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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 190 journals)
Abstracta Iranica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Archaeological Practice : A Journal of the Society for American Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription  
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Altorientalische Forschungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription  
American Indian Culture and Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Archaeology     Partially Free   (Followers: 27)
Anatolica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ancient Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Ancient Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access  
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Antiqua     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access  
Apeiron     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Archaeologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Archaeologiai Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription  
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 116)
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archaeology International     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
ArcheoArte. Rivista Elettronica di Archeologia e Arte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ArcheoSciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete     Full-text available via subscription  
Archivo Español de Arqueología     Partially Free  
Arkeos     Open Access  
Arqueología de la Arquitectura     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BABesch - Bulletin Antieke Beschaving     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access  
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bryn Mawr Classical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre | BUCEMA - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Cambridge Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 155)
Catalan Historical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Chiron     Full-text available via subscription  
Chronique des activités archéologiques de l'École française de Rome     Open Access  
Complutum     Open Access  
Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Deltion of the Christian Archaeological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
digitAR - Revista Digital de Arqueologia, Arquitectura e Artes     Open Access  
Documents d’archéologie méridionale - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access  
Economic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Etruscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Études océan Indien     Open Access  
European Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 185)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Evolution of Science and Technology / Mokslo ir technikos raida     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Exchange     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frühmittelalterliche Studien     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geoarchaeology: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Geochronometria     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Germanistik     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Heritage Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hesperia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Hispania Epigraphica     Open Access  
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Industrial Archaeology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology , The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Heritage in the Digital Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 131)
International Journal of Nautical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 107)
International Journal of Paleopathology     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internet Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)

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Acta Antiqua
   [16 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0044-5975 - ISSN (Online) 1588-2543
     Published by Akademiai Kiado RT Homepage  [62 journals]   [SJR: 0.1]   [H-I: 2]
  • The Historical Geography of Sophene
    • Abstract: This paper deals with the historical geography of Sophene — it aims to determine its original territory and geopolitical developments from Hellenistic times to the eve of the Arab conquests. To achieve this goal, a wide range of sources have been examined with regard to geographical (and ethnographical) information on Sophene — Greek and Latin geographical and ethnographical texts, Greek and Latin historiographical accounts, Byzantine legislations, and finally Armenian writings.In the light of the available data, the heartland of Hellenistic Sophene was located in the triangle marked by the Euphrates (in the west), the Munzur Mountains (in the north), and the Tauros (in the south). This territory includes the modern Dersim (Tunceli), the lower Murat valley (on either side of the river), and the Elaziğ plain, and coincides with the center of the pre-Hellenistic — Suppani. As a political entity Sophene expanded its territory, and especially its expansion in the northeast (including Balabitene and Asthianene) and over the Tauros into the upper Tigris valley (Ingilene, Sophanene) turned out to have more lasting consequences. These territories were closely integrated into Sophene as a political and cultural entity. The first capital of Sophene was ancient Arsamosata (likely located at modern Haraba), but due to the expansion of the kingdom of Sophene over the Tauros, the capital was later moved to the bank of the Tigris as to a more central position (likely today’s Eğil — Strabo’s and Pliny’s Karkathiokerta). Sophene’s political significance resulted from its geographical location — it straddled one of the most important communication lines between West and East in ancient times (the Tomisa crossing).
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 295-338

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.1

      Authors
      Michaŀ Marciak, Rzeszów University Instytut Historii Al. Rejtana 16 C Rzeszów 35-959 Poland
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
  • The Role of the Lares in the ‘Augustan’ Theology of Tibullus
    • Abstract: In his poetic collection, Tibullus often refers to the ancient household gods Lares. In this paper we will show that the prominent position Tibullus reserves for the Lares in his elegies proves that the poet agrees with Augustus’ programme of political and moral renovatio. Also we will point out how traditional worship in Augustan Rome is revived in order to serve both the religious and the political objectives of the Princeps.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 349-362

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.3

      Authors
      Panagiota Papakosta, Ecclesiastical Lyceum of Lamia GR 35100 Lamia Greece
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
  • The Quaestors and The IUS Intercedendi in The Flavian Municipal Law
    • Abstract: It is widely accepted that the former emendation of chapter 27 of the lex Salpensana concerning the intercessio of the quaestors is superfluous in the light of the same chapter of the lex Irnitana. But the explanations of the commentaries about this lack are wrong and the text itself shows that the quaestors originally had the ius intercedendi. Additionally, its accidental omission in all three copies can be easily explained. Therefore, the emendation is correct.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 375-381

