Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8447 journals)
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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (330 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 330 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal  
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AORTA     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access  
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Cardiology Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Interventional Cardiology Review     Full-text available via subscription  
JACC : Basic to Translational Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JACC : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
JACC : Heart Failure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
JMIR Cardio     Open Access  
Jornal Vascular Brasileiro     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Arrhythmia     Open Access  
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
JACC : Cardiovascular Imaging
Journal Prestige (SJR): 4.66
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1936-878X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Long-Term LV Characterization Using CMR in Patients With Spontaneous
           Coronary Artery Dissection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Felipe Diez-Delhoyo, Ricardo Sanz-Ruiz, Esther Perez-David, Enrique Gutierrez-Ibañes, Hugo González-Saldivar, Maria Jesus Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria Eugenia Vazquez-Alvarez, Ana Gonzalez-Mansilla, Javier Soriano, Jose Angel Quiroz-Burgos, Jaime Elizaga, Raquel Prieto-Arevalo, Maria Angeles Espinosa, Pablo Martínez-Legazpi, Javier Bermejo, Francisco Fernandez-Aviles
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Value of Late Gadolinium Enhancement Imaging in Diagnosis of Myocardial
           Infarction and Unobstructed Coronary Arteries ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Raymond Y. Kwong, Afshin Farzaneh-FarCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Post-Systolic Shortening by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography Predicts
           Cardiac Events in Type 2 Diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Philip Brainin, Magnus T. Jensen, Tor Biering-Sørensen, Rasmus Møgelvang, Thomas Fritz-Hansen, Tina Vilsbøll, Peter Rossing, Peter Godsk Jørgensen
       
  • Prognostic Value of Stress Dynamic Computed Tomography Perfusion With
           Computed Tomography Delayed Enhancement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Satoshi Nakamura, Kakuya Kitagawa, Yoshitaka Goto, Masafumi Takafuji, Shiro Nakamori, Tairo Kurita, Kaoru Dohi, Hajime Sakuma ObjectivesThis study sought to evaluate the prognostic value of stress dynamic computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) with CT delayed enhancement (CTDE) in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) and in subgroups of patients with stent, heavy calcification, or stenosis.BackgroundThe prognostic value of stress dynamic CTP with CTDE is unknown.MethodsParticipants were 540 patients with suspected or known CAD. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) consisted of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or hospitalization for congestive heart failure. Ischemic score was calculated by scoring the reduction of normalized myocardial blood flow in 16 segments excluding areas of myocardial scarring. Ischemic perfusion defect (IPD) was defined as Ischemic score ≥4. Scar score was also calculated by scoring the transmural extent of scarring in each segment on CTDE.ResultsDuring a median follow-up of 2.9 years, 43 MACEs occurred. By adding IPD to obstructive CAD (≥50% stenosis) on coronary CT angiography, the concordance index for predicting MACEs increased from 0.73 to 0.82 in patients with suspected CAD (p = 0.028) and from 0.61 to 0.73 in patients with known CAD (p = 0.004). IPD and scar score of ≥4 were independent predictors when adjusted for each other in patients with suspected (adjusted hazard ratios: 7.5 [p 
       
  • Prospective CMR Survey in Children With Thalassemia Major: Insights From a
           National Network
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Alessia Pepe, Antonella Meloni, Aldo Filosa, Laura Pistoia, Zelia Borsellino, Domenico Giuseppe D’Ascola, Roberto Lisi, Maria Caterina Putti, Massimo Allò, Maria Rita Gamberini, Antonella Quarta, Carmelo Fidone, Tommaso Casini, Gennaro Restaino, Massimo Midiri, Maurizio Mangione, Vincenzo Positano, Maddalena Casale
       
  • Feasibility of Computed Tomography Perfusion for Detection of Cardiac
           Allograft Rejection Following Heart Transplantation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Anna Oleksiak, Małgorzata Sobieszczańska-Małek, Mariusz Kruk, Tomasz Zieliński, Anna Drohomirecka, Krzysztof Komuda, Małgorzata Karczmarz, Mariusz Kuśmierczyk, Jacek Kądziela, Marcin Demkow, Cezary Kępka
       
  • Cardiac Amyloidosis: Mimics, Multimodality Imaging Diagnosis, and
           Treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Afsoon Fazlinezhad, Tasneem Z. Naqvi
       
  • Myocardial Evaluation of Post-Preeclamptic Women by CMR: Is Early Risk
           Stratification Possible'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Anna Birukov, Stephanie Wiesemann, Michaela Golic, Andras Balogh, Lajos Marko, Natalia Rakova, Nicola Wilck, Edyta Blaszczyk, Carolin Lim, Sara Weiss, Kristin Kräker, Nadine Haase, Alina Frolova, Jan Stener Jørgensen, Steffen Daub, Dominik N. Müller, Florian Herse, Jeanette Schulz-Menger, Ralf Dechend
       
  • CMR for Identifying the Substrate of Ventricular Arrhythmia in Patients
           With Normal Echocardiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Daniele Andreini, Antonio Dello Russo, Gianluca Pontone, Saima Mushtaq, Edoardo Conte, Marco Perchinunno, Marco Guglielmo, Ana Coutinho Santos, Marco Magatelli, Andrea Baggiano, Simone Zanchi, Eleonora Melotti, Laura Fusini, Paola Gripari, Michela Casella, Corrado Carbucicchio, Stefania Riva, Gaetano Fassini, Letizia Li Piani, Cesare Fiorentini ObjectivesThis study sought to determine whether cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may identify structural heart disease (SHD) in patients with ventricular arrhythmia who had echocardiography ruled out pathological findings.BackgroundApproximately one-half of sudden cardiac deaths are attributable to malignant VA. Echocardiography is commonly used to identify SHD that is the most frequent substrate of VA.MethodsA single-center prospective study was conducted in consecutive patients with significant VA, categorized as>1,000 but 
       
  • Full Issue PDF
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s):
       
  • Aortic Valve Area in Aortic Stenosis: A Network Meta-Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Lisa Q. Rong, Irbaz Hameed, Antonino Di Franco, Mohamed Rahouma, Faiza M. Khan, Michelle Demetres, Jiwon Kim, Jonathan W. Weinsaft, Richard B. Devereux, Mario Gaudino
       
  • Evaluation of Disease Progression in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: The
           Change of Echocardiographic Deformation Characteristics Over Time
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Karim Taha, Thomas P. Mast, Maarten J. Cramer, Jeroen F. van der Heijden, Folkert W. Asselbergs, Pieter A. Doevendans, Arco J. Teske
       
  • Advanced Imaging Insights in Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Rebecca K. Hughes, Kristopher D. Knott, James Malcolmson, João B. Augusto, Peter Kellman, James C. Moon, Gabriella Captur
       
