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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (329 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 329 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal  
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AORTA     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access  
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access  
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 100)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access  
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Cardiology Review     Full-text available via subscription  
JACC : Basic to Translational Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JACC : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
JACC : Heart Failure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
JMIR Cardio     Open Access  
Jornal Vascular Brasileiro     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Arrhythmia     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cardiac Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
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Hellenic Journal of Cardiology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.479
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 1109-9666
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Performing Modified Fontan Before Six Years of Age Leads to Superior
           Long-Term Exercise Capacity

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Panagiotis G. Sfyridis, Konstantinos S. Mylonas, Dimosthenis Avramidis, Konstantinos Kontzoglou, Gregory Kouraklis, Chris K. Rokkas, George E. Sarris
       
  • 3D STRESS ECHO: Is it a fact or a fiction'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): C. Aggeli
       
  • Floppy Mitral Valve/Mitral Valve Prolapse (FMV/MVP): An Unrevealed
           Genotype – Phenotype Relationship

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Konstantinos Dean Boudoulas, Antonios A. Pitsis, Efstratios K. Theofilogiannakos, Francesca Madiai, Sara Koenig, Timotheos G. Kelpis, Peter J. Mohler, Ernest L. Mazzaferri, Harisios Boudoulas
       
  • Short-term effects of angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors on
           diastolic strain and tissue doppler parameters in heart failure patients
           with reduced ejection fraction: A pilot trial

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Eleni S. Nakou, Maria E. Marketou, Alexandros Patrianakos, Alexandros Protonotarios, Panos E. Vardas, Fragiskos I. ParthenakisAbstractBackgroundAlthough sacubitril/valsartan has recently shown its long-term benefits on morbidity and mortality in symptomatic patients with chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), its short-term effects on diastolic function remain uncertain. We sought to assess 30-day effects of sacubitril/valsartan on left ventricular (LV) diastolic paremeters determined by speckle tracking and tissue Doppler imaging (STI and TDI respectively) as well as their association with functional capacity change evaluated by peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) in stable patients with symptomatic HFrEF.MethodsA total of 35 patients (aged 61 ± 9 years) eligible for sacubitril/valsartan underwent a complete two-dimension (2D) echocardiographic study and a cardiopulmonary exercise test at baseline and 30 days after the initiation of therapy.ResultsSignificant improvements in ratio of trans-mitral inflow early diastolic velocity E to mitral annulus early diastolic velocity E′ (ΔΕ/Ε′ = -35.9%, p = 0.001), peak early diastolic strain rate SRE (ΔSRE = +22.5%, p = 0.024) and ratio E/SRE (ΔE/SRE = -33.2%, p = 0.025) were observed after 1-month therapy. Compared with baseline, VO2max also increased significantly by 16.7 % (p = 0.001). Baseline E/SRE and ΔE/SRE were the strongest independent predictors of VO2max improvement (beta = -0.43, p = 0.004 and beta= 0.45, p =0.021 respectively) in the multivariate analysis.ConclusionsSacubitril/valsartan was associated with early improvement in LV diastolic function determined by TDI and 2D STI. Baseline E/SRE was stronger than standard echocardiographic parameters in predicting the early benefit of sacubitril/valsartan therapy.
       
  • Prolonged DAPT following a myocardial infarction: Is there a role for the
           DAPT score'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Dimitrios Alexopoulos
       
  • A case of intermittent, non-cyclic prosthetic aortic valve regurgitation

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Foukarakis Emmanouil, Papoutsakis Antonios, Kafarakis Panagiotis, Rogdakis Emmanouil, Lazaros George
       
  • Adipose tissue browning in cardiometabolic health and disease

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Alexios S. Antonopoulos, Dimitris Tousoulis
       
  • Monocyte subsets as predictors of adverse events in patients with
           atherosclerosis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Nikolaos G. Frangogiannis
       
  • Reference values for aerobic capacity estimated by cardiopulmonary
           exercise test on a cycle ergometer in a healthy Greek population

