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  Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 1099 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (220 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (179 journals)
    - DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION STUDIES (207 journals)
    - ETHNIC INTERESTS (157 journals)
    - GENEALOGY AND HERALDRY (7 journals)
    - HUMANITIES (242 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (87 journals)

HUMANITIES (242 journals)                  1 2 3     

Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Adeptus     Open Access  
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription  
African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
African Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
AFRREV IJAH : An International Journal of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Altre Modernità     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Amaltea. Revista de mitocrítica     Open Access  
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Review of Canadian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Anabases     Open Access  
Angelaki: Journal of Theoretical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anglo-Saxon England     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236)
Antik Tanulmányok     Full-text available via subscription  
Antipode     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Arbutus Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argumentation et analyse du discours     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arion : A Journal of Humanities and the Classics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Asia Europe Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Popular Culture, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Behaviour & Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 230)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cahiers de civilisation espagnole contemporaine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers de praxématique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Carl Beck Papers in Russian and East European Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Child Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Choreographic Practices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Claroscuro     Open Access  
Co-herencia     Open Access  
Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cogent Arts & Humanities     Open Access  
Colloquia Humanistica     Open Access  
Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Congenital Anomalies     Hybrid Journal  
Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Cornish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Critical Arts : South-North Cultural and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Crossing the Border : International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
Cuadernos de historia de España     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de la Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales. Universidad Nacional de Jujuy     Open Access  
Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Culture, Theory and Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Daedalus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Dandelion : Postgraduate Arts Journal & Research Network     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Debatte: Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Digital Humanities Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Diogenes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Doct-Us Journal     Open Access  
e-Hum : Revista das Áreas de Humanidade do Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte     Open Access  
Early Modern Culture Online     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Égypte - Monde arabe     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eighteenth-Century Fiction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Éire-Ireland     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
En-Claves del pensamiento     Open Access  
Enfoques     Open Access  
Ethiopian Journal of the Social Sciences and Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Études arméniennes contemporaines     Open Access  
Études de lettres     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Expositions     Full-text available via subscription  
Fudan Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
GAIA - Ecological Perspectives for Science and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
German Research     Hybrid Journal  
German Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Germanic Review, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Globalizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Gothic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Gruppendynamik und Organisationsberatung     Hybrid Journal  
Habitat International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Hopscotch: A Cultural Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Human Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Nature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Human Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Human Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
humanidades     Open Access  
Humanitaire     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Hungarian Studies     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2 3     

Journal Cover   Journal of African American Studies
  [SJR: 0.212]   [H-I: 6]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1559-1646 - ISSN (Online) 1936-4741
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2302 journals]
  • The Crucial Role of Naming in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon
    • PubDate: 2015-05-03
       
  • You Moved Up, Did You Forget Us?: The Influence of African American
           Intra-familial Social Mobility on Extended Family Relationships
    • Abstract: This study explored the extent to which changes in socioeconomic status influenced the willingness or ability of extended family members to adhere to family scripts regarding interaction and resource sharing. Ethnographic methodology was utilized to examine the lived experience of the members of one large, extended African American family with its roots in a rural area of North Carolina. The results suggest that interaction is maintained despite changes in socioeconomic status among family members but that the interaction is transformed as one rises in socioeconomic status. The results also suggest that certain levels of ambiguous loss may occur as a result of the changing family relationships.
      PubDate: 2015-04-23
       
  • The CEO of Self: Herman Cain, Black Conservatism and the Achievement
           Ideology
    • Abstract: In his autobiography This Is Herman Cain, conservative business executive and former Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain attributes his success to the hard work ethic and perseverance instilled in him by his father. Cain asserts that possessing a positive mindset or as he states becoming the “CEO of Self” played a major role in his ability to transcend the various hurdles he faced as a young African-American male growing up in the Deep South during the civil rights era. Cain’s line of thinking fits within the paradigm of the American achievement ideology, but I argue that Cain’s idealized construction of an American society where racism’s impact on the opportunity chances of African-Americans is minimal ultimately allows for the maintenance of an American social structure where “whiteness” reigns supreme.
      PubDate: 2015-04-16
       
