensitivity analysis yielded consistent results.ConclusionsAlthough the role of potential bias and evidence of heterogeneity should be carefully evaluated, our review indicates that parental alcohol exposures are significantly associated with the risk of CHDs in offspring, which highlights the necessity of improving health awareness to prevent alcohol exposure during preconception and conception periods.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-03T04:00:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874530
       
  • Parental alcohol exposure and congenital heart diseases in offspring: A
           causal link with controversial evidence
    • Authors: Thomas Zegkos, Despoina Ntiloudi, Georgios Giannakoulas
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-03T04:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877705
       
  • Cardiovascular care of patients with stroke and high risk of stroke: The
           need for interdisciplinary action: A consensus report from the European
           Society of Cardiology Cardiovascular Round Table

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Wolfram Doehner, Mikael Mazighi, Bernd M Hofmann, Dominik Lautsch, Gerhard Hindricks, Erin A Bohula, Robert A Byrne, A John Camm, Barbara Casadei, Valeria Caso, Christophe Cognard, Hans-Christoph Diener, Matthias Endres, Patrick Goldstein, Alison Halliday, Jemma C Hopewell, Dejana R Jovanovic, Adam Kobayashi, Maciej Kostrubiec, Antonin Krajina, Ulf Landmesser, Hugh S Markus, George Ntaios, Francesca R Pezzella, Marc Ribo, Giuseppe MC Rosano, Marta Rubiera, Mike Sharma, Rhian M Touyz, Petr Widimsky
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Comprehensive stroke care is an interdisciplinary challenge. Close collaboration of cardiologists and stroke physicians is critical to ensure optimum utilisation of short- and long-term care and preventive measures in patients with stroke. Risk factor management is an important strategy that requires cardiologic involvement for primary and secondary stroke prevention. Treatment of stroke generally is led by stroke physicians, yet cardiologists need to be integrated care providers in stroke units to address all cardiovascular aspects of acute stroke care, including arrhythmia management, blood pressure control, elevated levels of cardiac troponins, valvular disease/endocarditis, and the general management of cardiovascular comorbidities. Despite substantial progress in stroke research and clinical care has been achieved, relevant gaps in clinical evidence remain and cause uncertainties in best practice for treatment and prevention of stroke. The Cardiovascular Round Table of the European Society of Cardiology together with the European Society of Cardiology Council on Stroke in cooperation with the European Stroke Organisation and partners from related scientific societies, regulatory authorities and industry conveyed a two-day workshop to discuss current and emerging concepts and apparent gaps in stroke care, including risk factor management, acute diagnostics, treatments and complications, and operational/logistic issues for health care systems and integrated networks. Joint initiatives of cardiologists and stroke physicians are needed in research and clinical care to target unresolved interdisciplinary problems and to promote the best possible outcomes for patients with stroke.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-01T05:20:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319873460
       
  • Workload-indexed blood pressure response is superior to peak systolic
           blood pressure in predicting all-cause mortality
    • Authors: Kristofer Hedman, Nicholas Cauwenberghs, Jeffrey W Christle, Tatiana Kuznetsova, Francois Haddad, Jonathan Myers
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe association between peak systolic blood pressure (SBP) during exercise testing and outcome remains controversial, possibly due to the confounding effect of external workload (metabolic equivalents of task (METs)) on peak SBP as well as on survival. Indexing the increase in SBP to the increase in workload (SBP/MET-slope) could provide a more clinically relevant measure of the SBP response to exercise. We aimed to characterize the SBP/MET-slope in a large cohort referred for clinical exercise testing and to determine its relation to all-cause mortality.Methods and resultsSurvival status for male Veterans who underwent a maximal treadmill exercise test between the years 1987 and 2007 were retrieved in 2018. We defined a subgroup of non-smoking 10-year survivors with fewer risk factors as a lower-risk reference group. Survival analyses for all-cause mortality were performed using Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs (95% confidence interval)) adjusted for baseline age, test year, cardiovascular risk factors, medications and comorbidities. A total of 7542 subjects were followed over 18.4 (interquartile range 16.3) years. In lower-risk subjects (n = 709), the median (95th percentile) of the SBP/MET-slope was 4.9 (10.0) mmHg/MET. Lower peak SBP (10 mmHg/MET) were both associated with 20% higher mortality (adjusted HRs 1.20 (1.08–1.32) and 1.20 (1.10–1.31), respectively). In subjects with high fitness, a SBP/MET-slope > 6.2 mmHg/MET was associated with a 27% higher risk of mortality (adjusted HR 1.27 (1.12–1.45)).ConclusionIn contrast to peak SBP, having a higher SBP/MET-slope was associated with increased risk of mortality. This simple, novel metric can be considered in clinical exercise testing reports.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-30T07:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877268
       
  • Relationship between physical activity and long-term outcomes in patients
           with stable coronary artery disease
    • Authors: Simone Biscaglia, Gianluca Campo, Emmanuel Sorbets, Ian Ford, Kim M Fox, Nicola Greenlaw, Alexander Parkhomenko, Jean-Claude Tardif, Luigi Tavazzi, Michal Tendera, Kirsty Wetherall, Roberto Ferrari, Ph. Gabriel Steg
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aims of this study were to ascertain the relationship between level of physical activity and outcomes and to discriminate the determinants of physical activity performance or avoidance.MethodsCLARIFY is an international prospective registry of 32,370 consecutive outpatients with stable coronary artery disease who were followed for up to five years. Patients were grouped according to the level and frequency of physical activity: i) sedentary (n = 5223; 16.1%); ii) only light physical activity most weeks (light; n = 16,634; 51.4%); iii) vigorous physical activity once or twice per week (vigorous ≤ 2×; n = 5427; 16.8%); iv) vigorous physical activity three or more times per week (vigorous>2×; n = 5086; 15.7%). The primary outcome was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke.ResultsPatients performing vigorous physical activity ≤2 × had the lowest risk of the primary outcome (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.71–0.93; p = 0.0031) taking the light group as reference. Engaging in more frequent exercise did not result in further outcome benefit. All-cause death, cardiovascular death, and stroke occurred less frequently in patients performing vigorous physical activity ≤2×. However, the rate of myocardial infarction was comparable between the four physical activity groups. Female sex, peripheral artery disease, diabetes, previous myocardial infarction or stroke, pulmonary disease and body mass index all emerged as independent predictors of lower physical activity.ConclusionVigorous physical activity once or twice per week was associated with superior cardiac outcomes compared with patients performing no or a low level of physical activity in outpatients with stable coronary artery disease.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-27T04:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871217
       
  • Body height is inversely associated with left ventricular end-diastolic
           pressure in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction
    • Authors: David Montero, Candela Diaz-Canestro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-26T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319873453
       
  • How to re-style your life
    • Authors: Tommaso Gori, Kudrat Rakhimov
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-20T05:12:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876232
       
  • Risk factors for Lyme carditis: A case-control study
    • Authors: Luis A Marcos, Paul M Castle, Kalie Smith, Teresa Khoo, Eric J Morley, Michelle Bloom, Bettina C Fries
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-20T05:12:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876046
       
  • From geriatric cardiology to ‘cardio-geriatric’ prevention and
           rehabilitation: Need for a new core curriculum'
    • Authors: Roberto FE Pedretti, Marco Ambrosetti, Simona Sarzi Braga
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-20T05:12:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876229
       
  • The challenge of multiple cardiovascular risk factor control outside
           Western Europe: Findings from the International ChoLesterol management
           Practice Study
    • Authors: Dirk J Blom, Raul D Santos, Veronique Daclin, Florence Mercier, Alvaro J Ruiz, Nicolas Danchin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundComprehensive control of multiple cardiovascular risk factors reduces cardiovascular risk but is difficult to achieve.DesignA multinational, cross-sectional, observational study.MethodsThe International ChoLesterol management Practice Study (ICLPS) investigated achievement of European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) guideline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets in patients receiving lipid-modifying therapy in countries outside Western Europe. We examined the rate of, and association between, control of multiple risk factors in ICLPS participants with dyslipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension (N = 2377).ResultsMean (standard deviation) age of patients was 61.4 (10.4) years; 51.3% were male. Type 2 diabetes was the most common form of diabetes (prevalence, 96.9%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 67.8%, obesity 40.4%, atherosclerotic disease 39.6% and coronary artery disease 33.5%. All patients were at high (38.2%) or very high (61.8%) cardiovascular risk according to ESC/EAS guidelines. Body mass index (BMI) was
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-19T07:00:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871735
       
  • Associations of depression-anxiety and dyslipidaemia with subclinical
           carotid arterial disease: Findings from the Whitehall II Study
    • Authors: Elizabeth A Ellins, Martin J Shipley, D Aled Rees, Andrew Kemp, John E Deanfield, Eric J Brunner, Julian P Halcox
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThere is mixed evidence for an association between depression and/or anxiety and carotid intima-media thickness, and limited information on the related role of dyslipidaemia. Here we report associations between depression and/or anxiety and intima-media thickness in the Whitehall II cohort, considering the moderating effects of sex and dyslipidaemia.MethodsA total of 2822 men and 1112 women (61 ± 6 years) were studied during phase 7 (2002–2004) of the Whitehall II study. Intima-media thickness and lipid levels were assessed, and questionnaires (general health questionnaire and the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies depression scale) were completed. Linear regression was used to explore relationships between depression and/or anxiety and intima-media thickness and the moderating effects of sex and dyslipidaemia.ResultsA total of 1461 participants were categorised with depression and/or anxiety. The association between depression and/or anxiety and intima-media thickness differed between men and women so analyses were undertaken separately by sex. In men, intima-media thickness was significantly associated with dyslipidaemia (P = 0.002) but not depression and/or anxiety (P = 0.29). In women, both dyslipidaemia and depression and/or anxiety were independently associated with intima-media thickness (P = 0.028 and P = 0.031). The greatest intima-media thickness was in women with both depression and/or anxiety and dyslipidaemia. These results were replicated when the general health questionnaire score was substituted for depression and/or anxiety and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for dyslipidaemia.ConclusionsDepression and/or anxiety is associated with increased intima-media thickness in women but not in men. Dyslipidaemia is associated with intima-media thickness in both men and women. Women with both depression and/or anxiety and dyslipidaemia are potentially at the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-18T03:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876230
       
  • Health behaviours reported by adults with congenital heart disease across
           15 countries
    • Authors: Christina E Holbein, James Peugh, Gruschen R Veldtman, Silke Apers, Koen Luyckx, Adrienne H Kovacs, Corina Thomet, Werner Budts, Junko Enomoto, Maayke A Sluman, Chun-Wei Lu, Jamie L Jackson, Paul Khairy, Stephen C Cook, Shanthi Chidambarathanu, Luis Alday, Katrine Eriksen, Mikael Dellborg, Malin Berghammer, Bengt Johansson, Andrew S Mackie, Samuel Menahem, Maryanne Caruana, Alexandra Soufi, Susan M Fernandes, Kamila White, Edward Callus, Shelby Kutty, Philip Moons
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHealth behaviours are essential to maintain optimal health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular complications in adults with congenital heart disease. This study aimed to describe health behaviours in adults with congenital heart disease in 15 countries and to identify patient characteristics associated with optimal health behaviours in the international sample.DesignThis was a cross-sectional observational study.MethodsAdults with congenital heart disease (n = 4028, median age = 32 years, interquartile range 25–42 years) completed self-report measures as part of the Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study (APPROACH-IS). Participants reported on seven health behaviours using the Health Behaviors Scale-Congenital Heart Disease. Demographic and medical characteristics were assessed via medical chart review and self-report. Multivariate path analyses with inverse sampling weights were used to investigate study aims.ResultsHealth behaviour rates for the full sample were 10% binge drinking, 12% cigarette smoking, 6% recreational drug use, 72% annual dental visit, 69% twice daily tooth brushing, 27% daily dental flossing and 43% sport participation. Pairwise comparisons indicated that rates differed between countries. Rates of substance use behaviours were higher in younger, male participants. Optimal dental health behaviours were more common among older, female participants with higher educational attainment while sports participation was more frequent among participants who were younger, male, married, employed/students, with higher educational attainment, less complex anatomical defects and better functional status.ConclusionsHealth behaviour rates vary by country. Predictors of health behaviours may reflect larger geographic trends. Our findings have implications for the development and implementation of programmes for the assessment and promotion of optimal health behaviours in adults with congenital heart disease.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-18T03:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876231
       