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Helen Triantafyllidi, Dimitrios Benas, Dionyssia Birba, Paraskevi Trivilou, Efstathios IliodromitisBaselineAerobic capacity (AC) is inversely associated with a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as all-cause mortality. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) represents the gold standard for assessing exercise capacity based on maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). The purpose of our study was to provide for the first time CPET-derived normative reference values in a Greek cohort of apparently healthy males and females on a cycle ergometer in order to evaluate their AC and to compare our results with similar studies from other countries.MethodsA cohort of 194 apparently healthy subjects (118 males and 76 females, age range 15-69 years) was submitted to CPET using a cycle ergometer. Mean+SD values for several exercise parameters, VO2max included, were determined. We compared our results with existing data derived from USA and North Europe cohorts.ResultsMales achieved significantly higher levels of relative and absolute VO2max, (p
       
  • TAVR in a patient with an anomalous left main: self-expanding-prosthesis
           might be the preferred choice

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Georgios Tzanis, Marco Ancona, Vittorio Romano, Barbara Bellini, Fabio Sgura, Matteo Montorfano
       
  • Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: Initial experience of the 1st
           Cardiac Surgery Department of Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center. A Propensity
           score-adjusted analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Antonios Roussakis, Aikaterini Gavalaki, Constantinos Contrafouris, Konstantinos Petsios, Dimitrios Zarkalis, Panagiotis Ftikos, Konstantinos Perreas
       
  • “TAVI: Valve in Valve. A new field for structuralists'
           Literature review”

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Dimitrios A. Vrachatis, Michail Vavuranakis, Styliani Tsoukala, Giotaki Sotiria, Theodore G. Papaioannou, Gerasimos Siasos, Gerasimos Deftereos, Georgios Giannopoulos, Konstantinos Raisakis, Dimitrios Tousoulis, Spyridon Deftereos, Manolis VavuranakisTranscatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) literally founded the structural heart interventions subspecialty and created an emerging journey of clinical and technical issues. Soon after TAVI introduction into clinical practice, boundaries were expanded with utilization of valve-in-valve (V-i-V) techniques. V-i-V comprised of a diverse subset of patients including TAVI within TAVI, TAVI within a degenerated surgically implanted bioprosthesis or even TAVI-in-TAVI-in-surgical bioprosthesis. In the present review we summarize available literature and present initial Greek experience on the field.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Understanding the anatomy of a perforated mitral valve: From 2D
           echocardiography to 3D printing

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Konstantinos C. Theodoropoulos, Alexandros Papachristidis, Tiago Fonseca, Joseph Reiken, Mark J. Monaghan
       
  • MitralClip for mitral regurgitation: Is the solution to any inoperable
           case'

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Dimitris Tousoulis
       
  • Acquired Gerbode type defect after bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Aikaterini Siama, Petros Fountoulakis, Athanasios Tsoukas, Athanasios Manolis
       
  • Transthoracic 3D echocardiography used as a low-cost and precise technique
           to facilitate ablation of ventricular tachycardia from the left
           posteromedial papillary muscle

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Dionyssios Leftheriotis, Panayota Flevari, Vassilios Stassinos, Ignatios Ikonomidis
       
  • A reversible cause of hypoxaemia in a patient with acute right ventricular
           infarction

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): George Makavos, Nikolaos V. Cholevas, Loukianos S. Rallidis
       
  • Cardiotoxicity after vemurafenib administration

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Leonidas G. Raftopoulos, Constantina Aggeli, Konstantinos Zisimos, Erifili Venieri, Konstantinos Toutouzas, H. Gogas, Dimitris Tousoulis
       
  • The need to improve cardiac care after acute coronary syndrome

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Genovefa KolovouAbstractPatients who experience acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at increased risk of new cardiovascular (CV) events. The main strategies for prevention of recurrence of CV events is the protection from ruptured plaque, thrombus formation, occlusion or downstream embolization in the coronary artery. The percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting and anticoagulants, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (HMGCoAi, commonly called statins) and neurohormonal inhibition, has led to a notable decrease in 1-year mortality events. Today it is well documented that all patients with an ACS should be treated early, intensively and continuously for lowering the LDL-C values to the recommended goals. Regularly interviewing by trained health care personnel and post-discharge follow-up of patients after ACS seems to be more effective concerning adherence to statin for achieving LDL-C treatment goals compared with the standard of care.
       