  • Optimizing the Assessment of Patient Clinical Risk at the Time of Cardiac
           Stress Testing
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Alan Rozanski, Daniel Berman Due to a marked temporal decline in inducible myocardial ischemia over recent decades, most diagnostic patients now referred for cardiac stress testing have nonischemic studies. Among nonischemic patients, however, long-term risk is heterogeneous and highly influenced by a variety of clinical parameters. Herein, we review 8 factors that can govern long-term clinical risk: coronary risk factor burden; patient symptoms; exercise capacity and exercise test responses; the need for pharmacologic stress testing; autonomic function; musculoskeletal status; subclinical atherosclerosis; and psychosocial risk. To capture the clinical benefit provided by both assessing myocardial ischemia and these additional parameters, the authors propose that a cardiac stress tests report have an additional component beyond statements as to the likelihood of obstructive coronary artery disease and/or magnitude of ischemia. This added component could be a comment section designed to make referring physicians aware of aspects of long-term risk that may influence clinical management and potentially lead to changes in the intensity of risk factor management, frequency of follow-up, need for further testing, or other management decisions. In this manner, the increasingly frequent normal stress test result might more commonly influence treatment recommendations and even patient behavior, thus leading to improvement in patient outcomes even in the setting of normal stress test results.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Echocardiographic Prediction of Ventricular Arrhythmias: The Dispersion in
           Patients With Moderate Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Daniel A. MorrisCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Advanced Echocardiographic Imaging for Prediction of SCD in Moderate and
           Severe LV Systolic Function
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Rebecca Perry, Sanjana Patil, Christian Marx, Matthew Horsfall, Derek P. Chew, Karthigesh Sree Raman, Noor Darinah Mohd Daril, Kathryn Tiver, Majo X. Joseph, Anand N. Ganesan, Andrew McGavigan, Gaetano Nucifora, Joseph B. Selvanayagam ObjectivesThis study sought to determine the long-term prognostic value of myocardial deformation imaging by echocardiography in risk stratification of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and malignant ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) in a large consecutive cohort of patients with left ventricular (LV) systolic impairment, irrespective of its etiology.BackgroundLeft ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is limited for prediction of SCD. Echocardiographic strain-derived mechanical dispersion (MD) and global longitudinal strain (GLS) has been linked to VA and SCD. However, due to low event rates, the role of these parameters has not been fully elucidated.MethodsConsecutive clinically stable patients who underwent echocardiographic study performed in an outpatient setting from 2008 to 2014 with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% were included in the study. Strain analysis was performed in which the LV was separated into 16 segments for regional analysis. Mechanical dispersion (MD) was calculated as the SD of the time to peak of each of the 16 regions. Outcome data were obtained from medical records.ResultsA total of 939 patients were included in the study, with median LVEF of 37% (interquartile range 30% to 42%). At follow-up (91.4 ± 23.4 months), 96 VA events had occurred. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only MD ≥75 ms (hazard ratio: 9.45; 95% confidence interval: 4.75 to 18.81; p 
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Afterload and Fibrosis: Aortic Stenosis Co-Conspirators ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Nathaniel ReichekCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Relative Contribution of Afterload and Interstitial Fibrosis to Myocardial
           Function in Severe Aortic Stenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Alisson Slimani, Julie Melchior, Christophe de Meester, Sophie Pierard, Clotilde Roy, Mihaela Amzulescu, Caroline Bouzin, Frédéric Maes, Agnès Pasquet, Anne-Catherine Pouleur, David Vancraeynest, Bernhard Gerber, Gebrine El Khoury, Jean-Louis Vanoverschelde ObjectivesThe present study aimed at investigating the respective contribution of afterload and myocardial fibrosis to pre- and post-operative left ventricular (LV) function by using stress−strain relationships.BackgroundSeparating the effect of myocardial dysfunction and afterload on pump performance has important implications for the prognosis and management of patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS).MethodsA total of 101 patients with isolated severe AS (57% men; mean age 71 years) and 75 healthy control subjects underwent resting 2-dimensional and speckle-tracking echocardiography to measure global circumferential strain (GCS) and global longitudinal strain (GLS), as well as end-systolic wall stress (ESWS). Normal stress−strain relationships were constructed using control subjects’ data and fitted to linear regression. End-systolic stress−strain indexes (the number of SDs from the mean regression line) were used as an afterload-independent index of myocardial function and compared with myocardial fibrosis, measured on transmural myocardial biopsies harvested at the time of surgery.ResultsGCS and GLS were afterload-dependent in both control subjects and patients. The GLS-ESWS relationship of patients was shifted downward compared with control subjects. Patients with reduced pre-operative end-systolic stress−strain indexes exhibited larger degrees of interstitial myocardial fibrosis than patients without (3.8 ± 2.9% vs. 8.3 ± 6.3%, p 
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Timing of Surgery for Primary MR: We’re Not There Yet But We’re
           Getting Closer ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Blase A. CarabelloCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Prognostic Value of Global Longitudinal Strain and Etiology After Surgery
           for Primary Mitral Regurgitation
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Yasmine L. Hiemstra, Anton Tomsic, Suzanne E. van Wijngaarden, Meindert Palmen, Robert J.M. Klautz, Jeroen J. Bax, Victoria Delgado, Nina Ajmone Marsan ObjectivesThis study sought to investigate whether left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) is associated with long-term outcome after mitral valve (MV) surgery for primary mitral regurgitation (MR) and assess the differences in outcome according to MR etiology: Barlow’s disease (BD), fibroelastic deficiency (FED), and forme fruste (FF).BackgroundAppropriate timing of MV surgery for primary MR is still challenging and may differ according to the etiology. In these patients, LV-GLS has been proposed as more sensitive measure to detect subtle LV dysfunction as compared with LV ejection fraction.MethodsEchocardiography was performed in 593 patients (64% men, age 65 ± 12 years) with severe primary MR who underwent MV surgery, including assessment of LV-GLS. The etiology (BD, FED, or FF) was defined based on surgical observation. During follow-up, primary endpoint was all-cause mortality and a secondary endpoint included cardiovascular death, heart failure hospitalizations, and cerebrovascular accidents.ResultsDuring a median follow-up of 6.4 (interquartile range: 3.6 to 10.4) years, 146 patients died (16 within 30 days after surgery), 46 patients were hospitalized for heart failure, and 13 patients had a cerebrovascular accident. Age (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05 to 1.11; p 
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Disparity of Dispersion in Predicting Ventricular Arrhythmias ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Allan L. Klein, Zoran B. Popović, Michael ChetritCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Prediction of Ventricular Arrhythmias With Left Ventricular Mechanical
           Dispersion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Hiroshi Kawakami, Nitesh Nerlekar, Kristina H. Haugaa, Thor Edvardsen, Thomas H. Marwick ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to assess the association between left ventricular mechanical dispersion (LVMD) and the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs).BackgroundRecent, mainly single-center, studies have demonstrated that LVMD assessed using speckle tracking might be a powerful marker in risk stratification for VA. A systematic review and meta-analysis provides a means of understanding the prognostic value of this parameter, relative to other parameters, the most appropriate cutoff for designating risk.MethodsA systemic review of studies reporting the predictive value of LVMD for VA was undertaken from a search of MEDLINE and Embase. VA events were defined as sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrest, documented ventricular tachyarrhythmia, and appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy. Hazard ratios were extracted from univariate and multivariate models reporting on the association of LVMD and VA and described as pooled estimates with 95% confidence intervals. In a meta-analysis, the predictive value of LVMD was compared with that of left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain.ResultsAmong 3,198 patients in 12 published studies, 387 (12%) had VA events over follow-up ranging from 17 to 70 months. Patients with VAs had greater LVMD than those without (weighted mean difference −20.3 ms; 95% confidence interval: −27.3 to −13.2; p 
       
