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        1 2     

  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 192 journals)
Abstracta Iranica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 250)
Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Archaeological Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Altorientalische Forschungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
American Indian Culture and Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American Journal of Archaeology     Partially Free   (Followers: 37)
Anatolica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Ancient Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Ancient Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Antiqua     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Antiquity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access  
Apeiron     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archaeologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Archaeologiai Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription  
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 183)
Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archaeology International     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ArcheoArte. Rivista Elettronica di Archeologia e Arte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ArcheoSciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Archivo Español de Arqueología     Partially Free  
Arkeos     Open Access  
Arqueología de la Arquitectura     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ART-SANAT     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BABesch - Bulletin Antieke Beschaving     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Bryn Mawr Classical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Cambridge Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 230)
Catalan Historical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chiron     Full-text available via subscription  
Chronique des activités archéologiques de l'École française de Rome     Open Access  
Complutum     Open Access  
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Deltion of the Christian Archaeological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digital Applications in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
digitAR - Revista Digital de Arqueologia, Arquitectura e Artes     Open Access  
Dissertationes Archaeologicae     Open Access  
Documents d’archéologie méridionale - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access  
Economic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 213)
Etruscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Études océan Indien     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 219)
Evolution of Science and Technology / Mokslo ir technikos raida     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frühmittelalterliche Studien     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geoarchaeology: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Geochronometria     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Germanistik     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Heritage Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hesperia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Hispania Epigraphica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Heritage in the Digital Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 216)
International Journal of Nautical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192)
International Journal of Paleopathology     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Internet Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)

        1 2     

Journal Cover   Acta Antiqua
  [SJR: 0.1]   [H-I: 2]   [16 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0044-5975 - ISSN (Online) 1588-2543
   Published by Akademiai Kiado RT Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Remarks on the interpretation of ex eo in Chapter 24 of Tacitus’
           Agricola
    • Abstract: In Chapter 24 of Tacitus’ Agricola the historian claims — as it is frequently mentioned in the various editions of this work — that he heard his father-in-law discuss the easy invasion of Ireland (Hibernia) many times. In this paper the author attempts to demonstrate that the Zweibrücken-edition of the Agricola offers a more plausible text-variation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 393-398

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.5

      Authors
      László Takács, Pázmány Péter Catholic University Department of Classical Philology Egyetem u. 1. H-2087 Piliscsaba Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • Homonymy as a logical term in Origen
    • Abstract: The paper aims to deal with the problem of “homonymy” in Origen’s work from the point of logic. As far as Origen is concerned, this term expresses the difference between the literal and non-literal meanings of various Scriptural texts. Therefore, homonymy can be regarded as a primitive linguistic entity for the interpretation of the Scripture. Origen’s use of this term shows that a considerable part of the tools he classifies into the arsenal of logic is in close connection with linguistic entities, that is, with the Scripture. Nevertheless, as in the case of the difference between the literal and non-literal sense of the statements and commands of the Scripture, so too in connection with homonymy, the question of truth and falsity may emerge. Therefore, in this sense, homonymy has a logical character as well.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 409-421

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.7

      Authors
      Róbert Somos, University of Pécs Department of Philosophy Ifjúság útja 6/b H-7624 Pécs Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • Neighbors: Ethnocentrism in Antiphon and Montaigne
    • Abstract: In the first book of his history, Herodotus interrupts his political narrative to offer a quick ethnographic survey of the Persians, wherein he remarks that Persians respect other ethnicities in proportion to their proximity to Persia and reserve their greatest disdain for the most distant peoples. For Herodotus and his 5th-century Greek audience, the Persian himself incarnates the category of the Barbarian, whose inferiority is a function of his distance from Greece. This article proposes to assess the role of ethnocentrism, and its correlation of proximity and superiority, in two of the most iconoclastic figures in the history of Western thought, the ancient Greek sophist Antiphon of Rhamnus and the French Renaissance author Michel de Montaigne. Recently excavated and edited papyrus fragments reveal tantalizing glimpses of Antiphon’s lost treatise On truth, which seems to formulate a very far-reaching critique of ethnocentrism within the framework of cultural relativism. In his renowned essay Des Cannibales (“Of Cannibals”), Montaigne formulates a remarkably similar critique in his portrayal of the Brazilians encountered by Europeans in their trans-Atlantic voyages of the 16th century. Both authors take their distance from normative cultural values in order to rethink the relation of proximity and superiority, but Montaigne adds a temporal dimension to his analysis by challenging our condescension to the past. The vicinity of Montaigne and Antiphon suggests a similar intuition into the reversibility of cultural values and the contingency of collective identity in space and time.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 399-408