  • Motivational interviewing to support LDL-C therapeutic goals and
           lipid-lowering therapy compliance in patients with acute coronary
           syndromes (IDEAL-LDL) study: rationale and design

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Aristi Boulmpou, Anastasios Kartas, Ioannis Farmakis, Stefanos Zafeiropoulos, Vasileios Nevras, Ioannis Papadimitriou, Athina Tampaki, Anastasia Vlachou, Leonidas Lillis, Athanasios Koutsakis, Haralampos Karvounis, George GiannakoulasBackgroundAchieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) target levels after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is of paramount importance, and is often burdened by undertreatment and medication or lifestyle non-adherence issues.ObjectiveWe examined the effect of a patient-centered, physician-led motivational intervention following ACS on relevant secondary prevention aspects.Methods-designThe IDEAL-LDL is a single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted among patients hospitalized due to an ACS. Following discharge, all patients undergo a baseline assessment of lipid profile. Patients in the intervention group receive an in-person educational session and an informative leaflet, and also undergo two phone-based, motivational interviewing sessions at 1 and 6 months. These interventions emphasize on LDL-C goals, adherence to lipid-lowering medication, and healthy dietary-lifestyle habits, and are not provided to patients in the control group, who receive usual care. At 12 months after each patient's discharge, an in-person interview and lipid profile reassessment are performed. The primary outcomes are the assessment of LDL-C goal achievement (50% reduction from baseline levels) from baseline to 1 year and changes in medication adherence. Secondary outcomes relate to the incidence of the composite outcome of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction/stroke, need for myocardial revascularization, and recurrent hospitalization during the follow-up period.DiscussionThis paper describes the protocol, design, and rationale for key methodology for an ongoing clinical trial featuring a simple and feasible intervention. Similar adherence efficacy trials have not led to sufficient improvements, and there remains a gap regarding how adherence interventions should be implemented into clinical care.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • The importance of characteristics of angina symptoms for the prediction of
           coronary artery disease in a cohort of stable patients in the modern era

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Georgios Nakas, Aris Bechlioulis, Aikaterini Marini, Konstantinos Vakalis, Mara Bougiakli, Sophia Giannitsi, Konstantina Nikolaou, Emorfili Ioanna Antoniadou, Anna Kotsia, Konstantina Gartzonika, Georgios Chasiotis, Eleni Bairaktari, Christos S. Katsouras, Georgios Triantis, Dimitrios Sionis, Lampros K. Michalis, Katerina K. NakaObjectiveAngina is an important clinical symptom indicating underlying coronary artery disease (CAD). Its characteristics are important for the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with CAD. Currently, we aimed to investigate the association of chest pain characteristics with the presence of obstructive CAD in a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing coronary angiography for suspected stable CAD.MethodsConsecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography for suspected stable CAD (n = 686) in a single university hospital cardiology department were enrolled. Chest pain was classified as typical angina, atypical angina, nonangina chest pain, and lack of symptoms. The presence of significant angiographic CAD was diagnosed by standard coronary angiography.ResultsTypical angina symptoms were associated with a higher prevalence of CAD (odds ratio [OR], 3.47, p 
       
  • Mitraclip for the treatment of radiation associated mitral valve
           regurgitation. Is it the last resort or a viable option'

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Manolis Vavuranakis
       
  • MitraClip for radiotherapy-related mitral valve regurgitation

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Iside Scarfò, Paolo Denti, Rodolfo Citro, Nicola Buzzatti, Ottavio Alfieri, Giovanni La CannaObjectiveOwing to mediastinal and cardiac damage burden, the surgical treatment of radiotherapy-related mitral regurgitation (MR) may be associated with high operative risk or might even contraindicated. We evaluated the feasibility and outcome of MitraClip therapy in patients with radiotherapy-related MR as an alternative to surgery.MethodsBased on Doppler Echocardiography, 15 of 33 screened patients underwent MitraClip implantation.ResultsFollowing MitraClip MR improved (residual MR ≤2+) without significant mitral valve stenosis (planimetric area 2.83 ± 0.8 cm2, mean gradient 4.6 ± 1.8 mm Hg). All patients completed a 6-month follow-up, while 14 of 15 patients achieved a longer follow-up, ranging from 12 to 72 months (median 24 months, IQR 42 months). At 6-month follow-up we observed NYHA improvement in 13 patients with an increase of 6-min walking covered distance (from 260 ± 34 to 367 ± 70, p 
       
  • Elderly patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. The case whereas
           lower blood pressure is always worst!

