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  Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 1128 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (221 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (187 journals)
    - ETHNIC INTERESTS (159 journals)
    - GENEALOGY AND HERALDRY (7 journals)
    - HUMANITIES (253 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (89 journals)

HUMANITIES (253 journals)            First | 1 2 3     

humanidades     Open Access  
Humanitaire     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Hungarian Cultural Studies     Open Access  
Hungarian Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Ibadan Journal of Humanistic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inter Faculty     Open Access  
Interim : Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Heritage Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Humanities of the Islamic Republic of Iran     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Listening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of the Classical Tradition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Jangwa Pana     Open Access  
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal de la Société des Américanistes     Open Access  
Journal des africanistes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Cultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal for General Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal for Lacanian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal for Learning Through the Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal for Research into Freemasonry and Fraternalism     Hybrid Journal  
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Advances in Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Aesthetics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of African American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of African Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Arts & Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Bioethical Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cultural Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Data Mining and Digital Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Family Theory & Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Franco-Irish Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Interactive Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Intercultural Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Interdisciplinary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Labor Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Medical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Modern Jewish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Semantics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Jurnal Pendidikan Humaniora : Journal of Humanities Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
La lettre du Collège de France     Open Access  
La Revue pour l’histoire du CNRS     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lagos Notes and Records     Full-text available via subscription  
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Law and Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Law, Culture and the Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Le Portique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Legal Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Legon Journal of the Humanities     Full-text available via subscription  
Letras : Órgano de la Facultad de Letras y Ciencias Huamans     Open Access  
Literary and Linguistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Litnet Akademies : 'n Joernaal vir die Geesteswetenskappe, Natuurwetenskappe, Regte en Godsdienswetenskappe     Full-text available via subscription  
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Medical Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Medieval Encounters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Médiévales     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Mens : revue d'histoire intellectuelle et culturelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Messages, Sages and Ages     Open Access  
Mind and Matter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Modern Italy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Mouseion     Open Access  
Mouseion: Journal of the Classical Association of Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Museum International Edition Francaise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
National Academy Science Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nationalities Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Natures Sciences Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription  
Neophilologus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
New German Critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
New West Indian Guide     Open Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Northeast African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
OMEGA - Journal of Death and Dying     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Palgrave Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Patrimônio e Memória     Open Access  
Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Platform Papers     Full-text available via subscription  
Poiesis & Praxis : International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