  • ∗&rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">The Value of Strain in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Screening∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Sanjay K. Prasad, Upasana TayalCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Value of Speckle Tracking–Based Deformation Analysis in Screening
           Relatives of Patients With Asymptomatic Dilated Cardiomyopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Job A.J. Verdonschot, Jort J. Merken, Hans-Peter Brunner-La Rocca, Mark R. Hazebroek, Casper G.M.J. Eurlings, Eline Thijssen, Ping Wang, Jerremy Weerts, Vanessa van Empel, Georg Schummers, Marcus Schreckenberg, Arthur van den Wijngaard, Joost Lumens, Han G. Brunner, Stephane R.B. Heymans, Ingrid P.C. Krapels, Christian Knackstedt ObjectivesThis study sought to investigate the prevalence of systolic dysfunction using global longitudinal strain (GLS) and its prognostic value in relatives of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients that had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF).BackgroundDCM relatives are advised to undergo cardiac assessment including echocardiography, irrespective of the genetic status of the index patient. Even though LVEF is normal, the question remains whether this indicates absence of disease or simply normal cardiac volumes. GLS may provide additional information regarding (sub)clinical cardiac abnormalities and thus allow earlier disease detection.MethodsA total of 251 DCM relatives and 251 control subjects with a normal LVEF (≥55%) were screened. Automated software measured the GLS on echocardiographic 2-, 3-, and 4-chamber views. The cutoff value for abnormal strain was>−21.5. Median follow-up was 40 months (interquartile range: 5 to 80 months). Primary outcome was the combination of death and cardiac hospitalization.ResultsA total of 120 relatives and 83 control subjects showed abnormal GLS (48% vs. 33%, respectively; p 
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Myocardial Strain, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, and the Expanding Spectrum
           of Stress-Induced Cardiomyopathy ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Federico M. Asch, Diego MedvedofskyCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Neurocardiac Injury Assessed by Strain Imaging Is Associated With
           In-Hospital Mortality in Patients With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Nobuyuki Kagiyama, Masataka Sugahara, Elizabeth A. Crago, Zhi Qi, Theodore F. Lagattuta, Khalil M. Yousef, Robert M. Friedlander, Marilyn T. Hravnak, John Gorcsan ObjectivesThis study sought to test the hypothesis that speckle tracking strain echocardiography can quantify neurocardiac injuries in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which is associated with worse clinical outcome.BackgroundSAH may be a life-threatening disease associated with variable degrees of neurocardiac injury. Strain imaging has the potential to detect subtle myocardial dysfunction which is additive to conventional measurements.MethodsA total of 255 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled with acute SAH, who were admitted to the intensive care unit with echocardiography studies within 72 h. Left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) strains were acquired from standard apical views. Abnormal LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) and RV free-wall strain were pre-defined as 
       
  • Full Issue PDF
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s):
       
  • Substrate for Ventricular Arrhythmia: To See Is to Know'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Subha V. Raman, Y. Chandrashekhar
       
  • The Authors Reply:
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Amardeep Ghosh Dastidar, Chiara Bucciarelli-Ducci
       
  • High Mortality in the Group of Takotsubo Syndrome in Patients With
           “MINOCA”: So High, A Clarification
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Shams Y-Hassan
       
  • Relationship of Degree of Systolic Dysfunction to Variations in Exercise
           Capacity and Hemodynamic Status in HFpEF
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Shane Nanayakkara, Fernando Telles, Anna L. Beale, Shona Evans, Donna Vizi, Thomas H. Marwick, David M. Kaye
       
  • Out of Focus: Increase of the Excess Longitudinal Range in Coronary
           Computed Tomographic Angiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Thomas J. Stocker, Mathias Heckner, Jonathon Leipsic, Martin Hadamitzky, Simon Deseive, Stephan Achenbach, Marcus Y. Chen, Ronen Rubinshtein, Jeroen J. Bax, Marcio S. Bittencourt, Uday M. Jadhav, Thomas Schlosser, Subramaniyan Ramanathan, Jeannie H. Yu, Steffen Massberg, Jörg Hausleiter
       
  • Evaluation of a Deep Learning–Based Automated CT Coronary Artery
           Calcium Scoring Algorithm
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Simon S. Martin, Marly van Assen, Saikiran Rapaka, H. Todd Hudson, Andreas M. Fischer, Akos Varga-Szemes, Pooyan Sahbaee, Chris Schwemmer, Mehmet A. Gulsun, Serkan Cimen, Puneet Sharma, Thomas J. Vogl, U. Joseph Schoepf
       
  • Prevalence and Prognosis of High-Risk Plaque on Coronary CT Angiography in
           Hospitalized Patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Yong Yang, Jageshwar Prasad Shah, Hanjiang Zeng, Jianqun Yu, Abdullah Hagar, Vivendar Sihag, Mao Chen
       
  • High-Definition IVUS Versus OCT to Assess Coronary Artery Disease and
           Results of Stent Implantation
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Marcos Garcia-Guimaraes, Paula Antuña, Francisco De la Cuerda, Ramón Maruri-Sanchez, Javier Cuesta, Teresa Bastante, Fernando Rivero, Fernando Alfonso
       
  • DE-MDCT Predicts Regional Functional Improvement After Reperfused AMI
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Hiroaki Watabe, Akira Sato, Akinori Sugano, Yui Takaiwa, Tomohiko Harunari, Hideaki Aihara, Yuko Fumikura, Tomoya Hoshi, Kentaro Yoshida, Hidetaka Nishina, Kazushi Maruo, Noriyuki Takeyasu, Yuichi Noguchi, Kazutaka Aonuma, Masaki Ieda
       