  • The efficacy of acupuncture for stable angina pectoris: A systematic
           review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Mingxiao Yang, Mingsheng Sun, Ting Du, Hulin Long, Ji Chen, Fanrong Liang, Lixing Lao
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of patients with stable angina pectoris.MethodsA literature search was performed in nine databases, including PubMed and the Cochrane Library, from their inception to 30 August 2018. Randomized controlled trials that compared acupuncture therapy with sham acupuncture or no treatment were included. Two reviewers under the guidance of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines assessed the eligibility of each record and extracted essential information independently. The data were merged using a fixed-effect model.ResultsPooled analysis of 17 eligible trials with 1516 participants showed that acupuncture was associated with reduced angina attack frequency (–4.91; 95% confidence interval, –6.01– –3.82; p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-18T03:02:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876761
       
  • Brief recommendations for participation in leisure time or competitive
           sports in athletes–patients with coronary artery disease: Summary of a
           Position Statement from the Sports Cardiology Section of the European
           Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC)
    • Authors: Mats Borjesson, Mikael Dellborg, Josef Niebauer, Andre LaGerche, Christian Schmied, Erik E Solberg, Martin Halle, Paolo Emilio Adami, Alessandro Biffi, Francois Carré, Stefano Caselli, Michael Papadakis, Axel Pressler, Hanne Rasmusen, Luis Serratosa, Sanjay Sharma, Frank van Buuren, Antonio Pelliccia
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents a brief summary of the recommendations from the Sports Cardiology section of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC) on sports-participation in patients with coronary artery disease, coronary artery anomalies or spontaneous dissection of the coronary arteries, all entities being associated with myocardial ischaemia.1Given the wealth of evidence supporting the benefits of exercise for primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease, individuals should be restricted from competitive sport only when a substantial risk of adverse event or disease progression is present. These recommendations aim to encourage regular physical activity including participation in sports and, with reasonable precaution, ensure a high level of safety for all individuals with coronary artery disease. The present document is based on available current evidence, but in most instances because of lack of evidence, also on clinical experience and expert opinion.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T01:00:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876186
       
  • Blood group and abdominal aortic aneurysm
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T01:00:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319876044
       
  • The impact of systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability on
           mortality is age dependent: Data from the Dublin Outcome Study
    • Authors: Grzegorz Bilo, Eamon Dolan, Eoin O'Brien, Rita Facchetti, Davide Soranna, Antonella Zambon, Giuseppe Mancia, Gianfranco Parati
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundTwenty-four-hour blood pressure variability (BPV) is independently related to cardiovascular outcomes, but limited and conflicting evidence is available on the relative prognostic importance of systolic and diastolic BPV. The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that the association of systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability over 24 h with cardiovascular mortality in untreated subjects is affected by age.Design and methodsThe study included 9154 untreated individuals assessed for hypertension between 1982 and 2002 in the frame of the Dublin Outcome Study, in which 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was obtained (age 54.1 ± 14.3 years, 47% males). The association of short-term systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in the entire sample and separately in younger and older age subgroups was assessed over a median follow-up period of 6.3 years.ResultsDiastolic BPV was directly and independently related to cardiovascular mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) for daytime standard deviation 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.08–1.26)) with no significant differences among age groups. Conversely, systolic BPV was independently associated with cardiovascular mortality only in younger (
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-12T01:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319872572
       
  • The prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement in hypertrophic
           cardiomyopathy: An updated meta-analysis
    • Authors: Federico Fortuni, Filippo Angelini, Raffaele Abete, Claudia Raineri, Laura Sclesi, Annalisa Turco, Gabriele Crimi, Sergio Leonardi, Stefano Ghio, Luigi Oltrona Visconti, Gaetano Maria De Ferrari
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-10T01:32:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874352
       
  • Reference values of heart rate variability from 10-second resting
           electrocardiograms: the Lifelines Cohort Study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Balewgizie S Tegegne, Tengfei Man, Arie M van Roon, Harold Snieder, Harriëtte Riese
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-10T01:32:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319872567
       
  • Percentage low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol response to a given statin
           dose is not fixed across the pre-treatment range: Real world evidence from
           clinical practice: Data from the ESC-EORP EUROASPIRE V Study
    • Authors: Dirk De Bacquer, Delphine De Smedt, Željko Reiner, Lale Tokgözoğlu, Els Clays, Kornelia Kotseva, Lars Rydén, David Wood, Guy De Backer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsRecent European guidelines recommend in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease to achieve a reduction of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol of at least 50% if the baseline low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level is between 1.8 and 3.5 mmol/L. Systematic reviews have associated a given statin/dose combination with a fixed percentage low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol response. Algorithms for detecting cases and estimating the prevalence of familial hypercholesterolaemia often rely on such fixed percentage reductions.Methods and resultsWe used data from 915 coronary patients participating in the EUROASPIRE V study in whom atorvastatin or rosuvastatin therapy was initiated at hospital discharge and who were still using these drugs at the same dose at a follow-up visit 6 or more months later. Pre and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were compared across the full low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol range. The prevalence of FH was estimated using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria, once using observed pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and once using imputed pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol by following the common strategy of applying fixed correction factors to on-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Inter-individual variation in the low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol response to a fixed statin and dose was considerable, with a strong inverse relation of percentage reductions to pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. The percentage low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol response was markedly lower at the left end of the pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol range especially for levels less than 3 mmol/L. The estimated prevalence of familial hypercholesterolaemia was 2% if using observed pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and 10% when using imputed low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol.ConclusionThe inter-individual variation in the percentage low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol response to a given dose of a statin is largely dependent on the pre-treatment level: the lower the pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level the smaller the percentage low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol reduction. The use of uniform correction factors to estimate pre-treatment low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is not justified.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-10T01:32:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874898
       
  • A call for attention: Is it time to revise the exercise guidelines for
           hypertension in African and Asian populations'
    • Authors: Karla F Goessler, Tiago Peçanha
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-06T03:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874896
       
  • Optimisation of cardiac resynchronisation therapy device selection guided
           by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: Cost-effectiveness analysis
    • Authors: Carlos Crespo, Markus Linhart, Juan Acosta, David Soto-Iglesias, Mikel Martínez, Beatriz Jáuregui, Áurea Mira, Gabriela Restovic, Joan Sagarra, Angelo Auricchio, Bernhard Fahn, Artem Boltyenkov, Luis Lasalvia, Laura Sampietro-Colom, Antonio Berruezo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundA recent study showed that the presence and characteristics of myocardial scar could independently predict appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapies and the risk of sudden cardiac death in patients receiving a de novo cardiac resynchronisation device.DesignThe aim was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-based algorithms versus clinical practice in the decision-making process for the implantation of a cardiac resynchronisation device pacemaker versus cardiac resynchronisation device implantable cardioverter-defibrillator device in heart failure patients with indication for cardiac resynchronisation therapy.MethodsAn incidental Markov model was developed to simulate the lifetime progression of a heart failure patient cohort. Key health variables included in the model were New York Heart Association functional class, hospitalisations, sudden cardiac death and total mortality. The analysis was done from the healthcare system perspective. Costs (€2017), survival and quality-adjusted life years were assessed.ResultsAt 5-year follow-up, algorithm I reduced mortality by 39% in patients with a cardiac resynchronisation device pacemaker who were underprotected due to misclassification by clinical protocol. This approach had the highest quality-adjusted life years (algorithm I 3.257 quality-adjusted life years; algorithm II 3.196 quality-adjusted life years; clinical protocol 3.167 quality-adjusted life years) and the lowest lifetime costs per patient (€20,960, €22,319 and €28,447, respectively). Algorithm I would improve results for three subgroups: non-ischaemic, New York Heart Association class III–IV and ≥65 years old. Furthermore, implementing this approach could generate an estimated €702 million in health system savings annually in European Society of Cardiology countries.ConclusionThe application of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-based algorithms could improve survival and quality-adjusted life years at a lower cost than current clinical practice (dominant strategy) used for assigning cardiac resynchronisation device pacemakers and cardiac resynchronisation device implantable cardioverter-defibrillators to heart failure patients.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-06T01:08:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319873149
       
  • Pharmacotherapeutics for prevention of aortic root enlargement in Marfan
           Syndrome – A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    • Authors: Aaqib H Malik, Srikanth Yandrapalli, Gayatri Pemmasani, Senada S Malik, Wilbert S Aronow
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-06T01:08:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874907
       
  • Does prior antithrombotic therapy influence recurrence and bleeding risk
           in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter'
    • Authors: David T Gamble, Romain Buono, Mamas A Mamas, Stephen Leslie, Joao H Bettencourt-Silva, Allan B Clark, Kristian M Bowles, Anthony K Metcalf, John F Potter, Phyo K Myint
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundWhilst antithrombotic therapy is recommended in people with atrial fibrillation, little is known about the survival benefits of antithrombotic treatment in those with both high ischaemic and bleeding risk scores. We aim to describe the distribution of these risk scores in those with a prior diagnosis of atrial fibrillation who have suffered stroke and to determine the net clinical benefit of antithrombotic treatment.MethodsWe used regional stroke register data in the UK. Patients with a prior diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke patients were selected and their ischaemic stroke risk score (CHA2DS2-VASc) and bleeding risk score (HEMORR2HAGES) scores retrospectively calculated. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to determine the association between antithrombotic therapy prior to stroke and in-hospital and long-term mortality.ResultsA total of 1928 stroke patients (mean age 81.3 years (standard deviation 8.5), 56.8% women) with prior atrial fibrillation were included. Of these, 1761 (91.3%) suffered ischaemic stroke. The most common phenotype (64%) was of those with both high CHA2DS2-VASc (≥2) and high HEMORR2HAGES score (≥4). In our fully adjusted model, patients on antithrombotic treatment with both high ischaemic and bleeding risk had a significant reduction in odds of 31% for in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.48–1.00: p = 0.049)) and 17% relative risk reduction for long-term mortality (hazard ratio 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.71–0.97: p = 0.02)).ConclusionsOur study suggests that antithrombotic treatment has a prognostic benefit following incident stroke in those with both high ischaemic risk and high bleeding risk. This should be considered when choosing treatment options in this group of patients.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T01:27:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871709
       
  • The pulse; from adagio to prestissimo; the prognostic importance of heart
           rate increase and its associations with cardiovascular risk factors
    • Authors: Alf-Inge Larsen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T01:27:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319872690
       
  • Feasibility of measuring patient-reported health status at time of
           percutaneous coronary intervention: Results from a single-center
           quality-improvement initiative
    • Authors: Serdar Farhan, Usman Baber, Birgit Vogel, Melissa Aquino, Gennaro Giustino, Jaya Chandrasekhar, Sabato Sorrentino, Paul Guedeney, Gloria Manzanilla, Norwin Bunal, Mona Rassouli, Nitin Barman, Joseph Sweeny, Asaad Khan, George Dangas, Roxana Mehran, Annapoorna Kini, Samin K Sharma
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T01:27:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874150
       
  • Prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy: Has PEGASUS landed in the real
           world'
    • Authors: Stephan Gielen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T01:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319872631
       
  • Non-invasive blood pressure monitoring underestimates hypertensive
           response to exercise in suspected heart failure with preserved ejection
           fraction
    • Authors: Luke K Cieslik, Hitesh C Patel, Simon J Steele, Anna L Beale, Christianne N Tan, Justin A Mariani, Shane Nanayakkara, David M Kaye
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T01:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319873452
       
  • Modifiable risk factors in congenital heart disease: Education,
           transition, digital health and choice architecture
    • Authors: Andrew Constantine, Ana Barradas-Pires, Konstantinos Dimopoulos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T01:27:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874146
       
