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        1 2     

  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 181 journals)
Abstracta Iranica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201)
Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Archaeological Practice : A Journal of the Society for American Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Altorientalische Forschungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Indian Culture and Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Archaeology     Partially Free   (Followers: 30)
Anatolica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ancient Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Ancient Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access  
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Antiqua     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access  
Apeiron     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Archaeologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Archaeologiai Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription  
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144)
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archaeology International     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
ArcheoArte. Rivista Elettronica di Archeologia e Arte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ArcheoSciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Archivo Español de Arqueología     Partially Free  
Arkeos     Open Access  
Arqueología de la Arquitectura     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ART-SANAT     Open Access  
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BABesch - Bulletin Antieke Beschaving     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access  
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bryn Mawr Classical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Cambridge Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189)
Catalan Historical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Chiron     Full-text available via subscription  
Chronique des activités archéologiques de l'École française de Rome     Open Access  
Complutum     Open Access  
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Deltion of the Christian Archaeological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
digitAR - Revista Digital de Arqueologia, Arquitectura e Artes     Open Access  
Documents d’archéologie méridionale - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access  
Economic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166)
Etruscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Études océan Indien     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 175)
Evolution of Science and Technology / Mokslo ir technikos raida     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frühmittelalterliche Studien     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geoarchaeology: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Geochronometria     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Germanistik     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Heritage Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hesperia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Hispania Epigraphica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Heritage in the Digital Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170)
International Journal of Nautical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 152)
International Journal of Paleopathology     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internet Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
INTRECCI d'arte     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
IpoTESI di Preistoria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranica Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)

        1 2     

Journal Cover Acta Antiqua
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [15 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0044-5975 - ISSN (Online) 1588-2543
     Published by Akademiai Kiado RT Homepage  [62 journals]   [SJR: 0.1]   [H-I: 2]
  • Shifting shadows on the landscape: Reading umbrae in Vergil and other
           poets
    • Abstract: A survey of Vergil’s uses of the word umbra and comparisons with its uses in other Roman poets reveals that Vergil was the first poet to deploy umbra, previously neutral or negative in connotation, with positive associations, and that he may have been the first to coin it as meaning ‘ghost’. Unlike many other poets, Vergil exploits the multivalent potential of umbra, requiring readers to interpret his usage. The fact that all of Vergil’s varied uses of umbra appear in the Culex suggests that it was written by an astute follower who was perceptive to the poet’s nuanced usage of the term.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 245-259

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.7

      Authors
      Lorina N. Quartarone, University of St. Thomas Dept. of Modern and Classical Languages 2115 Summit Avenue Saint Paul MN 55105 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Landscapes of war
    • Abstract: Drawing on established connections between Roman identity and an agricultural landscape, this paper examines how the imagery of disrupted pastoral and agrarian landscapes and characters represent the effects of civil war on the Roman people in Vergil’s Aeneid and Lucan’s Bellum Civile. While disturbance and turmoil are already a part of the natural landscape in Vergil’s Eclogues and Georgics, in epic, a genre that concerns itself with how empire and imperial power mediate Roman identity, the displacement of shepherds and agriculture partially redefines Roman identity in militaristic terms. Vergil’s pastoral characters, written into military roles as civic landscapes displace agrarian ones in the Aeneid, survive but fail to find a place in Lucan’s ruined and desolate Pharsalian landscape in the Bellum Civile. There, the broken natural landscape, unfit for agriculture, pastoralism, or trade, mirrors the redefinition of what is “Roman” and the occlusion of Rome’s link to an idealized bucolic past.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 261-274

