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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (330 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 330 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal  
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AORTA     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access  
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Cardiology Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Cardiology Review     Full-text available via subscription  
JACC : Basic to Translational Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JACC : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
JACC : Heart Failure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
JMIR Cardio     Open Access  
Jornal Vascular Brasileiro     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Arrhythmia     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.273
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0972-6292
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Reducing inappropriate therapy in defibrillators-can we count on
           mathematical models'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Mukund A. Prabhu
       
  • Channelopathies – An update 2018

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): K.U. Natarajan, Mani Ram Krishna
       
  • Paced QRS morphology and outcomes

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Richard Sutton
       
  • Optimizing RV lead position in RV Cardiomyopathy: Are we there yet'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Apurva Sharma, Harikrishna Tandri
       
  • Paced QRS morphology predicts incident left ventricular systolic
           dysfunction and atrial fibrillation

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Martin van Zyl, Chance M. Witt, Subir Bhatia, Majd Khasawneh, Prakriti Gaba, Charles J. Lenz, Andrew N. Rosenbaum, Htin Aung, David O. Hodge, Christopher J. McLeod, Samuel J. Asirvatham BackgroundThe prognostic significance of paced QRS complex morphology on surface ECG remains unclear. This study aimed to assess long-term outcomes associated with variations in the paced QRS complex.MethodsAdult patients who underwent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation with 20% or more ventricular pacing and a 12-lead ECG showing a paced complex were included. The paced QRS was analyzed in leads I and aVL. Long-term clinical and echocardiographic outcomes were compared at 5 years.ResultsThe study included 844 patients (43.1% female; age 75.0 ± 12.1). Patients with a longer paced QRS (pQRS) duration in lead I had a lower rate of atrial fibrillation (HR 0.80; p = 0.03) and higher rate of systolic dysfunction (HR 1.17; p 
       
  • Late elimination of challenging idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias
           originating from left ventricular summit by anatomical ablation

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Basar Candemir, Emir Baskovski, Veysel Duzen, Firat Coskun, Kutay Vurgun, Huseyin Goksuluk, Nil Ozyuncu, Seda Tan Kurklu, Timucin Altin, Omer Akyurek, Cetin Erol Ablation of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) originating from left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT)/left ventricular summit (LVS) is challenging with considerable rate of failure. Recently, in a novel approach to ablation of these arrythmias, application of radiofrequency energy to anatomically opposite sites of presumed origin of arrythmia, has been associated with moderate procedure success. Although late elimination of PVCs that are persistent following an ablation procedure has been previously reported, this observation has not been studied sufficiently. In this report, firstly, we present three cases of lately eliminated LVS PVCs, then, we discuss possible mechanism of this observation and conclude that after an initial failed attempt of anatomic ablation, operators may choose a period of watchful waiting before attempting a redo procedure.
       
  • Fetal arrhythmias: Diagnosis and management

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Anjan S. Batra, Seshadri Balaji This article reviews important features for improving the diagnosis and management of fetal arrhythmias. The normal fetal heart rate ranges between 110 and 160 beats per minute. A fetal heart rate is considered abnormal if the heart rate is beyond the normal ranges or the rhythm is irregular. The rate, duration, and origin of the rhythm and degree of irregularity usually determine the potential for hemodynamic consequences. Most of the fetal rhythm disturbances are the result of premature atrial contractions (PACs) and are of little clinical significance. Other arrhythmias include tachyarrhythmias (heart rate in excess of 160 beats/min) such as atrioventricular (AV) reentry tachycardia, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia, and bradyarrhythmias (heart rate
       
  • Epsilon wave: A review of historical aspects

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Andrés Ricardo Pérez-Riera, Raimundo Barbosa-Barros, Rodrigo Daminello-Raimundo, Luiz Carlos de Abreu, Javier García-Niebla, Mauro José de Deus Morais, Kjell Nikus, Frank I. Marcus The epsilon wave of the electrocardiogram (ECG) together with fragmented QRS (fQRS), the terminal conduction delay, incomplete right bundle branch block (IRBBB) and complete/advanced RBBB (CRBBB) of peripheral origin are part of a spectrum of ventricular depolarization abnormalities of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC). Although the epsilon wave is considered a major diagnostic criterion for AC since 2010 (AC Task Force Criteria), its diagnostic value is limited because it is a sign of the later stage of the disease. It would be more appropriate to say that the epsilon wave is a “hallmark” of AC, but is of low diagnostic sensitivity. Although the epsilon wave has high specificity for AC, it can be present in other pathological conditions. In this update we will cover the nomenclature, association with disease states and electrocardiographic aspects of the epsilon wave.
       