  • Not All Plaque Erosions Are Equal: Novel Insights From 1,660 Patients With
           STEMI: A Clinical, Angiographic, and Intravascular OCT Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Jiannan Dai, Chao Fang, Shaotao Zhang, Jingbo Hou, Lei Xing, Lulu Li, Yini Wang, Jifei Wang, Yidan Wang, Yingfeng Tu, Xiling Zhang, Huimin Liu, Maoen Xu, Xuefeng Ren, Lijia Ma, Huai Yu, Guo Wei, Shaosong Zhang, Gary S. Mintz, Bo Yu
       
  • Coronary Access After Repeated Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: A
           Glimpse Into the Future
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Nicola Buzzatti, Vittorio Romano, Ole De Backer, Lars Soendergaard, Liesbeth Rosseel, Pal Maurovich-Horvat, Julia Karady, Bela Merkely, Stefania Ruggeri, Bernard Prendergast, Michele De Bonis, Antonio Colombo, Matteo Montorfano, Azeem LatibGraphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Myocarditis in Athletes Is a Challenge: Diagnosis, Risk Stratification,
           and Uncertainties
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Christian Eichhorn, Loïc Bière, Frédéric Schnell, Christian Schmied, Matthias Wilhelm, Raymond Y. Kwong, Christoph Gräni Presentation of myocarditis in athletes is heterogeneous and establishing the diagnosis is challenging with no current uniform clinical gold standard. The combined information from symptoms, electrocardiography, laboratory testing, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and in certain cases endomyocardial biopsy helps to establish the diagnosis. Most patients with myocarditis recover spontaneously; however, athletes may be at higher risk of adverse cardiac events. Based on scarce evidence and mainly autopsy studies and expert’s opinions, current recommendations generally advise abstinence from competitive sports ranging from a minimum of 3 to 6 months. However, the dilemma poses that (un)necessary prolonged disqualification of athletes to avoid adverse cardiac events can cause considerable disruption to training schedules and tournament preparation and lead to a decline in performance and ability to compete. Therefore, better risk stratification tools are imperatively needed. Using latest available data, this review contrasts existing recommendations and presents a new proposed diagnostic flowchart putting a greater focus on the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in athletes with suspected myocarditis. This may enable cardiac caregivers to counsel athletes with suspected myocarditis more systematically and furthermore allow for pooling of more unified data. To modify recommendations regarding sports behavior in athletes with myocarditis, evidence, based on large multicenter registries including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy, is needed. In the future, physicians might rely on combined novel risk stratification methods, by implementing both noninvasive and invasive tissue characterization methods.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Management of Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis: Evolving Concepts in
           Timing of Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Brian R. Lindman, Marc R. Dweck, Patrizio Lancellotti, Philippe Généreux, Luc A. Piérard, Patrick T. O’Gara, Robert O. Bonow New insights into the pathophysiology and natural history of patients with aortic stenosis, coupled with advances in diagnostic imaging and the dramatic evolution of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, are fueling intense interest in the management of asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis. An intervention that is less invasive than surgery could conceivably justify pre-emptive transcatheter aortic valve replacement in subsets of patients, rather than waiting for the emergence of early symptoms to trigger valve intervention. Clinical experience has shown that symptoms can be challenging to ascertain in many sedentary, deconditioned, and/or elderly patients. Evolving data based on imaging and biomarker evidence of adverse ventricular remodeling, hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis may radically transform existing clinical decision paradigms. Clinical trials currently enrolling asymptomatic patients have the potential to change practice patterns and lower the threshold for intervention.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Multiorgan Imaging of Comorbidity and Cardiovascular Risk ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Matthias NahrendorfCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Chronic Stress-Related Neural Activity Associates With Subclinical
           Cardiovascular Disease in Psoriasis: A Prospective Cohort Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Aditya Goyal, Amit K. Dey, Abhishek Chaturvedi, Youssef A. Elnabawi, Tsion M. Aberra, Jonathan H. Chung, Agastya D. Belur, Jacob W. Groenendyk, Joseph B. Lerman, Joshua P. Rivers, Justin A. Rodante, Charlotte L. Harrington, Nevin J. Varghese, Gregory E. Sanda, Yvonne Baumer, Alexander V. Sorokin, Heather L. Teague, Leonard D. Genovese, Balaji Natarajan, Aditya A. Joshi ObjectivesThis study hypothesized that there is an association between chronic stress (as indexed by resting amygdalar activity [AmygA]), hematopoietic system activity (HMPA), and subclinical cardiovascular indexes (aortic vascular inflammation [VI] and noncalcified coronary plaque burden [NCB]) in psoriasis (PSO). The study also hypothesized that treatment of PSO would improve these parameters.BackgroundPSO is a stress-related chronic inflammatory condition that is associated with increased prevalence of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD). In individuals without PSO, stress has been linked to CVD through a serial biological pathway that involves the amygdala, hematopoietic tissues, and atherosclerotic plaques.MethodsA total of 164 consecutive patients with PSO and 47 healthy volunteers underwent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans for assessment of AmygA, HMPA, and VI, as well as coronary computed tomography angiography scans for quantifying NCB. Furthermore, a consecutive subset of 30 patients with severe PSO (Psoriasis Area Severity Index Score>10) were followed at 1 year to assess the relationship between skin disease improvement and AmygA, HMPA, VI, and NCB.ResultsThe PSO cohort was middle-aged (mean age: 50 years), had low cardiovascular risk (Framingham risk score: median: 3) and had mild to moderate PSO activity (median Psoriasis Area Severity Index Score: 5.6). AmygA was higher in patients with PSO compared to volunteer participants. AmygA was associated with HMPA (bone marrow activity: β = 0.20, p = 0.01) and subclinical CVD (VI: β = 0.31, p < 0.001; NCB: β = 0.27, p < 0.001) The AmygA−CVD association was in part mediated by HMPA (VI: 20.9%, NCB: 36.7%). Following 1 year of PSO treatment in those with severe disease, improvement in skin disease was accompanied by a reduction in AmygA, bone marrow activity, and VI, with no progression of NCB.ConclusionsIn PSO, a chronic inflammatory disease state, AmygA, which is a manifestation of chronic stress, substantially contributes to the risk of subclinical CVD. Additional studies that use psychometric measures of stress are required to explore therapeutic impact.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">What’s in Your Wallet' ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Udo HoffmannCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Clinical Use of CT-Derived Fractional Flow Reserve in the Emergency
           Department
