Subjects -> JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (Total: 234 journals)
    - JOURNALISM (31 journals)
    - JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (163 journals)
    - NEW AGE PUBLICATIONS (8 journals)
    - PUBLISHING AND BOOK TRADE (32 journals)

JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (163 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
#PerDebate     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Journalism and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
African Journalism Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
American Journalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Âncora : Revista Latino-Americana de Jornalismo     Open Access  
Annales françaises d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie et de Pathologie Cervico-faciale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anuario de investigaciones     Open Access  
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Apunts. Medicina de l'Esport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arethusa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Astérion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Bibliothecae.it     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Brazilian Journalism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 73)
Brookings-Wharton Papers on Financial Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bulletin of the Comediantes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers d'histoire. Revue d'histoire critique     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Cahiers de la Méditerranée     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CIC. Cuadernos de Informacion y Comunicacion     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Comics Grid : Journal of Comics Scholarship     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Communication and Media in Asia Pacific (CMAP)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Communication Cultures in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Communication Papers : Media Literacy & Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Comunicação Pública     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y Ciudadanía     Open Access  
Comunicacion y Hombre     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cuadernos.info     Open Access  
Cybergeo : European Journal of Geography     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
De Arte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Développement durable et territoires     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Digital Journalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Documentación de las Ciencias de la Información     Open Access  
E-rea     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
El Argonauta español     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Espaço e Tempo Midiáticos     Open Access  
Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études caribéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Science Editing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Filo de Palabra     Open Access  
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Research Metrics and Analytics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
General Relativity and Gravitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Géocarrefour     Open Access  
Grey Room     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Hipertext.net : Anuario Académico sobre Documentación Digital y Comunicación Interactiva     Open Access  
IFE Psychologia : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a Journal for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Improntas     Open Access  
In die Skriflig / In Luce Verbi     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Index on Censorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Information Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
InMedia     Open Access  
International Journal of Bibliometrics in Business and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Entertainment Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Investment Analysts Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
IRIS - Revista de Informação, Memória e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Journal of European Periodical Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Healthcare Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Illustration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Information Privacy and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interactive Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Late Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Latin American Geography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Literacy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Brazilian Society of Mechanical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Short Story in English     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Thyroid Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transatlantic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of World History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journalism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Komunika     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
L'Espace Politique     Open Access  
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
La corónica : A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
La Presse Médicale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Latin American Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Latin American Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Law, State and Telecommunications Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d'Outre-Mer     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Media & Jornalismo     Open Access  
Memory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Missionalia : Southern African Journal of Mission Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Museum International Edition Francaise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Natural Language Semantics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Newspaper Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Nordic Journal of Media Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Norsk medietidsskrift     Open Access  
OJS på dansk     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Papers of The Bibliographical Society of Canada     Open Access  
Periodica Mathematica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physics of the Solid State     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Pollack Periodica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Pozo de Letras     Open Access  
Prometheus : Critical Studies in Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Publishers Weekly     Free   (Followers: 3)
Qatar Foundation Annual Research Forum Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Religion, State and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Observatório     Open Access  
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’économie industrielle     Open Access  
Revue européenne des migrations internationales     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
RUDN Journal of Studies in Literature and Journalism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Scientometrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Sensorium Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern African Forestry Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Stellenbosch Theological Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Stilet : Tydskrif van die Afrikaanse Letterkundevereniging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Multidisciplinarity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Syntax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sztuka Edycji     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
TD : The Journal for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa     Open Access  
Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Tracés     Open Access  
Transport Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Trípodos     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Geesteswetenskappe     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde     Open Access  
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variants : Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veld & Flora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Verbum et Ecclesia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Word and Action = Woord en Daad     Full-text available via subscription  
World Futures: Journal of General Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.484
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 31  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1077-6990 - ISSN (Online) 2161-430X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1099 journals]
  • From Global Pandemic to Research Excellence in Regions Across the Globe
    • Authors: Louisa Ha
      Pages: 569 - 572
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 569-572, September 2020.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-10T11:26:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020938682
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Book Review: Spiritual News: Reporting Religion Around the World by Yoel
           Cohen
    • Authors: Mark Silk
      Pages: 856 - 857
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 856-857, September 2020.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-10T11:27:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923285
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • What’s in a Label' Negative Credibility Labels in Partisan News
    • Authors: Megan Duncan
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Concern about partisan audiences blindly following partisan news brands while simultaneously being unable to distinguish the credible news from hoax news dominates media criticism and theoretical inquiries. Companies and media literacy advocates have suggested credibility labels as a solution. This experiment tests the effectiveness of credibility labels at the intersection of partisan news brands and partisan news stories. Using news credibility theory and Partisan Media Opinion hypothesis, it investigates the effects credibility labels have on partisan audiences, partisan news brands, and partisan news stories. It finds that credibility labels may be an effective news literacy tool, and that credibility is enhanced when the news story’s ideological perspective does not match the ideology of the news brand.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-10-13T06:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020961856
       
  • Understanding Customers’ Reactions to Allegations of Corporate
           Environmental Irresponsibility
    • Authors: Arunima Krishna, Soojin Kim
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine issue- and organization-specific factors that may influence customers’ reactions to allegations of environmental irresponsibility. This study focused on the idea of brand identity fusion to examine how it may act as a figurative shield against the negative cognitive and behavioral impacts of misconduct allegations. To do so, online surveys were conducted among Australian citizens in October 2018. Brand identity fusion lowered customers’ perceptions of perceived moral inequity and triggered rewarding behavioral intentions despite the allegations. Situational motivation about environmental issues was found to positively affect boycotting and lower buycotting intentions as well as perceived moral inequity. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-10-13T06:49:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020958756
       