  • Accuracy and usability of single-lead ECG from smartphones - A clinical
           study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Haakon Tillmann Haverkamp, Stig Ove Fosse, Peter Schuster BackgroundSeveral wireless ECG devices are commercially available for possible screening, monitoring and diagnosis of rhythms. The field is rapidly expanding, and some devices have demonstrated acceptable qualities. The objective was to evaluate the accuracy, usability and diagnostic capabilities of smartphone ECG in both patients and healthy controls.MethodsWe used a commercially available smartphone ECG device, connected wirelessly to a tablet, to record a 30-s lead I ECG in 144 subjects—20 of whom repeated the test after vigorous exercise. The subjects included 94 patients under standard calculated 12-lead ECG surveillance; transcripts were obtained shortly after the smartphone ECG was acquired.ResultsNo significant differences were found in the QRS, frequency and QT intervals between the two modalities. Smartphone ECG recordings separated pathologic rhythms (atrial fibrillation (AF)/flutter, atrioventricular block, regular supraventricular rhythm, and pacing) from sinus rhythms with a sensitivity of 0.75 and a specificity of 0.97. The specific diagnosis of AF appeared in 11 patients and was detected with a sensitivity of 1 and a specificity of 0.94. There was a marginal decrease in the interpretability of the smartphone ECG after exercise. Inter- and intraobserver variability was low.ConclusionsSmartphone ECG accurately measures most baseline intervals and has acceptable sensitivity and specificity for pathological rhythms, especially for AF. Vigorous activity has a minor influence on the readability of the PR interval. Elderly patients may face challenges in recording a smartphone ECG correctly without assistance. According to our findings, the smartphone ECG would be applicable as a screening device for pathological rhythms.
       
  • Characterization of pulmonary vein reconnection post Cryoballoon ablation

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Shivang Shah, Wenjie Xu, Evan Adelstein, Andrew Voigt, Samir Saba, Sandeep Jain BackgroundThe Arctic Front Cryoballoon System is a technology in which substrate alterations in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence have not been well characterized. In this study, we evaluated sites of pulmonary vein (PV) reconnections and the accuracy of the Achieve™ circular mapping catheter in detecting these reconnections after cryoablation.MethodsThis study included 15 patients undergoing redo AF ablation after a prior single cryoablation procedure. PV reconnection sites were determined by measuring PV signals and high output pacing from 4 vectors of the Achieve catheter. The results were compared with a roving mapping catheter guided by rotational intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) in the left atrium.ResultsAll patients had PV reconnections (2.1 ± 0.8 veins/patient). The left superior PV was most commonly reconnected (n = 11), whereas the right inferior PV was least likely (n = 3). Both carinas (left: n = 11; right: n = 7) and left atrial appendage ridge (n = 11) were also frequently reconnected. Mapping with the Achieve catheter showed a positive predictive value (PPV) 100% and negative predictive value (NPV) 96% when compared with ICE guided mapping. In 2 patients, right superior PV reconnection was not identified by the Achieve.ConclusionDuring redo AF ablation after index cryoablation, multiple PVs are usually reconnected, with both carinas and left atrial appendage ridge being common sites of reconnection. The Achieve mapping catheter was able to identify reconnection with high positive and negative predictive values.
       
  • Failure-free survival of the Riata implantable cardioverter-defibrillator
           lead after a very long-term follow-up

