Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8690 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (220 journals)
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    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (338 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (236 journals)
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    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (163 journals)
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    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (178 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (99 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2415 journals)
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    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (207 journals)
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    - SPORTS MEDICINE (81 journals)
    - SURGERY (406 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (155 journals)

MEDICAL SCIENCES (2415 journals)            First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Showing 1201 - 1400 of 3562 Journals sorted alphabetically
Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forensic Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Gandaki Medical College-Nepal     Open Access  
Journal of Generic Medicines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geographical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hand Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Head & Neck Physicians and Surgeons     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health & Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Health and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Design     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Economics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior     Open Access  
Journal of Health Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of health sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences / Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Health Sciences and Surveillance System     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Health Specialties     Open Access  
Journal of Health Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Helminthology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of HIV for Clinical and Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hospital Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology [Medical Sciences]     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Rhythm     Open Access  
Journal of Human Transcriptome     Open Access  
Journal of Ideas in Health     Open Access  
Journal of Inflammation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Inflammation Research     Open Access  
Journal of Injury and Violence Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Institute of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Insulin Resistance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Interventional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Investigative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamabad Medical & Dental College     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Karnali Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Kathmandu Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of King Abdulaziz University : Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Laryngology and Voice     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Lasers in Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Limb Lengthening & Reconstruction     Open Access  
Journal of Lumbini Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Materials Science : Materials in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medical Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Cases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Colleges of PLA     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Medical Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ethics     Partially Free   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Medical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Medical Hypotheses and Ideas     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Imaging and Health Informatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Investigation and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Laboratory and Diagnosis     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Law and Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medical Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Screening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Signals and Sensors     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Systems     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medicinal Botany     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medicine and the Person     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medicine in Scientific Research     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine in the Tropics     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine Research and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Medicines Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Metabolomics & Systems Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Movement Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Multidisciplinary Research in Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nanotechnology in Engineering and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Nanotheranostics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Medicines     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nature and Science of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Negative and No Positive Results     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalgunj Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Neurocritical Care     Open Access  
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Neurorestoratology     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroscience and Neurological Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Nobel Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Obesity and Bariatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Occupational Health     Open Access  
Journal of Occupational Therapy Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral Health and Craniofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Orofacial Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, Hearing and Balance Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ovarian Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ozone Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Paramedical Sciences & Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Participatory Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Patan Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Pathogens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Patient Experience     Open Access  
Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes     Open Access  
Journal of Periodontal Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Personalized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physiobiochemical Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physiology-Paris     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pioneering Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Pregnancy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health     Open Access  
Journal of Primary Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Prosthodontic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prosthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Receptor, Ligand and Channel Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Regenerative Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Research in Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Science and Applications : Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Scientific Innovation in Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Scientific Perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Arthroplasty     Open Access  
Journal of Sleep Disorders : Treatment & Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of South American Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences : Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stomal Therapy Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Surgical Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Surgical and Clinical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Case Reports     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report     Open Access  
Journal of Systemic Therapies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of The Academy of Clinical Microbiologists     Open Access  
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the American College of Certified Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American College of Clinical Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Anatomical Society of India     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Anus, Rectum and Colon     Open Access  
Journal of The Arab Society for Medical Research     Open Access  

  First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.822
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1357-633X - ISSN (Online) 1758-1109
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1092 journals]
  • Evaluation of real-time video from the digital indirect ophthalmoscope for
           telemedicine consultations in retinopathy of prematurity
    • Authors: Tiffany Ho, Thomas C Lee, Ja-Yoon Choe, Sudha Nallasamy
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate the validity of using real-time video indirect ophthalmoscopy for telemedicine consultations for paediatric retinal findings, using retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) as a model disease.MethodsAn ophthalmologist simultaneously performed and recorded routine ROP screenings on enrolled premature infants (aged ≤30 weeks and weighing
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T06:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20958240
       
  • Effectiveness of theory-based digital self-management interventions for
           improving depression, anxiety, fatigue and self-efficacy in people with
           neurological disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Stephen CL Lau, Sutanuka Bhattacharjya, Mandy WM Fong, Ginger E Nicol, Eric J Lenze, Carolyn Baum, Angela Hardi, Alex WK Wong
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aimed to (a) review what theories have been applied to the development of digital self-management interventions for people with neurological disorders; (b) examine their effectiveness to improve depression, anxiety, fatigue and self-efficacy; and (c) identify the optimal mode of intervention delivery.MethodsElectronic databases (SCOPUS, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Clinicaltrials.gov) were searched. Two investigators independently screened studies and extracted data. Study quality and use of theory were also assessed ResultsA total of 944 studies were screened, and 16 randomised controlled trials were included. Theory-based digital self-management interventions were effective in reducing depression (standardised mean difference (SMD) = –0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) –1.04 to –0.49), anxiety (SMD = –0.88, 95% CI –1.54 to –0.21) and fatigue (SMD = –0.62, 95% CI –0.96 to –0.27) and in enhancing self-efficacy (SMD = 1.15, 95% CI 0.11–2.18). Cognitive–behavioural theory (CBT)-based interventions were effective in reducing depression (SMD = –0.81, 95% CI –1.22 to –0.39), anxiety (SMD = –1.15, 95% CI –1.85 to –0.44) and fatigue (SMD = –0.75, 95% CI –0.97 to –0.54) and in improving self-efficacy (SMD = 0.84, 95% CI 0.63–1.05), whereas social cognitive theory (SCT)-based interventions were effective in reducing depression (SMD = –0.73, 95% CI –1.17 to –0.28). Partially digital interventions were more effective than fully digital interventions.DiscussionOur findings support the use of theory to guide the development of digital self-management interventions to increase intervention effectiveness. In particular, CBT-based interventions have a positive impact on depression, anxiety, fatigue and self-efficacy, whereas SCT-based interventions have a positive impact on depression.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T06:42:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20955122
       
  • A model for the pandemic and beyond: Telemedicine for all outpatient
           gastroenterology referrals reduces unnecessary clinic visits
    • Authors: Zhouwen Tang, Susan Dubois, Cristina Soon, Deepak Agrawal
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has forced providers to dramatically scale down in-person clinic visits to enforce social distancing and triage care to the neediest patients. We describe our five-month experience with a hybrid gastroenterology electronic consultation programme starting in 2019 in which we perform electronic consultations for every referral regardless of indication as well as directly initiate telephone-based telehealth visits with patients without the need for in-person clinic. Over five consecutive months, 1243 hybrid electronic consultations were performed with 356 (29%) resulting in a clinic appointment. The remaining 887 (71%) electronic consultations were resolved without need for a clinic visit. Five hundred and fourteen (41%) electronic consultations resulted in a directly scheduled procedure without clinic appointment. Eighty-five per cent of electronic consultations were performed on the same day of referral and 98% of electronic consultations were completed in under 20 min. A hybrid electronic consultation model which pre-emptively reviews all outpatient referrals streamlines access to specialty care. Such a model may be implemented rapidly during the current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic as well as serve as a platform for long-term improvement in efficiency of care.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T06:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20957224
       
  • Patients transferred within a telestroke network for large-vessel
           occlusion
    • Authors: Sujan T Reddy, Sean I Savitz, Elliott Friedman, Octavio Arevalo, Jing Zhang, Christy Ankrom, Alyssa Trevino, Tzu-Ching Wu
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionIn a telestroke network, patients at a referring hospital (RH) with large-vessel occlusion (LVO) are transferred to a comprehensive stroke centre (CSC) for endovascular thrombectomy (EVT). However, a significant number of patients do not ultimately undergo thrombectomy after CSC arrival.MethodsWithin a 17-hospital telestroke network, we retrospectively analysed patients with suspected or confirmed LVO transferred to a CSC, and characterized the reasons why these patients did not undergo EVT based on the 2019 American Heart Association guidelines.ResultsOf 400 patients transferred to our hub, 68 (17%) were based on vascular imaging at RH. Time from RH arrival to neuroimaging was significantly longer in patients that underwent both computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography of the brain and neck compared to only CT of the brain (53 vs 13 minutes, p 
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T06:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20957894
       
