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  Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 1066 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (217 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (174 journals)
    - DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION STUDIES (200 journals)
    - ETHNIC INTERESTS (153 journals)
    - GENEALOGY AND HERALDRY (7 journals)
    - HUMANITIES (228 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (87 journals)

HUMANITIES (228 journals)                  1 2 3     

Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription  
African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Altre Modernità     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Amaltea. Revista de mitocrítica     Open Access  
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Review of Canadian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Anabases     Open Access  
Angelaki: Journal of Theoretical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anglo-Saxon England     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 116)
Antik Tanulmányok     Full-text available via subscription  
Antipode     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Arbutus Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Argumentation et analyse du discours     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arion : A Journal of Humanities and the Classics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Asia Europe Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities     Open Access  
Australasian Journal of Popular Culture, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Behaviour & Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Behemoth     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cahiers de civilisation espagnole contemporaine     Open Access  
Cahiers de praxématique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Carl Beck Papers in Russian and East European Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Child Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Choreographic Practices     Hybrid Journal  
Claroscuro     Open Access  
Co-herencia     Open Access  
Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Congenital Anomalies     Hybrid Journal  
Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Continental Journal of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cornish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Critical Arts : South-North Cultural and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Crossing the Border : International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
Cuadernos de historia de España     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de la Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales. Universidad Nacional de Jujuy     Open Access  
Cultural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Culture, Theory and Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Daedalus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dandelion : Postgraduate Arts Journal & Research Network     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Debatte: Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Digital Humanities Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Diogenes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Doct-Us Journal     Open Access  
Early Modern Culture Online     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Égypte - Monde arabe     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eighteenth-Century Fiction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Éire-Ireland     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
En-Claves del pensamiento     Open Access  
Enfoques     Open Access  
Études de lettres     Open Access  
European Journal of Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Social Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Expositions     Full-text available via subscription  
GAIA - Ecological Perspectives for Science and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
German Research     Hybrid Journal  
German Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Germanic Review, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Globalizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Gothic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gruppendynamik und Organisationsberatung     Hybrid Journal  
Habitat International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Hopscotch: A Cultural Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Human Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Nature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Human Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Human Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Humanitaire     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hungarian Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Ibadan Journal of Humanistic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Inter Faculty     Open Access  
Interim : Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal for History, Culture and Modernity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Heritage Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)

        1 2 3     

Journal Cover Agriculture and Human Values
   [12 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1572-8366 - ISSN (Online) 0889-048X
     Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2208 journals]   [SJR: 0.823]   [H-I: 32]
  • Books Received
    • PubDate: 2014-07-24
       
  • From the editor
    • PubDate: 2014-07-23
       
  • Aya Hirata Kimura: Hidden hunger: gender and the politics of smarter foods
    • PubDate: 2014-07-23
       
  • Lauren E. Baker: Corn meets maize—food movements and markets in
           Mexico
    • PubDate: 2014-07-23
       
  • Charlotte Biltekoff: Eating right in America—the cultural politics
           of food and health
    • PubDate: 2014-07-23
       
  • Farm to institution programs: organizing practices that enable and
           constrain Vermont’s alternative food supply chains
    • Abstract: Abstract Farm to institution (FTI) programs represent alternative supply chains that aim to organize the activities of local producers with institutions that feed the local community. The current study demonstrates the value of structuration theory (Giddens in J Theory Soc Behav 13(1):75–80, 1983; The constitution of society: outline of the theory of structuration. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1984) for conceptualizing how FTI agents create, maintain, and change organizational structures associated with FTI and traditional supply chains. Based on interviews with supply chain agents participating in FTI programs, we found that infrastructure, relationships, and pricing were seen as important factors that enabled and constrained FTI organizing. Additionally, we describe how FTI organizing serves to simultaneously reinforce and challenge the practices associated with traditional supply chains. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed as well as directions for future research.
      PubDate: 2014-07-23
       
  • Customary rights and societal stakes of large-scale tobacco cultivation in
           Malawi
    • Abstract: Abstract The recent surge in land-based investments in the global South has been seen as both an opportunity for rural economic development and as a trend that poses significant social and environmental risks. This study sheds light on this debate through a look at the tobacco industry in Malawi. We employ a case study approach to investigate how rights, property, and authority associated with land and forest resources have shifted in the context of expanded investments in tobacco, and the stakes for both local land users and citizens. Findings point to the need to broaden the metric of risks and trade-offs associated with large-scale land acquisitions, and to engage in a deeper reading of how these are borne out throughout history.
      PubDate: 2014-07-17
       