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.6

      Authors
      Eric MacPhail, Indiana University French and Italian Department 1020 East Kirkwood Avenue Bloomington IN 47405 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • Nonkonformisten
    • Abstract: Archelaus, King of Macedonia, proved to admire Greek culture by inviting some distinguished authors and artists to live at his Court. They were the Athenian tragedians Euripides and Agathon, the poet and musician Timotheus of Miletus, the epic poet Choerilus of Samos and the painter Zeuxis of Heraclea, and it is possible that Thucydides, the historian, belonged to them, too. The Greek guests who did not seem to comply with the established standards of the contemporaneous art and life excelled at creating new forms and ideas. Without being a coherent group they were highly inspiring individuals. Each of them succeeded in promoting the literary or artistic field. Due to the generosity of their Macedonian host the Greek emigrants, far away from the struggles of the Peloponnesian War, were able to enjoy a safe and apparently prolific stay — evident above all from the Euripidean Iphigeneia in Aulis and the Bacchae.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 361-369

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.2

      Authors
      Heinrich Kuch, Dathepromenade 3, 11/02 D-10319 Berlin Germany
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • A new Greek letter from early Ptolemaic Egypt
    • Abstract: Description and discussion of a Greek papyrus letter from 3rd-century BC Egypt. The format, the spelling mistakes, the thickness of the strokes and the ductus of the hand suggest that this Greek letter was written by a native Egyptian using an Egyptian rush pen.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 371-377

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.3

      Authors
      Csaba A. La’da, University of Kent School of European Culture and Languages Cornwallis North West Canterbury Kent CT2 7NF England
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • Assyrians and Greeks: The nature of contacts in the 9th–7th
           centuries BC
    • Abstract: In this paper we present an analysis of the nature of early contacts between the Greeks and the ancient Near Eastern states (mainly the Neo-Assyrian Empire) in the 9th–7th centuries BC. In the first part, on the base of cuneiform sources we try to reconstruct the historical background of the western expansion of Assyria, in consequence of which the Levant came under the firm control of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, and the process of the eastern expansion of the Greeks as colonists, mercenaries or traders.In the second part of the article we discuss and emphasize the effect of the Assyrian imperial control on the trade of the Levant, namely the construction and functioning of the kāru-s, a system of ports of trade, whereto the Assyrians restricted the long-distance trading activity.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 325-359

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.1

      Authors
      Tamás Dezső, Eötvös Loránd University ELTE Department of Assyriology and Hebrew Múzeum krt. 4/F H-1088 Budapest Hungary
      Ádám Vér, Eötvös Loránd University ELTE Department of Assyriology and Hebrew Múzeum krt. 4/F H-1088 Budapest Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • ʿAmmār al-Baṣrī’s Werk in der Geschichte der
           Arabischen Literatur
    • Abstract: ʿAmmār al-Baṣrī was an outstanding representative of the Nestorian theology in the Christian-Moslem disputes of the ninth century. As a Christian writer who knew both Greek and Syriac, he continued the traditions of the Eastern (Greek) church in every respect, including the way of presentation and argumentation. Relying on his example the author tries to point out that the Christian writers of the early Islamic centuries represented the traditional Greek rhetoric culture in Islamic surroundings.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 423-464

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.8

      Authors
      Miklós Maróth, Ungarische Akademie der Wissenschaften Forschungsgruppe für Altertumswissenschaft Múzeum krt. 4/F H-1088 Budapest Ungarn
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • Between the monstrous and the divine: Hermaphrodites in Phlegon of
           Tralles’ Mirabilia
    • Abstract: The aim of this paper is to examine the role of sexually ambiguous human individuals in the Mirabilia by Phlegon of Tralles. The text preserves two curious accounts of the birth of hermaphroditic infants. In antiquity hermaphrodites were usually regarded as maleficent portents which needed a propitiation of the gods; traces of this belief are to be found also in the Mirabilia, since both accounts represent these ‘creatures’ as evil omens. However, in Phlegon’s times hermaphrodites ceased to be considered dangerous and became objects of refined entertainment. I attempt to show that Phlegon, incorporating these particular stories of hermaphrodites into his compilation, plays with the former significance of this phenomenon. First of all, hermaphrodites perfectly fit Phlegon’s collection of marvels, which is focused exclusively on human oddities. But most importantly, he chooses two stories, one of which is strikingly drastic, highly incredible and exceptionally complex in terms of the odd and the bizarre, and the other is reduced to mere quotations from vague and gloomy Sybilline Oracles; in both of them the hermaphrodite is just a part of the sensation and triggers off a sequence of many other extraordinary elements. No longer seen as dangerous, these very special hermaphrodites are used for entertainment purposes providing amusement to the readers by means of shock, astonishment and sensation, along with other ‘freaks of nature’ in the Mirabilia.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 379-392