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Rodolfo San Antonio, Eduard Guasch, Fredy Chipa-Ccasani, José Apolo, Margarida Pujol-López, Hael Fernández, Omar Trotta, Mireia Niebla, Roger Borràs, Emilce Trucco, Elena Arbelo, Ivo Roca-Luque, Josep Brugada, Lluís Mont, José María Tolosana AimsRiata® implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads from St. Jude Medical are prone to malfunction. This study aimed to describe the rate of this lead's malfunction in a very long-term follow-up.MethodsThis single-centre observational study included 50 patients who received a Riata 7Fr dual-coil lead between 2003 and 2008. Follow-up was conducted both in person and remotely, and analysed at 8-month intervals. We evaluated the rates of cable externalization (CE), electrical failure (EF), and the interaction of these two complications. Structural lead failure was defined as radiographic CE. Oversensing of non-cardiac signal or sudden changes in impedance, sensing, or pacing thresholds constituted EF.ResultsDuring a mean follow-up of 10.2 ± 2.9 years, 16 patients (32%) died. We observed lead malfunction in 13 patients (26%): three (23%) due to CE, six (46%) to EF and four (31%) to both complications. Of the malfunctioning leads, 77% failed after seven years of follow-up. The incidence rate (IR) of overall malfunction per 100 patients per year was 0.9 during the first seven years post-implantation, increased to 7.0 after the 7th year and more than doubled (to 16.7) after 10 years. Beyond seven years post-implantation, IR per 100 patient-years increased in both EF and CE (from 0.6 to 5.6 vs. 0.3 to 4.2, respectively). Presence of CE was associated with a 4-fold increase in the proportion of EF.ConclusionThe incidence of Riata ICD lead malfunction, both for EF and CE, increased dramatically after seven years and then more than doubled after 10 years post-implantation.
       
  • Radiofrequency ablation of recurrent, drug refractory, left posterior
           fascicular ventricular tachycardia in a pregnant lady without the use of
           fluoroscopy

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Anandaroop Lahiri, Sirish Chandra Srinath, John Roshan
       
  • Adenosine-induced persistent recovery of accessory pathway conduction
           following mechanical block

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Mikael Laredo, Victor Waldmann, Laurent Macle, Marc Dubuc
       
  • Incidence and predictors of left atrial thrombus in patients with atrial
           fibrillation prior to ablation in the real world of China

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Fengpeng Jia, Yongyue Tian, Sen Lei, Yuan Yang, Suxin Luo, Quan He BackgroundThe present study was to evaluate the value of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASC scores on predicting left atrial (LA) or left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients prior to ablation in the real world of China.Methods and resultsA total of 397 patients with non-valvular AF were analyzed to determine the relationship between CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASC scores and LA/LAA thrombus identified on transesophageal echocardiography prior to radiofrequency ablation(RFA). LA/LAA thrombus was present in 38 patients (9.6%). There was a strong association between higher CHADS2 score or CHA2DS2VASC score and LA/LAA thrombus. No thrombus was identified in patients with CHA2DS2VASC score of 0 regardless of anticoagulation status. However, LA/LAA thrombus was detected in 2.9% patients with CHADS2 score of 0 without adequate anticoagulation, while no thrombus was present in the patients with CHADS2 score of 0 with adequate anticoagulation. Univariate analysis showed that heart failure (LVEF<50%), LA≥40 mm, diabetes mellitus, previous stroke or TIA, CAD, hypertension, inadequate anticoagulation therapy, CHADS2 score of ≥2 and CHA2DS2VASC score of ≥2 were significantly associated with LA/LAA thrombus. Multivariable Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CHA2DS2VASC score of ≥2 (p = 0.02) and previous stroke or TIA (p = 0.04) were independently associated with LA/LAA thrombus regardless of anticoagulation status. ROC curve analysis showed that higher CHADS2 score and CHA2DS2VASC score could be similarly used to predict the presence of LA thrombus.ConclusionsBoth higher CHA2DS2VASC and CHADS2 scores were associated with LA/LAA thrombus in non-valvular AF patients prior to ablation. Although CHA2DS2VASC score and CHADS2 score had similar value to predict LA/LAA thrombus, CHA2DS2VASc score was better to identify low-risk patients for LA/LAA thrombus than CHADS2 score without anticoagulation. There will be a possibility of performing AF ablation or cardioversion in patients with a CHA2DS2VASC of 0 without TEE or anticoagulation therapy. The safety need to be verified by more multicentre randomized controlled clinical trails.
       
  • Case report: Surgical repair of an esophageal perforation after
           radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Patrick Badertscher, Tarik Delko, Daniel Oertli, Oliver Reuthebuch, Ulrich Schurr, Maurice Pradella, Michael Kühne, Christian Sticherling, Stefan Osswald Recent reports have described the incidence of atrioesophageal fistulas (AEF), often resulting in death, from radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF).1 Cases of esophageal perforation without concomitant AEF have not been described as extensively.1 The precise mechanisms leading to esophageal injury after catheter ablation without involvement of the left atrium are not fully understood. The surgical approach to treat esophageal perforation is strongly recommended.2 However, a unified surgical treatment approach has not yet been established. We describe a case of successful surgical repair of an esophageal perforation after ablation using surgical repair in combination with an omental wrap.
       
  • Hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum – A rare cause of heart
           block

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Bhagwati Pant, Ananthakrishnan Ramesh, Raja Selvaraj
       
  • Transvenous pacing in complex post-operative congenital heart disease
           guided by angiography: A case report

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Jayaprakash Shenthar, Maneesh K. Rai, Tammo Delhaas Transvenous pacing in patients with postoperative complex congenital heart disease (CHD) can be challenging and pose technical challenges to lead placement because of the complex anatomy, distortions produced by the surgical procedures, and the altered relationship of cardiac chambers. We describe the utility of angiography for transvenous dual chamber pacemaker implantation in a post-operative complex congenital heart disease.
       
  • Predictors of recurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation following
           cryoablation based pulmonary vein isolation

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Daljeet Kaur, C. Narasimhan
       
  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemakers versus defibrillators in
           older non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Yanting Wang, Michael S. Sharbaugh, Andrew D. Althouse, Suresh Mulukutla, Samir Saba IntroductionWith the recent publication of the negative DANISH trial, the mortality benefit of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has been put in question in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). Because a majority of patients in DANISH receive cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, we investigated in the present study the survival of recipients of CRT pacemakers (CRT-P) versus CRT ICDs (CRT-D) in a cohort of older (≥75 years) NICM patients at our institution.MethodsA total of 135 NICM patients with CRT device were identified (42 with CRT-P and 93 with CRT-D) and were followed to the endpoint of all-cause mortality. Overall survival was compared between the CRT-P and CRT-D groups with adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics.ResultsOver a median follow-up of 46 months from the time of CRT device implantation, there were 54 total deaths (40%): 14 in the CRT-P (33%) and 40 in the CRT-D (43%) groups. Overall, CRT-P recipients had similar unadjusted mortality compared to CRT-D recipients (hazard ratio [HR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56–1.93), and this remained unchanged after adjusting for unbalanced covariates (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.47–1.89) including left ventricular ejection fraction, used of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and the Charlson comorbidity index.ConclusionOur data support that in older NICM patients with CRT devices, the addition of ICD therapy does not improve survival.
       
  • Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy in the elderly: A shocking conundrum

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Deepak Padmanabhan, Samuel J. Asirvatham
       
  • Radiofrequency ablation of a middle cardiac vein inserted accessory
           pathway resulting in posterolateral coronary artery occlusion: A case
           report

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): José Nunes de Alencar Neto, Marina Vieira Nagahama, Saulo Rodrigo Ramalho de Moraes, Rafael Thiesen Magliari, Claudio Cirenza, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de Paola IntroductionPosteroseptal accessory pathways account for 34.5% of the total. Of these, 36% are located within the coronary sinus (CS). Its ablation requires technical alternatives to avoid damage to surrounding tissues, especially branches of the right coronary artery.Case reportA 22-year-old man was referred for re-do ablation of an accessory left septal-septal (PSE) pathway. Inside the CS, a precocity of 25 ms was found in the region of the median cardiac vein (VCM) (Fig. 2, panel A). Radiofrequency (RF) was administered with a non-irrigated bidirectional catheter within this vessel with resolution of the pre-excitation after 5 seconds. Immediately after, the patient presented chest pain and revealed a ST segment elevation of 1 mm in the inferior leads of ECG. Coronary angiography showed occlusion of the middle third of the posterior ventricular branch of the right coronary artery, with no signs of thrombus or dissection. Arterial angioplasty was performed with a bare metal stent, followed by TIMI III distal flow. Retrograde aortic mapping was performed and a precocity of 20 ms was found in the PSE region. The RF was applied followed by loss of pre-excitation after 1.5 seconds of application.ConclusionThis case demonstrates the risks involving delivering radiofrequency within the coronary sinus. We discuss some strategy that could help electrophysiologists in similar cases.
       