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.5

      Authors
      Imre Áron Illés, University of Szeged Egyetem u. 2 H-6722 Szeged Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
  • Multiplex Sermo the ‘Manifold Speech’ of Fama in
           Virgil’S Aeneid
    • Abstract: In this paper, I establish a connection between the manifold character of Fama as reported by Virgil in Aen. 4. 173 ff. and her ‘manifold speech’ (multiplex sermo) in the framework of a narratological reading. According to my interpretation, the short fama of the Virgilian Fama (4. 191-194), as a spectacular example of ‘polyphonic narrative’, radicalises and thus domesticates the dangers inherent in the epic discourse itself.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 339-348

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.2

      Authors
      Ábel Tamás, Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) Budapest Dept. of Comparative Literature Múzeum krt. 4/A H-1088 Budapest Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
  • Resyllabification and Metre: The Issue of S Impurum Revisited
    • Abstract: This paper discusses a phenomenon of Latin phonology, word-initial extrasyllabic s, a subcase of what is traditionally called s impurum. Extrasyllabic s behaves unlike other consonants in syllabification, especially at morpheme boundaries, where resyllabification takes place. The odd behaviour of initial extrasyllabic s in poetry is explained not on the basis of clashing metrical conventions but on the basis of principles inherent in the phonological system of Latin.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 363-373

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.4.4

      Authors
      András Cser, Pázmány Péter Catholic University Egyetem u. 1. H-2081 Piliscsaba Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 4/December 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:30:41 GMT
       
  • Variations on a theme: From Thucydides to Procopius
    • Abstract: In the present paper I try to point out the importance of imitation as a literary tool in the historiography of the early Byzantine period. Dexippus, Priscus, and Procopius used the description of the siege of Plataea as a base text for imitation. The primary aim of these authors was to continue the classical tradition through imitation and to create something new at the same time.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 225-234

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.4

      Authors
      Tamás Mészáros, Eötvös József Collegium H-1118 Budapest Ménesi út 11-13 Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • A Roman tradition of Alexander the Great counterfactual history
    • Abstract: The military success of Alexander and his early death lends itself perfectly to the realm of counterfactual history. No less than nine authors partook in the creation and propagation of Alexander counterfactual history. Our extant examples range from as early as the third century BCE to the sixth century CE. This paper examines first the scholarly debates surrounding the placement of Livy’s digression in his larger narrative, the objectives of Livy’s digression, and the reasons for its existence. It then turns to a discussion of the popularity and consistency of the Roman tradition of Alexander counterfactual history. The tradition not only attempted to represent Rome and Italy as places of relative international importance in the late forth century BCE but also served to compare a young Roman state, which would rise to dominance in the Mediterranean world, favorably to the mightiest conqueror in all of ancient history.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 203-212

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.2

      Authors
      Nikolaus Leo Overtoom, Louisiana State University Department of History 224 Himes Hall Baton Rouge LA 70803 USA
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • The aftermath of Christian persecutions: Lapsed and heretic bishops in the
           works of Saint Cyprian
    • Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to uncover similarities and differences between the works of the famous 3rd-century Carthaginian bishop written in adverse of his lapsed and heretic “colleagues”. The former ones are primarily the object of Letters 65 and 67, while the latter ones appear in the De Ecclesiae Unitate and in Letters 69–75. Their comparative analysis is motivated by the fact that in both cases the author’s purpose is to prove that these ecclesiastic leaders had become inconvenient to their office and thus to carry out their job substantially. Causes mentioned by Cyprian are the following: they call wrongfully for the right of performing a sacrifice; their sacraments are invalid because of their sins; they are separated from the Church; their inaptness is proclaimed by both contemporary and former bishops and synods; and finally, they contaminate their followers, so it is necessary to be separated from them. These arguments are formulated concerning both groups, so it can be supposed that in Cyprian’s opinion lapsed and heretic bishops were not sharply different from each other, therefore he may have used the same thoughts about the former group to apply them to the latter one as well.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 213-223

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.3

      Authors
      Ádám Szabó, University of Szeged Department of Classics and Neo-Latin Studies H-6722 Szeged Egyetem u. 2 Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • Etruskische Religion und Christentum
    • Abstract: During the Roman Empire, when an autonomous Etruscan culture had disappeared long ago, aspects of the old Etruscan religion were still surviving and had been integrated in the Roman traditional religion: the haruspices, acting as diviners for public or private purposes all over the Roman empire, could interpret prodigies, what Roman priests and even augurs did not. When, with the Christians, a new religion arrived which risked to overthrow the old national religion of the Romans, Etruscan religious tradition played an important role against the rise of Christianity: with the sacred books of the Etruscans, with the prophets who were alleged to have created the Etruscan religious tradition, the Romans could find in their own heritage what could match the Bible of the Christians or their prophets. Unsurprisingly, haruspices were active in the resistance movement against the new religion.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 273-281