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.4.4

      Authors
      Julia Doroszewska, University of Silesia in Katowice Department of Classical Studies pl. Sejmu Śląskiego 1, pok. 117 40-032 Katowice Poland
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Number 4/December 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:07:30 GMT
       
  • Shifting shadows on the landscape: Reading umbrae in Vergil and other
           poets
    • Abstract: A survey of Vergil’s uses of the word umbra and comparisons with its uses in other Roman poets reveals that Vergil was the first poet to deploy umbra, previously neutral or negative in connotation, with positive associations, and that he may have been the first to coin it as meaning ‘ghost’. Unlike many other poets, Vergil exploits the multivalent potential of umbra, requiring readers to interpret his usage. The fact that all of Vergil’s varied uses of umbra appear in the Culex suggests that it was written by an astute follower who was perceptive to the poet’s nuanced usage of the term.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 245-259

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.7

      Authors
      Lorina N. Quartarone, University of St. Thomas Dept. of Modern and Classical Languages 2115 Summit Avenue Saint Paul MN 55105 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Landscapes of war
    • Abstract: Drawing on established connections between Roman identity and an agricultural landscape, this paper examines how the imagery of disrupted pastoral and agrarian landscapes and characters represent the effects of civil war on the Roman people in Vergil’s Aeneid and Lucan’s Bellum Civile. While disturbance and turmoil are already a part of the natural landscape in Vergil’s Eclogues and Georgics, in epic, a genre that concerns itself with how empire and imperial power mediate Roman identity, the displacement of shepherds and agriculture partially redefines Roman identity in militaristic terms. Vergil’s pastoral characters, written into military roles as civic landscapes displace agrarian ones in the Aeneid, survive but fail to find a place in Lucan’s ruined and desolate Pharsalian landscape in the Bellum Civile. There, the broken natural landscape, unfit for agriculture, pastoralism, or trade, mirrors the redefinition of what is “Roman” and the occlusion of Rome’s link to an idealized bucolic past.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 261-274

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.8

      Authors
      Jessica McCutcheon, Amherst College Dept. of Classics 55 College Street Amherst MA 01002-5000 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Frustrated desires of the pastoral world
    • Abstract: In Theocritus, Virgil, and Longus each author establishes a tree that is symbolic of their approach to the pastoral tradition. In the opening of Theocritus’ Idylls, a goatherd’s piping is favorably compared with the sound of wind through the pine (πίτυς). This passage establishes the pine as a symbolic marker for Theocritus’ pastoral world. This world, however, is punctuated by the frustration of unfulfilled personal desires, and the pine tree is present in passages which depict this (Idylls 1. 134, 3. 38, 5. 49).Virgil adopts this pastoral tradition and in Eclogue 1, Meliboeus comments that Tityrus lies beneath a beech tree (fagus), piping to the woodland Muse. Although the reader may assume that the beech is simply Virgil’s version of the Theocritean pine, the beginning of the fourth line makes it clear that this pastoral world is not only inhabited by unrequited personal desire, but external upheaval and frustration: “nos patriam fugimus”. The inclusion of external strife is found in two key passages in the Eclogues associated with the beech tree: 3. 12 and 9. 9, and reveals a break in the Theocritean tradition.Virgil thus establishes a mutable element of the pastoral tradition which is taken up by Longus in his genre-bending novel, Daphnis and Chloe. In the tradition of Theocritus and Virgil, Longus establishes the oak as the symbolic tree for Daphnis and Chloe. The oak appears frequently throughout the novel and represents the intensely personal erotic frustrations of the young couple. In many instances, however, Daphnis and Chloe seek refuge under their tree after outsiders have attempted violence on them. In this way, Longus blends the function of the programmatic pastoral tree established by Theocritus and Virgil.Thus, this paper examines how Virgil’s association of his pastoral symbol, the beech, with external frustrations contributes to the adaptability of the pastoral landscape established by Theocritus’ pines, and in turn inherited by Longus’ oak.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 211-220