  • Acknowledgement to Referees 2018

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Venoplasty of a chronic venous occlusion with ‘diathermy’ for cardiac
           device lead placement

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Enes Elvin Gul, Reda Abuelatta, Sohaib Haseeb, Mohammad Melhem, Osama Al Amoudi Venous revascularization is an approach used in patients with total venous occlusion requiring venous access for cardiac device lead placement. Several percutaneous approaches to venous revascularization have been proposed. For the first time, we describe the case of a 69-year-old male with total venous occlusion who was successfully revascularized using a ‘diathermy’ technique.
       
  • Ablation of post-operative atrial flutter in the presence of interrupted
           IVC

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Pramod N. Pawar, Raja J. Selvaraj
       
  • Endocardial transvenous pacing in patients with surgically palliated
           univentricular hearts: A review on different techniques, problems and
           management

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Koneru Lakshmi Umamaheshwar, Arvind Sahadev Singh, Kothandam Sivakumar Fontan surgery and its modifications have improved survival in various forms of univentricular hearts. A regular atrial rhythm with atrioventricular synchrony is one of the most important prerequisite for the long-term effective functioning of this preload dependent circulation. A significant proportion of these survivors need various forms of pacing for bradyarrhythmias, often due to sinus nodal dysfunction and sometimes due to atrioventricular nodal block. The diversion of the venous flows away from the cardiac chambers following this surgery takes away the simpler endocardial pacing options through the superior vena cava. The added risks of thromboembolism associated with endocardial leads in systemic ventricles have made epicardial pacing as the procedure of choice. However challenges in epicardial pacing include surgical adhesions, increased pacing thresholds leading to early battery depletion and frequent lead fractures. When epicardial pacing fails, endocardial lead placement is equally challenging due to lack of access to the cardiac chambers in Fontan circulation. This review discusses the univentricular heart morphologies that may warrant pacing, issues about epicardial pacing, different techniques for endocardial pacing in patients with disconnected superior vena cava, pacing in different modifications of Fontan surgeries, issues of systemic thromboembolism with endocardial leads, atrioventricular valve regurgitation attributed to pacing leads and device infections. In a vast majority of patients following Glenn shunt and Senning surgery, an epicardial pacing and lead replacement is always feasible though technically very difficult. This article highlights the different options of transatrial and transventricular endocardial pacing.
       
  • Predictors of the paroxysmal atrial fibrillation recurrence following
           cryoballoon-based pulmonary vein isolation: Assessment of left atrial
           volume, left atrial volume index, galectin-3 level and
           neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio

    • Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2019Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 19, Issue 1Author(s): Aziz Inan Celik, Mehmet Kanadasi, Mesut Demir, Ali Deniz, Rabia Eker Akilli, Onur Sinan Deveci, Caglar Emre Cagliyan, Caglar Ozmen, Firat Ikikardes, Muhammet Bugra Karaaslan BackgroundCryoballoon-based pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF). Left atrial volume (LAV) and left atrial volume index (LAVi) are important parameters for long term success of PVI. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio) are biomarkers to demonstrate the cardiac fibrosis and remodelling.Methods50 patients with symptomatic PAF despite ≥1 antiarrhythmic drug(s), who underwent PVI were enrolled. LAV, LAVi, Gal-3 and N/L ratio were calculated before ablation and after ablation at 6 and 12 months. According to AF recurrence patients were divided into two groups, recurrent AF (n = 14) and non-recurrent AF (n = 36).ResultsIn both groups (recurrent and non-recurrent), initial and 12 months follow-up LAV values were 41.39 ± 18.13 ml and 53.24 ± 22.11 ml vs 48.85 ± 12.89 ml and 42.08 ± 13.85 (p = 0.037). LAVi were 20.9 ± 8.91 ml/m2 and 26.85 ± 11.28 ml/m2 vs 25.36 ± 6.21 and 21.87 ± 6.66 (p = 0.05) for recurrent and non-recurrent AF groups, respectively. In both groups PVI had no significant effect on serum Gal-3 levels and N/L ratio during 12 months follow-up. The comparison between two groups at the end of 12th month showed Gal-3 values of 6.66 ± 4.09 ng/ml and 6.02 ± 2.95 ng/ml (p = 0.516), N/L ratio values of 2.28 ± 1.07 103/μl and 1.98 ± 0.66 103/μl (p = 0.674).ConclusionLAV and LAVi are useful to predict the remodelling of the left atrium and AF recurrence after cryoballoon-based PVI. However, biomarkers such as Gal-3 and N/L ratio are not associated with AF recurrence.
       