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Kavitha M. Chinnaiyan, Robert D. Safian, Michael L. Gallagher, Julie George, Simon R. Dixon, Abhay N. Bilolikar, Amr E. Abbas, Mazen Shoukfeh, Marc Brodsky, James Stewart, Elvis Cami, David Forst, Steven Timmis, Jason Crile, Gilbert L. Raff ObjectivesThis study sought to examine the feasibility, safety, clinical outcomes, and costs associated with computed tomography–derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT) in acute chest pain (ACP) patients in a coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA)–based triage program.BackgroundFFRCT is useful in determining lesion-specific ischemia in patients with stable ischemic heart disease, but its utility in ACP has not been studied.MethodsACP patients with no known coronary artery disease undergoing coronary CTA and coronary CTA with FFRCT were studied. FFRCT ≤0.80 was considered positive for hemodynamically significant stenosis.ResultsAmong 555 patients, 297 underwent coronary CTA and FFRCT (196 negative, 101 positive), whereas 258 had coronary CTA only. The rejection rate for FFRCT was 1.6%. At 90 days, there was no difference in major adverse cardiac events (including death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and unexpected revascularization after the index visit) between the coronary CTA and FFRCT groups (4.3% vs. 2.7%; p = 0.310). Diagnostic failure, defined as discordance between the coronary CTA or FFRCT results with invasive findings, did not differ between the groups (1.9% vs. 1.68%; p = NS). No deaths or myocardial infarction occurred with negative FFRCT when revascularization was deferred. Negative FFRCT was associated with higher nonobstructive disease on invasive coronary angiography (56.5%) than positive FFRCT (8.0%) and coronary CTA (22.9%) (p 
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Guidelines' ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Michael K. Cheezum, Nishant R. ShahCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Reducing Radiation Dose in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: We
           Are Not There Yet ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Troy M. LaBountyCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Getting Shorter Predicts Living Longer: The Remarkable Success of
           Ventricular Strain as a Prognostic Marker
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 2Author(s): Frank A. Flachskampf, Y. Chandrashekhar
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Intraplaque Hemorrhage as a Marker of Stroke Risk ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Mohammad Alkhalil, Robin P. ChoudhuryCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Prediction of Stroke Risk by Detection of Hemorrhage in Carotid Plaques:
           Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient Data
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Andreas Schindler, Regina Schinner, Nishaf Altaf, Akram A. Hosseini, Richard J. Simpson, Lorena Esposito-Bauer, Navneet Singh, Robert M. Kwee, Yoshitaka Kurosaki, Sen Yamagata, Kazumichi Yoshida, Susumu Miyamoto, Robert Maggisano, Alan R. Moody, Holger Poppert, M. Eline Kooi, Dorothee P. Auer, Leo H. Bonati, Tobias Saam ObjectivesThe goal of this study was to compare the risk of stroke between patients with carotid artery disease with and without the presence of intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) on magnetic resonance imaging.BackgroundIPH in carotid stenosis increases the risk of cerebrovascular events. Uncertainty remains whether risk of stroke alone is increased and whether stroke is predicted independently of known risk factors.MethodsData were pooled from 7 cohort studies including 560 patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis and 136 patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Hazards of ipsilateral ischemic stroke (primary outcome) were compared between patients with and without IPH, adjusted for clinical risk factors.ResultsIPH was present in 51.6% of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis and 29.4% of patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. During 1,121 observed person-years, 66 ipsilateral strokes occurred. Presence of IPH at baseline increased the risk of ipsilateral stroke both in symptomatic (hazard ratio [HR]: 10.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.6 to 22.5) and asymptomatic (HR: 7.9; 95% CI: 1.3 to 47.6) patients. Among patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis, annualized event rates of ipsilateral stroke in those with IPH versus those without IPH were 9.0% versus 0.7% (
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Imaging Fibrosis in Aortic Stenosis: Coming of Age' ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Gerry P. McCann, Anvesha SinghCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • The Prognostic Role of Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Aortic Stenosis: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Christos A. Papanastasiou, Damianos G. Kokkinidis, Polydoros N. Kampaktsis, Iosif Bikakis, Daniela K. Cunha, Evangelos K. Oikonomou, John P. Greenwood, Mario J. Garcia, Theodoros D. Karamitsos ObjectivesThe aim of this systematic review was to explore the prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS).BackgroundMyocardial fibrosis is a common feature of many cardiac diseases. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has the ability to noninvasively detect regional fibrosis by using the LGE technique. Several studies have explored whether LGE is associated with adverse outcome in patients with AS.MethodsElectronic databases were searched to identify studies investigating the ability of LGE to predict all-cause mortality in patients with AS. A random effects model meta-analysis was conducted. Heterogeneity was assessed with the I2 statistic.ResultsSix studies comprising 1,151 patients met our inclusion criteria. LGE was present in 49.1% of patients with AS. In the pooled analysis, LGE was found to be a strong univariate predictor of all-cause mortality (pooled unadjusted odds ratio: 2.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.83 to 3.57; I2 = 0%). Four of the included studies reported adjusted hazard ratios for mortality. LGE was independently associated with mortality, even after adjusting for baseline characteristics (pooled adjusted hazard ratio: 2.50; 95% confidence interval: 1.64 to 3.83; I2 = 0%).ConclusionsFibrosis on LGE-CMR is a powerful predictor of all-cause mortality in patients with AS and may serve as a novel marker for risk stratification. Future studies should explore whether LGE-CMR can also be used to optimize timing of AS-related interventions.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">(Deep) Learning Your Left From Your Right ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Paul LeesonCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • A Deep Learning Approach for Assessment of Regional Wall
           Motion Abnormality From Echocardiographic Images
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Kenya Kusunose, Takashi Abe, Akihiro Haga, Daiju Fukuda, Hirotsugu Yamada, Masafumi Harada, Masataka Sata ObjectivesThis study investigated whether a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) could provide improved detection of regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMAs) and differentiate among groups of coronary infarction territories from conventional 2-dimensional echocardiographic images compared with that of cardiologists, sonographers, and resident readers.BackgroundAn effective intervention for reduction of misreading of RWMAs is needed. The hypothesis was that a DCNN trained using echocardiographic images would provide improved detection of RWMAs in the clinical setting.MethodsA total of 300 patients with a history of myocardial infarction were enrolled. From this cohort, 3 groups of 100 patients each had infarctions of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, the left circumflex (LCX) branch, and the right coronary artery (RCA). A total of 100 age-matched control patients with normal wall motion were selected from a database. Each case contained cardiac ultrasonographs from short-axis views at end-diastolic, mid-systolic, and end-systolic phases. After the DCNN underwent 100 steps of training, diagnostic accuracies were calculated from the test set. Independently, 10 versions of the same model were trained, and ensemble predictions were performed using those versions.ResultsFor detection of the presence of WMAs, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) produced by the deep learning algorithm was similar to that produced by the cardiologists and sonographer readers (0.99 vs. 0.98, respectively; p = 0.15) and significantly higher than the AUC result of the resident readers (0.99 vs. 0.90, respectively; p = 0.002). For detection of territories of WMAs, the AUC by the deep learning algorithm was similar to the AUC by the cardiologist and sonographer readers (0.97 vs. 0.95, respectively; p = 0.61) and significantly higher than the AUC by resident readers (0.97 vs. 0.83, respectively; p = 0.003). From a validation group at an independent site (n = 40), the AUC by the deep learning algorithm was 0.90.ConclusionsThe present results support the possibility of using DCNN for automated diagnosis of RWMAs in the field of echocardiography.