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.8

      Authors
      Jessica McCutcheon, Amherst College Dept. of Classics 55 College Street Amherst MA 01002-5000 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Frustrated desires of the pastoral world
    • Abstract: In Theocritus, Virgil, and Longus each author establishes a tree that is symbolic of their approach to the pastoral tradition. In the opening of Theocritus’ Idylls, a goatherd’s piping is favorably compared with the sound of wind through the pine (πίτυς). This passage establishes the pine as a symbolic marker for Theocritus’ pastoral world. This world, however, is punctuated by the frustration of unfulfilled personal desires, and the pine tree is present in passages which depict this (Idylls 1. 134, 3. 38, 5. 49).Virgil adopts this pastoral tradition and in Eclogue 1, Meliboeus comments that Tityrus lies beneath a beech tree (fagus), piping to the woodland Muse. Although the reader may assume that the beech is simply Virgil’s version of the Theocritean pine, the beginning of the fourth line makes it clear that this pastoral world is not only inhabited by unrequited personal desire, but external upheaval and frustration: “nos patriam fugimus”. The inclusion of external strife is found in two key passages in the Eclogues associated with the beech tree: 3. 12 and 9. 9, and reveals a break in the Theocritean tradition.Virgil thus establishes a mutable element of the pastoral tradition which is taken up by Longus in his genre-bending novel, Daphnis and Chloe. In the tradition of Theocritus and Virgil, Longus establishes the oak as the symbolic tree for Daphnis and Chloe. The oak appears frequently throughout the novel and represents the intensely personal erotic frustrations of the young couple. In many instances, however, Daphnis and Chloe seek refuge under their tree after outsiders have attempted violence on them. In this way, Longus blends the function of the programmatic pastoral tree established by Theocritus and Virgil.Thus, this paper examines how Virgil’s association of his pastoral symbol, the beech, with external frustrations contributes to the adaptability of the pastoral landscape established by Theocritus’ pines, and in turn inherited by Longus’ oak.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 211-220

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.5

      Authors
      Deanna Wesolowski, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 829 Curtin Hall Department of Foreign Language and Literature P.O. Box 413 3243 N. Downer Avenue Milwaukee WI 53201 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Ad sidera:Tree-space symbolism in Plato’s Phaedrus and
           Vergil’s Eclogues
    • Abstract: This article explores the symbiotic relationship between nature and poetry, which is in many ways pivotal for Vergil’s Arcadia, as an imaginary construct. Interdependence of the ideal landscape and the poetic creativity finds an especially refined and polysemic expression in the fagus, which functions in the Eclogues simultaneously as a literary image, a metaphor, and a symbol. It is also strongly reminiscent of the proto-idyllic segment of Plato’s Phaedrus (230b-e), describing a beautiful πλάτανος that turns out to be the source of anagogic inspiration. Based on this analogy, a comparative reading of Plato’s dialogue and Vergil’s idyllic poems is offered, and the ascensus motive of Eclogue 5 reveals the Platonic echoes. The anagogic aspect of Arcadia is examined from an intertextual and interdisciplinary point of view, hopefully contributing to seize the polyphonic complexity of Vergil’s poetics.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 221-244

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.6

      Authors
      Jelena Pilipović, University of Belgrade Dept. of General Literature and Theory of Literature Studentski Trg 3 11 000 Belgrade Serbia
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Landscapes in the Bellum Civile: From negation to subversion of the locus
           amoenus
    • Abstract: Looking at two descriptions of landscape in Lucan’s Bellum Civile (the sacred grove near Massilia and the Libyan desert), we will try to show that the poet uses bucolic elements to depict some places. However, he does not use these pastoral elements to describe a locus amoenus but a locus horridus. Lucan’s landscape can be defined as an inversion and a subversion of the bucolic one.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 275-285

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.9

      Authors
      Florian Barrière, Université de Paris-Ouest Nanterre la Défense Dept. de langues et littératures grecques et latines Paris France
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • From tamarisks to stars: Cosmic inspiration in Vergil’s Eclogues
    • Abstract: Vergil’s Eclogues, despite belonging to the bucolic genre and being largely modelled on Theocritus’ Idylls, bear clear marks of cosmic inspiration; these emerge from time to time, now in one poem, next in another, issuing ideas and images apparently inconsistent with the pastoral world: this happens especially in the three central Eclogues. Non-pastoral ideas and images often refer to philosophical or mythological themes, possibly coming either from poets with a cosmic vein (such as Hesiod and Lucretius), or from philosophic schools dealing with cosmogony (such as Orphism and Stoicism). Vergil develops these themes in innovative ways. This broadening of perspective concerns the power of song that seduces and dominates nature (with remarkable self-reflexive implications), the human desire to interact with the gods (even to enter their realm and identify with them through apotheosis), and the longing for purification and rebirth, hand-in-hand with the universal aspiration for peace and happiness.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 185-209

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.4

      Authors
      Giampiero Scafoglio, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli Dipartimento di Lettere e Beni Culturali Piazza San Francesco - Complesso San Francesco 81055 Santa Maria Capua Vetere Italy
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:41 GMT
       