  • Teleconsultation in orthopaedic surgery: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis of patient and physician experiences
    • Authors: Christina Melian, David Kieser, Christopher Frampton, Michael C Wyatt
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe primary purpose of this review was to evaluate patient and physician preference and satisfaction for teleconsultation in orthopaedic surgery compared to traditional face-to-face consultation. In addition, we evaluated the effects of teleconsultation on patient length of visit, healthcare costs, range of motion (ROM), pain, quality of life (QOL), and ongoing management plans.MethodsA systematic review of MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. Randomised control trials and case control studies comparing teleconsultation with traditional, face-to-face consultation in the management of orthopaedic conditions were included. The primary outcome measures were patient and physician preference and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included patient length of visit, healthcare costs, ROM, pain, QOL, and ongoing management plans.ResultsA total of 13 articles meeting the eligibility criteria were included for systematic review and 8 for meta-analysis. There was no significant difference in patient satisfaction, length of visit, or time spent with the physician between the telemedicine and in-office control group. The mean difference of patient preference for telemedicine was significantly higher in the telemedicine group compared to the in-office visit group (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.12–1.87, p = 0.005).DiscussionTelemedicine was not inferior to face-to-face office visits in regard to patient and physician preference and satisfaction. Therefore, it would be an effective adjunct to face-to-face office visits, serving as a mechanism of triage and long-term continuity of care.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-02T04:43:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20950995
       
  • Rapid creation of an emergency department telehealth program during the
           COVID-19 pandemic
    • Authors: Samita M Heslin, Michael Nappi, Gerald Kelly, Joan Crawford, Eric J Morley, Veena Lingam, Mark Henry, Peter Viccellio
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread to nearly every continent, with over 2.6 m cases confirmed worldwide. Emergency departments care for a significant number of patients who are under investigation for COVID-19 or are COVID-19-positive. When patients present in the emergency department, there is an increased risk of spreading the virus to other patients and staff. We designed an emergency department telehealth program for patients physically in the emergency department, to reduce exposure and conserve personal protective equipment. While traditional telehealth is designed to be patient-specific and device-independent, our emergency department telehealth program was device-specific and patient-independent. In this article, we describe how we rapidly implemented our emergency department telehealth program, used for 880 min of contact time and 523 patient encounters in a 30-day period, which decreased exposure to COVID-19 and conserved personal protective equipment. We share our challenges, successes and recommendations for designing an emergency department telehealth program, building the technological aspects, and deploying telehealth devices in the emergency department environment. Our recommendations can be adopted by other emergency departments to create and run their own emergency department telehealth initiatives.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-02T04:43:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20952632
       
  • Look beyond the retinopathy: The incidental finding of a brain tumour
    • Authors: Caroline Vloka, Evan Waman
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who was found to have optic-nerve head swelling on fundus photographs obtained for telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening. The patient was found to have a large vestibular schwannoma on brain imaging. This case shows the added benefit of implementing timely changes in management in response to significant incidental findings on tele-ophthalmology diabetic retinopathy screening, which can lead to potentially life- and vision-saving interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-02T04:43:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20955123
       
  • Novel use of existing technology: A preliminary study of patient portal
           use for telerehabilitation
    • Authors: Susan S Conroy, Stacey Harcum, Linda Keldsen, Christopher T Bever
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      Patient portals (PPs) foster engagement and self-management of chronic disease and are emerging as extensions of the care continuum. Utilisation from a health service delivery perspective is growing; however, it is a relatively new model of care in the field of rehabilitation. This pilot, within a larger randomised controlled stroke rehabilitation trial, explored the feasibility and acceptance of secure messaging using an established nationwide PP system for e-visits. Fifteen participants with stroke-related arm disability were randomised to 6 weeks of home arm telerehabilitation. All were over the age of 60 and 73% lived with a spouse or significant other. Mean intervention time was 6.8 weeks, and participants sent 2.3 ± 1.4 messages per week to complete 15.1 h of reported therapy (prescribed therapy = 18 h). Portal use improved therapist efficiency and resulted in a 1:6 therapist to patient exercise time ratio compared with the conventional 1:1 ratio for in-person therapy. Low initial electronic health literacy, self-efficacy or cognitive scores did not prohibit utilisation, and satisfaction with secure messaging for patient–therapist communication was 3.5 ± 1.2 out of 5. Overall, PP-supported e-visits were a feasible and acceptable telerehabilitation care delivery method for this chronic stroke population.ClinicalTrials.gov IdentifierNCT02665052. Registered 27 January 2016. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02665052
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-09-01T09:05:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20950172
       
  • Cost analysis of home telerehabilitation for speech treatment in people
           with Parkinson’s disease
    • Authors: Masnoon Saiyed, Anne J Hill, Trevor G Russell, Deborah G Theodoros, Paul Scuffham
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionGeographical barriers and impaired physical mobility among people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) hinder their timely access to speech pathology services. We compared the costs of delivering a speech treatment via in-person consultation versus telerehabilitation.MethodsWe used data from a non-inferiority randomised controlled trial delivering the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD®), where patients with dysarthria associated with PD were assigned to either the urban in-person group (N = 16) or the urban online group (N = 15), supplemented with a non-randomised group (regional online; N = 21). We compared costs over a one-month treatment period from a health-system perspective and a patient perspective.ResultsThe mean treatment costs of both urban online ($1076) and regional ($1206) treatments tended to be slightly higher than urban in-person ($1020) from a health-system perspective. From a patient perspective, the mean treatment cost was $831 in the urban in-person group, $247 in the urban online group and $200 in the regional group.DiscussionLSVT LOUD® may be delivered via telerehabilitation at a slightly higher cost than in-person delivery from a health-system perspective, but it is cost saving from a patient perspective. Telerehabilitation is an economically beneficial alternative for the delivery of the LSVT LOUD® programme in PD patients with speech disorders.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-27T06:04:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20948302
       
  • A telemedicine communication exchange network in Gorno-Badakhshan
           Autonomic Oblast in collaboration with Swiss Surgical Teams
    • Authors: Intizor Mamadnabiev, Stephan Imfeld, Lorenz Gürke, Markus Aschwanden, Andrej Isaak
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe purpose of this article is to report on the implementation of a telemedicine network serving as a second opinion pool for a surgeon in a remote area of a developing country.MethodsThis study involved an international collaboration between two members of Swiss Surgical Teams at a tertiary referral hospital and a surgeon in a remote area in Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomic Oblast, Tajikistan, which established a second opinion pool discussing diagnostics and therapeutic options via a messenger application. A retrospective analysis of response times was performed using a series of 50 challenging cases.ResultsThe median time to receive a first telemedical response from any of the two contacts was 24 min (interquartile range 6–73). Urgent and emergent pathologies accounted for 57% of cases. The suggested treatment was carried out in 90% (n = 44) of cases.ConclusionsTimely and convenient telemedicine support to provide diagnostic and therapeutic reassurance and improve treatment quality for patients presenting to a general and vascular surgeon in the large and remote region of Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomic Oblast can be installed via a messenger application.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-24T06:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20948989
       
  • The use of wearable devices in chronic disease management to enhance
           adherence and improve telehealth outcomes: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Authors: Tomoko Kamei, Takuya Kanamori, Yuko Yamamoto, Sisira Edirippulige
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionWearable device (WD) interventions are rapidly growing in chronic disease management; nevertheless, the effectiveness of these technologies to monitor telehealth outcomes has not been adequately discussed. This study aims to evaluate the effects of WDs in adherence and other health outcomes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiac disease (CD).MethodsCINAHL, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs from 1937 to February 2020. Studies comparing interventions with the use of WD were assessed for quality in RCTs and a meta-analysis was performed.ResultsEleven studies were included in this review. All of the interventions involved WD use with educational support such as goal setting, virtual social support, e-health program, real-time feedback, written information, maintain diary, and text messaging. The meta-analysis showed no difference in adherence (p = .38). The DM group showed effects of more than a 2% reduction in weight when WDs were implemented for three months (risk ratio = 2.20; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38 to 3.50; p = .0009), as well as blood glucose (mean difference (MD) = –32.39; 95% CI = –48.07 to –16.72; p 
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-21T05:05:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20937573
       