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Elias A. Sanidas, Konstantinos Tsioufis
       
  • Lower admission blood pressure as an independent predictor of 1-year
           mortality in elderly patients experiencing a first hospitalization for
           acute heart failure

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Francesc Formiga, Rafael Moreno-Gonzalez, David Chivite, Sergi Yun, Albert Ariza, Xavier CorbellaBackgroundSystolic blood pressure (SBP) is an acknowledged prognostic factor in patients with heart failure (HF). Admission SBP should be a risk factor for 1-year mortality even in elderly patients experiencing a first admission for HF, and this risk may persist in the oldest subset of patients.DesignMethods: We reviewed the medical records of 1031 patients aged 70 years or older admitted within a 3-year period for a first episode of acute heart failure (AHF). The cohort was divided according to admission SBP values in quartiles. We analyzed all-cause mortality as a function of these admission SBP quartiles.ResultsMean age was 82.2 ± 6 years; their mean admission SBP was 138.6 ± 25 mmHg. A statistically significant association was present between mortality at 30 (p 
       
  • Should we abandon the term 〝lone atrial fibrillation〞'

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Kai-bin Lin, Joseph E. Marine, Hugh Calkins, Saman Nazarian, Meng Wei, Dong Huang, Jing-bo LiCharacterized by lack of evidence of structural heart disease or any secondary causes of atrial fibrillation (AF), “lone AF” is used to represent a unique subtype of AF among young individuals aged less than 60 years. Although the longstanding definition has been proposed for years, the diagnostic criteria for “lone AF” remain ambiguous. As more contributing factors causing AF are recognized gradually, the validity of the term “lone AF” is in question. Despite advances in the past few decades, the mechanism of AF remains poorly understood, particularly in the absence of other structural changes. It is generally accepted that three essential electrophysiological elements (trigger, substrate, and modulators) contribute to the initiation and maintenance of lone AF. In addition, the role of microRNAs and genomic variations in the pathogenesis of lone AF has been also gaining attention. Some changes in relevant biomarker levels have also been proven to correlate with lone AF. Accumulating insights into the pathogenesis of lone AF strongly suggest coexistent disorders in patients with lone AF. Consequently, the growing evidence of these numerous and diverse pathogenic mechanisms and factors related to lone AF inevitably raises the question of whether the term “lone AF” is a meaningful category. The classification of lone AF as a separate identity has not lead to any unique clinical management. In this review, we update knowledge of definition, mechanisms, genetics, biomarkers, and clinical management of “lone AF.” With this comprehensive review, we suggest that the term “lone AF” should be abandoned for its futility.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Challenges and unanswered questions in STEMI management

    • Abstract: Publication date: July–August 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 4Author(s): Athanasios Koutsoukis, Ioannis KanakakisThe management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has evolved significantly over the last decades. STEMI treatment includes reperfusion therapy, ideally by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI), modern antithrombotic therapy and secondary prevention measures. Even though many areas in the management of STEMI are well studied and analyzed in the guidelines, there are still challenges and unanswered questions on how to improve outcomes. This review aims to offer an insight in areas that need to be explored.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • PCSK9 inhibitors in clinical practice: novel directions and new
           experiences