  • Mediation Analysis and Warranted Inferences in Media and Communication
           Research: Examining Research Design in Communication Journals From 1996 to
           2017
    • Authors: Michael Chan, Panfeng Hu, Macau K. F. Mak
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The number of studies employing mediation analysis has increased exponentially in the past two decades. Focusing on research design, this study examines 387 articles in the Journal of Communication, Human Communication Research, Communication Research, Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, and Media Psychology between 1996 and 2017. Findings show that while most studies report statistically significant indirect effects, they are inadequate to make causal inferences.
      Authors also often infer that they uncovered the “true” mediator(s) while alternative models and mediators are rarely acknowledged. Future studies should pay more attention to the role of research design and its implications for making causal inferences.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-10-01T10:38:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020961519
       
  • Online InformationSeeking and Disease Prevention Intent During COVID-19
           Outbreak
    • Authors: Jinhui Li, Han Zheng
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by the risk information seeking and processing (RISP) model, this study aims to examine the key determinants that predispose individuals’ online information seeking behavior and prevention intent during the COVID-19 outbreak. Through an online survey with 741 respondents in China, results indicate that affective responses, informational subjective norms, and information insufficiency are positively related to online information seeking about COVID-19. Furthermore, online information seeking is positively associated with prevention intent, and attitude toward prevention partially mediates this association. Finally, theoretical and practical implications of this study are discussed in the context of COVID-19.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-28T09:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020961518
       
  • Book Review: Censorship and Propaganda in World War I: A Comprehensive
           History by Eberhard Demm
    • Authors: Aditi Paul
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-28T09:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020961494
       
  • Thinking, Knowing, or Thinking You Know: The Relationship Between
           Multiscreening and Political Learning
    • Authors: Stacey Frank Kanihan, Patrick C. Meirick, Claire M. Segijn
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Multiscreening (using a device like a smartphone while watching TV) is pervasive and may have beneficial and detrimental consequences for informed citizenship. This national survey (N = 847) examines how multiscreening during debates and TV news during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign was related to political learning. Multiscreening was associated with higher levels of thinking about politics (elaboration) and greater confidence about knowledge (information efficacy) but lower actual knowledge. The positive relationship with efficacy yet negative relationship with knowledge raises the possibility that multiscreening contributes to overconfidence. Implications for cognitive resource theories are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-28T09:03:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020960066
       
  • Adolescents’ Objectification of Their Same-Sex Friends: Indirect
           Relationships With Media Use Through Self-Objectification, Rewarded
           Appearance Ideals, and Online Appearance Conversations
    • Authors: Laurens Vangeel, Jolien Trekels, Steven Eggermont, Laura Vandenbosch
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The current cross-sectional study among adolescent boys and girls (N = 640, Mage = 15.47, SD = 1.63) examined whether exposure to popular television programs and Facebook predicts the extent to which adolescents objectify their same-sex friends. Two pathways were tested to explain these relationships. The first included internalization of rewarded appearance ideals and self-objectification. The second included appearance conversations with friends on Facebook. Results revealed that adolescents’ television exposure and Facebook use only indirectly predicted friend-objectification through their engagement in appearance conversations on Facebook. The relationship between television exposure and friend-objectification was also fully mediated by internalization and self-objectification.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-28T09:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020959723
       
  • Engagement in Emotional News on Social Media: Intensity and Type of
           Emotions
    • Authors: Jihyang Choi, Sang Yup Lee, Sung Wook Ji
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study sheds new light on the relationship between emotion and engagement. Specifically, we investigate how the six discrete emotions that news visuals deliver, as well as the positiveness of news text, are associated with three engagement activities: sharing, commenting, and reacting. The findings show that users are less likely to share or comment on news posts that convey positive emotions, although they tend to react to such news frequently. The most prominent kind of emotion associated with user engagement activities was “sadness.” We analyzed 12,179 news stories posted on the four major U.S. newspapers’ Facebook pages.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-28T08:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020959718
       
  • A Persistent Gender Bias in Chilean Press: The Influence of Journalist’s
           Gender and Editor’s Gender
    • Authors: Ricardo Leiva, David Kimber
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      There is a lot of evidence about gender bias in the media, but not clear evidence about its causes. In this article, we study the influence of journalist’s gender and editor’s gender on gender bias in Chilean press through time. Based on content analysis of 2,645 news articles from Chilean leading newspapers and logistics regression, results confirm the relevance of the gender of both, journalists and editors, on the presence of gender bias in Chilean press, being a permanent behavior through time. Our research supports that the more women in the newsrooms, the greater women’s representation by the news media.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T10:06:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020958753
       
  • The Labor of Building Trust: Traditional and Engagement Discourses for
           Practicing Journalism in a Digital Age
    • Authors: Megan L. Zahay, Kelly Jensen, Yiping Xia, Sue Robinson
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This work of rhetorical analysis interrogates the understanding of journalism as a deliberative instrument in democracy. With 42 in-depth interviews and hundreds of pages of text from websites, social media, and trade press articles, we find a major shift occurring in the United States between more traditional reporters and a growing class often calling themselves “engagement specialists.” These engagement-oriented journalists assert a responsibility to relationally engage with citizens in person and online, making space for them in the news production process. These emerging routines of trust-building are informing a new rhetoric around what it means to “do journalism.”
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T09:59:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020954854
       
  • Book Review: Reporting Elections: Rethinking the Logic of Campaign
           Coverage, by Stephen Cushion and Richard Thomas
    • Authors: Anthony Moretti
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T10:05:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020958759
       
  • Book Review: Journalism and Translation in the Era of Convergence, by
           Lucile Davier and Kyle Conway
    • Authors: Yuan Ping
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T10:02:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020958758
       
  • Book Review: Newsmakers: Artificial Intelligence and the Future of
           Journalism, by Francesco Marconi
    • Authors: Gregory Gondwe
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T10:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020957963
       
  • Book Review: Unwanted Witnesses: Journalists and Conflict in Contemporary
           Latin America, by Gabriela Polit Dueñas
    • Authors: Adriana Amado
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T09:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020956285
       