  • Exploring Australian regional cancer patients’ experiences of clinical
           trial participation via telemedicine technology
    • Authors: Jin Joo Lee, Kate Burbury, Craig Underhill, Samuel Harris, Kylie Shackleton, Jacquiline McBurnie, Narelle McPhee, Felicity Osmond, Kathleen Wilkins, Paul Baden, Meinir Krishnasamy
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionRegional cancer patients face various barriers in accessing specialist cancer services. Teletrials are a new model of care that utilise telemedicine technology to enable access to and participation in clinical trials close to home. The present study aimed to explore the experiences of regional cancer patients and their carers while participating in a teletrial, and those of regional patients who travelled to a metropolitan centre for trial participation.MethodsA concurrent, mixed methods study design was used to address the study aim. Patient quality of life data were gathered for both groups and an audio-recorded semi-structured interview undertaken to explore patients’ and carers’ experiences of the two modes of trial participation. Greater weighting was given to the qualitative data.ResultsParticipants described teletrials as an acceptable and valuable initiative that reduced overall burden of trial participation. Irrespective of mode of delivery, patients and carers identified access to trials and specialist cancer services as an important equity issue for regional cancer patients.DiscussionFrom the perspective of regional cancer patients and carers, a teletrial offers convenient, acceptable access to a clinical trial. Although not all patients may want to engage in a teletrial, patients and carers agree that it offers equity of opportunity for trial participation, irrespective of where people live.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-19T05:05:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20950180
       
  • Low stroke incidence in the TEMPiS telestroke network during COVID-19
           pandemic – effect of lockdown on thrombolysis and thrombectomy
    • Authors: Felix Schlachetzki, Carmen Theek, Nikolai D Hubert, Mustafa Kilic, Roman L Haberl, Ralf A Linker, Gordian J Hubert
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundDuring the COVID-19 pandemic emergency departments have noted a significant decrease in stroke patients. We performed a timely analysis of the Bavarian telestroke TEMPiS “working diagnosis” database.MethodsTwelve hospitals from the TEMPiS network were selected. Data collected for January through April in years 2017 through 2020 were extracted and analyzed for presumed and definite ischemic stroke (IS), amongst other disorders. In addition, recommendations for intravenous thrombolysis (rtPA) and endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) were noted and mobility data of the region analyzed. If statistically valid, group-comparison was tested with Fisher’s exact test considering unpaired observations and ap-value < 0.05 was considered significant.ResultsUpon lockdown in mid-March 2020, we observed a significant reduction in recommendations for rtPA compared to the preceding three years (14.7% [2017–2019] vs. 9.2% [2020], p = 0.0232). Recommendations for EVT were significantly higher in January to mid-March 2020 compared to 2017–2019 (5.4% [2017–2019] vs. 9.3% [2020], p = 0.0013) reflecting its increasing importance. Following the COVID-19 lockdown mid-March 2020 the number of EVT decreased back to levels in 2017–2019 (7.4% [2017–2019] vs. 7.6% [2020], p = 0.1719). Absolute numbers of IS decreased in parallel to mobility data.ConclusionsThe reduced stroke incidence during the COVID-19 pandemic may in part be explained by patient avoidance to seek emergency stroke care and may have an association to population mobility. Increasing mobility may induce a rebound effect and may conflict with a potential second COVID-19 wave. Telemedical networks may be ideal databases to study such effects in near-real time.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-19T05:05:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20943327
       
  • Optimising telemedicine in ophthalmology during the COVID-19 pandemic
    • Authors: Shriji Patel, Saif Hamdan, Sean Donahue
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      Ophthalmology, an outpatient surgical specialty, depends on regular in-person encounters to manage complex eye disease. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought about unprecedented challenges in how we take care of our patients. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, we have gone to great lengths to implement expeditiously a telemedicine platform for safely and securely evaluating our patients during the pandemic. Since implementing live videoconference appointments in late March, 840 patients received ophthalmic care during a 12-week period among all subspecialties at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute. Of these, the majority (79.6%) were either return or postoperative visits. Live telehealth visits were more amenable to certain ophthalmic subspecialties, with paediatrics, neuro-ophthalmology and oculoplastics encounters making up 80.5% of all telemedicine visits. As demonstrated through this care model and our initial experience, live video telemedicine is a sustainable and safe care delivery approach to extend ophthalmic care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic and even post pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-17T05:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20949796
       
  • Willingness to pay for a telemedicine-delivered healthy lifestyle
           programme
    • Authors: Vanessa K Rauch, Meredith Roderka, Auden C McClure, Aaron B Weintraub, Kevin Curtis, David F Kotz, Richard I Rothstein, John A Batsis
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionEffective weight-management interventions require frequent interactions with specialised multidisciplinary teams of medical, nutritional and behavioural experts to enact behavioural change. However, barriers that exist in rural areas, such as transportation and a lack of specialised services, can prevent patients from receiving quality care.MethodsWe recruited patients from the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Weight & Wellness Center into a single-arm, non-randomised study of a remotely delivered 16-week evidence-based healthy lifestyle programme. Every 4 weeks, participants completed surveys that included their willingness to pay for services like those experienced in the intervention. A two-item Willingness-to-Pay survey was administered to participants asking about their willingness to trade their face-to-face visits for videoconference visits based on commute and copay.ResultsOverall, those with a travel duration of 31–45 min had a greater willingness to trade in-person visits for telehealth than any other group. Participants who had a travel duration less than 15 min, 16–30 min and 46–60 min experienced a positive trend in willingness to have telehealth visits until Week 8, where there was a general negative trend in willingness to trade in-person visits for virtual. Participants believed that telemedicine was useful and helpful.ConclusionsIn rural areas where patients travel 30–45 min a telemedicine-delivered, intensive weight-loss intervention may be a well-received and cost-effective way for both patients and the clinical care team to connect.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-12T04:56:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20943337
       
  • Better one or two' A systematic review of portable automated
           refractors
    • Authors: Anindya Samanta, Akaanksh Shetty, Patricia C Nelson
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      AbstractIntroductionMore than 400 million people suffer from visual impairment globally, with more than half due to uncorrected refractive error. Autorefraction (AR) is the most common examination performed prior to prescribing glasses. As technology advances, so has the accuracy and number of portable autorefractors available. Portable technology has become acutely important with the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and the conversion of in-person clinical evaluations to remote telemedicine encounters. Patients and providers want to do as much as possible remotely. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic literature review of the accuracy and effectiveness of available portable automated refractors compared to the current standard of care, subjective refraction (SR).MethodsA literature search of PubMED, Embase and ClinicalTrials.gov 97 unique publications in English on portable autorefractors. Twelve studies comparing a portable AR device to at least one form of SR were systematically included in this review.ResultsThere were four portable autorefractors (Netra, Quicksee, Retinomax and SVOne) studied against SR. There was high patient acceptance of glasses prescriptions by the Quicksee alone, with 87% subjects seeing the same or better than SR. Quicksee was more accurate than Netra and Retinomax. SVOne was preferred over Netra and outperformed Retinomax in multiple measures, despite Retinomax being the fastest test.DiscussionThere are numerous portable autorefractors available, but few were compared against SR. Quicksee and SVOne are the most accurate and patient-preferred devices. Quicksee was the most accurate, and it performed clinically the same as SR in some reports.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-11T05:19:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20940140
       
  • Implementation of a telehealth-enhanced home visiting programme for
           families of young children
    • Authors: Katelyn K Jetelina, Oluwaseun Oke, Patricia Rodriguez, Sitara M Weerakoon, Sarah E Barlow
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionHealth systems are applying innovative solutions, such as telehealth and home visiting, to reduce unnecessary healthcare utilization, including emergency department (ED) visits. A large paediatric healthcare system implemented a telehealth-enhanced home visiting programme as an extension of primary care services. The purpose of this paper is three-fold: (1) Examine the process of implementation and the intermediate clinical outcomes; (2) Evaluate patient experiences and acceptability of the programme post-implementation; (3) Identify system, clinic and patient factors influencing implementation of the home visiting programme.MethodsImplementation of the telehealth-enhanced home visiting programme occurred from July 2018 to March 2019. Longitudinal electronic health records (EHR) and surveys were triangulated with qualitative data to evaluate the preliminary effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of the programme.ResultsOf the 948 eligible families, clinical care staff referred 38% of families to the home visiting programme and 49 families (5%) completed the 12-week home visiting programme. Necessary ED utilization significantly increased post-implementation compared with pre-implementation. Families were overall highly satisfied with the programme and its content. Several factors influenced implementation including outer setting (i.e. patient needs and external policy), inner setting (e.g. poor leadership engagement, fully integrated network, and high tension for change), and individual characteristics (e.g. high self-efficacy).ConclusionsOnce families were enrolled, the programme was fairly successful in addressing patient outcomes. The programme and visit process was highly regarded by families and the unlicensed healthcare professionals. Future programme recommendations, such as small programmatic changes and major improvements in the clinic, should be implemented before widespread dissemination.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-10T05:08:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20938282
       