  • “Vergilian” wolves in the Panegyric on Avitus by Sidonius
           Apollinaris (Carm. 7. 361–368)
    • Abstract: The article analyzes a simile of the Panegyric on the emperor Avitus by the Late Antique poet Sidonius Apollinaris (430–486 CE). The Vandals who sacked Rome in 455 become terrible wolves. Sidonius has to exaggerate the drama of the event experienced by Rome in order to exalt the salvific role played by the emperor Avitus. Sidonius echoes a lot of Vergil’s pastoral landscapes and other epic similes or phrases by Statius, Silius, Valerius Flaccus, Lucan. This simile is a good example of the poetry of Sidonius and of the literary conceptions of the Late Antique Literature.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 287-300

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.10

      Authors
      Francesco Montone, Federico II University of Naples Naples Italy
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Cara deum suboles: Hercules and Orpheus in Vergil’s pastoral
           landscape
    • Abstract: The tragedies of Hercules and Orpheus in Vergil’s Georgics anticipate their respective elevations in the afterlife.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 171-183

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.3

      Authors
      Patricia A. Johnston, Brandeis University Classical Studies Faculty 415 South Street Waltham MA 02453 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • The humanist reception of Vergil’s Bucolics
    • Abstract: In the framework of an European program that I direct — which is devoted to the enhancement of the humanist heritage of the Upper Rhine region (Southern Germany, Northern Switzerland and Alsace), that is the humanistic editions of the Greek and Roman authors held by the libraries —, a curious work to be found in the University Library of Basel has come to my attention. Indeed, I would like to speak about some aspects of the humanist reception of Virgil and more specifically of his Bucolica, concerning the form as well as the content.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 301-310

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.11

      Authors
      Marie-Laure Freyburger-Galland, Université de Haute-Alsace Faculté des Lettres, Langues et Sciences Humaines 10, rue des Frères Lumière F-68093 Mulhouse Cedex France
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Embracing Vergil’s ‘Arcadia’: Constructions and
           representations of a literary topos in the poetry of the Augustans
    • Abstract: The Arcadian landscape was originally developed in Vergil to transcend an actual landscape and identify with an idealized setting temptingly abstract in order to serve as a metaphor for the redesigned pastoral genre as promoted in the Eclogues. Vergil’s Arcadia as described in Eclogue 4, for the first time in Latin literature, was a construction, a literary topos and a symbol of innovative poetics, but also of Roman history and contemporary politics interfused. Vergil’s Arcadia was an imaginary landscape. This utopia becomes — in full awareness of Vergil’s literary contemporaries and the poets following after them — an appropriate setting for the staging of imaginary literary dialogues between shepherds-poets, and the changing poetics is reflected on the changes of the archetypal landscape of the original Arcadia topography. These changes appear first in Tibullus (in selected passages from 1. 1, 1. 3, 1. 5, 1. 7, 1. 10, 2. 1, 2. 3 and 2. 5) and recur in new forms in Propertius, Horace and Ovid. The progress of transformation evidences Arcadia’s ability to observe the rules of different generic environments and anticipates the propagation of the particularly literary topos across the centuries, as a multi-leveled symbol of poetics, aesthetics and politics.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 145-170

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.2

      Authors
      Sophia Papaioannou, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens Department of Classics Faculty of Philology University Campus Zografou 157 84 Athens Greece
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: In the Western literary tradition the concept of the Golden Age and its identification with a special location is as old as the earliest poetic compositions, for it features prominently in the 8th c. BCE didactic epic Works and Days by the Greek poet Hesiod. Filtered through the sophisticated and poetically-determined poetry of the Alexandrians (Theocritus, Aratus), the Golden Age, now linked to an idyllic pastoral landscape, becomes the centerpiece, the common point of reference of all ten poems that comprise Vergil’s earliest work, the Eclogues. In Vergil’s pastoral art the Golden Age is identified with Arcadia, a location allegedly evoking the Greek area at the center of the Peloponnese, proverbial for its rusticity and shunning of civilization, and as a result, free of all pretention. The fashioning, significance and transformation of the Arcadia theme in literature, both ancient and later, and the evolution of the Augustan model, is the topic of the present volume, the structure and objectives of which are detailed in this introductory chapter.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 133-144