  • Association of lowering apolipoprotein B with cardiovascular outcomes
           across various lipid-lowering therapies: Systematic review and
           meta-analysis of trials
    • Authors: Safi U Khan, Muhammad U Khan, Shahul Valavoor, Muhammad Shahzeb Khan, Victor Okunrintemi, Mamas A Mamas, Thorsten M Leucker, Michael J Blaha, Erin D Michos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe effect of therapeutic lowering of apolipoprotein B (apoB) on mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events is uncertain. It is also unclear whether these potential effects vary by different lipid-lowering strategies.MethodsA total of 29 randomized controlled trials were selected using PubMed, Cochrane Library and EMBASE through 2018. We selected trials of therapies which ultimately clear apolipoprotein B particles by upregulating low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) expression (statins, ezetimibe, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, bile acid sequestrants) or therapies which reduce apolipoprotein B independent of LDL-R (cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor, fibrates, niacin, omega-3 fatty acids) with sample size of ≥1000 patients and follow-up of ≥1 year. The meta-regression and meta-analyses were constructed using a random effects model.ResultsIn 332,912 patients, meta-regression analyses showed relative risks of 0.95 for all-cause mortality (95% confidence interval 0.92–0.99) and 0.93 (0.88–0.98) for cardiovascular mortality for every 10 mg/dL decrease in apolipoprotein B by all interventions combined. Reduction in all-cause mortality was limited to statins (0.92 (0.86–0.98)). For MACE, the relative risk per 10 mg/dL reduction in apolipoprotein B was 0.93 (0.90–0.97) for all therapies combined, with both statin (0.88 (0.83–0.93)) and non-statin therapies (0.96 (0.94–0.99)). which clear apolipoprotein B by upregulating LDL-R showing significant reductions; whereas interventions which lower apolipoprotein B independent of LDL-R did not demonstrate this effect (1.02 (0.81–1.30)).ConclusionWhile both statin and established non-statin therapies (PCSK9 inhibitor and ezetimibe) reduced cardiovascular risk per decrease in apolipoprotein B, interventions which reduce apolipoprotein B independently of LDL-R were not associated with cardiovascular benefit.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-02T02:39:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871733
       
  • Plasma lipid levels during ACS: Association with 20-year mortality: The
           ABC-5 Study on Heart Disease
    • Authors: Giuseppe Berton, Rocco Cordiano, Heba T Mahmoud, Francesco Bagato, Fiorella Cavuto, Mattia Pasquinucci
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-02T02:38:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319873061
       
  • Comment on: Acute impact of an endurance race on cardiac function and
           biomarkers of myocardial injury in triathletes with and without myocardial
           fibrosis
    • Authors: Wilfried Kindermann, Jürgen Scharhag
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-31T10:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871114
       
  • The effect of exercise training on blood pressure in African and Asian
           populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized
           controlled trials
    • Authors: Marina Bersaoui, Se-Sergio M Baldew, Nils Cornelis, Jerry Toelsie, Veronique A Cornelissen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundExercise is key in the primary prevention and management of hypertension. Yet, current exercise recommendations are predominantly based on meta-analyses involving populations of European descent. Since blood pressure (BP) responses to pharmaceutical interventions are known to differ among ethnic groups, we aimed to investigate the BP responses to exercise training in non-European descendants.PurposeThe aim of this study was to systematically summarize the available literature on the efficacy of exercise on BP in healthy adults (age ≥18 years) of African or Asian origin.MethodsWe searched the MEDLINE database for randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of exercise training on BP in healthy African and Asian adults with optimal BP, elevated BP or hypertension and published in a peer-reviewed journal up to May 2019. Random effect models were fitted to estimate the effect sizes.ResultsWe identified 22 trials involving individuals of Asian origin (n = 931; mean age: 44 years; 41% male) and four trials involving individuals of African origin (n = 510; mean age: 56.7 years; 80% male). Aerobic exercise training significantly (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T05:42:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871233
       
  • Prognostic comparison of the FRIEND and Wasserman/Hansen peak VO2
           equations applied to a submaximal walking test in outpatients with
           cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Giorgio Chiaranda, Jonathan Myers, Ross Arena, Leonard Kaminsky, Biagio Sassone, Giovanni Pasanisi, Simona Mandini, Gianni Mazzoni, Giovanni Grazzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to determine the ability to predict all-cause mortality using established per cent-predicted (%PRED) equations for peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) estimated by a submaximal walk test in outpatients with cardiovascular disease.MethodsMale patients (N = 1491) aged 62 ± 10 years at baseline underwent a moderate and perceptually regulated (11–13 on the 6–20 Borg scale) 1-km treadmill-walking test to estimate VO2peak. %PRED was derived from the Fitness Registry and the Importance of Exercise: A National Data Base (FRIEND) and the Wasserman/Hansen equations.ResultsThere were 215 deaths during a median 9.4-year follow-up. The FRIEND prediction equation provided better prognostic information with receiver operating curve analysis showing significantly different areas under the curve (0.72 and 0.69 for the FRIEND and the Wasserman/Hansen equations respectively, p = 0.001). Overall mortality rate was higher across decreasing tertiles of %PRED using FRIEND, with 26%, 11% and 5% for the least fit, intermediate and high fit tertiles, respectively (p for trend 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T05:42:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871728
       
  • High prevalence of cardiac dysfunction or overt heart failure in
           71-year-old men: A 21-year follow-up of “The Study of men born in
           1943”
    • Authors: Xiaojing Chen, Erik Thunström, Per-Olof Hansson, Annika Rosengren, Zacharias Mandalenakis, You Zhong, Constantinos Ergatoudes, Kenneth Caidahl, Michael Fu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundKnowledge about long-term risk factors and the prevalence of heart failure stages in general population is limited. We aimed to study the prevalence of cardiac dysfunction and heart failure in 71-year-old men and potential risk factors in the past two decades.DesignThis research was based on a randomized selected population study with longitudinal follow-up.MethodsA random sample of men born in 1943 in Gothenburg, Sweden were examined in 1993 (at 50 years of age) and re-examined 21 years later in 2014 (at 71 years of age). Cardiac dysfunction or heart failure was classified into four stages (A–D) according to American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on heart failure.ResultsOf the 798 men examined in 1993 (overall cohort), 535 (67%) were re-examined in 2014 (echo cohort). In the echo cohort 122 (23%) men had normal cardiac function, 135 (25%) were at stage A, 207 (39%) men were at stage B, 66 (12%) men were at stage C, and five (1%) men were at stage D. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that elevated body mass index at 50 years old was the only independent risk factor for developing heart failure/cardiac dysfunction during the subsequent 21 years. For each unit (1 kg/m2) of increased body mass index, the odds ratio for stages C/D heart failure vs no heart failure/stage A increased by 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.11–1.31, p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-25T11:18:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871644
       
  • Effect of hypertension and diabetes on subclinical left ventricular
           systolic dysfunction in a predominantly elderly population-based cohort
    • Authors: Carlo Mannina, Zhezhen Jin, Cesare Russo, Shunichi Homma, Mitchell SV Elkind, Tatjana Rundek, Tetz C Lee, Kenji Matsumoto, Sofia Shames, Ralph L Sacco, Marco R Di Tullio
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-25T11:18:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319872571
       
  • The 2016 Joint European Prevention Guidelines and the uses of polypills:
           Time to update the evidence
    • Authors: Ruth Webster, Diederick Grobbee, Anthony Rodgers
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-25T11:18:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319872660
       
  • Living in a highly polluted and warmer environment: Challenges for
           cardiovascular prevention
    • Authors: Ana M Vicedo-Cabrera, Kai Chen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-23T04:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871708
       
  • How do baseline aortic root diameter, age and fibrillin-1 mutation affect
           the pooled effect of losartan on aortic dilatation'
    • Authors: Kee-Hsin Chen, Hsin-Hui Chiu, Yi-No Kang
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-21T05:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319870014
       
  • Psycho-affective pathology in adults with congenital heart disease:
           Important progress is being made within a challenging field
    • Authors: John Wallert, Claes Held, Guy Madison, Erik Olsson
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-21T04:18:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871629
       
  • The preventive approach to degenerative aortic stenosis should depart from
           the approach to atherosclerotic diseases: A Japanese perspective
    • Authors: Kazuhiro Yamamoto, Yukihiro Koretsune, Yoshiharu Kinugasa, Tomohiro Ohigashi, Takashi Sozu, Tohru Masuyama
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-20T05:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871630
       
  • Cardiovascular disease burden of Chinese middle-aged and elderly people
           across the spectrum of glycaemia levels
    • Authors: Binbin Lin, Hui Cheng, Yuanyan Dou, Minglan Jiang, Zhennan Lin, Qinghua Ma, Congju Wang, Yong Xu, Yana Ma, Hongpeng Sun, Liyuan Han
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-19T10:15:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868787
       
  • Cross-country skiing and the risk of acute myocardial infarction: A
           prospective cohort study
    • Authors: Jari A Laukkanen, Timo A Lakka, Babatope A Ogunjesa, Sudhir Kurl, Setor K Kunutsor
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-19T07:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319869696
       
  • Exercise-induced cardio-pulmonary remodelling in endurance athletes: Not
           only the heart adapts
    • Authors: Blanca Domenech-Ximenos, Maria Sanz-de la Garza, Susanna Prat-González, Álvaro Sepúlveda-Martínez, Fatima Crispi, Rosario J Perea, Ana Garcia-Alvarez, Marta Sitges
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe cumulative effects of intensive endurance exercise may induce a broad spectrum of right ventricular remodelling. The mechanisms underlying these variable responses have been scarcely explored, but may involve differential pulmonary vasculature adaptation. Our aim was to evaluate right ventricular and pulmonary circulation in highly trained endurance athletes.MethodsNinety-three highly trained endurance athletes (>12 h training/week at least during the last five years; age: 36 ± 6 years; 52.7% male) and 72 age- and gender-matched controls underwent resting cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac dimensions and function, as well as pulmonary artery dimensions and flow. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was estimated based on left ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary artery flow mean velocity. Resting and exercise Doppler echocardiography was also performed in athletes to estimate pulmonary artery pressure.ResultsAthletes showed larger biventricular and biatrial sizes, slightly reduced systolic biventricular function, increased pulmonary artery dimensions and reduced pulmonary artery flow velocity as compared with controls in both genders (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-19T05:20:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868545
       
  • Prognostic performance of the ESC SCORE and its German recalibrated
           versions in primary and secondary prevention
    • Authors: Laura K Elsner, Beatrice von Jeinsen, Dimitri Grün, Jan S Wolter, Maren Weferling, Katharina Diouf, Steffen Kriechbaum, Christian Troidl, Oliver Dörr, Holger Nef, Christian W Hamm, Christoph Liebetrau, Till Keller
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-19T05:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868034
       
  • Combined use of trimethylamine N-oxide with BNP for risk stratification in
           heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: findings from the
           DIAMONDHFpEF study
    • Authors: Andrea Salzano, Muhammad Zubair Israr, Yoshiyuki Yazaki, Liam M Heaney, Prathap Kanagala, Anvesha Singh, Jayanth R Arnold, Gaurav S Gulsin, Iain B Squire, Gerry P McCann, Leong L Ng, Toru Suzuki
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-15T06:29:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319870355
       
  • Prediction of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality with weight loss in
           patients with chronic heart failure: a meta-analysis
    • Authors: Yu Fan, Xuyu Gu, Chen Zou
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-15T06:29:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319871122
       
  • Oxidative stress and inflammation in the evolution of heart failure: From
           pathophysiology to therapeutic strategies
    • Authors: Alberto Aimo, Vincenzo Castiglione, Chiara Borrelli, Luigi F Saccaro, Maria Franzini, Stefano Masi, Michele Emdin, Alberto Giannoni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Both oxidative stress and inflammation are enhanced in chronic heart failure. Dysfunction of cardiac mitochondria is a hallmark of heart failure and a leading cause of oxidative stress, which in turn exerts detrimental effects on cellular components, including mitochondria themselves, thus generating a vicious circle. Oxidative stress also causes myocardial tissue damage and inflammation, contributing to heart failure progression. Furthermore, a subclinical inflammatory state may be caused by heart failure comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes mellitus or sleep apnoeas. Some markers of both oxidative stress and inflammation are enhanced in chronic heart failure and hold prognostic significance. For all these reasons, antioxidants or anti-inflammatory drugs may represent interesting additional therapies for subjects either at high risk or with established heart failure. Nonetheless, only a few clinical trials on antioxidants have been carried out so far, with several disappointing results except for vitamin C, elamipretide and coenzyme Q10. With regard to anti-inflammatory drugs, only preliminary data on the interleukin-1 antagonist anakinra are currently available. Therefore, a comprehensive, deep understanding of our current knowledge on oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic heart failure is key to providing some suggestions for future research on this topic.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-15T06:28:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319870344
       