  • Optimising the use of telemedicine in a kidney transplant programme during
           the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic
    • Authors: Anju Yadav, Kristi Caldararo, Pooja Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-07T04:59:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20942632
       
  • Telemedicine in orthopaedics and its potential applications during
           COVID-19 and beyond: A systematic review
    • Authors: Zakir Haider, Bashaar Aweid, Padmanabhan Subramanian, Farhad Iranpour
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionTelemedicine is the delivery of healthcare from a remote location using integrated computer/communication technology. The current COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased adoption of telemedicine with national orthopaedic governing bodies advocating its use, as evidence suggests that social distancing maybe necessary until 2022. This systematic review aims to explore evidence for telemedicine in orthopaedics to determine its advantages, validity, effectiveness and utilisation.MethodsDatabases of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and CINHAL were systematically searched and articles were included if they involved any form of telephone or video consultation in an orthopaedic population. Findings were synthesised into four themes: patient/clinician satisfaction, accuracy and validity of examination, safety and patient outcomes and cost effectiveness. Quality assessment was undertaken using Cochrane and Joanna Briggs Institute appraisal tools.ResultsTwenty-one studies were included consisting of nine randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Studies revealed high patient satisfaction with telemedicine for convenience, less waiting and travelling time. Telemedicine was cost effective particularly if patients had to travel long distances, required hospital transport or time off work. No clinically significant differences were found in patient examination nor measurement of patient-reported outcome measures. Telemedicine was reported to be a safe method of consultation.DiscussionEvidence suggests that telemedicine in orthopaedics can be safe, cost effective, valid in clinical assessment and with high patient/clinician satisfaction. However, more high-quality RCTs are required to elucidate long-term outcomes. This systematic review presents up-to-date evidence on the use of telemedicine and provides data for organisations considering its use in the current COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-07T04:59:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20938241
       
  • Primary-care registered nurse telehealth policy implications
    • Authors: Susan Watkins, Judy Neubrander
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has drastically changed health-care delivery models within primary-care settings. Primary-care providers are limiting routine care face-to-face office visits while triaging COVID-19 symptomatic patients to hospital emergency rooms. Primary-care providers are rapidly adopting telehealth modalities for care provisions during this unprecedented pandemic to allow practices to continue delivering primary care while preventing community spread of COVID-19. Federal legislation has responded to emergent public-health needs by removing barriers that have impeded widespread adoption of telehealth modalities. This legislation has omitted professional registered nurses (RNs) from delivering reimbursable telehealth services, which is problematic for primary-care practice. RNs historically have led telehealth service delivery and should therefore be included in new legislation as eligible health professionals permitted to provide reimbursable telehealth services. RNs improve quality outcomes in primary care within innovative team-based care models and are essential clinicians capable of providing ongoing care coordination and disease management for patients needing to stay on track with their usual care needs.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-04T06:06:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20940142
       
  • Ongoing effects of eConsultation in nephrology on hospital referral rates:
           An observational study
    • Authors: Victor EA Boom, Laura T van der Kamp, Arjan D van Zuilen, Wendela L De Ranitz, Willem Jan Bos, Wilbert T Jellema, Kwok Wai Mui, Alexander F Later, Monique Prinssen, Karin Kaasjager
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductioneConsultation in nephrology is an innovative way for general practitioners (GPs) to consult a nephrologist. Studies have shown that questions from GPs can be answered and intended referrals can be avoided by eConsultation. However, follow-up data are lacking. The primary aim of this study was therefore to assess whether patients for whom a referral to the outpatient clinic of a medical specialist was avoided in the short term were not then referred for the same problem within one year after the eConsultation.MethodsAll eConsultations sent between June 2017 and April 2018 to seven nephrologists in three different hospitals in The Netherlands were included. Exclusion criteria were duplications and missing data on follow-up. Data were obtained from the eConsultation application forms and from GP medical records.ResultsA total of 173 eConsultations were included. Of the 32 patients for whom a referral was initially prevented, 91% (95% confidence interval 75–98) had not been referred to a specialist for the same problem within one year after the eConsultation.DiscussioneConsultation in the field of nephrology can prevent referrals in the long term. It can therefore contribute to a more modern and efficient health-care system in which chronic care is provided by GPs in close proximity to patients, while specialist support is easily available and accessible through eConsultation when necessary.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-04T06:06:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20942037
       
  • Economic evaluation and costs of telepsychiatry programmes: A systematic
           review
    • Authors: John A Naslund, Lauren M Mitchell, Udita Joshi, Dipal Nagda, Chunling Lu
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTelepsychiatry involves use of telecommunications technology to deliver psychiatric care and offers promise to reduce costs and increase access to mental health services. This systematic review examined cost reporting of telepsychiatry programmes for mental healthcare.MethodsWe systematically searched electronic databases for studies reporting costs, including economic evaluations such as cost-effectiveness analyses, or costs of developing telepsychiatry programmes for clinical care of mental disorders. Included studies enrolled participants with mental disorders and involved telepsychiatry for depression, anxiety disorders, serious mental illnesses including schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, dementia or epilepsy.ResultsTwenty-six unique studies met inclusion criteria (17,967 participants), with most targeting depression (n = 7; 27%), general mental disorders and screening (n = 7; 27%), child mental health (n = 4; 15%) and geriatric mental health (n = 4; 15%). Nearly all studies (n = 25; 96%) compared telepsychiatry programme costs with either standard in-person consultation or usual care, with 15 (60%) reporting that telepsychiatry programmes were less expensive, and 8 (32%) showing telepsychiatry programmes were more expensive. Three studies reported cost-effectiveness analyses, favouring telepsychiatry programmes, but at highly elevated cost-effectiveness thresholds. Few studies reported costs of developing or delivering telepsychiatry programmes.ConclusionCosts of telepsychiatry programmes varied widely, with substantial heterogeneity in how costs were defined and reported. Some programmes cost less than in-person services while others cost more. Therefore, rigorous cost-effectiveness studies following established standards in economic evaluation are needed to inform implementation and sustainability of these programmes in health systems.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-08-04T06:06:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20938919
       
  • Economic impact and cost savings of teledermatology units compared to
           conventional monitoring at hospitals in southern Spain
    • Authors: Antonio Lopez-Villegas, Rafael Jesus Bautista-Mesa, Miguel Angel Baena-Lopez, Maria Luisa Alvarez-Moreno, Jesus E Montoro-Robles, Francisco Antonio Vega-Ramirez, Isabel Ordoñez-Naranjo, Carlos Javier Hernandez-Montoya, Cesar Leal-Costa, Salvador Peiro
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAsynchronous teledermatology (TD) has undergone exponential growth in the past decade, allowing better diagnosis. Moreover, it saves both cost and time and reduces the number of visits involving travel and opportunity cost of time spent on visits to the hospital. The present study performed a cost-saving analysis of TD units and assessed whether they offered a cheaper alternative to conventional monitoring (CM) in hospitals from the perspective of public health-care systems (PHS) and patients.MethodsThis study was a retrospective assessment of 7030 patients. A cost-saving analysis comparing TD units to CM for patients at the Hospital de Poniente was performed over a period of one year. The TD network covered the Hospital de Poniente reference area (Spain) linked to 37 primary care (PC) centres that belonged to the Poniente Health District of Almeria.ResultsWe observed a significant cost saving for TD units compared to participants in the conventional follow-up group. From the perspective of a PHS, there was a cost saving of 31.68% in the TD group (€18.59 TD vs. €27.20 CM) during the follow-up period. The number of CM visits to the hospital reduced by 38.14%. From the patients’ perspective, the costs were lower, and the cost saving was 73.53% (€5.45 TD vs. €20.58 CM).DiscussionThe cost-saving analysis showed that the TD units appeared to be significantly cheaper compared to CM.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-29T05:06:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20942044
       