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.5

      Authors
      Deanna Wesolowski, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 829 Curtin Hall Department of Foreign Language and Literature P.O. Box 413 3243 N. Downer Avenue Milwaukee WI 53201 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Ad sidera:Tree-space symbolism in Plato’s Phaedrus and
           Vergil’s Eclogues
    • Abstract: This article explores the symbiotic relationship between nature and poetry, which is in many ways pivotal for Vergil’s Arcadia, as an imaginary construct. Interdependence of the ideal landscape and the poetic creativity finds an especially refined and polysemic expression in the fagus, which functions in the Eclogues simultaneously as a literary image, a metaphor, and a symbol. It is also strongly reminiscent of the proto-idyllic segment of Plato’s Phaedrus (230b-e), describing a beautiful πλάτανος that turns out to be the source of anagogic inspiration. Based on this analogy, a comparative reading of Plato’s dialogue and Vergil’s idyllic poems is offered, and the ascensus motive of Eclogue 5 reveals the Platonic echoes. The anagogic aspect of Arcadia is examined from an intertextual and interdisciplinary point of view, hopefully contributing to seize the polyphonic complexity of Vergil’s poetics.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 221-244

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.6

      Authors
      Jelena Pilipović, University of Belgrade Dept. of General Literature and Theory of Literature Studentski Trg 3 11 000 Belgrade Serbia
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • Landscapes in the Bellum Civile: From negation to subversion of the locus
           amoenus
    • Abstract: Looking at two descriptions of landscape in Lucan’s Bellum Civile (the sacred grove near Massilia and the Libyan desert), we will try to show that the poet uses bucolic elements to depict some places. However, he does not use these pastoral elements to describe a locus amoenus but a locus horridus. Lucan’s landscape can be defined as an inversion and a subversion of the bucolic one.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 275-285

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.9

      Authors
      Florian Barrière, Université de Paris-Ouest Nanterre la Défense Dept. de langues et littératures grecques et latines Paris France
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:42 GMT
       
  • From tamarisks to stars: Cosmic inspiration in Vergil’s Eclogues
    • Abstract: Vergil’s Eclogues, despite belonging to the bucolic genre and being largely modelled on Theocritus’ Idylls, bear clear marks of cosmic inspiration; these emerge from time to time, now in one poem, next in another, issuing ideas and images apparently inconsistent with the pastoral world: this happens especially in the three central Eclogues. Non-pastoral ideas and images often refer to philosophical or mythological themes, possibly coming either from poets with a cosmic vein (such as Hesiod and Lucretius), or from philosophic schools dealing with cosmogony (such as Orphism and Stoicism). Vergil develops these themes in innovative ways. This broadening of perspective concerns the power of song that seduces and dominates nature (with remarkable self-reflexive implications), the human desire to interact with the gods (even to enter their realm and identify with them through apotheosis), and the longing for purification and rebirth, hand-in-hand with the universal aspiration for peace and happiness.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 185-209

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.4

      Authors
      Giampiero Scafoglio, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli Dipartimento di Lettere e Beni Culturali Piazza San Francesco - Complesso San Francesco 81055 Santa Maria Capua Vetere Italy
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:41 GMT
       
  • “Vergilian” wolves in the Panegyric on Avitus by Sidonius
           Apollinaris (Carm. 7. 361–368)
    • Abstract: The article analyzes a simile of the Panegyric on the emperor Avitus by the Late Antique poet Sidonius Apollinaris (430–486 CE). The Vandals who sacked Rome in 455 become terrible wolves. Sidonius has to exaggerate the drama of the event experienced by Rome in order to exalt the salvific role played by the emperor Avitus. Sidonius echoes a lot of Vergil’s pastoral landscapes and other epic similes or phrases by Statius, Silius, Valerius Flaccus, Lucan. This simile is a good example of the poetry of Sidonius and of the literary conceptions of the Late Antique Literature.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 287-300

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.10

      Authors
      Francesco Montone, Federico II University of Naples Naples Italy
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Cara deum suboles: Hercules and Orpheus in Vergil’s pastoral
           landscape
    • Abstract: The tragedies of Hercules and Orpheus in Vergil’s Georgics anticipate their respective elevations in the afterlife.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 171-183

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.3

      Authors
      Patricia A. Johnston, Brandeis University Classical Studies Faculty 415 South Street Waltham MA 02453 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • The humanist reception of Vergil’s Bucolics
    • Abstract: In the framework of an European program that I direct — which is devoted to the enhancement of the humanist heritage of the Upper Rhine region (Southern Germany, Northern Switzerland and Alsace), that is the humanistic editions of the Greek and Roman authors held by the libraries —, a curious work to be found in the University Library of Basel has come to my attention. Indeed, I would like to speak about some aspects of the humanist reception of Virgil and more specifically of his Bucolica, concerning the form as well as the content.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 301-310