  • Lifestyle factors and high-risk atherosclerosis: Pathways and mechanisms
           beyond traditional risk factors

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Katharina Lechner, Clemens von Schacky, Amy L McKenzie, Nicolai Worm, Uwe Nixdorff, Benjamin Lechner, Nicolle Kränkel, Martin Halle, Ronald M Krauss, Johannes Scherr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite major efforts to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) burden with conventional risk factor control, significant residual risk remains. Recent evidence on non-traditional determinants of cardiometabolic health has advanced our understanding of lifestyle–disease interactions. Chronic exposure to environmental stressors like poor diet quality, sedentarism, ambient air pollution and noise, sleep deprivation and psychosocial stress affect numerous traditional and non-traditional intermediary pathways related to ASCVD. These include body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength and functionality and the intestinal microbiome, which are increasingly recognized as major determinants of cardiovascular health. Evidence points to partially overlapping mechanisms, including effects on inflammatory and nutrient sensing pathways, endocrine signalling, autonomic function and autophagy. Of particular relevance is the potential of low-risk lifestyle factors to impact on plaque vulnerability through altered adipose tissue and skeletal muscle phenotype and secretome. Collectively, low-risk lifestyle factors cause a set of phenotypic adaptations shifting tissue cross-talk from a proinflammatory milieu conducive for high-risk atherosclerosis to an anti-atherogenic milieu. The ketone body ß-hydroxybutyrate, through inhibition of the NLRP-3 inflammasome, is likely to be an intermediary for many of these observed benefits. Adhering to low-risk lifestyle factors adds to the prognostic value of optimal risk factor management, and benefit occurs even when the impact on conventional risk markers is discouragingly minimal or not present. The aims of this review are (a) to discuss novel lifestyle risk factors and their underlying biochemical principles and (b) to provide new perspectives on potentially more feasible recommendations to improve long-term adherence to low-risk lifestyle factors.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-13T04:02:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319869400
       
  • 130/80 is the new 140/90: Do we need a tailored approach for older
           patients'
    • Authors: Nathalia Gonzalez-Jaramillo, Arjola Bano
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-13T04:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868539
       
  • Gym space in the era of digital cardiovascular rehabilitation: Often
           overlooked but critically important
    • Authors: Antonio Mazza, Mara Paneroni
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319869576
       
  • Investigations on the clinical utility of apolipoprotein B measurement: A
           research priority
    • Authors: Michel R Langlois
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319869578
       
  • Determinants of the athlete’s heart: a cardiovascular magnetic
           resonance imaging study
    • Authors: Sabiha Gati, Sanjay Sharma
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319870339
       
  • HeFH in real life, how to: More evolocumab than authorized
    • Authors: Francesco Sbrana, Beatrice Dal Pino, Federico Bigazzi, Andrea Ripoli, Michele Coceani, Tiziana Sampietro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868792
       
  • Accelerated coronary artery calcification: doubling in 5 years is
           predictive of hard cardiovascular events
    • Authors: Nils Lehmann, Raimund Erbel, Amir A Mahabadi, Karl-Heinz Jöckel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868857
       
  • Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling during adolescence
    • Authors: Timothy W Churchill, Erich Groezinger, Garrett Loomer, Aaron L Baggish
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319869691
       
  • Prediction of cardiovascular, cancer and non-cardiovascular non-cancer
           death by exercise echocardiography
    • Authors: Jesús Peteiro, Alberto Bouzas-Mosquera, Sonia Pertega, Cayetana Barbeito-Caamaño, Francisco Broullón, Jose M Vazquez-Rodriguez
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T04:22:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319869692
       
  • Comments on and assessments of ‘Associations between endothelial nitric
           oxide synthase gene polymorphisms and the risk of coronary artery disease:
           A systematic review and meta-analysis of 132 case–control studies’
    • Authors: Morteza Gholami, Mahsa M Amoli, Farshad Sharifi, Kamyar Khoshnevisan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-07T12:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319867785
       
  • ACS in lunar wonderland: Lunar phases and acute coronary syndrome
    • Authors: Hisato Takagi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-06T12:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868328
       
  • Compositional analysis of the association between mortality and 24-hour
           movement behaviour from NHANES
    • Authors: Duncan E McGregor, Javier Palarea-Albaladejo, Philippa M Dall, Borja del Pozo Cruz, Sebastien FM Chastin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPrevious prospective studies of the association between mortality and physical activity have generally not fully accounted for the interplay between movement behaviours. A compositional data modelling approach accounts for relative scale and co-dependency in time-use data across physical activity behaviours of the 24-hour day.MethodsA prospective analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2006 on N = 1468 adults (d = 135 deaths) in ages 50–79 years was undertaken using compositional Cox regression analysis. Daily time spent in sedentary behaviour, light intensity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was determined from waist-mounted accelerometer data (Actigraph 7164) and supplemented with self-reported sleep data to determine the daily time-use composition.ResultsThe composition of time spent in sedentary behaviour, LIPA, MVPA and sleep was associated with mortality rate after allowing for age and sex effects (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-06T12:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319867783
       
  • Impact of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin on coronary atherosclerotic
           plaque volume – a systematic review and meta-analysis with trial
           sequential analysis of randomized control trials
    • Authors: Ashish Kumar, Mariam Shariff, Rajkumar Doshi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-06T12:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319868035
       
  • The impact of sex, age and training on biventricular cardiac adaptation in
           healthy adult and adolescent athletes: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging
           study
    • Authors: Ibolya Csecs, Csilla Czimbalmos, Attila Toth, Zsofia Dohy, Imre F Suhai, Liliana Szabo, Attila Kovacs, Balint Lakatos, Nora Sydo, Mobin Kheirkhahan, David Peritz, Orsolya Kiss, Bela Merkely, Hajnalka Vago
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsPhysiological cardiac adaptation in athletes is influenced by multiple factors. This study aimed to investigate the impact of sex, age, body size, sports type and training volume on cardiac adaptation in healthy athletes with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.MethodsA total of 327 athletes (242 male) were studied (adults ≥18 years old; adolescents 14–18 years old). Left and right ventricular ejection fractions, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volumes and masses were measured. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume/left ventricular mass, right ventricular end-diastolic volume/right ventricular mass and derived right/left ventricular ratios were determined to study balanced ventricular adaptation. Athletes were categorised as skill, power, mixed and endurance athletes.ResultsMale athletes had higher left and right ventricular volumes and masses in both adult (n = 215 (145 male); 24 ± 5 years old) and adolescent (n = 112 (97 male); 16 ± 1 years old) groups compared with women (all P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-02T01:19:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319866019
       
  • The effects of geriatric aortic stenosis education and its implications on
           heart failure prevention in medically underserved communities
    • Authors: George W Matar, Merna M Abdou, Maryssa E Lyons, Firas Alani, Chin-I Cheng, Neli P Ragina
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-08-01T01:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319863505
       
  • The effects of exposure to different noise frequencies on the prevalence
           of metabolic syndrome
    • Authors: Masoud Khosravipour, Hadi Abdollahzad, Farid Khosravi, Mansour Rezaei, Hadis Mohammadi Sarableh, Zahra Moradi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T04:29:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319866988
       
  • Bempedoic acid plus ezetimibe fixed-dose combination in patients with
           hypercholesterolemia and high CVD risk treated with maximally tolerated
           statin therapy
    • Authors: Christie M Ballantyne, Ulrich Laufs, Kausik K Ray, Lawrence A Leiter, Harold E Bays, Anne C Goldberg, Erik SG Stroes, Diane MacDougall, Xin Zhao, Alberico L Catapano
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe aim of this study was to evaluate the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering efficacy and safety of a bempedoic acid 180 mg and ezetimibe 10 mg fixed-dose combination in patients with hypercholesterolemia and a high risk of cardiovascular disease receiving maximally tolerated statin therapy.MethodsThis phase 3, double-blind clinical trial enrolled adult patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, or multiple cardiovascular disease risk factors. Patients were randomly assigned (2:2:2:1) to treatment with the fixed-dose combination, bempedoic acid 180 mg, ezetimibe 10 mg or placebo added to stable background statin therapy for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage change from baseline to week 12 in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.ResultsAmong the 301 patients included in the primary analysis, the mean baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was 3.87 mmol/L (149.8 mg/dL). At week 12, the fixed-dose combination lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (–36.2%) significantly more than placebo (1.8% (placebo-corrected difference –38.0%); P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-30T01:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319864671
       
  • Efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy beyond statins to prevent
           cardiovascular events: a meta-analysis
    • Authors: Iryna Dykun, Raluca Mincu, Stefanie Hendricks, Bastian Balcer, Matthias Totzeck, Tienush Rassaf, Amir A Mahabadi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-30T01:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319866992
       
  • Cardiovascular strain and metabolic rate are higher following 15 minutes
           of standing versus seated computer work
    • Authors: Peter A Hosick, Joseph M Willett, Evan L Matthews
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-30T01:34:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319867402
       
  • Diagnostic evaluation of the hospital depression scale (HADS) and the Beck
           depression inventory II (BDI-II) in adults with congenital heart disease
           using a structured clinical interview: Impact of depression severity
    • Authors: Mechthild Westhoff-Bleck, Lotta Winter, Lukas Aguirre Davila, Christoph Herrmann-Lingen, Jens Treptau, Johann Bauersachs, Stefan Bleich, Kai G Kahl
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was the diagnostic evaluation of the hospital anxiety and depression scale total score, its depression subscale and the Beck depression inventory II in adults with congenital heart disease.MethodsThis cross-sectional study evaluated 206 patients with congenital heart disease (mean age 35.3 ± 11.7 years; 58.3% men). Major depressive disorder was diagnosed by a structured clinical interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV and disease severity with the Montgomery–Åsberg depression rating scale. Receiver operating characteristics provided assessment of diagnostic accuracy. Youden’s J statistic identified optimal cut-off points.ResultsFifty-three participants (25.7%) presented with major depressive disorder. Of these, 28 (52.8%) had mild and 25 (47.2%) had moderate to severe symptoms. In the total cohort, the optimal cut-off of values was>11 in the Beck depression inventory II,>11 in the hospital anxiety and depression scale and>5 in the depression subscale. Optimal cut-off points for moderate to severe major depressive disorder were similar. The cut-offs for mild major depressive disorder were lower (Beck depression inventory II>4; hospital anxiety and depression scale>8;>2 in its depression subscale). In the total cohort the calculated area under the curve varied between 0.906 (hospital anxiety and depression scale) and 0.93 (Beck depression inventory II). Detection of moderate to severe major depressive disorder (area under the curve 0.965–0.98) was excellent; detection of mild major depressive disorder (area under the curve 0.851–0.885) was limited. Patients with major depressive disorder had a significantly lower quality of life, even when they had mild symptoms.ConclusionAll scales were excellent for detecting moderate to severe major depressive disorder. Classification of mild major depressive disorder, representing 50% of cases, was limited. Therapy necessitating loss of quality of life is already present in major depressive disorder with mild symptoms. Established cut-off points may still be too high to identify patients with major depressive disorder requiring therapy. External validation is needed to confirm our data.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319865055
       
  • Comparison of MAGGIC and MECKI risk scores to predict mortality after
           cardiac rehabilitation among Dutch heart failure patients

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Ilse JM Kouwert, Esmée A Bakker, Maarten J Cramer, Johan A Snoek, Thijs MH Eijsvogels
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319865730
       
  • Meta-analysis of antithrombotic therapy with new oral anticoagulants in
           patients with atrial fibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention
           
    • Authors: Rabbia Siddiqi, Naser Yamani, Saed Alnaimat, Aiman Khurshid, Sadia Siddiqui, Mohammad Saud Khan, Safi U Khan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319865048
       
  • Stroke in endurance athletes with atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Marius Myrstad, Trygve Berge, Håkon Ihle-Hansen, Eivind Sørensen, Wenche Nystad, Anette H Ranhoff, Marit Aarønæs
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319866273
       
  • Methodological considerations for calculating ventilatory efficiency in
           healthy adults
    • Authors: James E Peterman, Adam P Grim, Leonard A Kaminsky, Mitchell H Whaley, Bradley S Fleenor, Matthew P Harber
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319865726
       