  • Telehealth in trauma: A scoping review
    • Authors: Elizabeth Wake, Heidi Atkins, Ashley Willock, Angela Hawkes, Jessica Dawber, Kelly A Weir
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe purpose of this scoping review was to ascertain how ‘telehealth’ is utilised within health care, from pre hospital to admission, discharge and post discharge, with patients who have suffered major trauma.MethodsA scoping review of the literature published in English since 1980 was conducted using MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, Austhealth, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Cochrane library) and Web of Science MEDLINE and MEBASE to identify relevant studies.ResultsWe included 77 eligible studies with both randomised controlled trial and cohort design methodology. A variety of trauma was included such as traumatic brain injuries (n = 52; 67.5%), spinal cord injury (n = 14; 18.2%) and multi-trauma (n = 9; 11.7%) to both adult (n = 38) and paediatric (n = 32) participants. Telehealth is used in pre-hospital and acute-care settings (n = 11; 14.3%) to facilitate assessment, and in rehabilitation and follow-up (n = 61; 79.2%) to deliver therapy. Effects on health were reported the most (n = 46), with no negative outcomes. The feasibility of telehealth as a delivery mode was established, but coordination and technical issues are barriers to use. Overall, both patients and clinicians were satisfied using this mode of delivery.ConclusionThis review demonstrates how telehealth is utilised across a spectrum of patients with traumatic injuries and to facilitate delivery of therapy, specialist consultations and assessments, with many studies reporting improvements to health. There is a paucity of high-quality rigorous research, which makes replication of findings and uptake of the intervention problematic. Future telehealth and trauma research should focus on the quality and reproducibility of telehealth interventions and the economic feasibility of using this platform to deliver trauma care.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-27T06:23:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20940868
       
  • A descriptive analysis of an on-demand telehealth approach for remote
           COVID-19 patient screening
    • Authors: Raj M Ratwani, David Brennan, William Sheahan, Allan Fong, Katharine Adams, Allyson Gordon, Mary Calabrese, Elizabeth Hwang, Mark Smith, Ethan Booker
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: COVID-19 requires methods for screening patients that adhere to physical distancing and other Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. There is little data on the use of on-demand telehealth to meet this need.Methods: The functional performance of on-demand telehealth as a COVID-19 remote patient screening approach was conducted by analysing 9270 patient requests.Results: Most on-demand telehealth requests (5712 of 9270 total requests; 61.6%) had a visit reason that was likely COVID-19 related. Of these, 79.1% (4518 of 5712) resulted in a completed encounter and 20.9% (1194 of 5712) resulted in left without being seen. Of the 4518 completed encounters, 19.1% were referred to an urgent care centre, emergency department or COVID-19 testing centre. The average completed encounter wait time was 26.5 min and the mean visit length was 8.8 min. For patients that completed an encounter 42.8% (1935 of 4518) stated they would have sought in-person care and 9.1% stated they would have done nothing if on-demand telehealth was unavailable.Discussion: On-demand telehealth can serve as a low-barrier approach to screen patients for COVID-19. This approach can prevent patients from visiting healthcare facilities, which reduces physical contact and reduces healthcare worker use of personal protective equipment.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-23T07:05:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20943339
       
  • An examination of suicidal behaviour among veterans receiving
           mental-health appointments in person versus clinical video telehealth
    • Authors: Sasha M Rojas, Marilyn L Piccirillo, Russell A McCann, Mark A Reger, Bradford Felker
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a national leader in the implementation of clinical video telehealth (CVT) services. Despite the growth of mental-health services offered via CVT, it is unclear to what extent these services are offered and accessed by veterans with previous suicidal behaviour.MethodsThe current quality improvement project examined this question within a local VA health-care system using data from suicide behaviour reports (SBRs), the Veteran Health Administration’s official reporting and surveillance system. The frequency of SBRs was compared during two different time points among veterans who received individual mental-health appointments in person only or via CVT during the 2017 calendar year. Among veterans with a SBR, time in days elapsed from their first mental-health appointment to a SBR was examined as a function of treatment modality.ResultsResults indicated veterans who received in-person treatment only were more likely to present with a SBR six months prior to their first mental-health appointment compared to those who received CVT during the observation period. There were no differences in SBRs during the 12 months after the first appointment or the time from the first appointment to the SBR as a function of treatment modality used.DiscussionAlthough veterans who received in-person mental-health services were more likely to have had a SBR six months prior to treatment, suicide risk throughout the observation period did not differ between groups. Clinical implications that arise from these findings are described in the discussion.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-21T05:04:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20942041
       
  • Telehealth during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic: Rapid expansion
           of telehealth outpatient use during a pandemic is possible if the
           programme is previously established
    • Authors: Thomas Schulz, Karrie Long, Kudzai Kanhutu, Ilana Bayrak, Douglas Johnson, Timothy Fazio
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted the health-care system both in Australia and internationally, and has rapidly transformed the delivery of health care in hospitals and the community. Implementation of social isolation and distancing measures to stop the spread of the disease and to reduce potential harm to patients has necessitated the use of alternate models of health-care delivery. Changes that would normally take months or years have occurred within days to weeks.MethodsWe conducted analysis of outpatient clinic data during the period of the pandemic and compared this to previous telehealth use. We also present the results of clinician and patient telehealth experience surveys.ResultsWe describe a 2255% increase in the use of telehealth at a tertiary hospital within a period of six weeks, and a significant simultaneous reduction in the outpatient clinic failure-to-attend rate. The vast majority of patients and clinicians agreed that the standard of care provided by telehealth was the same as that provided by on-site appointments.DiscussionTelehealth that previously had only limited utilisation has now become a main method for the delivery of outpatient care. Clinicians and patients agreed that consultations provided by telehealth were of the same standard as those provided on site. Health care in the post-pandemic period should embed the use of telehealth for outpatient care and consider the range of other clinical contexts where this can be utilised.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-20T06:25:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20942045
       
  • Scaling virtual health at the epicentre of coronavirus disease 2019: A
           case study from NYU Langone Health
    • Authors: Jason Sherwin, Katharine Lawrence, Veronica Gragnano, Paul A Testa
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has accelerated the drive of health-care delivery towards virtual-care platforms. While the potential of virtual care is significant, there are challenges to the implementation and scalability of virtual care as a platform, and health-care organisations are at risk of building and deploying non-strategic, costly or unsustainable virtual-health systems. In this article, we share the NYU Langone Health enterprise approach to building and scaling an integrated virtual-health platform prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and offer lessons learned and recommendations for health systems that need to undertake or are currently undertaking the transition to virtual-care delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-20T06:25:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20941395
       
  • Use of mobile health technologies for postoperative care in paediatric
           surgery: A systematic review
    • Authors: Nam Nguyen, Etienne Leveille, Elena Guadagno, Luc Malemo Kalisya, Dan Poenaru
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionMobile health (mHealth) is the use of mobile communication devices such as smartphones, wireless patient monitoring devices and tablet computers to deliver health services. Paediatric surgery patient care could potentially benefit from these technologies. This systematic review summarises the current literature on the use of mHealth for postoperative care after children’s surgery.MethodsSeven databases were searched by a senior medical librarian. Studies were included if they reported the use of mHealth systems for postoperative care for children  
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-07-01T05:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20934682
       