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.7

      Authors
      Dominique Briquel, Paris France
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • The warrior queen
    • Abstract: The Hellenistic kings’ mechanism for revealing divine power leaves no conceptual doubt, which is why it is generally accepted that the military deed, with time not necessarily an authentic one, was a major and even central element forming the basis of the cult of the ruler. The question, however, arises as to the framework within which a “military deed” could be performed in the context of the changing ontological status of women, and thus of female Hellenistic rulers. It should be considered that the concept of the military deed of female rulers as the basis of Hellenistic monarchical ideology was certainly not born on the battlefield, where queens basically did not appear. However, in spite of the lack of a military basis, the fighting female ruler is present in Hellenistic ideology. This situation begs the question of whether the armed deed, as in the case of male rulers, was at all necessary to associate the queens with war. Possibly it is a case of the reverse — maybe the military deed was a consequence rather than the cause of the cult of these female rulers, since female historical figures did not change their ontological status as a result of the armed deed.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 193-201

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.1

      Authors
      Lucyna Kostuch, The Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce Department of Ancient History ul. Żeromskiego 5 25-369 Kielce Poland
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • Die Planudes-Metaphrasis der Disticha Catonis
    • Abstract: The translation of Maximos Planudes is a curiosity of Byzantine literature. The subject of this paper is the translation of the Disticha Catonis and its reception in the Byzantine world and later in Western Europe. The final conclusion is that the Disticha Catonis were adapted to the Byzantine curriculum and used as a sample text in the progymnasmata-method.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 283-292

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.8

      Authors
      Nóra Fodor, Budapest Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • A Renaissance manuscript of Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius: Budapest,
           Országos Széchényi Könyvtár, Codex latinus medii
           aevi 137 and Cologny, Bibliotheca Bodmeriana, MS. Bodmer 141
    • Abstract: Budapest, Országos Széchényi Library, Codex latinus medii aevi 137 is a parchment codex from the 15th century that contains the poems of Catullus and Tibullus. It has a twin in Cologny, Bibliotheca Bodmeriana, MS. Bodmer 141, which contains the poems of Propertius; the two manuscripts were copied together and once constituted a two-volume ‘edition’ of the three poets. The subscription of the volume in Cologny shows that both were copied in 1466 in Florence by Ioannes Petrus de Spoleto. They were soon acquired by Antonello Petrucci (?-1487), secretary to King Ferdinand of Naples, and after Petrucci’s execution they entered the royal library. It is not clear what happened to the second volume when the library was scattered around AD 1500, but the first volume appears to have remained in Italy: in the early 16th century it was owned by one Iuuarius Indicus or Indico or Íñigo de Guevara, who presented it to his tutor Placidius Jacobus Antonius Ubertus in 1529, as is shown by an owner’s note and an epigram by Jacobus Antonius on the front flyleaf of the codex. Then we lose track of the first volume as well.The origins of the text of Propertius in the second volume have already been studied by Butrica, who noted that the codex was a sibling of the Codex Memmianus (Parisinus lat. 8233) and of Urbinas lat. 641. The stemma of Tibullus is not known well enough for us to be able to locate the first volume within it. However, it can be demonstrated that the text of Catullus in this volume descends indirectly from Siena H.V.41, and ultimately from R (Vatican, Ottobonianus lat. 1829); and that for Catullus too the volume is a sibling of the Memmianus and of Urbinas lat. 641.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 249-271

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.3.6

      Authors
      Dániel Kiss, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Abteilung für Griechische und Lateinische Philologie Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1 D-80539 München Germany
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 3/September 2012
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:30:33 GMT
       
  • Critica
    • Abstract: Critica
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 191-192

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.7

      Authors
      Gábor Hamvas
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:40 GMT
       
  • Phaedrus and the medieval tradition
    • Abstract: The name and the verses of Phaedrus were unknown in the Middle Ages but his fables were widespread in several prosified versions. One of these is the collection of Romulus, which is of great importance because it has preserved some lost Phaedrian fables and various other collections have derived from it. This paper examines the textual tradition of these and of Phaedrus’ fables. I attempt to present some problems about the tradition and offer a solution to these questions.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 173-189

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.6

      Authors
      Hanna Vámos, University of Szeged Dept. of Classical and Neo-Latin Studies H-6722 Szeged Egyetem u. 2. Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Quintilian’s influence on Juvenal’s Satire 1
    • Abstract: The question of the relationship between Juvenal and Quintilian is still unanswered: the reconstruction of their possible biographical and literary connections is very uncertain. The Life of Juvenal does not mention Quintilian; its author only states that Juvenal spent a significant part of his life declaiming. Their personal acquaintance is not confirmed by any ancient source, and the views of modern research are not univocal either. In his Institutes Quintilian declares concerning the satire that in his age there are satirists who will be famous in the future. However, research is very careful about the question whether Quintilian referred to Juvenal with these words. On the basis of the biographical data, it cannot even be proven with certainty that Juvenal had known Quintilian, thus we have to find evidence in the texts of the two authors. In this paper, I examine the possible influence of Quintilian on Juvenal’s Satire 1, by highlighting textual and thematic parallels, as well as common motifs, in order to unfold the relation between Satire 1, the Institutes, and the Minor Declamations attributed to Quintilian.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 165-171