  • Book Review: Aggregating the News: Secondhand Knowledge and the Erosion of
           Journalistic Authority, by Mark Coddington
    • Authors: Aske Kammer
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T09:55:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020956277
       
  • Copyright, Transformativeness, and Protection for internet Memes
    • Authors: Natalia Mielczarek, W. Wat Hopkins
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Internet memes have become popular artifacts of mass communication in digital culture. They are, by definition, reiterative as they remix already existing content to produce new communicative statements. This theoretical study, which lies at the intersection of media technologies, society, and media law, explores the legal implications of such memetic appropriation vis-à-vis the U.S. copyright law. With the help of legal research analysis and theoretical framework of remix culture and internet memes, the study shows how and why memes deserve legal protection as transformative work.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-17T09:52:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020950492
       
  • Determinants of Technology Acceptance: Two Model-Based Meta-Analytic
           Reviews
    • Authors: Guangchao Charles Feng, Xianglin Su, Zhiliang Lin, Yiru He, Nan Luo, Yuting Zhang
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Examining the determinants of technology acceptance has been a central interest across disciplines. The technology acceptance model (TAM) and its variants and extensions are the most popular theoretical frameworks in this line of research. Two model-based meta-analytical approaches, that is, meta-meta-analysis and conventional meta-analysis, are used to pool the correlations and to test the path relationships among the variables of the TAM. We find that the extended TAM, which we term the TAM Plus, prevails in the model fit testing and that the results of the pooled correlations and path coefficients estimated using the meta-meta-analysis and meta-analysis are generally consistent.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-10T12:56:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952400
       
  • Resisting Covert Persuasion in Digital News: Comparing Inoculation and
           Reactance in the Processing of Native Advertising Disclosures and in
           Article Engagement Intentions
    • Authors: Michelle A. Amazeen
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      An online experiment (N = 931) assessing recognition of and responses to native advertising sought to explore how disclosures affect behavioral intent in digital news contexts. Findings suggest that resistance to persuasive attempts conferred by native advertising disclosures is explained by both inoculation and reactance processes and demonstrates how a simple, or generic, disclosure can inoculate people against a type of message (covert advertising mimicking authentic journalism) rather than the content of the message. Furthermore, the attenuating effect of a simple disclosure on behavioral intent is fully and serially mediated through advertising recognition, increased perception of threat to freedom, and increased reactance.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-04T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952131
       
  • Book Review: The Other Digital China: Nonconfrontational Activism on the
           Social Web, by Jing Wang
    • Authors: Jun Liu
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-03T02:22:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946434
       
  • Motivated Fake News Perception: The Impact of News Sources and Policy
           Support on Audiences’ Assessment of News Fakeness
    • Authors: Stephanie Jean Tsang
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      An online experiment (N = 280) exposed participants in Hong Kong to an anti-police WhatsApp news message during the extradition bill controversy. Although source verification is commonly recommended as a strategy to avoid being deceived by fake news, the findings did not reveal that the news source (legacy news outlet vs. online forum vs. no source) impacted the perceived fakeness of the news message. Nonetheless, participants holding opposing stances were found to perceive the same news message to be fake to significantly varying degrees, providing evidence that motivated reasoning plays in the spread of fake news.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-31T10:48:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952129
       
  • Book Review: Confessions of a Free Speech Lawyer—Charlottesville and the
           Politics of Hate, by Rodney A. Smolla
    • Authors: W. Wat Hopkins
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-28T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946421
       
  • Book Review: Zoning China: Online Video, Popular Culture, and the State,
           by Luzhou Li
    • Authors: Elaine Jingyan Yuan
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-28T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020949260
       
  • Group Consciousness and Corrective Action: The Mediating Role of Perceived
           Media Bias and of Proattitudinal Selective Exposure
    • Authors: Alcides Velasquez, Matthew Barnidge, Hernando Rojas
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the role that group consciousness plays in driving corrective action. Drawing from an online survey of Latinos in the United States (N = 588), it tests the relationships among group consciousness, perceived media bias, proattitudinal selective exposure, and political participation. Results show support for a serial mediation model where the relationship between group consciousness and political participation runs through perceptions of media bias and proattitudinal selective exposure. Proattitudinal selective exposure also mediates the relationship between group consciousness and political participation independently. Theoretical contributions to corrective action and the role of minority groups in American politics are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-27T12:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020949249
       
  • On Evolving Nature of Relationship by Perspective Mutuality:
           Reconceptualizing Relationship Typology Between Organization and Its
           Publics
    • Authors: Yeunjae Lee, Jeong-Nam Kim
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      To address conceptual and methodological issues regarding the exchange–communal relationship typology in public relations scholarship, this study reconceptualizes and validates three relationship types—egoistic, provident, and communal relationships. Two distinct relationship perspectives, organization-oriented and public-oriented, are also explored. The results of the two studies, focusing on an organization’s respective relationships with internal (i.e., employees) and external (i.e., consumers) publics, demonstrate the construct reliability and validity of newly conceptualized relationship types. The association between relationship types and relationship quality—trust, control mutuality, commitment, and satisfaction—is examined with structural equation modeling (SEM) and each path of two studies was compared through multigroup analysis. Theoretical and practical implications for public relations disciplines are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-27T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020949255
       
  • Book Review: Becoming the News: How Ordinary People Respond to the Media
           Spotlight, by Ruth Palmer
    • Authors: Linda Steiner
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-27T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020949256
       
  • Book Review: Peace Journalism in East Africa: A Manual for Media
           Practitioners, by Fredrick Ogenga (Ed.)
    • Authors: Cecilia Arregui Olivera
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-26T12:22:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020949245
       