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.1

      Authors
      Patricia A. Johnston
      Sophia Papaioannou
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • The Eclogues of Miklós Radnóti: A twentieth-century Vergil
    • Abstract: At the beginning of the 19th century, when the poets wanted to create the national epic poem of Hungarians, they followed the Aeneid; at the end of the 18th century, when the agricultural reform was established in Hungary under the Habsburgs, the poets wrote agricultural poems in Vergilian form and translated and modernized his Georgics. The world of Vergil depicted in the Eclogues and in the Georgics became the idealized Arcadia, and poets and writers or the aristocracy — influenced by Vergil — wanted to create their own Arcadia. The pastoral theme and the bucolical forms were very popular in Hungarian literature of this period, at the end of the 18th century. The poets had pastoral names, and very different topics were expressed in eclogues (e.g. actual events of politics). In the first half of the 20th century Vergil had a new renaissance connected to the bimillennium of his birth. And this renaissance reached the most expressive element of the presence of Vergil’s Bucolics in the poetry of Miklós Radnóti (1909–1944), whose eclogues are the most tragic expression of cruelty of war. My paper focuses on the influence of Virgil’s Bucolics in Radnóti’s poetry, but his examples can attest to the deep influence of Vergil on Hungarian literature.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 311-322

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.12

      Authors
      László Takács, Pázmány Péter Catholic University Inst. of Classics and Oriental Studies Egyetem u. 1 2087 Piliscsaba Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Roman stamped tiles from Dunaszekcső
    • Abstract: This article presents an analysis and catalogue of Roman stamped tiles discovered in Dunaszekcso (Baranya county, Hungary) and serves as a preliminary report on the excavation conducted on the kilns in September 2012.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 73-100

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.1.6

      Authors
      István Gergő Farkas, University of Pécs Dept. of Archaeology Rókus u. 2 H-7624 Pécs Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 1/March 2014
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 17:31:40 GMT
       
  • Ancient Roman bridges and their social significance
    • Abstract: This article examines the narrative, epigraphic and legal textual sources to assess the social aspects and historical significance of ancient Roman bridges. Bridges are supposed to be not only utilitarian structures, but also monumental and highly sophisticated public projects for everyday usage by all inhabitants of the city, as well as suitable media for self-promotion by the emperors and senators involved. The main objective of this study is the visualization of ancient Roman bridges as historical objects full of military, religious and social connotations. Historical sources are analyzed and evaluated in order to establish whether the bridges of the Roman Empire could have been meant to impress inhabitants and visitors, travelers and residents alike with their size, grandeur, permanence and aesthetics, or whether they were only functional, strategic and costly structures, as well as to investigate if they served as suitable media for self-presentation of imperial power and senatorial class.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 61-72

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.1.4

      Authors
      Marek Babic, The Catholic University of Ružomberok Department of History Hrabovská cesta 1 034 01 Ružomberok Slovak Republic
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 1/March 2014
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 17:31:39 GMT
       
  • Auf den spuren eines gnostischen motivs im vierten evangelium
    • Abstract: The Gospel of John differs fundamentally from the synoptic Gospels, both as an historical source and a literary work. Some scholars consider that this gospel is to be interpreted from gnosis, a 2nd-century Mediterranean religious movement. Others deny this connection, assuming that John’s Gospel originates earlier than the emergence of the gnosis. This paper concentrates on the typical Johannine, and gnostic, motif of “misunderstanding”, which is reflected in the Fourth Gospel as faithlessness and sin. We will examine parallels in the recently discovered Gospel of Judas and in the writings of the Nag Hammadi Library. We will also attempt to interpret the function of “misunderstanding”.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 73-100

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.1.5

      Authors
      Peter Hubai, John Wesley Theologische Hochschule Dankó u. 11 H-1081 Budapest Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 1/March 2014
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 17:31:39 GMT
       
  • Place and time of the rape scenes in Terence’s comedies
    • Abstract: This paper is concerned with the rape of young girls which is one of the main elements in Greco-Roman New Comedy equally used by Greek and Roman authors. It concentrates on Terence and examines where and when these sexual assaults against young girls happen, trying to show that place and (dramatic and real) time have actually considerable function and significance into the Terentian comedies. More specifically, place is always associated with the excuses which the assailant uses in order to justify his sexual assault and subsequent attitude towards the victim. Instead, time is related to the victim’s pregnancy that sets the violent act before the play’s action and legitimate the assault through marriage-children (i.e. dramatic time); and finally, it is always night (i.e. real time) that along with wine constitutes a strong incitement to sex, which is what adulescentes used to do this time within the conventions of Greco-Roman Comedy.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 47-59

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.1.3

      Authors
      George C. Paraskeviotis, University of Cyprus Visiting Lecturer of Latin Philology Department of Classics and Philosophy 1, Eressou & Kallipoleos Street, First Floor P.O. Box 20537 CY-1678 Nicosia Cyprus
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 1/March 2014
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 17:31:38 GMT
       