  • Slave Religion, Slave Hiring, and the Incipient Proletarianization of
           Enslaved Black Labor: Developing Du Bois’ Thesis on Black
           Participation in the Civil War as a Revolution
    • Abstract: WEB Du Bois argued that black participation in the US Civil War was “the largest and most successful slave revolt,” but he did not link the causative agents of black participation in the war to those that motivated other major slave revolts in the antebellum USA. In this essay, I focus on how two factors contributed to such revolts: (1) slave religion, which provided an ideological justification for overthrowing the slave system and mobile slave preachers to articulate it, and (2) the system of hiring out slaves—especially slave artisans, which increased their disaffection with the slave system, while expanding networks across plantations and rural and urban slave and free black communities. I argue that these two factors provided ideological motivation and institutional coordination for the antebellum revolts and for the slave revolt of the Civil War, as well.
      PubDate: 2015-04-16
       
  • Examining the Value of Social Capital and Social Support for Black
           Student-Athletes’ Academic Success
    • Abstract: The purpose of this study is to understand how social capital and social support influence the academic success of Black student-athletes that attend predominantly White institutions of higher education (PWIHEs). Utilizing a qualitative approach, the authors conducted narrative interviews to understand the experiences of Black student-athletes (N = 9) at a PWIHE in the southwestern region of the USA. Employing critical race theory, the Black student-athletes revealed their experiential realities as a racial minority within the academic environment. The findings revealed that their academic success was contingent upon their interactions with faculty as their status as Black student-athletes promoted positive and negative interactions. As such, Black student-athletes leveraged their social capital, or social networks consisting of parents and family, to provide social support. Acknowledging the unique “culture” of student-athletes, college and university athletic departments and their personnel may find it beneficial to create proactive avenues for parental engagement to aid in student-athlete adjustment and matriculation.
      PubDate: 2015-04-14
       
  • Educational Expectations Among African American Suburban Low to Moderate
           Income Public High School Students
    • Abstract: This study examined the educational expectations and value of education among St. Louis, suburban, low to moderate income, African American male and female adolescents. The following factors: perceptions of parents’ expectations, teachers’ expectations, and neighborhood quality were examined to explore the academic gender disparity among African American high school students. Quantitative analyses showed that perceptions of teachers’ and parents’ expectations were associated with students’ educational expectations and value of education. The analyses also showed that some demographic variables were associated with teachers’ and parents’ expectations and value of education. No significant gender differences emerged between African American males and females for educational expectations.
      PubDate: 2015-04-14
       
  • Slaves to the Community: Blacks and the Rhetoric of “Selling
           Out”
    • Abstract: In 2008, Randall Kennedy, the Michael R. Klein Professor of Law at Harvard University, published Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal. In this work, Kennedy provided both a historical and a contemporary discussion of the term “sellout” as well as a defense of its usage among blacks. In this essay, I critique Kennedy’s work and argue that the rhetoric of “selling out” functions as a mechanism of social control meant to keep blacks on “their side” of the color line.
      PubDate: 2015-04-12
       
  • The Racial Exceptionalism of Barack Obama
    • Abstract: Since Barack Obama appeared on the political scene, questions regarding the authenticity of his blackness have remained at the forefront because of his mixed race parentage and nontraditional upbringing. These factors proved to be variously a political asset and liability as his blackness was often framed as scary to white voters who were essential to his electoral coalition. We argue that in order for whites to trust Obama politically, they divorced him from his black identity making him the “racial exception,” which made him more palatable. This, in part, was influenced by the deracialized electoral strategies deployed by Barack Obama. Still, we find race influences evaluations of Barack Obama differently by blacks and whites. Relying on data from the Pew Research Center, we find evidence that Barack Obama’s racial identity is more ambiguous for whites and evaluations of his favorability, values, and tenor of his opposition to fall along racial lines in significant ways despite the rhetoric of a post-racial America.
      PubDate: 2015-04-07
       