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Left Ventricular Systolic Function and Outcome in Aortic Stenosis: The
           Long- and Short-Axis of it ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Gerard P. Aurigemma, Colleen M. HarringtonCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Left Ventricular Contractility and Wall Stress in Patients With
           Aortic Stenosis With Preserved or Reduced Ejection Fraction
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Saki Ito, Cristina Pislaru, William R. Miranda, Vuyisile T. Nkomo, Heidi M. Connolly, Sorin V. Pislaru, Patricia A. Pellikka, Bradley R. Lewis, Blase A. Carabello, Jae K. Oh ObjectivesThis study sought to determine the prevalence of reduced contractility and uncompensated wall stress in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and their impact on survival.BackgroundLVEF in AS is determined not only by contractility but also by loading conditions.MethodsPatients with first diagnosis (time 0) of severe AS (aortic valve area [AVA]≤1 cm2) with prior echo study (−3±1 years) were identified. Contractility was evaluated by plotting midwall fractional shortening (mFS) against circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS), stratified by LVEF of 60% at time 0. The temporal changes (from −3 years to time 0) and prognostic value of LVEF, contractility, and wall stress were assessed.ResultsOf 445 patients, 290 (65%) had LVEF ≥60% (median: 66% [interquartile range {IQR}: 63% to 69%]) and 155 patients (35%) had LVEF 
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">The Unrelenting Search for Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Durability ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Mohamad AlkhouliCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Determinants of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Degeneration
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Volume 13, Issue 2, Part 1Author(s): Christian Nitsche, Andreas A. Kammerlander, Klaus Knechtelsdorfer, Jakob A. Kraiger, Georg Goliasch, Carolina Dona, Laurin Schachner, Begüm Öztürk, Christina Binder, Franz Duca, Stefan Aschauer, Daniel Zimpfer, Diana Bonderman, Christian Hengstenberg, Julia Mascherbauer ObjectivesThe aim of the present long-term study was to assess the incidence and mode of valve hemodynamic deterioration (VHD) of bioprosthetic aortic valves, as well as associated factors.BackgroundModern definitions of bioprosthetic valve deterioration recommend the use of echocardiography for the assessment of transprosthetic gradients and valvular regurgitation.MethodsA total of 466 consecutive patients (mean age 73.5 ± 7.5 years, 56.0% women) underwent surgical bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement between 1994 and 2014. Clinical assessment, transthoracic echocardiography, and laboratory testing were performed at baseline and follow-up. VHD was defined as mean transprosthetic gradient ≥30 mm Hg and/or at least moderate valvular regurgitation on echocardiography. Patient-prosthesis mismatch was defined as an effective orifice area indexed to body surface area ≤0.8 cm2/m2.ResultsPatients were followed for a median of 112.3 months (interquartile range: 57.7 to 147.7 months). Among patients with complete follow-up (n = 383), 70 subjects (18.3%; 4.8% per valve-year) developed VHD after a median of 32.4 months (interquartile range: 12.9 to 87.2 months; stenosis, n = 45; regurgitation, n = 16; both, n = 9). Factors associated with VHD by multivariate regression analysis were serum creatinine>2.1 mg/dl (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.143; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.740 to 9.866; p = 0.001), porcine tissue valves (HR: 2.241; 95% CI: 1.356 to 3.706; p = 0.002), arterial hypertension (HR: 3.022; 95% CI: 1.424 to 6.410; p = 0.004), and patient-prosthesis mismatch (HR: 1.931; 95% CI: 1.102 to 3.384; p = 0.022). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, elderly subjects showed faster development of VHD (age 80 years, 100.3 months [95% CI: 63.6 to 136.9 months]; p = 0.023). By multivariate Cox regression, age, diabetes, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, creatinine, and VHD (p < 0.05) were significantly associated with mortality.ConclusionsOn the basis of echocardiography, every fifth patient developed VHD after surgical bioprosthetic heart valve replacement. VHD was associated with renal impairment, the use of porcine tissue valves, arterial hypertension, and patient-prosthesis mismatch. Patients younger than 70 years were not affected by faster VHD.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Feature Tracking by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The New
           Gold Standard for Systolic Function' ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Andreas A. KammerlanderCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Routine Use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in the Work-Up of
           Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias' ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Chiara Bucciarelli-Ducci, Bostjan BerlotCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • LA Mechanics in Decompensated Heart Failure: Insights From Strain
           Echocardiography With Invasive Hemodynamics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Sébastien Deferm, Pieter Martens, Frederik H. Verbrugge, Philippe B. Bertrand, Jeroen Dauw, David Verhaert, Matthias Dupont, Pieter M. Vandervoort, Wilfried Mullens ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to assess the effect of congestion and decongestive therapy on left atrial (LA) mechanics and to determine the relationship between LA improvement after decongestive therapy and clinical outcome in immediate or chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF).BackgroundLA mechanics are affected by volume/pressure overload in decompensated HFrEF.MethodsA total of 31 patients with HFrEF and immediate heart failure (age 64 ± 15 years, 74% male, left ventricular ejection fraction 20 ± 12%) underwent serial echocardiography during decongestive therapy with simultaneous hemodynamic monitoring. LA function was assessed by strain (rate) imaging. Patients were re-evaluated 6 weeks after discharge and prospectively followed up for the composite endpoint of heart failure readmission and all-cause mortality.ResultsLA reservoir function was markedly reduced at baseline and improved with decongestion (peak atrial longitudinal strain from 6.4 ± 2.2% to 8.8 ± 3.0% and strain rate from 0.29 ± 0.11 s–1 to 0.38 ± 0.13 s–1), independent of changes in left ventricular global longitudinal strain, LA end-diastolic volume, and mitral regurgitation severity (p 
       