  • Le poète aux semelles de plomb. Les métaphores de la
           légèreté et du poids dans la tradition biographique sur
           Philitas de Cos
    • Abstract: The paper deals with the biographical anecdotes of Philitas of Cos, who was not only extremely thin as a result of his laborious philological activity, but according to Aelian and Athenaeus, the poet leptoteros even had to wear lead weights to keep his balance against the wind. In order to support the highly discussed metaphorical interpretation of the second story, the article focuses on a possible analogue not yet examined. After the reconsideration of the sources, including the scoptic epigram, the comedy, the statue of Philitas, we analyse a zoological paradox of Hellenistic origin transmitted also by Aelian: the bees also have to carry stones as counterweight against the wind. This indirect association of the poet with the melissa, a traditional poetological metaphor, would fit well into the tradition about Philitas: he is known to have had a particular interest in nature, as among his glossographical and poetical fragments several items concern the life of bees. Moreover, contemporary critical assessments on Philitas’ œuvre are based on a very similar zoological imagery.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 1-32

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.1.1

      Authors
      Elvira Pataki, Université Catholique Pázmány Péter Egyetem u. 1 H-2087 Piliscsaba Hongrie
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 1/March 2014
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 17:31:37 GMT
       
  • Science and literature in the age of Hellenism
    • Abstract: The Aristotelian tradition knows the dichotomy of his works into exoteric and esoteric groups. The interpretation of the two terms, however, changed in the course of time. According to the later, perhaps Hellenistic interpretation of the terms, the group of “exoteric” works included all the works which have been written in schools of rhetoric, and later ascribed to Aristotle. The well-known treatise De mundo should not be considered as a genuin work of school-philosophy, because it belongs to Pseudo-Aristotle’s works written in a school of rhetoric and ranged amond his “exoteric” works.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 33-46

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.1.2

      Authors
      Miklós Maróth, Research Centre for Ancient Study of the HAS Múzeum krt. 4/F H-1088 Budapest Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 1/March 2014
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 17:31:37 GMT
       
  • Multiplex Sermo the ‘Manifold Speech’ of Fama in
           Virgil’S Aeneid
    • Abstract: In this paper, I establish a connection between the manifold character of Fama as reported by Virgil in Aen. 4. 173 ff. and her ‘manifold speech’ (multiplex sermo) in the framework of a narratological reading. According to my interpretation, the short fama of the Virgilian Fama (4. 191-194), as a spectacular example of ‘polyphonic narrative’, radicalises and thus domesticates the dangers inherent in the epic discourse itself.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 339-348

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.2

      Authors
      Ábel Tamás, Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) Budapest Dept. of Comparative Literature Múzeum krt. 4/A H-1088 Budapest Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
  • The Historical Geography of Sophene
    • Abstract: This paper deals with the historical geography of Sophene — it aims to determine its original territory and geopolitical developments from Hellenistic times to the eve of the Arab conquests. To achieve this goal, a wide range of sources have been examined with regard to geographical (and ethnographical) information on Sophene — Greek and Latin geographical and ethnographical texts, Greek and Latin historiographical accounts, Byzantine legislations, and finally Armenian writings.In the light of the available data, the heartland of Hellenistic Sophene was located in the triangle marked by the Euphrates (in the west), the Munzur Mountains (in the north), and the Tauros (in the south). This territory includes the modern Dersim (Tunceli), the lower Murat valley (on either side of the river), and the Elaziğ plain, and coincides with the center of the pre-Hellenistic — Suppani. As a political entity Sophene expanded its territory, and especially its expansion in the northeast (including Balabitene and Asthianene) and over the Tauros into the upper Tigris valley (Ingilene, Sophanene) turned out to have more lasting consequences. These territories were closely integrated into Sophene as a political and cultural entity. The first capital of Sophene was ancient Arsamosata (likely located at modern Haraba), but due to the expansion of the kingdom of Sophene over the Tauros, the capital was later moved to the bank of the Tigris as to a more central position (likely today’s Eğil — Strabo’s and Pliny’s Karkathiokerta). Sophene’s political significance resulted from its geographical location — it straddled one of the most important communication lines between West and East in ancient times (the Tomisa crossing).
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 295-338

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.1

      Authors
      Michaŀ Marciak, Rzeszów University Instytut Historii Al. Rejtana 16 C Rzeszów 35-959 Poland
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
 
 
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