  First | 1 2 3     

Journal Cover
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Online) 2164-1668
   Published by Emory College of Arts and Sciences Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Three Poems
    • Authors: Anthony Madrid
      Abstract: Injured bone. Blynken and Nod. Visor your irises, handle with tongs. We all think the Mandate of Heaven belongs To him who gets-away-with.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Nov 2015 14:48:39 +000
  • Art after Art after Art
    • Authors: Nicholas Brown
      Abstract: Art as such does not pre-exist capitalism and will certainly not survive it, but rather presents an unemphatic alterity to it: art is not the before or after of capitalism, but its determinate other.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Oct 2015 12:01:24 +000
  • Totaling the Damage
    • Authors: Jennifer Ashton
      Abstract: What should the revolutionary poet be doing, when crisis – whether it be economic, social, environmental, or for that matter, aesthetic – appears increasingly frequent, inevitable, and irreversible? Or to ask the question in a slightly different form: What poetic forms do these conditions of crisis seem to require?
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Oct 2015 12:00:41 +000
  • Would Vanessa Place Be a Better Poet If She Had Better Opinions?
    • Authors: Aaron Kunin
      Abstract: Poets and critics have had some trouble discussing Vanessa Place’s piece Tweeting Gone with the Wind. I have a suggestion. Why not say that her piece is poorly written?
      PubDate: Sat, 26 Sep 2015 16:44:26 +000
  • From Moynihan to Post-Katrina New Orleans
    • Authors: Thomas Jessen Adams
      Abstract: It is of course a complete accident that the same year that marks the tenth anniversary of the failure of federally maintained levees, incompetent disaster relief, and rampant profiteering in the face of a relatively pedestrian hurricane known as Katrina should also mark the fiftieth anniversary of the publication by an obscure Assistant Secretary of Labor named Daniel Patrick Moynihan of The Negro Family: The Case for National Action…The chance of history that brought the anniversaries of the Moynihan Report and Hurricane Katrina together helps elucidate both the long-term implications of Moynihan’s dominance over a large portion of American discourse regarding inequality—a discourse that bears a great deal of responsibility for the effects of that fairly mundane storm—and the long historical temporalities that produced Katrina as a storm of unthinkable tragedy. Indeed, Katrina did not form to the southeast of the Bahamas on August 22, 2005. It formed when Moynihan helped consolidate the culture of poverty thesis in 1965. It formed when a conception of freedom grounded in contract, work-discipline, and various versions of moral economy defeated its multiple historical alternatives. It formed when American politics ceased to effectively challenge these defeats. In fact, if we further widen our lens, we can see its beginnings in the monumental transition from slavery to freedom that is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Sep 2015 16:00:20 +000
  • Why Moynihan Was Not So Misunderstood at the Time
    • Abstract: Even a cursory read of the Moynihan Report makes clear that Moynihan is not guilty of crass victim blaming. Indeed, as William Julius Wilson eloquently stated, Moynihan’s “presentation certainly lacked elegance, but it was an attempt to synthesize structural and cultural analyses to understand the dynamics of poor black families and the plight of low-skilled black males.” But while Wilson proffered that statement as a defense of Moynihan, his formulation functions equally well as a critique of the Moynihan Report. Specifically, Moynihan’s efforts to synthesize a cultural and structural analysis of poverty revealed a conception of structure rooted not in political economy but in ethnic pluralism. Simply put, what Moynihan meant by structural sources of inequality was racism (which established barriers to black social and economic progress) and the damage it inflicted on the institutions that regulated cultural norms among African Americans. To be sure, Moynihan’s conception of “structural inequality” offers some insulation against the facile charge of “victim blaming;” nevertheless, Wilson’s formulation ultimately highlights a more significant problem with the Moynihan Report. Moynihan was not particularly concerned about the impact of structural changes in the nation’s economy on black unemployment and poverty. As I will discuss below, the Moynihan Report’s indifference to the consequences of automation and mechanization on black life was consistent with the perspectives of Democratic policymakers who opposed a more robust War on Poverty. Indeed, the Moynihan Report’s emphasis on racism and black culture complemented the conservative antipoverty agenda of the Council of Economic Advisers (CEA), which—believing African American poverty to be exceptional— identified tax cuts, anti-discrimination legislation, and targeted programs, rather than redistributive policies, as the appropriate remedy for black poverty.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Sep 2015 15:00:31 +000
  • If You Blight It, They Will Come
    • Authors: Megan French-Marcelin
      Abstract: Depicting federal aid as the only means by which to pursue an antipoverty agenda, the mayor [Moon Landrieu] also argued that diminishing program funds required the city to grow in ways that reflected the vested interests of those fleeing the city center in order to facilitate their return. Already in the process of shepherding tourism and real estate development interests to the city, this narrative willfully erased material inequalities produced by codified segregation and unequal access to housing, employment, and education as well as hardened conceptualizations that blamed poverty on individual choices. Thus, this logic rationalized the market relations of a gentrification economy by implying it was imperative to defray costs for serving the poor. Ultimately, local governing officials deployed these assumptions to sanction their own participation in the making of middle-class neighborhoods.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Sep 2015 14:00:26 +000
  • Why Does Angela Glover Blackwell Hate Public Housing?
    • Authors: John Arena
      Abstract: The protestors, through chants, speeches and pamphlets, highlighted the glaring contradiction of a gathering dedicated to “equitable development and social justice” that was simultaneously honoring Richard Baron because of his role in overseeing the destruction of public housing in New Orleans and across the country. Policylink managed this contradiction by redefining social justice as the creation of “communities of opportunity,” rather than ones that guaranteed a right to housing and other basic needs, including the “right to stay put.” Thus, through this lens, “deconcentrating poverty” by refashioning public housing as “mixed income” developments that would include only a fraction of the previous public housing apartments, represented progress. How could they arrive at such an assessment? How did destroying poor people’s homes, and dispersing the former residents, become part of “best practices” for progressive social policy?
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Sep 2015 13:00:13 +000
  • Working the Reserve Army
    • Authors: Cedric Johnson
      Abstract: Most political discussions of New Orleans since the 2005 Hurricane Katrina disaster have relied heavily on notions of the city’s exceptionalism. Right-wing pundits pointed to the city’s reputation for corruption and its citizens’ alleged complacency and poor planning decisions (e.g., “Why would they build below sea-level?”) as central causes for the disaster, rather than the austerity or hubris of the Bush White House. This image of New Orleans as a political backwater or banana republic was used by some Congressional Republicans to discourage further federal investment in rebuilding the city. Liberal activists and city boosters, in turn, reached for notions of cultural particularity to stake their claims for the city’s reconstruction, arguing that the Crescent City’s unique colonial heritage, architecture, and sundry contributions to American music and foodways were all precious national resources. The trope of native cultural authenticity ultimately served to unite right of return advocates who insisted that New Orleans would not be the same without its black working class neighborhoods, and the various commercial interests that comprise the tourism-entertainment complex, around a recovery agenda that has still reproduced inequality and segregation. This essay explores and rejects another prevalent notion of exceptionalism, the underclass myth that has been central to the defeat of welfare statism in the United States, and especially influential in shaping the market-oriented reconstruction of New Orleans.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Sep 2015 12:00:44 +000
  • Issue #16: Situation
    • Authors: nonsite
      Abstract: The essays in this issue consider various ways we--our problems and works--emerge from and in our situation and the ways this fact can be figured in our poems and our paintings, and in our responses to them.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 00:40:16 +000
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