  • Book Review: Discourses of (De)legitimization: Participatory Culture in
           Digital Contexts, by Andrew S. Ross and Damian J. Rivers (Eds.)
    • Authors: Guodong Jiang, Shijia Shen
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-26T12:22:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946429
       
  • Book Review: This is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against
           Reality, by Peter Pomerantsev
    • Authors: Olga Lazitski
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-26T12:22:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946445
       
  • Book Review: Frenemies: How Social Media Polarizes America, by Jaime E.
           Settle
    • Authors: Sandra González-Bailón
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T07:59:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952130
       
  • Validation Repertories of Media Audiences in the Digital Age: Examining
           the Legitimate Authority of Cultural Mediators
    • Authors: Marc Verboord
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to the study of legitimate authority and symbolic power in the media field by analyzing what I call the “validation repertoires” of audiences, that is, the various ways individuals combine in a single set of beliefs separate judgments of how valid or worthwhile they regard the opinions of a media worker with a specific institutionalized background. The empirical analysis focuses on cultural mediators and has three aspects: (a) mapping repertoires via latent class analysis, (b) explaining adherence to repertoires by links to positions in the field, and (c) predicting how repertoires affect the concrete use of recommendation systems. The results show that, currently, validation repertoires are mainly organized according to the degree of validation, not the degree of institutionalization; the validation of mediators appears to be multifaceted, influenced by cultural and media-related resources and generalized institutional trust; and repertoires have an impact on choice behavior.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T07:58:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952117
       
  • Millennials’ Adoption of Radio Station Apps: The Roles of Functionality,
           Technology, Media, and Brand Factors
    • Authors: Sylvia Chan-Olmsted, Rang Wang, Kyung-Ho Hwang
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      To adapt to Millennials’ mobile-centric lifestyle, the U.S. radio broadcasters are integrating mobile apps into their services. Through a national survey, this study explores Millennial radio users’ functionality preferences regarding station-specific apps from radio stations, and factors affecting their adoption intentions and actual adoption behaviors of such apps. The potential contribution of these apps to brand loyalty is also examined. Three types of factors are investigated: technology, brand, and media factors. The results suggest that all of them affect adoption and loyalty building. As such, this study contributes to the literature of technology acceptance, mobile marketing, and media management.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T07:58:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952111
       
  • Examining the Use, Perception, and Motivation of Cord-Cutting: A Consumer
           Segment Approach
    • Authors: Hun Kim, Sylvia M. Chan-Olmsted, Kyung-Ho Hwang, Byeng-Hee Chang
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the factors affecting the cord-cutting behavior of media consumers. Adopting the frameworks of diffusion of innovations, uses and gratifications theory (U&G), channel repertoire, and media usage/segmentation, we conducted an online survey of 860 respondents in the United States to examine the use, perception, and motivation of cord-cutting behavior among three different consumer segments: cord-cutters, cord-loyalists, and cord-couplers. The results show that cord-cutting is predicted by eudaimonic and exploration motivators, perceived compatibility and complementarity, and age.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T07:07:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946442
       
  • Book Review: CTE, Media, and the NFL: Framing a Public Health Crisis as a
           Football Epidemic, by Travis Bell, Janelle Applequist, and Christian
           Dotson-Pierson
    • Authors: Hannah Cossmann
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T01:30:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020952085
       
  • Book Review: Mediated Intimacy: Sex Advice in Media Culture, by Meg-John
           Barker, Rosalind Gill, and Laura Harvey
    • Authors: Urszula Pruchniewska
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T01:30:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946428
       
  • Book Review: Nationalism on the Internet: Critical Theory and Ideology in
           the Age of Social Media and Fake News, by Christian Fuchs
    • Authors: Tingting Hu, Shuyong Li
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T01:30:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020946440
       
  • How CEO Social Media Disclosure and Gender Affect Perceived CEO
           Attributes, Relationship Investment, and Engagement Intention
    • Authors: Cen April Yue, Yoo Jin Chung, Tom Kelleher, Amanda S. Bradshaw, Mary Ann Ferguson
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      How does a chief executive officer (CEO)’s social media content disclosure on Twitter affect perceived CEO attributes, relationship investment, and public engagement, and to what extent does the CEO’s gender (male vs. female) moderate how publics evaluate content disclosures' A 2 (CEO gender: male vs. female) × 4 (level of disclosure: 100% corporate vs. 70% corporate and 30% personal vs. 30% corporate and 70% personal vs. 100% personal disclosure) between-subject experimental design was used to address these questions with a random sample of 465 adult Twitter users in the United States. Results showed that posts that featured high personal disclosure did not increase the perceived likability or competence of the CEO. Nor did CEO gender impact these outcomes. However, CEO professional disclosure proved to be an effective means to gain high levels of perceived relationship investment from publics. Finally, publics may hold implicit gender bias in cognitive (i.e., perceived relationship investment) and behavioral evaluation (i.e., engagement intention) of a female CEO.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-24T12:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020943521
       
  • Worth to Share' How Content Characteristics and Article
           Competitiveness Influence News Sharing on Social Network Sites
    • Authors: Veronika Karnowski, Dominik J. Leiner, Anna Sophie Kümpel, Larissa Leonhard
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated how sharing performance on Facebook and Twitter is influenced both by news articles’ content characteristics and the availability of additional news articles reporting on the same news topic. We conducted a multi-method study, integrating automated data collection and manual/automated content analyses of 1,764 German online news articles. Our findings show the influence of news factors and, more importantly, news outlets on sharing performance, while simultaneously highlighting differences between the logics of news sharing on Facebook and Twitter. We also find that the first article reporting on a news event is shared more often than subsequent articles.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-24T12:01:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020940340
       