  • Prognostic Value of Vasodilator Stress Perfusion CMR in Morbidly Obese
           Patients (BMI ≥40 kg/m2) Without Known CAD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Marine Kinnel, Jérôme Garot, Théo Pezel, Thomas Hovasse, Thierry Unterseeh, Stéphane Champagne, Yves Louvard, Marie Claude Morice, Philippe Garot, Francesca Sanguineti
       
  • Prognostic Value of 18F-FDG PET Using Texture Analysis in
           Cardiac Sarcoidosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Osamu Manabe, Kazuhiro Koyanagawa, Kenji Hirata, Noriko Oyama-Manabe, Hiroshi Ohira, Tadao Aikawa, Sho Furuya, Masanao Naya, Ichizo Tsujino, Yuuki Tomiyama, Yuka Otaki, Toshihisa Anzai, Nagara Tamaki
       
  • Mechanical Effects on Right Ventricular Function From Left Bundle Branch
           Block and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Petter Storsten, John M. Aalen, Espen Boe, Espen W. Remme, Ola Gjesdal, Camilla Kjellstad Larsen, Øyvind Senstad Andersen, Morten Eriksen, Erik Kongsgaard, Jürgen Duchenne, Jens-Uwe Voigt, Otto A. Smiseth, Helge Skulstad ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to investigate how LBBB and CRT modify RV free wall function by direct ventricular interaction.BackgroundRight ventricular (RV) function influences prognosis in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). There is, however, limited insight into how LBBB and CRT affect RV function.MethodsIn 24 patients with LBBB with nonischemic cardiomyopathy, RV and left ventricular (LV) strain by speckle-tracking echocardiography was measured before and after CRT. Underlying mechanisms were studied in 16 anesthetized dogs with ultrasonic dimension crystals and micromanometers.ResultsPatients with LBBB demonstrated distinct early systolic shortening in the RV free wall, which coincided with the typical abnormal early systolic septal shortening. In animals, this RV free wall contraction pattern resulted in reduced myocardial work as a large portion of the shortening occurred against low pressure during early systole, coinciding with abnormal leftward septal motion. RV systolic function was maintained by vigorous contraction in the late-activated LV lateral wall, which pushed the septum toward the RV. CRT reduced abnormal septal motion and increased RV free wall work because there was less inefficient shortening against low pressure.ConclusionsLBBB reduces workload on the RV free wall because of abnormal septal motion and delayed activation of the LV lateral wall. Restoring septal and LV function by CRT increases workload in RV free wall and may explain why patients with RV failure respond poorly to CRT. (Contractile Reserve in Dyssynchrony: A Novel Principle to Identify Candidates for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy [CRID-CRT]; NCT02525185)Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • The Added Value of 3D Real-Time Multiplanar Reconstruction for
           Intraprocedural Guidance of Challenging MitraClip Cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Serge C. Harb, Amar Krishnaswamy, Samir R. Kapadia, Rhonda L. Miyasaka
       
  • Stress-Only Adenosine CMR Improves Diagnostic Yield in Stable Symptomatic
           Patients With Coronary Artery Calcium
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Dorine Rijlaarsdam-Hermsen, Mallory Lo-Kioeng-Shioe, Ron T. van Domburg, Jaap W. Deckers, Dirkjan Kuijpers, Paul R.M. van Dijkman ObjectivesThis study assessed whether adenosine stress-only perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) following a positive coronary artery calcium (CAC) score improved the diagnostic yield of invasive coronary angiography (CAG) in patients with stable chest pain. The study also established the association between positive CAC scores and stress-induced myocardial ischemia.BackgroundThe diagnostic yield of catheterization among patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) is low. Improved patient selection and diagnostic testing are necessary. The CAC score can minimize unnecessary diagnostic testing, and in low-risk patients, normal CMR results have a high negative predictive value. Less comprehensive protocols may be sufficient to guide further work-up.MethodsA total of 642 consecutive patients (mean age: 63 years; 50% women) with stable chest pain and CAC scores of>0 who were referred for CMR were enrolled. Patients with a perfusion defect were subsequently examined by CAG. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome was obstructive CAD.ResultsObstructive CAD was present in 12% of patients. For CAD diagnosis, the sensitivity of adenosine CMR was 90.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 88.7 to 93.1), specificity was 98.7% (95% CI: 97.9 to 99.6), positive predictive value was 92.0% (95% CI: 89.8 to 94.1), and negative predictive value was 98.6% (95% CI: 97.6 to 99.5). A CAC score between 0.1 and 100 without typical angina was associated with obstructive CAD in only 3% of patients. Patients with non-anginal chest pain and a CAC score ≥400 had obstructive CAD (16%).ConclusionsStress-only adenosine CMR had high diagnostic accuracy and served as an efficient gatekeeper to CAG in stable patients with a CAC score>0. Patients with CAC scores between 0.1 and 100 could be deferred from further testing in the absence of clinical features that suggested high risk. However, in patients with CAC score ≥400, functional testing should be indicated, regardless of the type of chest pain.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopic Angiography in Management of Left
           Ventricular Assist Device Outflow Graft Obstruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Isaac Wamala, Simon Kneissler, Friedrich Kaufmann, Jamie Jürgen Eulert-Grehn, Evgenij Potapov, Stephan Dreysse, Christoph Starck, Volkmar Falk, Natalia Solowjowa
       
  • Left Ventricular Intramyocardial Fat Detected on Cardiac Computed
           Tomography in Patients With Stable Chest Pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Júlia Karády, Thomas Mayrhofer, Borek Foldyna, Alexander Ivanov, Yasuka Kikuchi, Maros Ferencik, Michael T. Lu, Stefan B. Puchner, Hamed Emami, Nandini M. Meyersohn, Daniel O. Bittner, Pál Maurovich-Horvat, Pamela S. Douglas, Udo Hoffmann
       
  • Four-Dimensional Intracardiac Echocardiography in Transcatheter Tricuspid
           Valve Repair With the MitraClip System
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Gilbert H.L. Tang, Steven J. Yakubov, Carlos E. Sanchez Soto
       
  • Comparing Risk Scores in the Prediction of Coronary and Cardiovascular
           Deaths: Coronary Artery Calcium Consortium
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Michael J. Blaha, Seamus P. Whelton, Mahmoud Al Rifai, Zeina Dardari, Leslee J. Shaw, Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, Kunihiro Matsushita, Alan Rozanski, John A. Rumberger, Daniel S. Berman, Matthew J. Budoff, Michael D. Miedema, Khurram Nasir, Miguel Cainzos-Achirica ObjectivesThis study compared risk discrimination for the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths for the Pooled Cohort Equations (PCE), the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) Risk Score (with and without coronary artery calcium [CAC]), and of simple addition of CAC to the PCE.BackgroundThe PCE predict 10-year risk of atherosclerotic CVD events, and the MESA Risk Score predicts risk of CHD. Their comparative performance for the prediction of fatal events is poorly understood.MethodsWe evaluated 53,487 patients ages 45 to 79 years from the CAC Consortium, a retrospective cohort study of asymptomatic individuals referred for clinical CAC scoring. Risk discrimination was measured using C-statistics.ResultsMean age was 57 years, 35% were women, and 39% had CAC of 0. There were 421 CHD and 775 CVD deaths over a mean 12-year follow-up. In the overall study population, discrimination with the MESA Risk Score with CAC and the PCE was almost identical for both outcomes (C-statistics: 0.80 and 0.79 for CHD death, 0.77 and 0.78 for CVD death, respectively). Addition of CAC to the PCE improved risk discrimination, yielding the largest C-statistics. The MESA Risk Score with CAC and the PCE plus CAC showed the best discrimination among the 45% of patients with 5% to 20% estimated risk. Secondary analyses by estimated CVD risk strata showed modestly improved risk discrimination with CAC also among low- and high-estimated risk groups.ConclusionsOur findings support the current guideline recommendation to use, among available risk scores, the PCE for initial risk assessment and to use CAC for further risk assessment in a broad borderline and intermediate risk group. Also, in select individuals at low or high estimated risk, CAC modestly improved discrimination. Studies in unselected populations will lead to further understanding of the potential value of tools combining risk scores and CAC for optimal risk assessment.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Performance Under Stress: Ischemia Assessment Post-STEMI ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Joyce WongCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Imaging Aspects of Pediatric Cardiac Tumors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Emmanuelle Fournier, Pierre-Emmanuel Séguéla, Fanny Sauvestre, Zakaria Jalal, Julie Thomas, Xavier Iriart, Béatrice Bonello, Jean-Benoit Thambo
       