  • Renin–angiotensin blockade after aortic valve replacement: A review
           based on current literature
    • Authors: Aaqib H Malik, Suchith S Shetty, Srikanth Yandrapalli, Ramzi El Accaoui
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319865949
       
  • Neighborhood environments and risk of incident atrial fibrillation: The
           Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
    • Authors: Parveen K Garg, Neal Jorgensen, Ana V Diez-Roux, Wesley O’Neal, Mahasin Mujahid, Kari Moore, Elsayed Z Soliman, Susan R Heckbert
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-27T04:53:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319866020
       
  • Exercise chronotropic incompetence phenotypes the level of cardiovascular
           risk and exercise gas exchange impairment in the general population. An
           analysis of the Euro-EX prevention trial
    • Authors: Pietro Laforgia, Francesco Bandera, Eleonora Alfonzetti, Marco Guazzi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundChronotropic insufficiency (CI) is defined as the inability of the heart to increase its rate commensurate with increased demand. Exercise CI is an established predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with cardiovascular diseases.AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate how exercise CI phenotypes different levels of cardiovascular risk and how it may better perform in defining cardiovascular risk when analysed in the context of cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET)-derived measures and standard echocardiography in a healthy population with variable cardiovascular risk profile.MethodsApparently healthy individuals (N = 702, 53.8% females) with at least one major cardiovascular risk factor (MCVRF; hypertension, diabetes, tabagism, dyslipidaemia, body mass index > 25), enrolled in the Euro-EX prevention trial, underwent CPET. CI was defined as the inability to reach 80% of the chronotropic index, that is, the ratio of peak heart rate – rest heart rate/peak heart rate – age predicted maximal heart rate (AMPHR: 220 – age), they were divided into four groups according to the heart rate reserve () and respiratory gas exchange ratio (RER; ) as a marker of achieved maximal performance. Subjects with a RER 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-26T01:31:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319863506
       
  • Eligibility for cardiovascular risk screening among different ethnic
           groups: The HELIUS study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Wilco Perini, Marieke B Snijder, Charles Agyemang, Ron JG Peters, Anton E Kunst, Irene GM van Valkengoed
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundEthnic differences in the age-of-onset of cardiovascular risk factors may necessitate ethnic-specific age thresholds to initiate cardiovascular risk screening. Recent European recommendations to modify cardiovascular risk estimates among certain ethnic groups may further increase this necessity.AimsTo determine ethnic differences in the age to initiate cardiovascular risk screening, with and without implementation of ethnic-specific modification of estimated cardiovascular risk.MethodsWe included 18,031 participants of Dutch, South-Asian Surinamese, African Surinamese, Ghanaian, Turkish and Moroccan background from the HELIUS study (Amsterdam). Eligibility for cardiovascular risk screening was defined as being eligible for blood pressure-lowering treatment, based on a combination of systolic blood pressure, estimated cardiovascular risk, and ethnic-specific conversion of estimated cardiovascular risk as recommended by European cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines. Age-specific proportions of eligibility were determined and compared between ethnic groups via logistic regression analyses.ResultsDutch men reached the specified threshold to initiate cardiovascular risk screening (according to Dutch guidelines) at an average age of 51.5 years. Among ethnic minority men, this age ranged from 39.8 to 52.4. Among Dutch women, the average age threshold was 53.4. Among ethnic minority women, this age ranged from 36.8 to 49.1. Age-adjusted odds of eligibility were significantly higher than in the Dutch among all subgroups, except among Moroccan men. Applying ethnic-specific conversion factors had minimal effect on the age to initiate screening in all subgroups.ConclusionsMost ethnic minority groups become eligible for blood pressure-lowering treatment at a lower age and may therefore benefit from lower age-thresholds to initiate cardiovascular risk screening.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-26T01:31:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319866284
       
  • Response to invited editorial ‘What can be learnt from an atypical
           population'’
    • Authors: Lola Neufcourt, Olivier Grimaud
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-19T04:37:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319864189
       
  • Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in a large metropolitan area: synergistic
           effect of exposure to air particulates and high temperature
    • Authors: Eleonora Tobaldini, Simona Iodice, Rodolfo Bonora, Matteo Bonzini, Annamaria Brambilla, Giovanni Sesana, Valentina Bollati, Nicola Montano
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsAir pollution and climate change are intrinsically linked to emerging hazards for global health. High air particulate matter (PM) levels may trigger out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). High temperature could act synergistically with PM in determining OHCA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of PM exposure alone, and in combination with temperature, on the risk of OHCA, in a large European metropolitan area with population>4 million.MethodsWe evaluated the association between short-term PM exposure, temperature, and the risk of OHCA over a two-year study period, allowing us to investigate 5761 events using a time-stratified case-crossover design combined with a distributed lag non-linear model.ResultsHigher risk of OHCA was associated with short-term exposure to PM10. The strongest association was experienced three days before the cardiac event where the estimated change in risk was 1.70% (0.48–2.93%) per 10 µg/m3 of PM. The cumulative exposure risk over the lags 0–6 was 8.5% (0.0–17.9%). We observed a joint effect of PM and temperature in triggering cardiac arrests, with a maximum effect of 14.9% (10.0–20.0%) increase, for high levels of PM before the cardiac event, in the presence of high temperature.ConclusionThe present study helps to clarify the controversial role of PM as OHCA determinant. It also highlights the role of increased temperature as a key factor in triggering cardiac events. This evidence suggests that tackling both air pollution and climate change might have a relevant impact in terms of public health.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862063
       
  • Bempedoic acid and ezetimibe – better together
    • Authors: Safi U Khan, Erin D Michos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T04:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319864672
       
  • Aortic stiffening is associated with increased left ventricular mass in
           women but not in men
    • Authors: Theodore G Papaioannou, Evangelos Oikonomou, George Lazaros, Evangelia Christoforatou, Georgia Vogiatzi, Sotiris Tsalamandris, Christos Chasikidis, Aimilios Kalambogias, Vasiliki-Xara Mystakidi, Nikolaos Galiatsatos, Mina Santouri, George Latsios, Spyridon Deftereos, Dimitrios Tousoulis
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T04:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319865054
       
  • Exercise training in cardiovascular disease: are we closing the gender
           gap'
    • Authors: Tim Kambic, Mitja Lainscak
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T04:53:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319864180
       
  • Null receptor homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia: Quoad valetudinem
           long life treatment
    • Authors: Tiziana Sampietro, Francesco Sbrana, Federico Bigazzi, Andrea Ripoli, Beatrice Dal Pino
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-13T05:11:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319864191
       
  • Age, race/ethnicity, and comorbidities predict statin adherence after
           ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Sheila L Chan, Nancy J Edwards, Carol Conell, Xiushui Ren, Nader M Banki, Vivek A Rao, Alexander C Flint
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-11T07:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319861219
       
  • Total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio discordance with LDL-cholesterol
           and non-HDL-cholesterol and incidence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular
           disease in primary prevention: The ARIC study
    • Authors: Renato Quispe, Mohamed B Elshazly, Di Zhao, Peter P Toth, Rishi Puri, Salim S Virani, Roger S Blumenthal, Seth S Martin, Steven R Jones, Erin D Michos
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe total cholesterol (TC)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio may carry additional information not available in more commonly used single cholesterol measures. Analysis of discordance between lipid parameters might help assess the impact of such additional information on the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate the role of the TC/HDL-cholesterol ratio in determining atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk when discordant with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol.MethodsWe studied 14,403 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study participants who were free of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease at baseline. TC/HDL-cholesterol discordance with LDL-cholesterol (estimated by the novel Martin/Hopkins method) and non-HDL-cholesterol was assessed at five visits and determined by being at or above the median for each lipid parameter. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the risk for incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease events associated with each lipid concordance/discordance category using a time-varying approach.ResultsMean age of participants was 54.1 years, 56% women and 25% black. There were 2634 atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease events over a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 24.2 (16.0–25.4) years. Among individuals with LDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol less than the median, 26% and 21% had discordant TC/HDL-cholesterol at or above the median, respectively. These individuals had a 24% (hazard ratio (HR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09, 1.41) and 29% (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.13, 1.46) greater risk of incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, respectively, compared to those with TC/HDL-cholesterol less than the median after multivariable adjustment. In individuals with diabetes with LDL-cholesterol or non-HDL-cholesterol less than the median, discordant TC/HDL-cholesterol at or above the median was more prevalent at 48% and 38%, respectively.ConclusionClinically significant discordance exists between TC/HDL-cholesterol, available from the standard lipid profile, and the routinely used non-HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. Such discordance may help inform atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk management, particularly in individuals with diabetes in whom discordance is more common.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-11T04:33:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862401
       
  • Associations of blood pressure categories defined by 2017 ACC/AHA
           guidelines with mortality in China: Pooled results from three prospective
           cohorts
    • Authors: Na Liu, Jae Jeong Yang, Ruiwei Meng, Xiong-Fei Pan, Xiaomin Zhang, Meian He, Honglan Li, Yu-Tang Gao, Yong-Bing Xiang, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Zheng, Tangchun Wu, Danxia Yu, An Pan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for high blood pressure lowered the hypertension criteria from systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) of 140/90 mmHg or greater to 130/80 mmHg or greater, while the potential impact of the change on Chinese adults remains unclear.DesignA pooled prospective cohort analysis.MethodsIncluded were 154,407 Chinese adults from three prospective cohorts, which measured blood pressure at baseline and follow-up visits, and tracked death events by linkages to medical insurance system or vital statistics registries. Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).ResultsDuring a total follow-up of 1,718,089 person-years, 14,692 deaths were documented including 5086 cardiovascular deaths (1277 ischaemic heart disease and 2509 cerebrovascular disease deaths). Compared to normal blood pressure (SBP/DBP 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T04:37:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862066
       
  • Three-year events and mortality in cardiovascular disease patients without
           lipid-lowering treatment
    • Authors: Irene Roman Dégano, Rafel Ramos, Maria García-Gil, Alberto Zamora, Marc Comas-Cufí, Albert Francés, Anna Garcia-Elias, Jaume Marrugat
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T04:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862103
       
  • Challenges in reducing atherosclerotic inflammation in patients with
           familial hypercholesterolemia
    • Authors: Fabrizio Montecucco, Federico Carbone, Luca Liberale, Amirhossein Sahebkar
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T04:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862907
       
  • Ventilatory efficiency is a stronger prognostic indicator than peak oxygen
           
    • Authors: Andrew J Maiorana, Louise H Naylor, Stijn Dongelmans, Angela Jacques, Dick HJ Thijssen, Lawrence Dembo, Gerry O’Driscoll, Daniel J Green
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T04:37:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862908
       
  • Heart failure rehabilitation improves quality of life but we need to offer
           alternative modes of delivery to increase uptake
    • Authors: Hasnain M Dalal, Rod S Taylor, Patrick Doherty
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T04:37:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319863507
       
  • Normal basic 2D echocardiographic values to screen and follow up the
           athlete's heart from juniors to adults: What is known and what is missing.
           A critical review
    • Authors: Massimiliano Cantinotti, Martin Koestenberger, Giuseppe Santoro, Nadia Assanta, Eliana Franchi, Marco Paterni, Giorgio Iervasi, Antonello D'Andrea, Flavio D'Ascenzi, Raffaele Giordano, Maurizio Galderisi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      In the last few years, multiple echocardiographic nomograms have been published. However, normal values calculated in the general population are not applicable to athletes, whose hearts may be enlarged and hypercontractile. Accordingly, athletes require specific nomograms. Our aim is to provide a critical review of echocardiographic nomograms on two-dimensional (2D) measures for athletes. We performed a systematic search in the National Library of Medicine for Medical Subject Headings and free text terms including echocardiography, athletes, normal values and nomograms. The search was refined by adding the keywords heart, sport, elite, master, children and young. Twenty-eight studies were selected for the final analysis. Our research revealed that currently available ranges of normality for athletes reported by different authors are quite consistent, with limited exceptions (e.g. atria, aorta). Numerical and methodological limitations, however, emerged. Numerical limitations included a limited sample size (e.g. 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-03T04:29:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319862060
       
  • Role of losartan in prevention of aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome: A
           systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Lin Li, Naser Yamani, Saed Al-Naimat, Aiman Khurshid, Muhammad S Usman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-07-01T04:42:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319861231
       