  • Reconceptualizing Arab Media Research: Moving From Centrism Toward
           Inclusiveness and Balance
    • Authors: Claudia Kozman
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This essay provides a brief overview of the dominant trends in Arab media research, paying particular attention to the most common methodologies they rely on. To understand the current state of Arab media scholarship, the article explores the various influences that have played a decisive role in determining the quality and quantity of research productivity. Factors such as the Arab countries’ historical roots, traditional societies, patterns in education, and current conflicts in the region are shown to have an impact on Arab scholars’ engagement with research. To aid the advancement of theory of Arab media research, this essay advocates for conducting collaborative research and proposes a hybrid approach that merges epistemologies in a culture-sensitive, empirical manner that is capable of making universal generalizations while staying true to the specificities of the region itself.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-24T12:01:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020942924
       
  • Toward Hybridity' Nationality, Ownership, and Governance of News
           Agencies in Europe
    • Authors: Terhi Rantanen
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the nationality, ownership, and governance of news agencies in Europe, and suggests that we need to rethink and problematize the categories previously used when studying these. Drawing on recent data from a pan-European study, the article suggests that the concept of hybridity could be applied to analyzing news agencies’ nationality, ownership, and governance. It reviews the concept through different fields: (a) cultural studies, (b) organizational studies, and (c) political-regime and media-system studies, each of these contributing to a complementary understanding of the concept of hybridity. It concludes that (a) the previously fixed categories of national and international news agencies have become more integrated, (b) the different ownership forms of national news agencies have been partly amalgamated in terms of both owners and clients, and (c) ownership category alone cannot determine whether governance is democratic or nondemocratic, so we also need to look at governance. The article suggests that, by using the concept of hybridity when analyzing news agencies, we are able to see crossing boundaries of earlier ideal types and even developing possible alternative approaches to studying news agencies in future.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-19T04:48:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923605
       
  • “Affective News” and Attitudes: A Multi-Topic Experiment of Attitude
           Impacts From Political News and Fiction
    • Authors: Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Melissa Robinson, Rebecca Frazer, Emily Schutz
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Popular entertainment often involves political messages, and entertainment elements are now commonly used in politics coverage. This study examines how suspense drives impacts of political entertainment media content on attitudes, building on the “affective news” extended model. Hypotheses were tested with four texts on controversial political issues (within-subjects), presented in a linear or inverted-pyramid structure and either as news or fiction. The resulting 2 × 2 × 3 × 4 online experiment (N = 227) showed that linear texts produced greater suspense and attitude change than inverted-pyramid texts. Suspense mediated attitude impacts. Both news and fiction versions influenced attitudes, with impacts still detectable 1 day after exposure.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-14T06:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020932883
       
  • “To Ask Freedom for Women”: The Night of Terror and Public
           Memory
    • Authors: Candi S. Carter Olson
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      On the night of November 14, 1917, 31 suffragists and members of the National Woman’s Party (“NWP”) were taken to Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia and tortured and beaten. This so-called “Night of Terror” captured national headlines at the time and has been memorialized through digital sites today. This article examines versions of the Night of Terror from the NWP’s official newspaper, The Suffragist, national newspapers of the day gathered from the Chronicling America database, and modern digital memorials of the event to understand the ways that the mediated telling of events create the fractured popular memories that are retold as the authoritative version of events. In the case of the Night of Terror, the NWP’s media strategies appealed strongly to pathos and captured public imagination then and now, making these retellings the narrative embedded in history as the authoritative version.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-30T06:39:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020927118
       
  • Book Review: Gorgeous War: The Branding War Between the Third Reich and
           the United States, by Tim Blackmore
    • Authors: Alexander L. Fattal
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-28T12:00:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020942925
       
  • Book Reviews: Latin American Film Industries, by Tamara L. Falicov
    • Authors: Leandro González
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-27T12:00:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020940347
       
  • Book Review: Late Night With Trump: Political Humor and the American
           Presidency, by Stephen J. Farnsworth and S. Robert Lichter
    • Authors: Ran Keren
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-27T12:00:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020940344
       
  • Agreeing to Surveillance: Digital News Privacy Policies
    • Authors: Paul C. Adams
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The shift toward digital distribution has led newspapers to adopt data collection and sharing practices with unexplored ethical consequences. Analysis of the privacy policies of the 15 largest U.S. newspapers reveals what is permitted with regard to the capture of newsreader data and the sharing of such data with advertisers, affiliated companies, and social media. These practices and the related news metrics and analytics are critiqued in light of journalism’s democratic role and traditional support of citizenship. The conclusion offers six recommendations to begin to address these ethical dilemmas through greater transparency and more reader control over data handling.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-24T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020934197
       
  • Book Review: Front Pages, Front Lines: Media and the Fight for Women’s
           Suffrage, by Linda Steiner, Carolyn Kitch, and Brooke Kroeger
    • Authors: Donna Harrington-Lueker
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-24T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020940336
       
  • Guilty by Association: Using Word Embeddings to Measure Ethnic Stereotypes
           in News Coverage
    • Authors: Anne C. Kroon, Damian Trilling, Tamara Raats
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The current study provides a new level of empirical evidence for the nature of ethnic stereotypes in news content by drawing on a sample of more than 3 million Dutch news items. The study’s findings demonstrate that universally accepted dimensions of stereotype content (i.e., low-status and high-threat attributes) can be replicated in news media content across a diverse set of ingroup and outgroup categories. Representations of minorities in newspapers have become progressively remote from factual integration outcomes, and are therefore rather an artifact of news production processes than a true reflection of what is actually happening in society.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-23T12:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020932304
       
  • Book Review: Social Media and the Islamic State: Can Public Relations
           Succeed Where Conventional Diplomacy Failed', by Ella Minty
    • Authors: Kevin Keenan
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-23T12:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020934540
       