  • Effects of a home-based occupational therapy telerehabilitation via
           smartphone for outpatients after hip fracture surgery: A feasibility
           randomised controlled study
    • Authors: Cabbee TL Li, Goris KN Hung, Kenneth NK Fong, Pablo Cruz Gonzalez, Shu-hong Wah, Hector WH Tsang
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aimed to investigate the effects of a home-based occupational therapy telerehabilitation (TR) via smartphone in enhancing functional and motor performance and fall efficacy for outpatients receiving day hospital rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery in Hong Kong.MethodsThis was a feasibility randomised controlled trial with two groups – an experimental group and a comparison group – and a sample of 31 older adults attending a geriatric day hospital who had undergone hip fracture surgery within 12 weeks of diagnosis. Patients were assessed at baseline, immediately after a three-week intervention and at three-week post-intervention follow-up for motor performance, activities of daily living (ADL) functioning and fall efficacy. The experimental group received a home programme using the Caspar Health e-system and a mobile app for smartphones, while the comparison group received paper-and-pencil instructions for the home programme on a weekly basis for three weeks.ResultsCompared to the comparison group, significant improvements in fall efficacy and instrumental ADL performance at post intervention and follow-up were found in the experimental group. However, in the comparison group, inadequate social support was a factor contributing to better muscle strength testing in both the affected and non-affected legs. There were no significant differences between the two groups in regard to the other variables.DiscussionThis study supports the potential use of TR via smartphone as an alternative home programme for use in occupational therapy practice with older adults after hip fracture surgery.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-28T07:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20932434
       
  • Association of teledermatology workflows with standardising co-management
           of rashes by primary care physicians and dermatologists
    • Authors: Jennifer R Dusendang, Sangeeta Marwaha, Stacey E Alexeeff, Eileen Crowley, Michael Haiman, Ngoc Pham, Melanie J Tuerk, Danny Wudka, Michael Hartmann, Lisa J Herrinton
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionFor patients with a rash, the effect of teledermatology workflow on utilization has not been defined. We compared utilization across four teledermatology workflows in patients with a rash.MethodsThe observational longitudinal cohort study included 28,857 Kaiser Permanente Northern California members with a new rash diagnosis seen in primary care and with dermatology advice obtained using teledermatology. The workflows differed in camera and image quality; who took the picture; how the image was forwarded; and synchronicity and convenience.ResultsOn average, 23% of patients had a follow-up office visit in dermatology within 90 days of their primary care visit. In multivariable analysis, the four technologies differed substantially in the likelihood of a follow-up dermatology office visit. In contrast, the likelihood was only negligibly related to medical centre or primary care provider.DiscussionTechnologies and workflows that offer the mobility of a smartphone with a high level of synchronicity in communication were associated with standardised co-management of rashes.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T10:54:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20930453
       
  • Medical students’ perceptions and expectations regarding digital health
           education and training: A qualitative study
    • Authors: Sisira Edirippulige, Sophie Gong, Malshi Hathurusinghe, Sarah Jhetam, Jasmine Kirk, Henry Lao, Annalise Leikvold, Jayde Ruelcke, Nim Chi Yau, Qichen Zhang, Nigel Armfield, Buddhika Senanayake, Xiaoyun Zhou, Anthony C Smith, Madelaine-Marie Judd, Mark G Coulthard
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionDigital health – the convergence of digital technologies within health and health care to enhance the efficiency of health-care delivery – is fast becoming an integral part of routine medical practice. The integration of digital health into traditional practice brings significant changes. Logic dictates that for medical practitioners to operate in this new digitally enabled environment, they require specific knowledge, skills and competencies relating to digital health. However, very few medical programmes in Australia and globally include digital health within their regular curriculum. This pilot study aimed to explore medical students’ perceptions and expectations of digital health education and training (ET).MethodsAn online survey and focus groups were used to collect information about medical students’ perceptions and expectations relating to digital health and ET relating to this field within the medical programme at the University of Queensland. Sixty-three students took part in the survey, and 17 students were involved in four focus groups.ResultsMost participants had no formal ET in digital health. Most participants (n = 43; 68%) expressed a willingness to learn about digital health as part of their medical programme.DiscussionPrimarily, knowledge- and practice-related factors have motivated students to learn about digital health. The analysis of focus group data identified two superordinate themes: (a) drivers of digital health ET and (b) expectations relating to digital health ET. Students agreed that digital health is a relevant field for their future practice that should be taught as part of their regular curriculum.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-23T06:56:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20932436
       
  • Telehealth and hospital performance: Does it matter'
    • Authors: Mei Zhao, Hanadi Hamadi, Jing Xu, D Rob Haley, Sinyoung Park, Cynthia White-Williams
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionPrevious studies indicated that telehealth services may improve hospital performance. However, the extent to which these telehealth provisions would improve hospital total performance score under the hospital value-based purchasing (HVBP) programme is not clear. The aim of this study is to examine the association between telehealth provision and hospital performance.MethodsWe performed a retrospective analysis of the association between the provision of telehealth services and 2699 hospital’s total performance score (TPS) on the 2018 HVBP programme and its four domains. Multivariate regression models were used to analyse TPS and hospital performance on each domain. Telehealth services offered by a hospital was categorically operationalized as hospitals with no telehealth services, with one to two telehealth services, and with three or more telehealth services.ResultsHospitals with one to two telehealth services have TPS (ß coefficient = 1.50; 95% confident intervals (CI): 0.28, 2.73; p 
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-19T02:34:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20932440
       
  • High-altitude mountain telemedicine
    • Authors: Massimo Martinelli, Davide Moroni, Luca Bastiani, Simona Mrakic-Sposta, Guido Giardini, Lorenza Pratali
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAn innovative teleconsultation platform has been designed, developed and validated between summer 2017 and winter 2018, in five mountain huts and in three remote outpatient clinical centres of the Italian region Valle d’Aosta of the Mont Blanc massif area.MethodsAn ad-hoc videoconference system was developed within the framework of the e-Rés@MONT (Interreg ALCOTRA) European project, to tackle general health problems and high-altitude diseases (such as acute mountain sickness, high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral oedema). The system allows for contacting physicians at the main hospital in Aosta to perform a specific diagnosis and to give specific advice and therapy to the patients in an extreme environment out-hospital setting. At an altitude between 1500–3500 m, five trained nurses performed clinical evaluations (anamnesis, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation), electrocardiographic and echography monitoring on both tourists and residents as necessary; all of the collected data were sent to the physicians in Aosta.ResultsA total of 702 teleconsultation cases were performed: 333 dismissed (47%), 356 observed (51%) and 13 immediate interventions (2%). In 30 cases the physicians decided there was no need for helicopter and ambulance rescue intervention and hospital admissions. The main physiological measures, the classified pathologies, the severe cases and the cost savings are described in this article.DiscussionThe e-Rés@MONT teleconsultation platform has been discussed in terms of treated cases, feasibility, proactivity in reducing complexities, direct and indirect advantages, and diagnostics help; moreover, general and specific pros and cons have been debated, and future steps have been exposed.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-16T03:50:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20921020
       
  • Components, design and effectiveness of digital physical rehabilitation
           interventions for older people: A systematic review
    • Authors: Eda Tonga, Cynthia Srikesavan, Esther Williamson, Sarah E Lamb
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundWith the rapid advancement in digital technologies, the use of digital health applications is increasing day by day. Although a large number of digital applications have been developed for rehabilitation of older people, there has been no review of the evidence for effectiveness of these interventions.MethodsThe aim of our study was to review the evidence of digital rehabilitation interventions on outcomes including pain, function and quality of life in older people. We focused on digital interventions that are designed to improve and restore physical functioning. We searched six electronic bibliographic databases and included randomised controlled trials. Cochrane risk of bias tool and Cochrane’s Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the risk of bias and grade the evidence.ResultsEight trials were included. The short-term effects of digital rehabilitation interventions on physical activity, quality of life, vertigo symptoms and falls are uncertain. Quality of trials was rated as very low to moderate evidence.ConclusionMore research is needed to estimate effectiveness of these interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:40:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20927587
       
  • Knowledge, attitudes and practices of telemedicine education and training
           of French medical students and residents
    • Authors: Sarina Yaghobian, Robin Ohannessian, Thomas Iampetro, Isabelle Riom, Nathalie Salles, Elisabeth Medeiros de Bustos, Thierry Moulin, Alexandre Mathieu-Fritz
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionTelemedicine is a remote medical practice that is progressively expanding in France. In 2018, regulatory changes authorised telemedicine to become part of daily clinical practice. Telemedicine education and training (ET), however, has not been widespread, despite its integration in the medical curriculum since 2009. The objective of this study was to examine the self-perceived knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) and ET of telemedicine ET from medical students and residents in France.MethodsA national survey was distributed online (15 December 2018 to 3 March 2019) to approximately 135,000 medical students and residents in medical schools (n = 38). The survey consisted of a total of 24 binary and Likert-scale questions covering telemedicine ET and KAP.ResultsIn total, 3,312 medical students and residents completed the survey. Synchronous video consultation was the most well-known telemedicine activity (86.9%); asynchronous tele-expertise was the least recognised (40.3%). Most respondents (84.8%) stated they were not familiar with telemedicine regulations. The relevance of telemedicine for improving access to care was acknowledged by 82.8% of students and residents; 14% of respondents stated they had previously practised telemedicine during their studies; 14.5% stated they had received telemedicine ET; however, 97.9% stated they were not sufficiently trained.DiscussionThis is the first national scale study on telemedecine ET by medical students and residents, to date. Despite positive attitudes, participants were found to have limited telemedicine ET, knowledge and practices. The demand for telemedicine ET is increasing. Such studies that incorporate the perspectives of medical students and residents may strengthen the implementation of telemedicine ET in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T04:40:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20926829
       