  • Lifestyle risk factors for atrial fibrillation in Ireland
    • Authors: Miroslawa Gorecka, Geraldine McDarby, Triona McNicholas, Breda Smyth
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-27T05:10:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319861226
       
  • Outcomes of emergency coronary angiography after cardiac surgery
    • Authors: Radoslaw Litwinowicz, Grzegorz Filip, Magdalena Bryndza, Magdalena Bartus, Jerzy Sadowski, Boguslaw Kapelak, Piotr Mazur, Venkat Vuddanda, Dhanunjaya Lakkireddy, Krzysztof Bartus
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-26T12:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319859972
       
  • Comparable anti-glycaemic effects of hypertrophy versus endurance
           resistance training in type 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Authors: Bernhard Reich, Martin Schönfelder, Kathrin Lampl, Edith E Mueller, Andreas Egger, Josef Niebauer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-20T04:10:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319859971
       
  • Comprehensive clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with
           mid-range left ventricular ejection fraction
    • Authors: Akiomi Yoshihisa, Yasuhiro Ichijo, Yu Sato, Yuki Kanno, Mai Takiguchi, Tetsuro Yokokawa, Satoshi Abe, Tomofumi Misaka, Takamasa Sato, Masayoshi Oikawa, Atsushi Kobayashi, Takayoshi Yamaki, Hiroyuki Kunii, Yasuchika Takeishi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-20T04:10:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319859689
       
  • Diastolic stress test in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction
    • Authors: Fabiola B Sozzi, Kameswari Maganti, Giovanni Malanchini, Elisa Gherbesi, Lara Tondi, Michele Ciulla, Ciro Canetta, Federico Lombardi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-20T04:10:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319858796
       
  • Descriptive bibliometric analysis of global publications in
           lifestyle-based preventive cardiology
    • Authors: Gloria Manyangu, Brendan Dineen, Rosemary Geoghegan, Gerard Flaherty
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundLifestyle-based preventive cardiology aims to combat the global burden of cardiovascular disease. There have been rapid advances in lifestyle and behavioural interventions aimed at preventing cardiovascular disease in individuals at high risk and in the general population. This study is the first bibliometric analysis of publications in the field of lifestyle-based preventive cardiology.MethodsJournal articles relating to lifestyle-based preventive cardiology published from 1996 to 2017 were retrieved from the Scopus database. The publications were limited to those in the English language. The data were indexed using bibliometric methodology and exported to Microsoft Excel for analysis. VOS viewer software was used to conduct co-occurrence and collaboration analysis between authors, institutions and countries.ResultsA total of 3300 publications were identified. The annual growth rate of publications increased globally during the study period. The USA made the highest contribution to global publications (1402) and total citation counts (68,540). Harvard Medical School was the most prolific institution and David Wood was the most prolific author in the field. The European Journal of Preventive Cardiology published the largest number of articles in this field. Obesity was the most common theme.ConclusionsThe current growth trends predict a large increase in the number of global publications on lifestyle-based preventive cardiology. Further research could focus on smoking cessation, which at present is under-represented in lifestyle-based preventive cardiology output.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-17T07:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319854827
       
  • Investigation of air pollution and noise on progression of thoracic aortic
           calcification: results of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Frauke Hennig, Susanne Moebus, Nico Reinsch, Thomas Budde, Raimund Erbel, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Nils Lehmann, Barbara Hoffmann, Hagen Kälsch
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsAir pollution and noise are potential risk factors for subclinical atherosclerosis. Longitudinal analyses, especially on the interplay of these environmental factors, are scarce and inconsistent. Hence we investigated long-term traffic-related exposure to air pollution and noise with the development and progression of thoracic aortic calcification, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis.MethodsWe used baseline (2000–2003) and follow-up (2006–2008) data from the German Heinz Nixdorf Recall cohort study, including 4814 middle-aged adults. Residence-based air pollution (PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm), PM10, nitrogen dioxide and particle number), and noise was assessed with dispersion models. Thoracic aortic calcification was quantified from non-contrast enhanced electron beam computed tomography. The presence and extent of thoracic aortic calcification progression were analysed with multiple logistic and linear regression models, respectively, adjusting for age, sex, lifestyle variables, socioeconomic status and respective co-exposure.ResultsWe observed no association in the full study sample (n = 3155, mean age 59.1 (±7.6) years, 52.8% women). While an interquartile range in particle number and night-time noise yielded odds ratios of 1.20 (1.03, 1.40) and 1.21 (1.00, 1.46) for binary thoracic aortic calcification progression, and 0.02 (–0.01, 0.05) and 0.04 (0.00, 0.07) higher growth rates of thoracic aortic calcification in participants with baseline thoracic aortic calcification less than 10, negative findings were observed in those with baseline thoracic aortic calcification of 10 or greater. Results were similar for other pollutants and daytime noise.ConclusionOur study shows no overall associations. Subgroup analyses suggest independent associations of traffic-related air pollution and noise with the development and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in participants with no or minor thoracic aortic calcification at baseline, in contrast to negative findings in those with advanced calcification.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T05:22:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319854818
       
  • ‘I am active and healthy, so I don’t need to make lifestyle
           changes!’ A short report of clinical markers of ‘risk’ for NCDs
           versus health and physical activity perceptions in a low-resourced setting
           
    • Authors: Martin Heine, Susan Hanekom, Wayne Derman
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T05:22:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319858158
       
  • Genetic counselling and testing in adults with congenital heart disease: A
           consensus document of the ESC Working Group of Grown-Up Congenital Heart
           Disease, the ESC Working Group on Aorta and Peripheral Vascular Disease
           and the European Society of Human Genetics
    • Authors: Julie De Backer, Antoine Bondue, Werner Budts, Arturo Evangelista, Pastora Gallego, Guillaume Jondeau, Bart Loeys, Maria L Peña, Gisela Teixido-Tura, Ingrid van de Laar, Aline Verstraeten, Jolien Roos Hesselink
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      Thanks to a better knowledge of the genetic causes of many diseases and an improvement in genetic testing techniques, genetics has gained an important role in the multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management of congenital heart disease and aortic pathology. With the introduction of strategies for precision medicine, it is expected that this will only increase further in the future. Because basic knowledge of the indications, the opportunities as well as the limitations of genetic testing is essential for correct application in clinical practice, this consensus document aims to give guidance to care-providers involved in the follow-up of adults with congenital heart defects and/or with hereditary aortic disease. This paper is the result of a collaboration between the ESC Working Group of Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease, the ESC Working Group on Aorta and Peripheral Vascular Disease and the European Society of Human Genetics. Throughout the document, the importance of correct counseling in the process of genetic testing is emphasized, indications and timing for genetic studies are discussed as well as the technical modalities of genetic testing. Finally, the most important genetic diseases in adult congenital heart disease and aortic pathology are also discussed.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-11T12:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319854552
       
  • Relationship between the shift of socioeconomic status and cardiovascular
           mortality
    • Authors: Jidong Sung, Yun-Mi Song, Kyung Pyo Hong
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T04:51:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319856125
       
  • Influence of appendicular skeletal muscle mass on resting metabolic
           equivalents in patients with cardiovascular disease: Implications for
           exercise training and prescription
    • Authors: Simon Nichols, Alasdair O’Doherty, Sean Carroll, Lee Ingle
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T04:51:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319856432
       
  • Plasma tumour necrosis factor correlates with mRNA expression of tumour
           necrosis factor and mitochondrial transcription factors in skeletal muscle
           in patients with chronic heart failure treated with cardiac
           resynchronization therapy: potential role in myopathy
    • Authors: Alf I Larsen, Torstein Valborgland, Christer Ogne, Sigurd Lindal, Bente Halvorsen, Peter S Munk, Jan T Kvaløy, Pål Aukrust, Arne Yndestad
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-08T04:35:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319855796
       
  • Acute effects of exercise and sauna as a single intervention on arterial
           compliance
    • Authors: Earric Lee, Peter Willeit, Tanjaniina Laukkanen, Setor K Kunutsor, Francesco Zaccardi, Hassan Khan, Jari A Laukkanen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-08T04:35:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319855454
       
  • Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with reduced left
           ventricular ejection fraction: The Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study in
           Heart Failure (CROS-HF): A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Birna Bjarnason-Wehrens, R Nebel, K Jensen, M Hackbusch, M Grilli, S Gielen, B Schwaab, B Rauch
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-08T04:35:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319854140
       
  • Occult obstructive coronary artery disease is associated with prolonged
           cardiac troponin elevation following strenuous exercise
    • Authors: Øyunn Kleiven, Torbjørn Omland, Øyvind Skadberg, Tor H Melberg, Magnus F Bjørkavoll-Bergseth, Bjørn Auestad, Rolf Bergseth, Ole J Greve, Kristin M Aakre, Stein Ørn
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-01T03:27:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319852808
       
  • Prognostic value of total testosterone levels in patients with acute
           coronary syndromes
    • Authors: Baris Gencer, Nicolas Vuilleumier, David Nanchen, Tinh-Hai Collet, Roland Klingenberg, Lorenz Räber, Reto Auer, David Carballo, Sebastian Carballo, Soheila Aghlmandi, Dik Heg, Stephan Windecker, Thomas F Lüscher, Christian M Matter, Nicolas Rodondi, François Mach
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-06-01T03:27:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319853343
       
  • Sex-differences in short QT syndrome: A systematic literature review and
           pooled analysis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Ibrahim El-Battrawy, Kim Schlentrich, Johanna Besler, Volker Liebe, Rainer Schimpf, Siegfried Lang, Katja E Odening, Christian Wolpert, Xiaobo Zhou, Martin Borggrefe, Ibrahim Akin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T07:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319850953
       
  • Prevalence of hypertension and associated cardiovascular risk factors
           among pharmacies customers: an Italian nationwide epidemiological survey
    • Authors: Rita Del Pinto, Silvia Pagliacci, Martina De Feo, Davide Grassi, Claudio Ferri
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-22T04:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319851301
       
  • Does exercise prescription based on estimated heart rate training zones
           exceed the ventilatory anaerobic threshold in patients with coronary heart
           disease undergoing usual-care cardiovascular rehabilitation' A United
           Kingdom perspective
    • Authors: Sean Pymer, Simon Nichols, Jonathon Prosser, Stefan Birkett, Sean Carroll, Lee Ingle
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-22T04:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319852711
       
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug effects on renal and cardiovascular
           function: from physiology to clinical practice
    • Authors: Aderville Cabassi, Stefano Tedeschi, Stefano Perlini, Ignazio Verzicco, Riccardo Volpi, Gianluca Gonzi, Stefano Del Canale
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T02:04:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319848105
       
  • Combined effect of posttraumatic stress disorder and prescription opioid
           use on risk of cardiovascular disease
    • Authors: Jeffrey F Scherrer, Joanne Salas, Patrick Lustman, Peter Tuerk, Sarah Gebauer, Sonya B Norman, F David Schneider, Kathleen M Chard, Carissa van den Berk-Clark, Beth E Cohen, Paula P Schnurr
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T05:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319850717
       
  • Post-exercise ankle–brachial index decline and risk of all-cause
           mortality: A meta-analysis
    • Authors: Hongxiao Sun, Longguang Liu, Yuntian Jing, Jian Wang, Yao Zhou, Kang Chen, Xinhua Hu
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T05:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319849507
       
  • HDL: Fact, fiction, or function' HDL cholesterol and cardiovascular
           risk
    • Authors: Marc P Allard-Ratick, Bryan R Kindya, Jay Khambhati, Marc C Engels, Pratik B Sandesara, Robert S Rosenson, Laurence S Sperling
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T05:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319848214
       
  • Exercise training prior to night shift work improves physical work
           capacity and arterial stiffness
    • Authors: Christine Schäfer, Barbara Mayr, Edith E Müller, Christoph Augner, Juliane Hannemann, Rainer H Böger, Martin Schönfelder, Josef Niebauer
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-08T05:25:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319848196
       
  • Risk of cardiac events during the Super Bowl
    • Authors: Sheldon M Singh, Maria Koh, Jiming Fang, Dennis T Ko
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-08T05:25:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319848534
       
  • Recent advances in synthetic pharmacotherapies for dyslipidaemias
    • Authors: Cesare R Sirtori, Shizuya Yamashita, Maria Francesca Greco, Alberto Corsini, Gerald F Watts, Massimiliano Ruscica
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-07T05:12:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319845314
       