  • Exploring Numerical Framing Effects: The Interaction Effects of Gain/Loss
           Frames and Numerical Presentation Formats on Message Comprehension,
           Emotion, and Perceived Issue Seriousness
    • Authors: ByungGu Lee, Jiawei Liu, Hyesun Choung, Douglas M. McLeod
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Statistical information permeates media messages, but little is known about how the use of different presentation formats influences message processing. Thus, we explore numerical framing effects by examining how presentation formats interact with gain/loss frames to alter message processing and issue perceptions. We found that logically equivalent information embedded in gain/loss frames generated different levels of comprehension when it was presented in a frequency format. The gap, however, disappeared when it was displayed in a percentage format. Different comprehension levels then shaped negative emotions differently, which in turn affected perceived issue seriousness. Mediational analyses tentatively suggest that numerical framing occurred through cognitive and emotional responses. The implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-22T10:53:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020934195
       
  • Book Reviews: Global Digital Cultures: Perspectives from South Asia, by
           Aswin Punathambekar and Sriram Mohan (Eds.)
    • Authors: Usha Raman
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-22T10:53:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020934199
       
  • Nudity of Male and Female Characters in Television Advertising Across 13
           Countries
    • Authors: Jörg Matthes, Michael Prieler
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      There is a lack of comparative research on nudity in television advertising. Building on cross-cultural theory, we examined countries’ gender indices and preclearance policies as predictors of nudity. We also tested the influence of a main actors’ gender and age, as well as the role of product categories. We sampled N = 1,755 TV ads from 13 countries and found that the main characters’ nudity was higher for women compared with men, less likely with increasing age, and occurred more often for congruent than incongruent products. Multilevel analyses showed that nudity was independent of a country’s gender indices and preclearance policy.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-17T09:44:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020925450
       
  • The Role of Storytelling in Crisis Communication: A Test of Crisis
           Severity, Crisis Responsibility, and Organizational Trust
    • Authors: Hyunmin Lee, Mi Rosie Jahng
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study tested the effectiveness of storytelling as a crisis communication strategy with a 2 (Storytelling: Present Vs. Not-Present) × 2 (Crisis Locus of Control: External Vs. Internal) experiment. The effect of using storytelling was tested on perceptions of trust, crisis severity, and crisis responsibility. Findings indicate that storytelling effectively maintains the level of trust toward the organization and reduces the responsibility attribution during crisis. However, crisis locus of control did not moderate the effects of storytelling on perceptions of the proposed dependent variables. Findings suggest practical and theoretical need to examine the use of storytelling, including ethically communicating about a crisis.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-17T09:28:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923607
       
  • Effects of Uniqueness, News Valence, and Liking on Personalization of
           Company News
    • Authors: Cong Li, Cheng Hong, Zifei Fay Chen
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Many online information systems are delivering personalized news to users today. The essence of this personalization process is to match a news article to the reader’s self-identity. However, prior studies mostly focus on matching a positive news story to a person’s desired identity. No known research has discussed the possibility of matching a negative news story to a person’s undesired identity. This study aims to fill this theoretical gap by testing a three-way interaction effect among news valence, identity desirability, and uniqueness on attitude toward the news story. Through a 2 × 2 × 2 between-subjects experiment, it is shown that a positive news story tends to generate a more favorable attitude when matched to the reader’s desired self-identity, whereas a negative news story will generate a more favorable attitude when matched to the person’s undesired self-identity, and such an effect is especially pronounced when the identity is unique. Perceived news credibility is found to partially mediate these effects.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-17T09:15:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923604
       
  • Voluntary Exposure to Political Fact Checks
    • Authors: Kyle Mattes, David P. Redlawsk
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      For political fact-checking enterprises to be effective, two conditions must be met. Voters must be interested in fact-checks, and the fact-checks must encourage voters to reevaluate their beliefs. Here, we study the former: whether voters are interested in reading fact-checks of political candidates’ statements. We use a simulated campaign environment in which participants’ exposure to fact-checks are voluntary. We find that voters are interested in fact-checking, especially for negative campaigns and personal (versus issue) campaigns. We also find that topics salient to voters are most often fact-checked. Finally, we provide evidence for the operation of a motivated reasoning process, as statements made by less preferred candidates were more deeply scrutinized.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-17T09:08:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923603
       
  • Stereotyping of Muslims in Germany: How the Presumed Influence of Media
           Stereotypes on Others Influences Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions
           Toward Muslims
    • Authors: Katharina Sommer, Rinaldo Kühne
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The study investigates the influence of media stereotypes on the degree of presumed media influence on others and the resulting effects for people’s own attitudes toward a minority. We examine how the presumption of negative effects of media stereotypes on others can lead to a correction of one’s own attitude toward Muslims. In an online experiment, we test the relationship among media stereotyping, presumed media effects, and attitudinal and behavioral consequences. The results show that one’s own attitude toward Muslims is corrected when people presume a negative influence of media stereotypes about Muslims on other people.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-16T05:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923602
       
  • Book Review: Tech Giants, Artificial Intelligence, and the Future of
           Journalism
    • Authors: Guodong Jiang, Shijia Shen
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-12T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923615
       
  • Muting or Meddling' Advocacy as a Relational Communication Strategy
           Affecting Organization–Public Relationships and Stakeholder Response
    • Authors: Nicholas Browning, Ejae Lee, Young Eun Park, Taeyoung Kim, Ryan Collins
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This article conceptualizes organizational advocacy as a relational communication strategy by which organizations take stances on controversial, sociopolitical issues to signal shared commitment with key publics. The authors conducted a series of two-by-two experimental surveys—controlling whether an organization took a defined position (advocacy vs. silence) and whether it acted alone or in line with peers (leader vs. follower)—across both less partisan (Study 1) and highly partisan (Study 2) issues. Findings indicate advocacy is an effective relational communication strategy that strengthens organization–public relationships (OPRs) and increases publics’ support for the organization. Theoretical contributions and practical applications are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-11T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020916810
       