  • Agricultural ethics: then and now
    • Abstract: Abstract This paper was written to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the University of Nottingham’s Easter School on “Issues in Agricultural Bioethics,” organized by Ben Mepham in 1993. At that time, agricultural ethics was being envisioned as an interdisciplinary sub-discipline comparable to that of medical ethics. Agricultural ethicists would co-operate with other agricultural faculty to produce careful articulation, analysis and critique (or defense) of norms and values being implicitly assumed by agricultural researchers, practitioners and policy makers. Roughly two factors have conspired to substantially limit the realization of that vision in the intervening 20 years. First, the institutional environment within agricultural universities was far less conducive to such an activity than medical schools. Second, while the rise of a food-oriented social movement might have provided new opportunities for food ethics, the social movement orientation has actually constrained the kind of philosophical work typically undertaken by bioethicists. The paper ends with a brief note calling for a renewal of the original vision.
      PubDate: 2014-07-17
       
  • Independence and individualism: conflated values in farmer
           cooperation?
    • Abstract: Abstract Social scientists have long examined the changing role of the individual, and the influence of individualism in social and economic arrangements as well as behavioral decisions. With respect to co-operative behavior among farmers, however, the ideology of individualism has been little theorized in terms of its relationship to the longstanding virtue of independence. This paper explores this relationship by combining analysis of historical literature on the agricultural cooperative movement with the accounts of contemporary English farmers. I show that the virtue of independence is deployed to justify a variety of cooperative (formal and informal) and non-cooperative practices and that, despite apparently alternative interpretations, independence is most often conflated with individualistic premises. That conflation, I argue, leads farmers to see their neighbors as natural competitors: as those from whom which independence must be sought. This has the effect of masking the structural dependencies which farmers face (such as lenders and large purchasers) and limits the alternatives available to them to realize a view of independence that is maintained, rather than opposed, by interdependent collective action. Thus perceived, individualism is an ideological doctrine that succeeds by appealing to the virtue of independence, while simultaneously denying its actual realization.
      PubDate: 2014-07-15
       
  • Payments for ecosystem services in relation to US and UK
           agri-environmental policy: disruptive neoliberal innovation or hybrid
           policy adaptation?
    • Abstract: Abstract This paper draws on ideas about policy innovation and adaptation to assess the extent to which ‘payments for ecosystem services’ (PES) can be seen as a challenge to traditionally more bureaucratic, state-centered ways of paying for the provisioning of environmental goods from agricultural landscapes through agri environmental policy (AEP). Focussing on recent experience in the United States and the UK, the paper documents the extent to which PES is now an established term of reference in AEP research and debate in both countries and postulates that this may usher in a new discourse of environmental provisioning in agriculture. The PES landscape is, however, currently highly fragmented and largely experimental, with ‘PES-like’ approaches being piloted in the field through partnerships between state agencies and localized private and charitable interests. State-supported AEP programs remain substantially intact, and rather than any displacement of state action, there appears to be a more gradual insertion of PES approaches and metrics into standard AEP operating procedures. This institutional stickiness is partly due to the continuing difficulty of agreeing the metrics necessary for measuring outcomes but may also be due to the politically well defended nature of traditional AEP entitlements and associated policy networks. We conclude by suggesting a need for further research to better understand these specifically political constraints and sources of resistance to PES and the ambiguous consequences for institutions, policy networks, rural communities and environment.
      PubDate: 2014-07-15
       
  • Transitions to agroecological farming systems in the Mississippi River
           Basin: toward an integrated socioecological analysis
    • Abstract: Abstract Industrial agriculture has extensive environmental and social costs, and efforts to create alternative farming systems are widespread if not yet widely successful. This study explored how a set of grain farmers and rotational graziers in Iowa transitioned to agroecological management practices. Our focus on the resources and strategies that farmers mobilized to develop opportunities for, and overcome barriers to, transitioning to alternative practices allows us to go beyond the existing literature focused on why farmers transition. We attend to both the ecological and socioeconomic context of innovation by comparing processes of technical change in two contrasting regions of Iowa. Farmers cultivated farm-level biodiversity and enterprise diversity, developed new cognitive and psychological competencies, and overcame barriers to innovation by developing external network linkages with peers, knowledge organizations, and federal policies. Our research provides insights into how biophysical, cognitive, structural and market considerations can be integrated into research efforts that aim to make sense of innovation toward sustainable agriculture.
      PubDate: 2014-07-02
       