  • Sitting–rising test: Sex- and age-reference scores derived from 6141
           adults
    • Authors: Claudio Gil S Araújo, Claudia Lucia B Castro, João Felipe C Franca, Denise SMS Araújo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-05-01T09:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319847004
       
  • Combined effect of work stress and impaired sleep on coronary and
           cardiovascular mortality in hypertensive workers: The MONICA/KORA cohort
           study
    • Authors: Jian Li, Seryan Atasoy, Xioayan Fang, Peter Angerer, Karl-Heinz Ladwig
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-04-28T04:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319839183
       
  • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the risk of obstructive coronary
           artery disease beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in non-diabetic
           individuals
    • Authors: Yong-Giun Kim, Young-Rak Cho, Gyung-Min Park, Ki-Bum Won, Soe H Ann, Dong H Yang, Joon-Won Kang, Tae-Hwan Lim, Hong-Kyu Kim, Jaewon Choe, Seung-Whan Lee, Young-Hak Kim, Yu J Yang, Shin-Jae Kim, Sang-Gon Lee
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-04-26T04:52:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319844364
       
  • Skipping breakfast concomitant with late-night dinner eating is associated
           with worse outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
    • Authors: Guilherme Neif Vieira Musse, Tayná Moreira, Maisa Ayumi Kimura, Filipe Welson Leal Pereira, Katashi Okoshi, Silmeia Garcia Zanati, Paula Schmidt Azevedo, Bertha Furlan Polegato, Sergio Alberto Rupp de Paiva, Leonardo Antonio Mamede Zornoff, Marcos Ferreira Minicucci
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-04-18T04:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319839546
       
  • Incidence and subsequent prognostic impacts of gastrointestinal bleeding
           in patients with heart failure
    • Authors: Akiomi Yoshihisa, Yuki Kanno, Yasuhiro Ichijo, Yu Sato, Mai Takiguchi, Tetsuro Yokokawa, Satoshi Abe, Tomofumi Misaka, Takamasa Sato, Masayoshi Oikawa, Atsushi Kobayashi, Takayoshi Yamaki, Hiroyuki Kunii, Yasuchika Takeishi
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T01:54:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319843069
       
  • Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors for the prevention of heart
           failure in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Naser Yamani, Muhammad Shariq Usman, Tauseef Akhtar, Kaneez Fatima, Nisar Asmi, Muhammad Shahzeb Khan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T01:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319841936
       
  • Renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibition in heart failure with
           mid-ranged ejection fraction: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Muhammad Mustafa Memon, Naser Yamani, Nisar Asmi, Rohit Agrawal, Muhammad Shahzeb Khan
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T01:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319841937
       
  • Impact of PCSK9 inhibitors on the quality of life of patients at high
           cardiovascular risk
    • Authors: Arturo Cesaro, Felice Gragnano, Fabio Fimiani, Elisabetta Moscarella, Vincenzo Diana, Ivana Pariggiano, Claudia Concilio, Francesco Natale, Giuseppe Limongelli, Eduardo Bossone, Paolo Calabrò
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-27T04:55:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319839179
       
  • Parental smoking and the risk of congenital heart defects in offspring: An
           updated meta-analysis of observational studies
    • Authors: Lijuan Zhao, Lizhang Chen, Tubao Yang, Lesan Wang, Tingting Wang, Senmao Zhang, Letao Chen, Ziwei Ye, Zan Zheng, Jiabi Qin
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-24T05:00:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319831367
       
  • Physicians' lifestyle advice on primary and secondary cardiovascular
           disease prevention in Germany: A comparison between the STAAB cohort study
           and the German subset of EUROASPIRE IV
    • Authors: Theresa Tiffe, Caroline Morbach, Carolin Malsch, Götz Gelbrich, Valerie Wahl, Martin Wagner, Kornelia Kotseva, David Wood, Rainer Leyh, Georg Ertl, Wolfgang Karmann, Stefan Störk, Peter U Heuschmann
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-20T05:22:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319838218
       
  • Exercise training in women with cardiovascular disease: Differential
           response and barriers – review and perspective
    • Authors: Isabel Witvrouwen, Emeline M Van Craenenbroeck, Ana Abreu, Trine Moholdt, Nicolle Kränkel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-20T05:22:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319838221
       
  • The case for extended thromboprophylaxis in medically hospitalised
           patients – not yet made
    • Authors: Jacob Y Cao, Seung Yeon Lee, Scott Dunkley, Mark Adams, Anthony Keech
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-17T05:03:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319836572
       
  • Long versus short dual antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndrome
           patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor and coronary
           revascularization: Insights from the RENAMI registry
    • Authors: Fabrizio D'Ascenzo, Maurizio Bertaina, Francesco Fioravanti, Federica Bongiovanni, Sergio Raposeiras-Roubin, Emad Abu-Assi, Tim Kinnaird, Albert Ariza-Solé, Sergio Manzano-Fernández, Christian Templin, Lazar Velicki, Ioanna Xanthopoulou, Enrico Cerrato, Andrea Rognoni, Giacomo Boccuzzi, Pierluigi Omedè, Andrea Montabone, Salma Taha, Alessandro Durante, Sebastiano Gili, Giulia Magnani, Michele Autelli, Alberto Grosso, Pedro Flores Blanco, Alberto Garay, Giorgio Quadri, Ferdinando Varbella, Berenice Caneiro Queija, Rafael Cobas Paz, María Cespón Fernández, Isabel Muñoz Pousa, Diego Gallo, Umberto Morbiducci, Alberto Dominguez-Rodriguez, Mariano Valdés, Angel Cequier, Dimitrios Alexopoulos, Andrés Iñiguez-Romo, Fiorenzo Gaita, Mauro Rinaldi, Thomas F Lüscher
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-13T05:18:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319836327
       
  • Cause-specific mortality in children and young adults with diabetes
           mellitus: A Danish nationwide cohort study
    • Authors: Jesper Svane, Thomas H Lynge, Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard, Thomas Jespersen, Gunnar H Gislason, Bjarke Risgaard, Bo G Winkel, Jacob Tfelt-Hansen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-13T05:18:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319836550
       
  • Recent TakoTsubo syndrome and lipoprotein apheresis: An alert for a safe
           procedure
    • Authors: Beatrice Dal Pino, Andrea Barison, Francesco Sbrana, Federico Bigazzi, Tiziana Sampietro
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T05:54:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319835635
       
  • The metabolomic signatures of alcohol consumption in young adults
    • Authors: Duc Du, Raimondo Bruno, Leigh Blizzard, Alison Venn, Terence Dwyer, Kylie J Smith, Costan G Magnussen, Seana Gall
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T05:04:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319834767
       
  • Does passive heat acclimation impact the athlete's heart continuum'
    • Authors: Mathew G Wilson, Julien D Périard, Carmen Adamuz, Abdulaziz Farooq, Victoria Watt, Sebastien Racinais
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T05:04:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319836522
       
  • Prevalence of ideal cardiovascular health in a Central European community:
           results from the Kardiovize Brno 2030 Project
    • Authors: Jose R Medina-Inojosa, Manlio Vinciguerra, Andrea Maugeri, Sarka Kunzova, Ondřej Sochor, Narine Movsisyan, Yonas E Geda, Gorazd B Stokin, Francisco Lopez-Jimenez
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T04:28:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319834875
       
  • Achieved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and stroke risk: A
           meta-analysis of 23 randomised trials
    • Authors: Jaewon Shin, Jong-Won Chung, Hyun-Soon Jang, Juneyoung Lee, Keun-Sik Hong, Oh Young Bang, Gyeong-Moon Kim, Woo-Keun Seo
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-02-20T09:09:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319830503
       
  • Mean platelet volume mediated the relationships between heavy metals
           exposure and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk: A
           community-based study
    • Authors: Chunmei Zhu, Bin Wang, Lili Xiao, Yanjun Guo, Yun Zhou, Limin Cao, Shijie Yang, Weihong Chen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-02-19T05:22:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319830536
       
  • Estimated age based on exercise stress testing performance outperforms
           chronological age in predicting mortality
    • Authors: Serge C Harb, Paul C Cremer, Yuping Wu, Bo Xu, Leslie Cho, Venu Menon, Wael A Jaber
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-02-14T05:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319826400
       
  • Left ventricular hypertrophy in world class elite athletes is associated
           with signs of improved cardiac autonomic regulation
    • Authors: Gianluigi Oggionni, Antonio Spataro, Antonio Pelliccia, Mara Malacarne, Massimo Pagani, Daniela Lucini
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-02-13T05:05:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319830534
       
  • Risk factors for atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Daniel J Philipson, Florian Rader, Robert J Siegel
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-02-07T05:09:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319828474
       
  • Maintaining physical activity in patients after acute coronary syndromes,
           the challenge remains
    • Authors: Joep Perk
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-01-31T09:37:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319826383
       
  • Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in diabetes
           mellitus: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Safi U Khan, Zain Ul Abideen Asad, Muhammad U Khan, Swapna Talluri, Farman Ali, Muhammad Shahzeb Khan, Ahmad N Lone, Farouk Mookadam, Richard A Krasuski, Edo Kaluski
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-01-31T04:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319825510
       
  • Relationship between age and maximal heart rate in atrial fibrillation
    • Authors: Yuko Kato, Shinya Suzuki, Tokuhisa Uejima, Hiroaki Semba, Takuto Arita, Naoharu Yagi, Hiroto Kano, Shunsuke Matsuno, Takayuki Otsuka, Yuji Oikawa, Minoru Matsuhama, Junji Yajima, Takeshi Yamashita
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-01-08T02:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487318823109
       
  • Coronary heart disease mortality trends during 50 years as explained by
           risk factor changes: The European cohorts of the Seven Countries Study
    • Authors: Alessandro Menotti, Paolo E Puddu, Daan Kromhout, Anthony Kafatos, Hanna Tolonen
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-01-07T06:14:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487318821250
       
  • “Progression” of a risk factor on cardiovascular outcome: A valuable
           point, a questionable interpretation
    • Authors: Akira Fujiyoshi
      First page: 231
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-15T07:01:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319880988
       
  • Progression of conventional cardiovascular risk factors and vascular
           disease risk in individuals: insights from the PROG-IMT consortium

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Martin Bahls, Matthias W Lorenz, Marcus Dörr, Lu Gao, Kazuo Kitagawa, Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen, Stefan Agewall, Gerald Berenson, Alberico L Catapano, Giuseppe D Norata, Michiel L Bots, Wiek van Gilst, Folkert W Asselbergs, Frank P Brouwers, Heiko Uthoff, Dirk Sander, Holger Poppert, Michael Hecht Olsen, Jean Philippe Empana, Ulf Schminke, Damiano Baldassarre, Fabrizio Veglia, Oscar H Franco, Maryam Kavousi, Eric de Groot, Ellisiv B Mathiesen, Liliana Grigore, Joseph F Polak, Tatjana Rundek, Coen DA Stehouwer, Michael R Skilton, Apostolos I Hatzitolios, Christos Savopoulos, George Ntaios, Matthieu Plichart, Stela McLachlan, Lars Lind, Peter Willeit, Helmuth Steinmetz, Moise Desvarieux, M Arfan Ikram, Stein Harald Johnsen, Caroline Schmidt, Johann Willeit, Pierre Ducimetiere, Jackie F Price, Göran Bergström, Jussi Kauhanen, Stefan Kiechl, Matthias Sitzer, Horst Bickel, Ralph L Sacco, Albert Hofman, Henry Völzke, Simon G Thompson
      First page: 234
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsAveraged measurements, but not the progression based on multiple assessments of carotid intima-media thickness, (cIMT) are predictive of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in individuals. Whether this is true for conventional risk factors is unclear.Methods and resultsAn individual participant meta-analysis was used to associate the annualised progression of systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with future cardiovascular disease risk in 13 prospective cohort studies of the PROG-IMT collaboration (n = 34,072). Follow-up data included information on a combined cardiovascular disease endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke, or vascular death. In secondary analyses, annualised progression was replaced with average. Log hazard ratios per standard deviation difference were pooled across studies by a random effects meta-analysis. In primary analysis, the annualised progression of total cholesterol was marginally related to a higher cardiovascular disease risk (hazard ratio (HR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.07). The annualised progression of systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was not associated with future cardiovascular disease risk. In secondary analysis, average systolic blood pressure (HR 1.20 95% CI 1.11 to 1.29) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.16) were related to a greater, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.97) was related to a lower risk of future cardiovascular disease events.ConclusionAveraged measurements of systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol displayed significant linear relationships with the risk of future cardiovascular disease events. However, there was no clear association between the annualised progression of these conventional risk factors in individuals with the risk of future clinical endpoints.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T05:32:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319877078
       