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Loukianos S. Rallidis, Ioannis Skoumas, Evangelos N. Liberopoulos, Charalambos Vlachopoulos, Estela Kiouri, Iosif Koutagiar, Georgia Anastasiou, Nikolaos Kosmas, Moses S. Elisaf, Dimitrios Tousoulis, Efstathios IliodromitisBackgroundIn randomized clinical trials, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors (PCSK9i) effectively reduce low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) with a favorable tolerability and safety profile. Our purpose is to provide real-world data regarding the indications, efficacy and safety of PCSK9i.MethodsThe cohort comprised 141 patients who attended the lipid clinic of 3 hospitals in Greece and started using PCSK9i. Patients were requested to attend the lipid clinic at 3 months and at one year.ResultsNinety percent of patients had heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (heFH) and 75% had cardiovascular disease (CVD). A PCSK9i [evolocumab 140 mg/2 weeks (n=82), alirocumab 75 mg/2 weeks (n=46) and alirocumab 150 mg/2 weeks (n=13)] was prescribed due to failure to achieve LDL-C targets despite maximum lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) in 75% of patients while in the rest of cases the indication was statin intolerance. The mean reduction of LDL-C at 3 months was 56.2% and remained unchanged at 12 months (55.8% reduction from baseline). LDL-C target was achieved by 68.1% of patients at 3 months. “Totally” intolerable to statins patients (unable to tolerate any statin dose, n=23) showed the lowest LDL-C reduction (47.7%). Side effects attributed to treatment were reported by 14 patients (10%). The total number of patients who stopped PCSK9i at one year was 14 (10%) but only 2 (1.4%) discontinued treatment because of side effects (myalgias).ConclusionsOur real-world results of PCSK9i showed comparable efficacy and tolerability to those reported in clinical trials and highlight the value of treatment with PCSK9i heFH patients not achieving LDL-C targets despite maximum LLT and high or very high risk statin intolerant patients.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Implantable Cardioverter – Defibrillators in Patients with Suboptimal
           Neurological Status The Brain – Heart Love and Hate Relationship

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Konstantinos A. Gatzoulis, Polychronis Dilaveris, Christos-Konstantinos Antoniou, Anastasia Damelou, Dimitrios Tousoulis
       
  • Transapical implantation of neochords in patients with severe degenerative
           mitral regurgitation; the first Greek experience.

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Vasilios Lozos, Constantina Aggeli, Petros Halkidis, Yannis Dimitroglou, Lazaros Kalampalikis, Manolis Vavuranakis, Dimitris Tousoulis, Konstantinos Triantafilou
       
  • Hypertension prevalence in a representative sample of Greek adults: The
           Hellenic National Nutrition and Health Survey (HNNHS)

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Emmanuella Magriplis, Demosthenes Panagiotakos, Costas Tsioufis, Anastasia-Vasiliki Mitsopoulou, Dimitra Karageorgou, Ioannis Dimakopoulos, Ioanna Bakogianni, Michalis Chourdakis, Renata Micha, George Michas, Triantafyllia Ntouroupi, Sophia-Maria Tsaniklidou, Kostantina Argyri, Antonis Zampelas, Fappa Evangelia, Eleni-Maria Theodoraki, Eirini Trichia, Theodora-Eirini Sialvera, Aggeliki Varytimiadi, Eleni Spyreli
       
  • A perforated Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet Aneurysm in a patient
           presenting with Acute Pulmonary Oedema

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Stefanos Archontakis, Constantina Aggeli, Yannis Dimitroglou, Nikolas Koumallos, Michael Demosthenous, Konstantinos Sideris, Dimitrios Tousoulis, George Triantafyllou, Skevos Sideris
       
  • Left Atrial Systolic Function in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Dimitrios Economou, Andrew Xanthopoulos, Michail Papamichalis, Aikaterini Chamaidi, Apostolos Dimos, Dimitrios Tavoularis, John Skoularigis, Filippos Triposkiadis
       
  • A practical algorithm for the management of patients with
           statin-associated muscle symptoms

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Loukianos S. RallidisSummaryStatin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are the most frequent clinically relevant adverse effect of statins causing discontinuation of statin treatment and subsequent increase in cardiovascular events. The incidence of SAMS in clinical practice is 5-10%. Clinical manifestations of SAMS are highly heterogeneous and ranges from mild weakness, cramps and muscle pains to the very rare and severe rhabdomyolysis. The most common type of SAMS (>80%) is muscle pains without or with mild increase in creatine kinase. The management of patients with SAMS is a clinical challenge. A strategic approach involving clinical assessment, patients’ reassurance regarding statin safety and reintroduction of low statin dose (daily or alternate scheme) combined with non-statins (ezetimibe first and if required addition of alirocumab or evolocumab) will allow the majority of them to achieve meaningful low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol reductions.
       