  • The African Traveller and the Chinese Customs Official: Ethnic Minority
           Profiling at Border Check Points in Hong Kong and China?
    • Abstract: Stronger government-to-government relations between Africa and China in the first two decades of the twenty-first century have led to an increasing presence of African travellers at Chinese border check points. This is a novel situation involving cross-linguistic and cross-cultural communication dynamics that we need to understand from different research perspectives: linguistic, socio-economic, and legal, among others. Academic studies are already detailing some misunderstandings between Chinese customs, immigration and public security officials and African travellers and immigrants, who are clearly a visible minority group, both at border check points and in the wider Chinese communities (Bodomo 2010; Bodomo and Ma 2010; Bodomo 2012). A number of questions may be asked towards understanding the cross-cultural dynamics involved in this novel situation. What are Chinese immigration and customs officials’ experiences with African travellers and how do they see and handle this visible minority ethnic group? What are, in turn, African experiences with Chinese immigration, customs, and public security, officials both at border check points and in the wider Chinese communities in places like mainland China and Hong Kong? To answer these questions, a profile of the most frequent African visitors to Hong Kong and China is constructed, based on research among Africans in China, particularly Guangzhou. An outline is then made of what Africans think of Chinese customs and immigration officials as a whole, what kind of treatment they expect on arrival in China and how they prepare for it. It is then claimed that the most fundamental issue that causes friction, unhappiness and sometimes lack of cooperation from African travellers at immigration and customs check points in Hong Kong and other places in China is not so much due to linguistic and cultural misunderstanding as it is due to stereotyping and, in extreme cases, (un)conscious racial profiling. Finally, it is proposed that the best way for Hong Kong and other Chinese customs personnel to serve African immigrants is to apply immigration rules using systematically fair, just and colour-blind strategies.
      PubDate: 2015-03-01
       
  • Triple Jeopardy: A Qualitative Investigation of the Experiences of
           Nontraditional African-American Female Students in One Hispanic-Serving
           Institution
    • Abstract: The purpose of this article is to provide key insights on the experiences of the nontraditional African-American female undergraduate student. A grounded theory design used in-depth interviews with 10 nontraditional African-American female undergraduate students attending a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in the Southwest. Findings suggest that academe must address the unique academic and social integration issues these students present from vantage points recognizing their African-American, female, and nontraditional identities. The authors conclude with recommendations to institutions of higher education for enhancing the matriculation experiences of this cohort.
      PubDate: 2015-03-01
       
  • Edward A. Bouchet: A Model for Understanding African Americans and Their
           Doctoral Experience
    • Abstract: The life and experiences of Dr. Edward A. Bouchet, the first African-American to receive a doctorate from Yale in 1876, are used to model features of the African-American doctoral experience. Bouchet’s early years and educational experiences are discussed to draw references to contemporary research on prior socialization toward doctoral degree completion. His experiences during doctoral study are highlighted to develop conclusions about literature regarding doctoral student socialization frameworks as they relate to the current experiences of African-American students. Furthermore, Bouchet’s life after the doctorate characterizes many issues associated with challenges faced by African-American doctoral degree completers and their postdoctoral degree completion experiences.
      PubDate: 2015-03-01
       
  • Finding a Voice: an Allocentric Worldview to Guide Effective Reduction of
           Behavioral Health Disparities in African Americans
    • Abstract: Reduction and elimination of African American health disparities, a major challenge of our society for the past 20 years, has not been realized, although empirical studies, clinical practice and policy initiatives have made progress in their attempt to achieve this goal. Behavioral health risks are a significant component of such disparities. In this paper the authors maintain that the precise lack of understanding of how much behavioral health is influenced by worldview, and the importance of historical roots of African American people, and the challenges they face in the 21st century need to be explored and understood within the context of worldview. Specifically, the allocentric worldview should be considered an essential component in discussions surrounding behavioral health disparities. This paper argues that anything less than an historical assessment of the conditions leading up to behavioral health ills in African American urban and rural communities today will be incomplete, inaccurate and fall short of achieving the goals of reducing behavioral health disparities in this population. The purpose of this manuscript is to present the allocentric worldview and explore how its adoption is critical to behavioral health recovery among African Americans today. It is proposed that knowing and adopting a cultural and historical worldview that is indigenous to African descended peoples may significantly improve motivation and action among African Americans to adopt healthier behavioral health life styles.
      PubDate: 2015-03-01
       