  • A novel telemedicine technique for evaluation of ocular exam findings via
           smartphone images
    • Authors: Joshua Sink, Stephen Blatt, David Yoo, Michael Henry, S Daniel Yang, Roshni Vasaiwala, Larissa Ghadiali, William Adams, Charles S Bouchard
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we compared the assessment of remote smartphone photographs to in-office exams in the diagnosis of two groups of external eye diseases, red-eye pathology and post-operative eyelid surgery complications. Participants were examined and received an in-office diagnosis by either a corneal or oculoplastic specialist. After viewing an educational video on smartphone photography, the patient’s companion then took a series of standardized photographs. Two additional corresponding specialists then made a separate diagnosis via the interpretation of only smartphone images and the patient’s history. ‘Remote’ and in-office diagnoses were compared using a kappa test for agreement. The remote and in-office diagnoses were in agreement for 27 of 28 eyes, representing a chance-corrected Kappa agreement rate of 93% (95% confidence interval: 79–99%). Among the 16 red eyes, the diagnoses were in agreement for 15 of 16 red eyes, representing a chance-corrected Kappa agreement rate of 92% (95% confidence interval: 77–99%). Among the 12 eyes with post-operative eyelid surgery complications, the diagnoses were in perfect agreement. Our results suggest that the diagnosis of 1) red-eye pathology and 2) post-operative eyelid surgery complications based on smartphone images may be comparable to in-office exams.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-07T04:44:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20926819
       
  • Enabling patient-centred policy for electronic consultations: A
           qualitative analysis of discussions from a stakeholder meeting
    • Authors: Clare Liddy, Jennifer Hauteclocque, Isabella Moroz, Luis Oppenheimer, Don Sturge, Katharina Kovacs Burns, Tanya Horsley, Delphine Tuot, Erin Keely
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionTo support the expansion of a successful regional electronic consultation (eConsult) service, we hosted a full-day national eConsult Policy Think Tank, connecting health-services researchers, clinicians, patients and policymakers to discuss policy considerations related to eConsult. In this paper, we assess the discussion arising from the Think Tank to identify and understand the policy enablers and barriers to the national spread and scale of eConsult services across Canada.MethodsWe conducted a constant comparative thematic analysis of stakeholder discussions captured during the Think Tank held in Ottawa, Canada, on 5 December 2016. Forty-seven participants attended and debated the following topic areas: (a) delivery of services and standards; (b) payment considerations; and (c) equitable access. The meeting was recorded, and verbatim transcripts were analysed using qualitative approaches.ResultsWe identified four themes affecting spread and scale of eConsult innovation from a policy perspective: (a) patient-centredness; (b) value; (c) regulation; and (d) considerations for spread and scale. Patient-centredness was viewed as a foundational principle upon which policy shifts should be guided. Active participation of patient partners transitioned the discussions and resulting recommendations from provider-centred to patient-centred thinking around the relevant policy issues, explicitly demonstrating the importance of patient involvement in healthcare policy decision making.DiscussioneConsult was viewed as a high-value, disruptive innovation with great potential to transform access to specialists in Canada. A patient-centred approach to policy change (and not just healthcare delivery) was identified as a novel yet critical enabler to the scale and spread of eConsult across Canada.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-06-03T04:39:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20926779
       
  • Acceptability of telehealth-delivered rehabilitation: Experiences and
           perspectives of people with traumatic brain injury and their carers
    • Authors: Rachael Rietdijk, Emma Power, Michelle Attard, Leanne Togher
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionCommunication skills training for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their carers is recommended best practice. Delivery via telehealth could improve access to this training. This paper focuses on the acceptability of telehealth delivery of communication skills training.MethodsA mixed-methods investigation of acceptability of telehealth to people with TBI and their carers was incorporated into a clinical trial. Thirty-six people with TBI (23 metropolitan and 13 regional) and their carers were recruited. Metropolitan participants were randomly allocated to telehealth or in-person intervention at a 1:3 ratio. Regional participants were allocated to telehealth. Telehealth and in-person participants were compared on retention, time to complete the programme, home practice completion and therapeutic alliance ratings. Participants completed semi-structured interviews regarding their views on telehealth, which were analysed using thematic analysis.ResultsThere were no significant differences between telehealth and in-person participants in retention rate, time to complete the programme, degree of home practice completion or therapeutic alliance ratings. Three themes were identified: ‘telehealth delivery opens a window for access to rehabilitation in the context of my daily life’, ‘in-person delivery offers rehabilitation based on natural human interaction’ and ‘weighing telehealth against in-person delivery’.DiscussionParticipants found telehealth delivery acceptable, as indicated by the similarity between groups in the quantitative process measures, and as reported in interviews. Some reported a preference for in-person delivery if there had been a choice of delivery mode. Participants described characteristics of the two delivery modes which were relevant to their attitudes towards telehealth.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-05-28T08:28:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20923824
       
  • Store-and-forward teledermatology impact on diagnosis, treatment and
           dermatology referrals: Comparison between practice settings
    • Authors: Selena R Pasadyn, John L McAfee, Alok Vij, Christine B Warren
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionStore-and-forward (SAF) teledermatology involves non-dermatologists sending clinical images to dermatologists. This improves patient care while reducing unwarranted face-to-face (FTF) specialist office visits. Comparisons between dermatologist diagnostic concordance with referring provider, treatment change recommendations, and FTF referrals have yet to be compared by type of provider and practice setting.MethodsThis retrospective chart review examined SAF teledermatology eConsults from four practice settings: Doctor of Medicine (MD)/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) office visits, MD/DO walk-in clinics, nurse practitioner (NP)/physician assistant (PA) office visits and NP/PA walk-in clinics. The most recent 100 MD/DO office- and 100 NP/PA walk-in-referred patient charts were reviewed. There were only 71 NP/PA office and 47 MD/DO walk-in eConsults to review.ResultsTeledermatologists agreed with referring provider diagnoses 50% of the time for MD/DO office visits, 29.8% for MD/DO walk-in clinics, 33.8% for NP/PA office visits and 34% for NP/PA walk-in clinics. Diagnostic concordance was significantly higher for eConsults from MD/DO office visits than MD/DO walk-in clinics (p = 0.021), NP/PA office visits (p = 0.035) or NP/PA walk-in clinics (p = 0.022). There were significantly more treatment changes recommended after walk-in eConsults than office visits (67 versus 44%, p 
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-05-23T07:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20925269
       
  • The impact of tele-neurologists on acute stroke care at an advanced
           primary stroke centre
    • Authors: Scott Gutovitz, Jonathan Leggett, Leslie Hart, Samuel M Leaman, Heather James, Toni Stillinger
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionWe evaluated the impact of tele-neurologists on the time to initiating acute stroke care versus traditional bedside neurologists at an advanced stroke center.MethodsThis observational study evaluated time to treatment for acute stroke patients at a single hospital, certified as an advanced primary stroke centre, with thrombectomy capabilities. Consecutive stroke alert patients between 1 March, 2016 and 31 March, 2018 were divided into two groups based on their neurology consultation service (bedside neurology: 1 March, 2016–28 February, 2017; tele-neurology: 1 April, 2017–31 March, 2018). Door-to-tPA time and door-to-IR time for mechanical thrombectomy were compared between the two groups.ResultsNine hundred and fifty-nine stroke patients met the inclusion criteria (436 bedside neurology, 523 tele-neurology patients). There were no significant differences in sex, age, or stroke final diagnosis between groups (p > 0.05). 85 bedside neurology patients received tPA and 35 had mechanical thrombectomy, 84 and 44 for the tele-neurology group respectively. Door-to-tPA time (median (IQR)) was significantly higher among tele-neurology (64 min (51.5–83.5)) than bedside neurology patients (45 min (34–69); p 
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-05-15T05:32:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20921039
       