  • Emotional Framing of News on Sexual Assault and Partisan User Engagement
           Behaviors
    • Authors: Yu-Hao Lee, Mo Chen
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the emotion-as-frames model and theories of political psychology, this study examines how the emotional frames (anger, anxiety, sexual) of news on sexual assault are associated with different news engagement behaviors in social media news pages with more conservative or liberal users. Results revealed that the approach or avoidance action tendencies of the emotional frames were associated with corresponding engagement behaviors. Anxiety was associated with less engagement, while sexual frames were associated with more engagement. The associations were stronger among news organizations with more conservative users and not significant among news organizations with more liberal users.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T12:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020916434
       
  • Book Review: Automating the News: How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Media
    • Authors: Bartosz Wilczek
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-09T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923613
       
  • Book Review: Communication and Media Ethics, by Patrick Lee Plaisance, Ed
    • Authors: Arthur S. Hayes
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-18T12:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020912928
       
  • Journalism as an Advocacy Tool: Negotiating Boundaries of Professionalism
           in the 20th-Century American Environmental Movement
    • Authors: Suzannah Evans Comfort
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Environmental nongovernmental organizations faced unprecedented opportunities after public interest in environmental issues exploded in the 1960s. Drawing on the official archives of the Wilderness Society, the Sierra Club, and the National Audubon Society, this study demonstrates how these organizations redeveloped their publications to take advantage of newfound public interest and political opportunities in the 1960s through the 1980s. The organizations adopted professional journalistic norms and practices in their publications to court mass appeal and gain political legitimacy, but their journalistic endeavors were hampered by internal disagreements over the use of journalism as an advocacy tool.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-10T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020911076
       
  • Did It Really Happen' How the Public Interprets Journalistic
           Disclaimers
    • Authors: Jacob Sohlberg, Bengt Johansson, Peter Esaiasson
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Immediately following dramatic events, news reporting must be both fast and accurate. In an attempt to reconcile the inherent conflict between these two ambitions, journalists often use disclaimers, for example, “unconfirmed” or “reports of.” These disclaimers allow for the rapid publication of less than reliable content. The results from our survey experiment suggest that strong disclaimers, as intended, do lower the perceived reliability of stories among news consumers. Furthermore, the results indicate that the context influences the effectiveness of disclaimers. It appears that in a crisis environment, such as after a large terrorist attack, individuals are less sensitive to disclaimers.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-06T01:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020910116
       
  • Reluctant to Criticize: Media, Academia, and the Press Council Without a
           Home
    • Authors: Stephen Bates
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The earliest recommendation for an American press council appears in A Free and Responsible Press (1947), the report of the Commission on Freedom of the Press. Few people know that Commission chair Robert Maynard Hutchins and two allies between 1959 and 1962 tried to create the press council. They wanted an organization that would evaluate television as well as print, and entertainment as well as news, with Adlai Stevenson as chair, Edward R. Murrow as staff director, Henry R. Luce as a major funder, and an elite university as a base. In substantial part because of resistance from the universities, they failed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T01:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020908038
       
  • “It’s Global Warming, Stupid”: Aggressive Communication Styles and
           Political Ideology in Science Blog Debates About Climate Change
    • Authors: Shupei Yuan, Hang Lu
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The current study examined the effects of aggressive communication styles on individuals’ pro-environmental behavioral intentions. Two underlying mechanisms—psychological reactance and expectancy violation—as well as the moderating role played by political ideology were investigated. An online experiment (N = 423) was conducted and the results showed that more aggressive style was more likely to trigger psychological reactance and violation of expectation, liberals responded more negatively to the aggressive message than conservatives, and expectancy violation was an important mediator. The findings provide explanations for how communication styles affect individuals’ information processing and offer implications regarding selecting communication styles wisely.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-02-17T01:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020904791
       
  • How the Geographic Diversity of Editorial Boards Affects What Is Published
           in JCR-Ranked Communication Journals
    • Authors: Manuel Goyanes, Marton Demeter
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This article tests whether the geographic diversity of editorial boards affects the diversity of research papers. Based on a content analysis of 84 journals listed in the Journal Citation Report, we show that diverse editorial boards are more likely to publish more diverse research articles, based on the country of origin of the first author and on where the data were collected. Our findings also indicate a negative association between (a) the impact factor and diversity of the research approach, (b) the journal’s affiliation to an academic association and diversity in the first author’s country of origin and the country of data collection, and (c) the founding year of the publication and the country of data collection. Finally, the founding year of the publication is explored as a moderator.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T01:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020904169
       
  • Book Review: Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing
           of America, by James Poniewozik
    • Authors: Todd Gitlin
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T01:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699019899192
       
  • Virtual Theme Collection: Journalism and Media Research on Africa
    • Authors: Eserinune McCarty Mojaye
      First page: 573
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T07:22:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020932181
       
  • Virtual Theme Collection: Shining a Spotlight on East Asian Communication
           Research, and Evidence for Optimism
    • Authors: Shuhua Zhou
      First page: 577
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T05:36:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020921136
       
  • Virtual Theme Collection: Journalism and Media Research in South Asia and
           Southeast Asia
    • Authors: Krishnamurthy Sriramesh
      First page: 581
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020924668
       
  • Virtual Theme Collection: Representation of Eastern Europe in Media
           Studies
    • Authors: Marton Demeter
      First page: 586
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T07:22:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020933871
       
  • Virtual Theme Collection: Journalism and Mass Communication Research in
           the MENA Region
    • Authors: Shahira S. Fahmy
      First page: 590
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T09:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020921137
       
  • Virtual Theme Collection: Journalism and Media in Latin America
    • Authors: Silvio Waisbord
      First page: 594
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-13T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020912324
       
  • Product Management in Journalism and Academia
    • Authors: Cindy Royal
      First page: 597
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T07:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020933872
       