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.5

      Authors
      Gergő Gellérfi, University of Szeged Szeged Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Ὅυτω τοι δɛι̑
           ζη̑ν τὸν
           ἐλɛύθɛρον Corrélation
           de la Bonne Alimentation et la Bonne vie dans les Fragments
           D’Archestrate
    • Abstract: The unique source of the 334 verses which came down to us from Archestratus is the Deipnosophistae, prolix dialogue of Athenaeus, author of the 2nd century A.D. The characters of this dialogue are introducing and commenting, therefore enchasing Archestratus’ fragments in the organic unity of the dialogue according to their own vision of world. Thus, the introducing comments which Athenaeus’ characters make on Archestratus’ fragments form the natural milieu of the fragments, insofar as they become inseparable of Archestratus’ text. Does these introducing comments help today’s reader to get closer to an adequate lecture of Archestratus? This is the question which the first part of the present study proposes to answer, trying to outline the antique vision on Archestratus by means of the unique source of the fragments: Athenaeus’ Deipnosophistae.The second part of the study examines — in the spirit of the results of the first part — each fragment of Archestratus, strictly from one point of view: the concept of good made out of the fragments. This part proposes to shed light upon what invests a food with the vertue of goodness, and how the good alimentation and good life are connected in Archestratus’ thought.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 113-133

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.2

      Authors
      Mária Adorjáni, Trosly-Breuil France
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Lucretius 4.791
    • Abstract: This note suggests an emendation of Lucretius 4.791: et repetunt modulis gestum pede convenienti.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 135-136

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.3

      Authors
      Włodzimierz Olszaniec, University of Warsaw Institute of Classical Studies Krakowskie Przedmieście 1 00-047 Warsaw Poland
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Pliny the elder on the Etruscans
    • Abstract: Pliny the Elder’s encyclopaedia contains lots of information on Etruria and the Etruscans in different contexts. Besides geographical descriptions, there are text parts related to the Etruscans in the volumes on botany, zoology, pharmacology and mineralogy. In the following, I am going to provide an analysis of all the passages related to the Etruscans in the encyclopaedia along different themes.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 137-163

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.4

      Authors
      Cecilia Gábli, Pécs Hungary
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:39 GMT
       
  • Zur Prophetischen Metaphorik in der Sechsten Olympischen ode Pindars?
    • Abstract: Every Pindaric ode poses the question of literary unity, which is the main issue of Pindaric scholarship. But every ode presents a specific form of unity, and so does the Sixth Olympian, one of Pindar’s most accomplished poems, whose ways of achieving unity are the chief concern of this paper. I argue that unity in O. 6 comes about by dint of a metaphoric parallel between the poet (Pindar) and the prophet (Hagesias, the victor, and Iamos, the mythic protagonist). This parallel is based on two significant moments, which are typical of both the prophet and the poet: the moment of inspiration and that of the utterance (of the oracle viz. poem). The same moments are brought to the fore in vv. 58–70 concerning the prophet Iamos, then in vv. 82–91 (the main stumbling block in the interpretation of the poem) concerning the poet Pindar. From this core metaphors of prophetic-poetic activity permeate the whole epinician ode.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 91-111

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.52.2012.2.1

      Authors
      Zsolt Adorjáni, Katholischen Péter-Pázmány-Universität Piliscsaba Institut für Altertumskunde der H-2087 Piliscsaba-Klotildliget Egyetem u. 1. Ungarn
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 52
      Journal Issue Volume 52, Number 2/June 2013
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2013 05:30:38 GMT
       
  • Der Nachlass von Gyula Moravcsik in der Handschriftenabteilung der
           Bibliothek der Ungarischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
    • Abstract: The paper reports on the legacy of Gyula Moravcsik, the internationally renowned professor of Byzantine Studies, who died in 1972. The legacy kept by the Department of Manuscripts and Rare Books of the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences has been fully catalogued and is now available to researchers.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Pages 187-198

      DOI 10.1556/AAnt.51.2011.2.6

      Authors
      Edit Krähling, Bibliothek der Ungarischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Abteilung für Handschriften und Alte Bücher Széchenyi István tér 9. H-1051 Budapest Ungarn
      Journal Acta Antiqua

      Online ISSN 0044-5975
      Journal Volume Volume 51
      Journal Issue Volume 51, Number 2/June 2011
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Jan 2013 13:31:30 GMT
       
 
 
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