  • The sustainability promise of alternative food networks: an examination
           through “alternative” characteristics
    • Abstract: Abstract Concerns about the unsustainability of the conventional food system have brought attention to so called alternative food networks (AFNs), which are widely thought to be more sustainable. However, claims made about AFNs’ sustainability have been subject to a range of criticisms. Some of them present counterevidence, while others have pointed to problematic underlying features in the academic literature and popular discourse that may hamper our understanding of AFNs’ sustainability. Considering these criticisms, together with the fact that the literature often addresses a specific type of AFN or a specific sustainability-related issue, it is hard to form a clear overall picture of the sustainability promise of AFNs. In this article, we seek to contribute to a clearer understanding of this promise through a structured review, focusing on links between AFN characteristics and sustainability. Through an analysis of AFN conceptualizations reflected in the literature, we identify and consolidate their key characteristics. We then synthesize claims of how these characteristics may translate into sustainability, finding a wide range of potential direct and indirect impacts. Examining these from different angles, we find that the sustainability promise of AFNs found in these claims is qualified by the presence of potentially unaddressed issues, by criticisms regarding for example the evidence base of the assumed impacts and their power in addressing sustainability, and by considerations of how these impacts might play out in actual, real-life food networks. Indirect impacts of learning and participation may be highly significant for sustainability. We conclude with recommendations for research and practice.
      PubDate: 2014-06-20
       
  • Cows desiring to be milked? Milking robots and the co-evolution of
           ethics and technology on Dutch dairy farms
    • Abstract: Abstract Ethical concerns regarding agricultural practices can be found to co-evolve with technological developments. This paper aims to create an understanding of ethics that is helpful in debating technological innovation by studying such a co-evolution process in detail: the development and adoption of the milking robot. Over the last decade an increasing number of milking robots, or automatic milking systems (AMS), has been adopted, especially in the Netherlands and a few other Western European countries. The appraisal of this new technology in ethical terms has appeared to be a complicated matter. Compared to using a conventional milking parlor, the use of an AMS entails in several respects a different practice of dairy farming, the ethical implications and evaluation of which are not self-evident but are themselves part of a dynamic process. It has become clear that with its use, the entire practice of dairy farming has been reorganized around this new device. With a robot, cows must voluntarily present themselves to be milked, whereby an ethical norm of (individual) freedom for cows can be seen to emerge together with this new technology. But adopting a robot also implies changes in what is considered to be a good farmer and an appropriate relation between farmer and cow. Through interviews, attending “farmers’ network” meetings in the Netherlands, and studying professional literature and dedicated dairy farming web forums, this paper traces the way that ethical concerns are a dynamic part of this process of rearranging a variety of elements of the practice of dairy farming.
      PubDate: 2014-06-20
       
  • Marking the success or end of global multi-stakeholder governance? The
           rise of national sustainability standards in Indonesia and Brazil for palm
           oil and soy
    • Abstract: Abstract The RSPO and RTRS are global private partnerships that have been set up by business and civil society actors from the North to curb de-forestation and to promote sustainable production of palm oil or soy in the South. This article is about the launch of new national standards in Indonesia and Brazil that are look-alikes of the global standards but have been set up and supported by government or business actors from the South. The two main questions of this article are: do the new national standards in Indonesia and Brazil provide a fundamental challenge to the RSPO and RTRS, or do they demonstrate the successful diffusion and adoption of global private rules into national contexts? Do the new national standards help or undermine the RSPO and RTRS in their efforts to reduce de-forestation? Combining the theoretical notions of proto-institution and rival governance network, a comparative analysis is offered of the launch of the new national standards in Indonesia and Brazil. The conclusion is that, whilst the RSPO and RTRS have served as models for the general design and principles of the national standards, they really differ from the global standards in terms of normative contents: the national standards offer more room to palm oil plantations and large-scale soy producers to expand production at the expense of forests and other high conservation areas. Governments and producer associations in Indonesia and Brazil have not launched national standards to implement the RSPO or RTRS but to challenge these interventions from the North.
      PubDate: 2014-06-11
       