  • Racializing Captain America: How Racial Attitudes Affect Perceptions of
           Affirmative Action and Diversity Initiatives in Media
    • Authors: S. R. Gubitz, Denzel Avant
      First page: 683
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Is announcing a commitment to diversity enough to activate attitudes toward diversity initiatives' And what are the spillover effects of these programs' To address these questions, we conduct an experiment imbedded in a nationally representative survey of non-Hispanic White Americans (n = 1,519). We inform respondents that the White actor who plays Captain America will be replaced, while varying whether there is a reference to a diversity initiative and whether the replacement is White or Black. We find that reference to diversity initiatives on its own has no effect but the action of displaying diversity affects marketplace preferences and attitudes toward diversity initiatives.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-09T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020909308
       
  • The Great Digital Migration: Exploring What Constitutes the Black Press
           Online
    • Authors: Miya Williams Fayne
      First page: 704
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have previously conceptualized the Black press as print publications that are owned and managed by African Americans, targeting a Black audience and advocating for the Black community. This study investigates how online producers of Black news are troubling previous definitions of the Black press. Websites that target African American readers but are owned by White media companies and Black-targeted websites that primarily produce entertainment news create ambiguity. I conclude that African American ownership and advocacy are no longer requirements for the Black press and that entertainment content is often a relevant and important component of the digital Black press.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-02-27T01:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020906492
       
  • Fear, Anger, and Political Advertisement Engagement: A Computational Case
           Study of Russian-Linked Facebook and Instagram Content
    • Authors: Chris J. Vargo, Toby Hopp
      First page: 743
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined political advertisements placed by the Russian-based Internet Research Agency on Facebook and Instagram. Advertisements were computationally analyzed for four rhetorical techniques presumed to elicit anger and fear: negative identity-based language, inflammatory language, obscene language, and threatening language. Congruent with extant research on arousing emotional responses, advertising clickthrough rates were positively associated with inflammatory, obscene, and threatening language. Surprisingly, however, a negative relationship between clickthrough rate and the use of negative identity-based language was observed. Additional analyses showed that the advertisements were engaged with at rates that exceed industry benchmarks, and that clickthrough rates increased over time.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-20T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020911884
       
  • Scandalous'! Examining the Differential Effects of News Coverage About
           (Non-)Severe Political Misconduct on Voting Intentions and News Source
           Evaluations
    • Authors: Christian von Sikorski
      First page: 762
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Scandal severity may affect public perceptions of both scandalous political actors and news sources reporting political misconduct. Yet, research that has empirically tested these assumptions is lacking. Drawing from theory on anchoring effects, the results of two experimental studies conducted using mediation analyses revealed that severe scandals hurt politicians (candidate evaluation) and weaken voting intentions. Although non-severe scandals have no such effects, they increased news consumers’ exaggerated scandalization perceptions and indirectly degraded news source evaluations. Severe scandals had no effect on the news source. Implications for the coverage of political scandals are discussed.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-11T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020911081
       
  • Hybrids Before Nonprofits: Key Challenges, Institutional Logics, and
           Normative Rules of Behavior of News Media Dedicated to Social Welfare
    • Authors: Sergio Sparviero
      First page: 790
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This article proposes comparing nonprofit news organizations that prioritize social welfare goals with the hybrid organizational form that mixes the institutional logics of charities and business enterprises: the Social Enterprise. The institutional logic comprises organizing templates, patterns of actions and values. These Social News Enterprises (SNEs) are analyzed as hybrids mixing the institutional logics of commercial, public, and alternative news media. Financed by donations and the revenue from services, SNEs engage in public, investigative, and explanatory journalism. Normative behavioral principles of SNEs are used to compare the impact-based model of ProPublica with the growth-focused model of The Texas Tribune.
      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-29T12:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020932564
       
  • Book Review: Beyond Journalism, by Mark Deuze and Tamara Witschge
    • Authors: Matthew Powers
      First page: 837
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-05-01T12:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020917110
       
  • Book Review: Newsmaking Cultures in Africa: Normative Trends in the
           Dynamics of Socio-Political & Economic Struggles
    • Authors: Chris Paterson
      First page: 838
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-29T12:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020932882
       
  • Book Review: Alternative Media in Contemporary Turkey: Sustainability,
           Activism and Resistance and Social Media and Politics in Turkey: A Journey
           Through Citizen Journalism, Political Trolling, and Fake News, by Murat
           Akser and Victoria McCollum and Erkan Saka
    • Authors: Mine Gencel Bek
      First page: 841
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T04:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020917979
       
  • Book Review: Deadline: Populism and the Press in Venezuela
    • Authors: Daniel C. Hallin
      First page: 843
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-15T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020925444
       
  • Book Review: Dead Tree Media: Manufacturing the Newspaper in
           Twentieth-Century North America
    • Authors: Nikki Usher
      First page: 845
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-28T12:00:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020932305
       
  • Book Review: Oliver Wendell Holmes: A Life in War, Law, and Ideas, by
           Stephen Budiansky
    • Authors: Joseph Russomanno
      First page: 847
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020912936
       
  • Book Review: The Social Fact: News and Knowledge in a Networked World, by
           John P. Wihbey
    • Authors: Peter Joseph Gloviczki
      First page: 849
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-24T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020914284
       
  • Book Review: Analyzing Analytics: Disrupting Journalism One Click at a
           Time, by Edson C. Tandoc Jr
    • Authors: Guodong Jiang
      First page: 850
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-03-25T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020914288
       
  • Book Review: Peace and Power in Cold War Britain: Media, Movements and
           Democracy, c. 1945-68, by Christopher R. Hill
    • Authors: Anthony Moretti
      First page: 852
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T12:02:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020917109
       
  • Book Review: The Media, the Public and the Great Financial Crisis
    • Authors: Matthew D. Kirk
      First page: 854
      Abstract: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-08T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077699020923612
       
 
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