  • “Nothing Aches Like A Heart”

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Elias A. Sanidas, George D. Dangas
       
  • Are Group-Based High Intensity Aerobic Interval Training Modalities the
           Future of the Cardiac Rehabilitation'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Jannis Papathanasiou, Donka Dimitrova, Nigyar Dzhafer, Kostadin Kanalev, Yannis Dionyssiotis, Arthur De Sa Ferreira, Fernando Silva Guimarães, Agnaldo José Lopes, Dorothea Tsekoura
       
  • Sex-discrete role of depressive symptomatology on 10-year first and
           recurrent cardiovascular disease incidence: results from ATTICA and GREECS
           prospective studies

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Matina Kouvari, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Christina Chrysohoou, Venetia Notara, Ekavi Georgousopoulou, Dimitrios Tousoulis, Christos Pitsavos, Y. Skoumas, N. Katinioti, L. Papadimitriou, C. Masoura, S. Vellas, Y. Lentzas, M. Kambaxis, K. Paliou, V. Metaxa, N. Skourlis, C. Papanikolaou, A. Kalogeropoulou, E. PitarakiBackgroundThe sex-specific effect of depressive symptomatology on 10-year first and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events was evaluated.MethodsThe Greek samples from ATTICA (2002-2012, n=845 free-of-CVD subjects) and GREECS (2004-2014, n=2,172 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects) prospective epidemiological studies with baseline psychological assessments were used, for the first and recurrent event, respectively. Depressive symptomatology was assessed at baseline, through Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale in ATTICA study and through Centre of Epidemiological Studies-Depressive symptoms scale in GREECS study.ResultsACS as well as free-of-CVD women scored significantly higher for depressive symptomatology. Men exceeded women against first (19.7% vs. 11.7%) and subsequent CVD events (38.8% vs. 32.9%). In participants with depressive symptoms man-to-woman first and recurrent CVD event rate ratio below -1- was noticed. Multiadjusted analysis revealed that depressive symptomatology had independent aggravating effect on first (Hazard Ratio (HR)=2.72, 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.50, 9.12) and recurrent (HR=1.31, 95%CI 1.01, 1.69) CVD events only in women. Mediation analysis in women revealed that 35% (23%, 44%) of excess first-CVD-event risk of depressive symptoms was attributed to conventional risk factors. The respective number for recurrent CVD events was 46% (23%, 53%); different patterns of ranking regarding the mediating effect corresponding to each adjustment factor was observed.ConclusionsThe present work augments prior evidence that psychological stressors possess important drivers of CVD onset and progression mainly in women while it gives rise to research towards unidentified paths behind this claim.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Systemic endothelial glycocalyx and aortic stiffness are preserved in
           pulmonary arterial hypertension

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Helen Triantafyllidi, Olympia Apostolopoulou, Dimitris Benas, Ignatios Ikonomidis, Mary Varoudi, Iraklis Tsagkaris, Anastasia Anthi, Loukianos Rallidis, Dimitrios Kostantonis, Frantzeska Frantzeskaki, George Pavlidis, Leonidas Palaiodimos, Antonios Schoinas, Apostolos Armaganidis, John Lekakis, Stylianos E. Orfanos
       
  • The Rationale And Design Of The Greek Registry For Familial
           Hypercholesterolemia (GRegistry-FH) Of The Hellenic College Of Treatment
           Of Atherosclerosis (HCTA)

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Genovefa Kolovou, Christina Marvaki, Stamatis Makrygiannis, Olga Kadda, Vasiliki Giannakopoulou, Petros Kalogeropoulos, Katerina Anagnostopoulou, Georgios Goumas, Georgios Kazianis, Sotiria Limberi, Despina Perrea, Vana Kolovou, Helen Bilianou
       
  • Transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis in aortic stenosis: prevalence,
           diagnostic challenges and clinical implications

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Giedre Balciunaite, Arnas Rimkus, Edvardas Zurauskas, Tomas Zaremba, Darius Palionis, Nomeda Valeviciene, Audrius Aidietis, Pranas Serpytis, Kestutis Rucinskas, Peter Sogaard, Sigita GlaveckaiteAbstractTransthyretin cardiac amyloidosis (ATTR-CA) is a challenging and underdiagnosed cause of heart failure. Advances in cardiac imaging enabled non-invasive diagnosis of ATTR-CA, causing the recent upsurge in disease awareness and detection. ATTR-CA has been increasingly recognized in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (AS). With the growing number of elderly patients undergoing aortic valve intervention, the identification of ATTR-CA in this group of patients is of high clinical importance. Timely and correct diagnosis is essential for amyloid directed therapies, as well as deciding on AS treatment strategy. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent studies investigating coexistence of these two entities. We present the data on the prevalence of ATTR-CA in AS and their prognostic associations. Since diagnosis of ATTR-CA may be challenging, special attention is paid to the diagnostic utility of different imaging modalities, echocardiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, nuclear imaging, and distinctive imaging features in patients with dual pathology. We also present a flow diagram summarizing integrated imaging in patients with suspected ATTR-CA.
       
  • Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection: Primum Non Nocere

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Iosif Xenogiannis, Ilias Nikolakopoulos, Evangelia Vemmou, Michael Megaly, Mohamed Omer, Anil Poulose, Emmanouil S. Brilakis
       
  • What’s in a prick' Vaccines and the cardiovascular system

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Vasiliki Katsi, Christos-Konstantinos Antoniou, Panagiota Manolakou, Konstantinos Toutouzas, Dimitrios TousoulisAbstractEvidence suggests a crucial role for vaccines in cardiovascular disease, mediated not only by disease prevention but also by immunomodulatory effects. In the present review, it will be attempted to briefly present the effects of pathogens and vaccines on the cardiovascular system, as well as potential mechanisms for development of vaccines against cardiovascular disease per se. Current epidemiological evidence regarding vaccine effectiveness in different categories of heart disease will be discussed, as well as current international guidelines’ recommendations. In summary, cardiologists should strive to promote vaccination against specific pathogens with proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease.
       
  • Successful interventional management of a giant atherosclerotic coronary
           aneurysm

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Andreas Mitsis, Xun Yuan, Christoph A. Nienaber
       
  • Arginine Vasopressin and Difficult Triangle of Heart Failure, Atrial
           Fibrillation, and Hyponatremia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Hakki Kaya, Yuksel Cavusoglu
       
  • Lack of macroscopically-evident cardiac regeneration or spontaneous
           functional recovery in infarcted neonatal pigs

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Konstantinos Malliaras, Erietta Polychronopoulou, Irene Poulakida, Dimitrios Sagris, Konstantinos Makaritsis
       
  • Extreme Heart Rhythm Alteration During a Head-up Tilt Test

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Nikolaos P. Margos, Panagiotis P. Margos, Velegraki E. Irini, Barbatzas Nikolaos, Kostas Filippou, Athanasios I. Kranidis
       
  • Late-onset cardiomyopathy among survivors of childhood lymphoma treated
           with anthracyclines: a systematic review

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Despoina-Rafailia Benetou, Evangelos Stergianos, Maria Geropeppa, Erato Ntinopoulou, Marina Tzanni, Apostolos Pourtsidis, Andreas C. Petropoulos, Marios K. Georgakis, Dimitrios Tousoulis, Eleni Th PetridouMedical advances in pediatric oncology have led to increases in survival but the long-term adverse effects of treatment in childhood cancer survivors have not yet been examined in depth. In this systematic review, we aimed to study the prevalence and risk factors of late-onset cardiomyopathy (LOCM) among survivors of childhood lymphoma treated with anthracyclines. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines we searched Pubmed/Medline, abstracted data and rated studies on quality regarding late-onset (>1 year following treatment) cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines in survivors of childhood lymphoma. Across 22 identified studies, the prevalence of anthracycline-induced LOCM among survivors of childhood lymphoma ranges from 0 to 40%. Anthracycline dose, administration and dose of mediastinal radiation, patient’s age and era of diagnosis and evaluation, follow-up duration as well as disease relapse have been reported as risk factors for LOCM, whereas administration of dexrazoxane seems to act protectively. There was significant between-study heterogeneity with regards to lymphoma subtypes, follow-up duration, definition of outcomes, and anthracycline-based treatment protocols. The rates of anthracycline-induced LOCM among survivors of childhood lymphoma are high and dependent on study design. Future studies should explore whether modifying risk factors and suggested supportive care could decrease its prevalence among childhood lymphoma survivors. Until then, lifelong follow-up of these patients aiming to determinate the earliest signs of cardiac dysfunction is the most important measure towards primordial prevention of LOCM.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Late dislocation of an Amplatzer septal occluder in the chordae tendineae
           of the tricuspid valve after failed transcatheter closure of atrial septal
           defect

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Panagiotis Artemiou, Branislav Bezák, Michal Hulman
       
  • Simultaneous implantation of MitraClip devices in a patient with severe
           mitral and tricuspid valve regurgitation

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Vlasis Ninios, Christos Tourmousoglou, Nikolaos Mezilis, Ilias Ninios, Petros Dardas, Dimitrios Tsikaderis, Stratos Theophylogiannakos, Antonios PitsisAbstractWe present a case of an 84-year old patient with severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitation with a lot of cormobidities who underwent a simultaneous transfemoral (one approach) mitral and tricuspid valve repair using the MitraClip system.
       