  • Beyond “Model Minority,” “Superwoman,” and
           “Endangered Species”: Theorizing Intersectional Coalitions
           among Black Immigrants, African American Women, and African American Men
    • Abstract: This essay brings an intersectional framework to the academic and popular discourse regarding relations of power among African American men, African American women, and Black immigrants. I demonstrate that African American women and Black immigrants are not necessarily and always more successful than African American men. Instead, all three groups share an experience of gendered and ethnicized racism that situates them differently in the labor force, the classroom, and beyond. Most importantly, African American men, African American women, and Black immigrants can forge feminist, anti-racist, and anti-nativist coalitions if and when they recognize that what it means to experience gendered and ethnicized racism is the result of rather than the reason for their politics.
      PubDate: 2015-03-01
       
  • Editorial
    • PubDate: 2015-02-24
       
  • The African-American Personality: Early Conceptions
    • Abstract: The personality traits and characteristics of African-Americans have been described, measured, and compared to those of other racial groups throughout the history of psychology in the USA. Most of the views commonly held were negative, and African-Americans were viewed as an inferior race. This study sought to investigate the early conceptions pertaining to the personality of African‐Americans, review the experimental research done in this area, and discuss the influences on and impact of these early studies.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01
       
  • Perceptions of Body Figure Attractiveness Among African American Male
           College Students
    • Abstract: Historically, females who had large body figures and considered overweight were seen as the epitome of beauty within the African American culture. More specifically, African American females with large body figures were perceived by African American males as smart, sexy, employable, desirable, wanted, marriatable, and rulers of their households. However, as African American males acculturate into the dominate culture via their college attendance, their perceptions of body figure attractiveness may begin to change towards perceptions that are similar to those of the dominate culture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine African American male college students’ perceptions of body figure attractiveness. Participants in this study consisted of 227 African American male college students between 18 and 31 years of age from two Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and two Traditionally White Institutions (TWIs) across the Southeast and Northeast regions of the United States. Findings from this study revealed that African American male college students’ perceptions of body figure attractiveness are changing towards those similar of the dominant culture. Thus, implications are discussed relative to the potential influence in which African American males’ perceived body figure attractiveness may have on African American females.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01
       
  • Self-Hate as Life Threat Pathology Among Black Americans: Black Pride
           Antidote Vis-à-Vis Leukocyte Telomere Length (LTL)
    • Abstract: Black Americans remain the most despised among the community of human races, reinforced via media images. In response is Black self-hate acted out by the political conservatism of Black American Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as icon. Black Conservatives insist that Blacks who fail, if they want, can succeed much as any other. Conversely, research substantiates that the self-hate pathology Black Americans who fail suffer precipitates a decrease in leukocyte telomere length (LTL). A decrease in LTL is a reduction in life span longevity. Black self-hate then presumes a life-threatening pathology among Black Americans so afflicted. In the aftermath, as the most despised among human races coupled with the internalization of self-hate, is a joint process which accelerates biological aging. The antidote may require Black pride as alternative to the premature LTL aging of Black people in America.
      PubDate: 2014-12-01
       
  • Expanding the African-American Studies Paradigm to Include Health: a Novel
           Approach to Promoting Health Equity
    • PubDate: 2014-07-11
       
  • Racial Economies of Academia: Africana Studies as Arbiter
    • Abstract: Recent scholarship that suggests the continuity of assaults on the Black body is often articulated from academic spaces. This should neither surprise nor comfort us. Whereas the academy has been an intellectual space which has been complicit in the physical and intellectual justifications of nonwhite inferiority, it has also emerged as the space where it is now en vogue to question the normative valuations of whiteness. But, has anything changed? Are there any contradictions in such an ordering of knowledge? This paper examines how the original understandings of Blackness have been filtered into the ways of approaching and understanding African-descended people in the contemporary, neoliberal academy. Whether through the constructions of ethnic studies, the opening of the social sciences and humanities, or the development of liberal approaches to race within university administrative practices, it questions whether or not the academy has abdicated its role as a third pillar of racial capitalism.
      PubDate: 2014-07-02
       
  • Aristotle and Black Drama: A Theater of Civil Disobedience
    • PubDate: 2014-06-18
       
 
 
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