  • An electrocardiographic series of flecainide toxicity

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Alexandra Smith, Gregg Gerasimon Anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) uniquely affect the various electrolyte channels in the heart and can slow conduction, increase refractoriness, and/or decrease automaticity with the goal of preventing tachyarrhythmias. Due to these properties, these same drugs are by nature pro-arrhythmic. Vaughan-Williams classification Ic AADs belong to a class of medications that inhibit sodium channels, leading to decreased conduction velocity of myocytes and Purkinje fibers as well as to decreased automaticity of pacemaker cells. When present in toxic amounts, this leads to classic changes on the electrocardiogram (ECG) that are harbingers of potentially lethal arrhythmias. Presented is a clinical series of ECGs that occurred in a patient who presented with flecainide toxicity.
       
  • Ventricular tachycardia prediction in patients with implantable
           cardioverter-defibrillators for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death
           

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Viktoria K. Lebedeva, Olga A. Klitcenko, Dmitry S. Lebedev, Tamara A. Lyubimtseva Clinical data analysis of 83 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for sudden cardiac death (SCD) primary prevention has been done. We revealed 5 parameters associated with the detection of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. These parameters formed the basis for constructing a logistic regression model. The model makes it possible to obtain the probability of occurrence of a specific event depending on the severity of the predictive parameters and the degree of its influence (risk of true ventricular arrhythmias detection). Estimating the potential risk of the life-threatening arrhythmias, individual programming options are required in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) to reduce the amount of unnecessary electrotherapy, as well as more accurate monitoring of the patient's drug therapy.
       
  • Implantation of a completely right sided subcutaneous
           cardioverter-defibrillator in a patient with situs inversus dextrocardia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Ariel González-Cordero, Javier López-Puebla, Hilton Franqui-Rivera Dextrocardia is a congenital anomaly where the heart is abnormally located in the right hemithorax. In these patients, the implementation of transvenous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (TV-ICD) can be technically challenging and pose a higher risk of complications than the general population. We present the case of a male patient that was successfully submitted to right-sided implantation of subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD) as an alternative to transvenous ICD (TV-ICD) for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. This option is not only feasible but may potentially be ideal for these patients, as it circumvents challenges and potential complications of TV-ICD insertion.
       
  • Left posterior fascicular block, state-of-the-art review: A 2018 update

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Andrés Ricardo Pérez-Riera, Raimundo Barbosa-Barros, Rodrigo Daminello-Raimundo, Luiz Carlos de Abreu, Joseane Elza Tonussi Mendes, Kjell Nikus We conducted a review of the literature regarding epidemiology, clinical, electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic aspects, classification, and differential diagnosis of left posterior fascicular block.Isolated left posterior fascicular block (LPFB) is an extremely rare finding both in the general population and in specific patient groups. In isolated LPFB 20% of the vectorcardiographic (VCG) QRS loop is located in the right inferior quadrant and when associated with right bundle branch block (RBBB) ≥40%.The diagnosis of LPFB should always consider the clinical aspects, because a definite diagnosis cannot be made in the presence of right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema), extensive lateral myocardial infarction (MI) or extremely vertical heart.Intermittent LPFBs are never complete blocks (transient or second degree LPFB) and even in the permanent ones, one cannot be sure that they are complete. When LPFB is associated with RBBB and acute inferior MI, PR interval prolongation is very frequent.
       
  • Correlation of pacing site in right ventricle with paced QRS complex
           duration

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Anunay Gupta, Neeraj Parakh, Raghav Bansal, Sunil K. Verma, Ambuj Roy, Gautam Sharma, Rakesh Yadav, Nitish Naik, Rajnish Juenja, Vinay K. Bahl BackgroundPacing from RV mid septum and outflow tract septum has been proposed as a more physiological site of pacing and narrower paced QRS complex duration. The paced QRS morphology and duration in different RV pacing sites is under continued discussion. Hence, this study was designed to address the correlation of pacing sites in right ventricle with paced QRS complex duration.MethodsTwo hundred fifty-two consecutive patients who underwent pacemaker implantation were enrolled. Baseline clinical characteristics were recorded for each patient. All patient underwent fluoroscopy, electrocardiogram and echocardiography post pacemaker implantation. Paced QRS duration was calculated from the leads with maximum QRS duration.ResultsMean paced QRS (pQRS) duration was significantly higher in apical septum group with a mean of 148.9 ± 14.8 m s compared to mid septum (139.6 ± 19.9 m s; p-value 0.003) and RVOT septum (139.6 ± 14.8 m s; p-value 0.002) groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between mid-septal and RVOT septal pQRS duration. On multivariate analysis, female gender, baseline QRS duration and RVOT septal pacing were the only predictors for narrow pQRS duration (
       