  • Transfemoral transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation for the treatment
           of a degenerated tricuspid valve bioprosthesis

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): V. Voudris, E. Kosmas, M. Balanika, D. Tsiapras, I. Iakovou
       
  • Reconsidering arrhythmic risk stratification in dilated cardiomyopathy –
           Beyond ventricular contractility and gene mutability

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Konstantinos A. Gatzoulis, Emmanuel Kanoupakis, Christos-Konstantinos Antoniou, Antonios Sideris, Theofilos M. Kolettis
       
  • Atorvastatin-induced gynecomastia in a dyslipidemic patient: A case report

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Ioannis Bostanitis, Maria Tsalidou
       
  • Infective endocarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis manifesting
           as pemphigus foliaceus

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Petros Ioannou, Emmanouela Tsagkaraki, Rodanthi Vamvoukaki, Chara Kouvidou, Konstantinos Krasagakis, Georgios Chamilos, Achilleas Gikas
       
  • Impella support following emergency percutaneous balloon aortic
           valvuloplasty in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and
           cardiogenic shock

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology, Volume 60, Issue 3Author(s): Konstantinos Karatolios, Georgios Chatzis, Ulrich Luesebrink, Birgit Markus, Holger Ahrens, Dimitris Tousoulis, Bernhard SchiefferBackgroundTo investigate the feasibility and outcomes of Impella 2.5 support in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) and cardiogenic shock (CS), who underwent emergency percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) with or without percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Methods and resultsWe retrospectively analyzed a consecutive series of patients with severe AS and CS who underwent Impella 2.5 support following emergency BAV with or without subsequent PCI. Outcome data included 30-day outcomes, periprocedural as well as throughout the circulatory support period complications. Eight patients with severe AS and CS were identified. Impella 2.5 implantation was successful following emergency BAV in all patients attempted. Additional PCI was performed in four patients. No periprocedural deaths or periprocedural neurologic events occurred. Mean procedure time was 125.9 min (range 64–210 min). Mortality at 30 days was 50%.ConclusionsImpella 2.5 can be used as hemodynamic support in patients with severe AS and CS following emergency percutaneous BAV and may help to improve tolerability of PCI in these high-risk patients.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Novel risks factors in coronary artery disease: are clinical relevant'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 September 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Dimitris Tousoulis
       
  • Cardiogenic shock in aortic stenosis patients: balancing between
           complexity and simplicity

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Anwar Tandar, Stavros G. Drakos
       
  • A Cardiologist’s heart for Social Responsibility or…

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Elpidoforos S. Soteriades
       
  • Cardiovascular disease risk status during the years of the financial
           crisis: the Greek case

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Demosthenes Panagiotakos, Alexandra Foscolou
       
  • Coronary Revascularization and Use of Hemodynamic Support in Acute
           Coronary Syndromes

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2019Source: Hellenic Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Iosif Xenogiannis, Peter Tajti, M. Nicholas Burke, Ivan Chavez, Mario Gössl, Michael Mooney, Anil Poulose, Paul Sorajja, Jay Traverse, Yale Wang, Emmanouil S. BrilakisCardiogenic shock develops in up to 10% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and continues to have high mortality, often>50%. Early invasive treatment is the default therapeutic approach in these patients. Based on the results of the CULPRIT-SHOCK trial, culprit only revascularization during the acute phase is preferred over multivessel revascularization. Routine use of Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is not recommended, however use of mechanical circulatory support has been increasing despite the fact there is limited observational data to support its use. Several studies support multivessel revascularization in patients with uncomplicated ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction and simple non-culprit lesions to improve subsequent clinical outcomes.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
 
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