  • Effect of Corticosteroid Dose and Duration on 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose
           Positron Emission Tomography in Cardiac Sarcoidosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): David R. Okada, Elie Saad, Alison L. Wand, Jan M. Griffin, Edward K. Kasper, Edward H. Chen, Jonathan Chrispin, Harikrishna Tandri, Lilja B. Solnes, Nisha A. Gilotra
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Scar in Secondary MR, Another Piece to the Puzzle: Dead Meat Don’t
           Beat ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Blase A. Carabello, Walter Douglas BoydCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Mosaic Bioprostheses May Mimic Infective Endocarditis by PET/CTA: Trust
           the Uptake Pattern to Avoid Misdiagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Albert Roque, María N. Pizzi, Nuria Fernández-Hidalgo, María Teresa González-Alujas, Remedios Ríos, Joan Castell-Conesa, Manuel Escobar, Ignacio Ferreira-González, Pilar Tornos, Santiago Aguadé-Bruix, Hug Cuellar-Calabria
       
  • Right Ventricular Abnormalities on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
           Imaging in Patients With Sarcoidosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Pratik S. Velangi, Ko-Hsuan Amy Chen, Felipe Kazmirczak, Osama Okasha, Lisa von Wald, Henri Roukoz, Afshin Farzaneh-Far, Jeremy Markowitz, Prabhjot S. Nijjar, Maneesh Bhargava, David Perlman, Mehmet Akçakaya, Chetan Shenoy ObjectivesThis study aimed to determine the prevalence on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) of right ventricular (RV) systolic dysfunction and RV late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), their determinants, and their influences on long-term adverse outcomes in patients with sarcoidosis.BackgroundIn patients with sarcoidosis, RV abnormalities have been described on many imaging modalities. On CMR, RV abnormalities include RV systolic dysfunction quantified as an abnormal right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), and RV LGE.MethodsConsecutive patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis who underwent CMR for suspected cardiac involvement were studied. They were followed for 2 endpoints: all-cause death, and a composite arrhythmic endpoint of sudden cardiac death or significant ventricular arrhythmia.ResultsAmong 290 patients, RV systolic dysfunction (RVEF 
       
  • Myocardial Inflammation and Edema in People Living With Human
           Immunodeficiency Virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Katia Menacho, Andreas Seraphim, Sara Ramirez, Liana Falcon, Anish Bhuva, Jorge Alave, Claudia Banda, Fernando Mejia, Daniela Salazar, Astrid Putri, Flavio Mosto, Pedro Gonzales, Veronica Culotta, Julio Menacho, Anna S. Herrey, Ntobeko A.B. Ntusi, J. Malcolm Walker, James C. Moon
       
  • 4-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiographic Guidance During TAVR With
           BASILICA
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Gilbert H.L. Tang, Stamatios Lerakis, Annapoorna Kini, Jaffar M. Khan, Jason C. Kovacic
       
  • &rft.title=JACC+:+Cardiovascular+Imaging&rft.issn=1936-878X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Bone Scintigraphy Imaging for Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Still
           Much to Learn ∗
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Kevin M. Alexander, Ronald M. WittelesCorresponding AuthorGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Multiparametric Echocardiography Scores for the Diagnosis of
           Cardiac Amyloidosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2019Source: JACC: Cardiovascular ImagingAuthor(s): Michele Boldrini, Francesco Cappelli, Liza Chacko, Maria Alejandra Restrepo-Cordoba, Angela Lopez-Sainz, Alberto Giannoni, Alberto Aimo, Andrea Baggiano, Ana Martinez-Naharro, Carol Whelan, Cristina Quarta, Claudio Passino, Vincenzo Castiglione, Vladyslav Chubuchnyi, Valentina Spini, Claudia Taddei, Giuseppe Vergaro, Aviva Petrie, Luis Ruiz-Guerrero, Vanessa Moñivas ObjectivesThis study aimed to investigate the accuracy of a broad range of echocardiographic variables to develop multiparametric scores to diagnose CA in patients with proven light chain (AL) amyloidosis or those with increased heart wall thickness who had amyloid was suspected. We also aimed to further characterize the structural and functional changes associated with amyloid infiltration.BackgroundCardiac amyloidosis (CA) is a serious but increasingly treatable cause of heart failure. Diagnosis is challenging and frequently unclear at echocardiography, which remains the most often used imaging tool.MethodsWe studied 1,187 consecutive patients evaluated at 3 referral centers for CA and analyzed morphological, functional, and strain-derived echocardiogram parameters with the aim of developing a score-based diagnostic algorithm. Cardiac amyloid burden was quantified by using extracellular volume measurements at cardiac magnetic resonance.ResultsA total of 332 patients were diagnosed with AL amyloidosis and 339 patients with transthyretin CA. Concentric remodeling and strain-derived parameters displayed the best diagnostic performance. A multivariable logistic regression model incorporating relative wall thickness, E wave/e′ wave ratio, longitudinal strain, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion had the greatest diagnostic performance in AL amyloidosis (area under the curve: 0.90; 95% confidence interval: 0.87 to 0.92), whereas the addition of septal apical–to–base ratio yielded the best diagnostic accuracy in the increased heart wall thickness group (area under the curve: 0.80; 95% confidence interval: 0.85 to 0.90).ConclusionsSpecific functional and structural parameters characterize different burdens of CA deposition with different diagnostic performances and enable the definition of 2 scores that are sensitive and specific tools with which diagnose or exclude CA.Central IllustrationGraphical abstract for this article
       
 
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