  • Contrasting electrical effects of apical vs non-apical right ventricular
           pacing

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Niraj Varma
       
  • Repeat ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation – Does adenosine play
           a role in predicting pulmonary vein reconnection patterns'

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): M. Kottmaier, F. Bourier, S. Wünscher, M. Kornmayer, V. Semmler, S. Lengauer, M. Telishevska, K. Koch-Büttner, E. Risse, S. Brooks, G. Hessling, I. Deisenhofer, T. Reents BackgroundPulmonary vein (PV) reconduction after PV isolation (PVI) unmasked by adenosine is associated with a higher risk for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) recurrence. It is unknown if the reconnected PVs after adenosine testing and immediate re-ablation can predict reconnection and reconnection patterns of PVs at repeat procedures. We assessed reconnection of PVs with and without dormant-conduction (DC) during the first and the repeat procedure.MethodsWe included 67 patients undergoing PVI for PAF and a second procedure for PAF recurrence. DC during adenosine administration at first procedure was seen in 31 patients (46%). 264 PVs were tested with adenosine; DC was found in 48 PVs (18%) and re-ablated during first procedure. During the second procedure, all PVs where checked for reconnection.ResultsFifty-eight patients (87%) showed PV reconnection during the second procedure. Reconnection was found in 152/264 PVs (58%). Of 216 PVs without reconnection during adenosine testing at the first ablation, 116 PVs (53.7%) showed reconnection at the repeat procedure. Overall, 14.9% of patients showed the same PV reconnection pattern in the first and second procedure, expected statistical probability of encountering the same reconnection pattern was only 6.6%(p = 0.012).ConclusionsIn repeat procedures PVs showed significantly more often the same reconnection pattern as during first procedure than statistically expected. More than 50% of initial isolated PVs without reconnection during adenosine testing showed a reconnection during repeat ablation. Techniques to detect susceptibility for PV re-connection like prolonged waiting-period should be applied. Elimination of DC should be expanded from segmental to circumferential re-isolation or vaster RF application.
       
  • Recovery of adenosine-sensitive dormant conduction is but one mechanism of
           pulmonary vein reconnection

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Dominik Linz, Kadhim Kadhim, Dennis Lau, Prashanthan Sanders
       
  • Intramural conduction system gradients and electrogram regularity during
           ventricular fibrillation

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Jason Tri, Roshini Asirvatham, Christopher V. DeSimone, Ammar M. Killu, Alan M. Sugrue, Scott H. Suddendorf, Dorothy J. Ladewig, Suraj Kapa, Paul A. Friedman, Christopher J. McLeod, Samuel J. Asirvatham IntroductionThe His-Purkinje system has been shown to harbor triggers for ventricular fibrillation (VF) initiation. However, the substrate responsible for VF maintenance remains elusive. We hypothesized that standard, electrode-based, point-to-point mapping would yield meaningful insight into site-specific patterns and organization which may shed light on the critical substrate for maintenance of VF.MethodsVF was induced under general anesthesia by direct current (DC) application to the right ventricle in 7 acute canines. A standard EPT Blazer mapping catheter (Boston Scientific, Natuck, MA) was used for mapping in conjunction with a Prucka recording system. We collected 30 consecutive electrograms at 24 distinct sites, confirmed by fluoroscopy and intracardiac echo. These sites included both endocardial and epicardial locations throughout the ventricles and conduction system.ResultsA total of 5040 individual data points were collected in 7 separate canine studies. During VF mapping, a transmural disparity was found between the epicardium (average cycle length [CL] of 1136 m s) and the endocardium (average CL of 123 m s) with a p value of
       