  • Benefits of exercise training on blood pressure and beyond in
           cardiovascular diseases
    • Authors: Carl J Lavie, Merrill Stewart, Cemal Ozemek
      First page: 244
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-02T03:06:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874344
       
  • Comparative efficacy of exercise and anti-hypertensive pharmacological
           interventions in reducing blood pressure in people with hypertension: A
           network meta-analysis
    • Authors: Chris Noone, Joy Leahy, Eimear C Morrissey, John Newell, Micheál Newell, Christopher P Dwyer, Jane Murphy, Frank Doyle, Andrew W Murphy, Gerard J Molloy
      First page: 247
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThis analysis aims to estimate the comparative efficacy of anti-hypertensive medications and exercise interventions on systolic and diastolic blood pressure reduction in people with hypertension.MethodsA systematic review was conducted focusing on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of exercise interventions and first-line anti-hypertensives where blood pressure reduction was the primary outcome in those with hypertension. Network meta-analyses were conducted to generate estimates of comparative efficacy.ResultsWe identified 93 RCTs (N = 32,404, mean age in RCTs: 39–70 years) which compared placebo or usual care with first-line antihypertensives including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers and thiazide-like diuretics and exercise interventions including aerobic training and dynamic resistance training. Of these, there were 81 (87%) trials related to medications (n = 31,347, 97%) and 12 (13%) trials related to exercise (n = 1057, 3%). The point estimates suggested that antihypertensive medications were more effective than exercise but there was insufficient evidence to suggest that first-line medications significantly reduced blood pressure to a greater extent than did the exercise interventions. Of the first-line treatments, angiotensin receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers had the highest treatment ranking, while exercise had the second lowest treatment ranking, followed by control conditions.ConclusionThe current evidence base with a bias towards medication research may partly explain the circumspection around the efficacy of exercise in guidelines and practice. Clinicians may justifiably consider exercise for low risk hypertension patients who confirm a preference for such an approach.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-16T06:17:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319879786
       
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy in patients with an implanted cardioverter
           defibrillator
    • Authors: Stefan Höfer
      First page: 256
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T06:49:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319884375
       
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy significantly reduces anxiety in patients
           with implanted cardioverter defibrillator compared with usual care:
           Findings from the Screen-ICD randomised controlled trial
    • Authors: Selina K Berg, Trine B Rasmussen, Margrethe Herning, Jesper H Svendsen, Anne V Christensen, Lau C Thygesen
      First page: 258
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention provided by trained cardiac nurses plus usual care compared with usual care alone in patients with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator who, prior to randomization, had presented with symptoms of anxiety measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.BackgroundAround 20–25% of all patients with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator experience anxiety. Among these patients anxiety is associated with mortality, presumably explained by risk behaviour and activation of the autonomic nervous system. We hypothesised that cognitive behavioural therapy provided by cardiac nurses in an out-patient setting would be an effective treatment of anxiety.MethodsThis was an investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 randomisation to cognitive behavioural therapy plus usual care or to usual care. The primary outcome was Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety mean score at 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes included Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression, Becks Anxiety Inventory, HeartQoL and Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Primary outcome analysis was based on the intention-to-treat principle.ResultsA total of 88 participants were included, 66% men, mean age 64.3 years and 61% had primary indication implantable cardioverter defibrillator. A significant difference after 16 weeks was found between groups: intervention group (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-A mean (standard deviation) 4.95 points (3.30) versus usual care group 8.98 points (4.03) (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-02T07:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874147
       
  • Mitral valve prolapse, a familial condition worth screening for'
    • Authors: Jakub J Regieli, Maarten J Cramer, Annette F Baas, Gertjan T Sieswerda, Hendrik M Nathoe
      First page: 269
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-13T12:35:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319893368
       
  • Familial occurrence of mitral regurgitation in patients with mitral valve
           prolapse undergoing mitral valve surgery
    • Authors: Yasmine L Hiemstra, Aniek L van Wijngaarden, Mathilde W Bos, Martin J Schalij, Robert JM Klautz, Jeroen J Bax, Victoria Delgado, Daniela QCM Barge-Schaapveld, Nina Ajmone Marsan
      First page: 272
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundInitial studies have suggested the familial clustering of mitral valve prolapse, but most of them were either community based among unselected individuals or applied non-specific diagnostic criteria. Therefore little is known about the familial distribution of mitral regurgitation in a referral-type population with a more severe mitral valve prolapse phenotype. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of familial mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing surgery for mitral valve prolapse, differentiating patients with Barlow's disease, Barlow forme fruste and fibro-elastic deficiency.MethodsA total of 385 patients (62 ± 12 years, 63% men) who underwent surgery for mitral valve prolapse were contacted to assess cardiac family history systematically. Only the documented presence of mitral regurgitation was considered to define ‘familial mitral regurgitation’. In the probands, the aetiology of mitral valve prolapse was defined by surgical observations.ResultsA total of 107 (28%) probands were classified as having Barlow's disease, 85 (22%) as Barlow forme fruste and 193 (50%) patients as fibro-elastic deficiency. In total, 51 patients (13%) reported a clear family history for mitral regurgitation; these patients were significantly younger, more often diagnosed with Barlow's disease and also reported more sudden death in their family as compared with ‘sporadic mitral regurgitation’. In particular, ‘familial mitral regurgitation’ was reported in 28 patients with Barlow's disease (26%), 15 patients (8%) with fibro-elastic deficiency and eight (9%) with Barlow forme fruste (P 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-09-02T03:04:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319874148
       
  • Prevalence and patterns of cognitive impairment in acute coronary syndrome
           patients: A systematic review
    • Authors: Alison Pottle
      First page: 281
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T05:18:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319889720
       
  • Prevalence and patterns of cognitive impairment in acute coronary syndrome
           patients: A systematic review
    • Authors: Emma Zhao, Nicole Lowres, Anna Woolaston, Sharon L Naismith, Robyn Gallagher
      First page: 284
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundMinimising risk factors through secondary prevention behaviour is challenging for patients following an acute coronary syndrome. Cognitive impairment can potentially make these changes more difficult. However, cognitive impairment prevalence in acute coronary syndrome patients is poorly understood.DesignThis study was based on a systematic review.MethodsA systematic review was conducted of PubMed, Medline, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases up to March 2019, to identify studies reporting the prevalence of cognitive impairment in acute coronary syndrome patients. Predefined inclusion criteria were specified, including use of a validated cognitive impairment screening tool. Studies were excluded if patients had diagnosed dementia or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Strengthening The Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology and Cochrane Risk of Bias tools were used to assess quality.ResultsFrom 747 potential studies, nine were included. The total sample size was 6457 (range 53–2174), mean age range was 51.3–77.4 years, and range of proportions of males was 57–100%. Reported cognitive impairment prevalence rates varied substantially (9–85%) with no clear pattern over time. From the two studies which examined domains, verbal fluency, memory and language were affected the most. Meta-analysis could not be undertaken due to diverse screening tools (n = 9), cut-off scores and screening timepoints.ConclusionsCognitive impairment in acute coronary syndrome patients is currently poorly described, and likely affects a substantial number of acute coronary syndrome patients who remain undetected and have the potential to develop to dementia in the future. As domains are most affected, this could impact understanding and retention of health education. Research is needed to accurately determine the prevalence of cognitive impairment in acute coronary syndrome patients and create suitable standardised measures and thresholds.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-24T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319878945
       
  • How to reduce risk in secondary prevention: First of all address the
           basics!
    • Authors: Willibald Hochholzer, Christian M Valina
      First page: 294
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-27T05:25:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887831
       
  • Risk factors and clinical outcomes in chronic coronary and peripheral
           
    • Authors: Thomas Vanassche, Peter Verhamme, Sonia S Anand, Olga Shestakovska, Keith AA Fox, Deepak L Bhatt, Alvaro Avezum, Marco Alings, Victor Aboyans, Aldo P Maggioni, Petr Widimsky, Scott D Berkowitz, Salim Yusuf, Stuart J Connolly, John W Eikelboom, Jackie Bosch
      First page: 296
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsSecondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease and peripheral artery disease involves antithrombotic therapy and optimal control of cardiovascular risk factors. In the Cardiovascular Outcomes for People Using Anticoagulation Strategies (COMPASS) study, adding low-dose rivaroxaban on top of aspirin lowered cardiovascular events, but there is limited data about risk factor control in secondary prevention. We studied the association between risk factor status and outcomes, and the impact of risk factor status on the treatment effect of rivaroxaban, in a large contemporary population of patients with coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease.Methods and resultsWe reported ischemic events (cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction) in participants from the randomized, double-blind COMPASS study by individual risk factor (blood pressure, smoking status, cholesterol level, presence of diabetes, body mass index, and level of physical activity), and by number of risk factors. We compared rates and hazard ratios of patients treated with rivaroxaban plus aspirin vs aspirin alone within each risk factor category and tested for interaction between risk factor status and antithrombotic regimen. Complete baseline risk factor status was available in 27,117 (99%) patients. Status and number of risk factors were both associated with increased risk of ischemic events. Rates of ischemic events (hazard ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.8–2.6) and cardiovascular death (hazard ratio 2.0; 1.5–2.7) were more than twofold higher in patients with 4–6 compared with 0–1 risk factors (p 
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-10-16T06:16:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319882154
       
  • Screening young athletes for diseases at risk of sudden cardiac death:
           role of stress testing for ventricular arrhythmias
    • Authors: Alessandro Zorzi, Teresina Vessella, Manuel De Lazzari, Alberto Cipriani, Vittoria Menegon, Gianmarco Sarto, Rachele Spagnol, Laura Merlo, Cinzia Pegoraro, Martina Perazzolo Marra, Domenico Corrado, Patrizio Sarto
      First page: 311
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.
      AimsThe athletic preparticipation evaluation (PPE) protocol proposed by the European Society of Cardiology includes history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG). The aim of this study was to assess the results of adding constant-load ECG stress testing (EST) to the protocol for the evaluation of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) inducibility.MethodsWe evaluated a consecutive cohort of young athletes with history, physical examination, resting ECG and EST. Athletes with VA induced by EST underwent 24-hour 12-lead Holter monitoring and echocardiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was reserved for those with frequent, repetitive or exercise-worsened VA, and for athletes with echocardiographic abnormalities.ResultsOf 10,985 athletes (median age 15 years, 66% males), 451 (4.1%) had an abnormal history, physical examination or resting ECG and 31 (0.28%) were diagnosed with a cardiac disease and were at risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the remaining 10,534 athletes, VA at EST occurred in 524 (5.0%) and a previously missed at-risk condition was identified in 23 (0.22%); the most common (N = 10) was an echocardiographically silent non-ischaemic left-ventricular fibrosis evidenced by CMR. The addition of EST increased the diagnostic yield of PPE by 75% (from 0.28% to 0.49%) and decreased the positive predictive value by 20% (from 6.9% to 5.5%). During a 32 ± 21 months follow-up, no cardiac arrests occurred among either eligible athletes or non-eligible athletes with cardiovascular disease.ConclusionsThe addition of exercise testing for the evaluation of VA inducibility to history, physical examination and ECG resulted in an increase of the diagnostic yield of PPE at the expense of an increase in false-positive findings.
      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T05:18:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319890973
       
  • Hypertension guidelines in children should be universal
    • Authors: Gorm B Jensen
      First page: 321
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-11-22T06:42:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319887463
       
  • Sex differences in risk factors for stroke: A nationwide survey of 700,000
           Chinese Adults
    • Authors: Shijiao Yan, Yong Gan, Liqing Li, Heng Jiang, Fujian Song, Xiaoxv Yin, Liwu Chen, Wenning Fu, Xiaojun Wang, Wenzhen Li, Chang Shu, Sai Hu, Chao Wang, Wei Yue, Feng Yan, Longde Wang, Chuanzhu Lv, Zhihong Wang, Zuxun Lu
      First page: 323
      Abstract: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-02T03:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2047487319831483
       
 
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