  • Governance in the age of global markets: challenges, limits, and
           consequences
    • Abstract: Abstract We live in an age defined in large part by various facets of neoliberalism. In particular, the market world has impinged on virtually every aspect of food and agriculture. Moreover, most nation-states and many international governance bodies incorporate aspects of neoliberal perspectives. Multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs), with their own standards, certifications, and accreditations are evidence of both the continuing hegemony of neoliberalism as well as various responses to it. Importantly, to date even attempts to limit neoliberal hegemony through MSIs have been largely within the parameters established by those same neoliberal agendas. However, neoliberalism is itself in crisis as a result of climate change, the continuing financial crisis, and rising food prices. The founding myths of neoliberalism are still widely held, having the effect of closing off alternative paths to the future. Yet, this need not be the case. Alternatives to the current MSIs that promote justice, democracy, and equality can still be constructed.
      PubDate: 2014-06-11
       
  • Privilege and exclusion at the farmers market: findings from a survey of
           shoppers
    • Abstract: Abstract Research consistently shows the typical farmers market shopper is a white, affluent, well-educated woman. While some research to date examining farmers markets discusses the exclusionary aspects of farmers markets, little has expounded on this portrait of the typical shopper. As a result of this neglect, the potential of farmers markets to be an inclusive, sustainable development tool remains hindered. This study seeks to better understand this typical shopper by drawing upon anti-consumerism literature to examine the motivations of these shoppers. Findings from a survey of 390 shoppers in a predominately Hispanic community are discussed. Results from the survey indicate that even in a community in which white, non-Hispanics are the minority, the farmers market shopper is likely to be a white, non-Hispanic female who is more affluent and well educated than the average community member. Theoretical implications and suggestions for those working in community development are discussed. Suggestions for future research are also provided.
      PubDate: 2014-06-05
       
  • Introduction to the symposium
    • Abstract: Abstract A number of multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) and commodity roundtables have been created since the 1990s to respond to the growing criticism of agriculture’s environmental and social impacts. Driven by private and global-scale actors, these initiatives are setting global standards for sustainable agricultural practices. They claim to follow the new standard-making virtues of inclusiveness and consensus and base their legitimacy on their claim of balanced representation of, and participation by, all categories of stakeholders. This principle of representing a wide range of interests with a balance of power is at the heart of a new type of action that forms part of a broader political liberal model for building coalitions of interest groups. The intention of this symposium is to assess the nature of processes and outcomes of this model while paying particular attention to the forms of inclusion and exclusion they generate. In this introduction, we highlight the differences in theoretical approaches to analyzing MSIs and the manifestation of power through them. We distinguish between more traditional political–economy approaches and approaches concerned with ideational and normative power, such as convention theory. We discuss some of the main paradoxes of MSIs related to their willingness to be “inclusive” and at the same time their exclusionary or “closure” effects due in part to interactions with existing political economic contexts and embedded power inequalities, as well as more subtle manifestations of power linked to the favoring of some forms of knowledge and engagement over others.
      PubDate: 2014-06-05
       
  • Battlefields of ideas: changing narratives and power dynamics in private
           standards in global agricultural value chains
    • Abstract: Abstract The rise of private standards, including those involving multi-stakeholder processes, raises questions about whose interests are served and the kind of power that is exerted to maintain these interests. This paper critically examines the battle for ideas—the way competing factions assert their own narratives about value chain relations, the role of standards and related multi-stakeholder processes. Drawing on empirical research on the horticulture and floriculture value chains linking Kenya and the United Kingdom, the analysis explores the framing of sustainability issues, especially around labor issues and good agricultural practice, and the choice of response with respect to private standards and multi-stakeholder initiatives since the late 1990s. We identify four competing narratives currently in play: a dominant global sourcing narrative, a pragmatic development narrative, a broader development narrative and a narrative we term potentially transformative. This last narrative is currently emerging through the unpacking of narratives in relation to the framing of sustainability problems and solutions, and in terms of legislative, executive and judicial governance. The paper contributes to emerging understanding of power in value chains, moving beyond material power to a consideration of how ideational power is exerted and resisted.
      PubDate: 2014-06-05
       
  • From the editor
    • PubDate: 2014-06-01
       
  • Laura German, Jeremias Mowo, Tilahun Amede and Kenneth Masuki (eds):
           Integrated natural resource management in the highlands of Eastern Africa:
           from concept to practice
    • PubDate: 2014-06-01
       
 
 
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