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.11

      Authors
      Marie-Laure Freyburger-Galland, Université de Haute-Alsace Faculté des Lettres, Langues et Sciences Humaines 10, rue des Frères Lumière F-68093 Mulhouse Cedex France
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Embracing Vergil’s ‘Arcadia’: Constructions and
           representations of a literary topos in the poetry of the Augustans
    • Abstract: The Arcadian landscape was originally developed in Vergil to transcend an actual landscape and identify with an idealized setting temptingly abstract in order to serve as a metaphor for the redesigned pastoral genre as promoted in the Eclogues. Vergil’s Arcadia as described in Eclogue 4, for the first time in Latin literature, was a construction, a literary topos and a symbol of innovative poetics, but also of Roman history and contemporary politics interfused. Vergil’s Arcadia was an imaginary landscape. This utopia becomes — in full awareness of Vergil’s literary contemporaries and the poets following after them — an appropriate setting for the staging of imaginary literary dialogues between shepherds-poets, and the changing poetics is reflected on the changes of the archetypal landscape of the original Arcadia topography. These changes appear first in Tibullus (in selected passages from 1. 1, 1. 3, 1. 5, 1. 7, 1. 10, 2. 1, 2. 3 and 2. 5) and recur in new forms in Propertius, Horace and Ovid. The progress of transformation evidences Arcadia’s ability to observe the rules of different generic environments and anticipates the propagation of the particularly literary topos across the centuries, as a multi-leveled symbol of poetics, aesthetics and politics.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 145-170

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.2

      Authors
      Sophia Papaioannou, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens Department of Classics Faculty of Philology University Campus Zografou 157 84 Athens Greece
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: In the Western literary tradition the concept of the Golden Age and its identification with a special location is as old as the earliest poetic compositions, for it features prominently in the 8th c. BCE didactic epic Works and Days by the Greek poet Hesiod. Filtered through the sophisticated and poetically-determined poetry of the Alexandrians (Theocritus, Aratus), the Golden Age, now linked to an idyllic pastoral landscape, becomes the centerpiece, the common point of reference of all ten poems that comprise Vergil’s earliest work, the Eclogues. In Vergil’s pastoral art the Golden Age is identified with Arcadia, a location allegedly evoking the Greek area at the center of the Peloponnese, proverbial for its rusticity and shunning of civilization, and as a result, free of all pretention. The fashioning, significance and transformation of the Arcadia theme in literature, both ancient and later, and the evolution of the Augustan model, is the topic of the present volume, the structure and objectives of which are detailed in this introductory chapter.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 133-144

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.1

      Authors
      Patricia A. Johnston
      Sophia Papaioannou
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • The Eclogues of Miklós Radnóti: A twentieth-century Vergil
    • Abstract: At the beginning of the 19th century, when the poets wanted to create the national epic poem of Hungarians, they followed the Aeneid; at the end of the 18th century, when the agricultural reform was established in Hungary under the Habsburgs, the poets wrote agricultural poems in Vergilian form and translated and modernized his Georgics. The world of Vergil depicted in the Eclogues and in the Georgics became the idealized Arcadia, and poets and writers or the aristocracy — influenced by Vergil — wanted to create their own Arcadia. The pastoral theme and the bucolical forms were very popular in Hungarian literature of this period, at the end of the 18th century. The poets had pastoral names, and very different topics were expressed in eclogues (e.g. actual events of politics). In the first half of the 20th century Vergil had a new renaissance connected to the bimillennium of his birth. And this renaissance reached the most expressive element of the presence of Vergil’s Bucolics in the poetry of Miklós Radnóti (1909–1944), whose eclogues are the most tragic expression of cruelty of war. My paper focuses on the influence of Virgil’s Bucolics in Radnóti’s poetry, but his examples can attest to the deep influence of Vergil on Hungarian literature.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 311-322

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.53.2013.2-3.12

      Authors
      László Takács, Pázmány Péter Catholic University Inst. of Classics and Oriental Studies Egyetem u. 1 2087 Piliscsaba Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua
      Online ISSN 1588-2543
      Print ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 53
      Journal Issue Volume 53, Numbers 2-3/June 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 05:30:39 GMT
       
 
 
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