  • Mapping ventricular fibrillation ... another piece from the jigsaw

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Philippe Maury, Anne Rollin
       
  • Consensus statement for implantation and follow-up of cardiac implantable
           electronic devices in India

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Shomu Bohora, Amit Vora, Aditya Kapoor, Vanita Arora, Nitish Naik, Raja Selvaraj, Narayan Namboodiri, Anil Saxena, Ajay Naik, Balbir Singh, C. Narsimhan, Mohan Nair, T.S. Kler, Working committee, Indian Heart Rhythm Society (IHRS) Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) procedures are being done by many operators/centers and it is projected that this therapy will remarkably increase in India in the coming years. This document by IHRS, aims at guiding the Indian medical community in the appropriate use and method of implantation with emphasis on implanter training and center preparedness to deliver a safe and effective therapy to patients with cardiac rhythm disorders and heart failure.
       
  • IHRS President's page

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Amit Vora
       
  • Editing a medical journal: Decisions, dilemmas and dreams …

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Narayanan Namboodiri
       
  • Dr Rajnish Juneja – A life dedicated to the service of the unknown

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Nitish Naik, Gautam Sharma, D. Prabhakaran
       
  • Positional pseudo-alternating bundle-branch-block on implantable loop
           recorder electrogram

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Tilman Perrin, Michael Kühne, Jan Novak
       
  • An addition to the differential diagnosis of AV Wenckebach in the
           His-bundle pacing era!

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Deep Chandh Raja, Muthuseenivasan Ranganathan, Jaya Pradhap Velu, Ulhas M. Pandurangi
       
  • Usefulness of a lead delivery system consisting of a fixed-shaped sheath
           and a lumenless bipolar lead in a patient with absent right and persistent
           left superior vena cava: A case report

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Kenichi Sasaki, Sakura Tateishi, Chiharu Sawada We report the case of an 84-year-old female with symptomatic bradycardia due to a complete atrioventricular block, who carried absent right and persistent left superior vena cava (SVC). Implantation of a pacing lead, particularly within the right ventricle (RV) in a patient with this venous anomaly is accompanied by technical difficulties. However, the apparatus consisting of a fixed-curve sheath (Model C315-S10, Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) and a lumenless fixed-screw pacing lead (Model 3830, Medtronic), allowed a rapid delivery into the RV without any complications. By rotating the Model C315-S10 sheath in the counterclockwise direction in the right atrium, its tip faced the tricuspid orifice, advanced across the tricuspid valve and confronted the RV lower septum near the apex. Then the RV-lead was fixed with acceptable pacing and sensing parameters. Utilizing a lumenless pacing lead and a preformed sheath to deliver it is a novel approach that could be helpful in pacemaker implantation in patients with absent right and persistent left SVC.
       
  • Sinus node modification utilising a novel multi electrode catheter with
           orthogonal wavefront mapping

    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Jonathan M. Behar, Emily Keating, Martin Lowe
       
  • Trends in implantable cardioverter defibrillator and cardiac
           resynchronisation therapy lead parameters for patients with arrhythmogenic
           and dilated cardiomyopathies

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2018Source: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology JournalAuthor(s): Jem D. Lane, Sarah Whittaker-Axon, Richard J. Schilling, Martin D. Lowe BackgroundImplantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) lead parameters may deteriorate due to right ventricular (RV) disease such as arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), with implications for safe delivery of therapies. We compared ICD and CRT-D (cardiac resynchronisation therapy-defibrillator) lead parameters in patients with ARVC and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).MethodsRV lead sensing (R wave amplitude) and pacing (threshold and amplitude-pulse width product (APWP)), left ventricular (LV) pacing (APWP), and imaging parameter trends were assessed in 18 patients with ARVC and 18 with DCM.ResultsR wave amplitude did not change significantly over time in either group (over 5 years, ARVC -0.4 mV, 95% CI -3.8–3.0 mV; DCM -1.8 mV, 95% CI -5.0–1.3 mV). Within ARVC group, divergent trends were seen according to lead position. DCM patients experienced an increase in RV lead threshold (+1.1 V over 5 years, 95% CI + 0.5 to +1.7 V) and RV APWP (+0.48 Vms over 5 years, 95% CI + 0.24 to +0.71 Vms); ARVC patients had no change. ARVC patients had a higher LVEF at baseline than DCM patients (52 vs 20%, p 
       
 
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