  • Combined in-person and tele-delivered mobile school clinic: A novel
           approach for improving access to healthcare during school hours
    • Authors: Rachel Nelson, Syamal D Bhattacharya, Sharon Hart
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      AbstractAimsWe report a novel pilot project that allows access to healthcare for children and staff at school via a mobile clinic or telemedicine portal connected to the mobile clinic. The objectives of this pilot project were (a) to perform physicals for children not attached to a primary care physician; (b) to provide medical consultations and treatment for acute illnesses of students and staff, and (c) to lower absenteeism rates among students and staff.MethodsIn 2013, Ronald McDonald House Charities, a non-profit organization, partnered with Children’s Hospital of Erlanger to provide a mobile clinic trademarked Ronald McDonald Care Mobile utilising a large, box-style truck equipped with examination rooms and a telemedicine portal. Initially, starting with three elementary schools in Bradley County, Tennessee, USA, the programme rapidly expanded to include schools in five other participating Tennessee counties. Only three schools in Bradley County have the option of in-person visits. All other schools access care via telemedicine portals. Funding is provided through multiple grants and community partners. If a student does have insurance, the insurance carrier is billed for the visit, but students without insurance are treated free of charge. Prior to the 2018–2019 school year, only limited data were collected.ResultsOur first goal was to perform physicals for children not attached to a primary care physician. During the 2018–2019 school year, 28 patients presented for a well-child check. However, 16 of these (57%) did not have a primary care physician. Of note, 19% of students presenting for any complaint did not have a primary care physician on file (172 students). All well-child checks were performed in-person on the Care Mobile. Our second goal was to provide medical consultations and treatment for acute illnesses. A total of 1446 persons were seen for sick visits. Of these, 424 were telemedicine visits (352 students and 72 staff), while 1022 were in-person visits. The five most common diagnoses that the nurse practitioner managed during the 2018–2019 school year included acute pharyngitis, acute upper respiratory infection, streptococcal pharyngitis, fever and acute maxillary sinusitis. Finally, our third goal was to lower absenteeism rates. There were 1446 sick person visits (1253 students and 193 staff). Twenty-two per cent of the students (276 persons) returned to class while 74% (142 persons) of staff returned to work.ConclusionThe mobile/telemedicine health clinic is a novel innovation to increase access to acute care and reduce school absenteeism among both students and staff, potentially saving schools hundreds to thousands of dollars.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-05-12T05:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20917497
       
  • Tele-orthopaedics: A systematic mapping study
    • Authors: Ali Behmanesh, Farahnaz Sadoughi, Farid Najd Mazhar, Mohammad Taghi Joghataei, Shahram Yazdani
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.
      AbstractIntroductionThe use of telemedicine in orthopaedics can provide high-quality orthopaedic services to patients in remote areas. Tele-orthopaedics is widely acknowledged for decreasing travel, time and cost, increasing accessibility and quality of care. In the absence of a comprehensive review on tele-orthopaedics applications and services, here, we systematically identify and classify the tele-orthopaedic applications and services and provide an overview of the trends in the field.MethodsIn this study, a systematic mapping was conducted to answer six research questions, we searched the databases Scopus, PubMed, IEEE Digital Library and Web of Science up to 2019. Consequently, 77 papers were screened and selected on the basis of specific inclusion and exclusion criteria.ResultsWe found that mobile-based teleconsultation was mostly asynchronous, while non-mobile teleconsultation was synchronous. The results showed that the physician–patient relationship was more common than other interactions, such as physician–physician and physician–robot interactions. In addition, more than half of the services provided by tele-orthopaedics have been used for orthopaedic diseases/traumas in which joint replacement and fracture reduction have been the most important orthopaedic procedures. It has been noted that more attention has been paid to tele-orthopaedics in developed countries such as the USA, Australia, Canada and Finland.DiscussionTelemonitoring (teleconsultation and telemetry) and telesurgery (telerobotics and telementoring) were found to be the two major forms of tele-orthopaedics. Mobile phones were used asynchronously in most of the teleconsultations. The development of different applications may result in the use of multiple smartphones applications in real-time teleconsultation. The use of smartphones is expected to increase in the near future.
      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-05-12T05:20:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20919308
       
  • The effects and safety of telerehabilitation in patients with lower-limb
           joint replacement: A systematic review and narrative synthesis
    • Authors: Miia M Jansson, Arja Rantala, Jouko Miettunen, Ari-Pekka Puhto, Minna Pikkarainen
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-04-22T05:38:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20917868
       
  • The effectiveness of mHealth interventions on postpartum depression: A
           systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Chuqing Zhou, Hua Hu, Chunyi Wang, Ziyu Zhu, Gengchen Feng, Jingping Xue, Ziyi Yang
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-04-19T12:19:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20917816
       
  • Comparison of video and in-hospital consultations during early in-home
           care for premature infants and their families: A randomised trial
    • Authors: Mai-Britt Hägi-Pedersen, Ram B Dessau, Annelise Norlyk, Hristo Stanchev, Hanne Kronborg
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:54:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20913411
       
  • Video-interpreting for cognitive assessments: An intervention study and
           micro-costing analysis
    • Authors: Kerry Hwang, Anurika De Silva, Julie A Simpson, Dina LoGiudice, Lidia Engel, Andrew S Gilbert, Samantha Croy, Betty Haralambous
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:54:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20914445
       
  • Characterization of dayshift tele-ICU pharmacist activities
    • Authors: Carrie L Griffiths, Desiree E Kosmisky, Sonia S Everhart
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T04:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20913712
       
  • Impact of professionally facilitated peer support for family carers of
           people with dementia in a WeChat virtual community
    • Authors: Jing Han, Guifang Guo, Li Hong
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-03-20T05:43:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20910830
       
  • Teledermatology in paediatrics: Health-care impact on the early treatment
           of infantile haemangiomas
    • Authors: Isabel Betlloch-Mas, María-Teresa Martínez-Miravete, Laura Berbegal-DeGracia, Laura Sánchez-Vázquez, José Sánchez-Payá
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T04:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20904901
       
  • Transition of care of stable ischaemic heart disease patients from
           tertiary to primary care with telemedicine support: Randomized
           noninferiority clinical trial
    • Authors: Karen B Ruschel, Dimitris RV Rados, Mariana V Furtado, Joanna d’Arc L Batista, Natan Katz, Erno Harzheim, Carisi A Polanczyk
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T04:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20906648
       
  • Adherence and acceptance of a home-based telemonitoring application used
           by multi-morbid patients aged 65 years and older
    • Authors: Caroline Lang, Karen Voigt, Robert Neumann, Antje Bergmann, Vjera Holthoff-Detto
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-02-03T06:13:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X20901400
       
  • Patient perception of physician empathy in stroke telemedicine
    • Authors: William P Cheshire, Kevin M Barrett, Benjamin H Eidelman, Elizabeth A Mauricio, Josephine F Huang, William D Freeman, Maisha T Robinson, Gary R Salomon, Colleen T Ball, Dale M Gamble, Vickie S Melton, James F Meschia
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-28T05:26:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19899237
       
  • Liver transplant recipients’ experiences and perspectives of a
           telehealth-delivered lifestyle programme: A qualitative study
    • Authors: Amandine Barnett, Katrina L Campbell, Hannah L Mayr, Shelley E Keating, Graeme A Macdonald, Ingrid J Hickman
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-28T05:26:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19900459
       
  • Non-invasive home telemonitoring system for heart failure patients: A
           randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Lucía M Yanicelli, Carla B Goy, Viviana del C González, Gerardo N Palacios, Ernesto C Martínez, Myriam C Herrera
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-24T05:37:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19899261
       
  • Establishment of an internationally agreed minimum data set for acute
           telestroke
    • Authors: Dominique A Cadilhac, Kathleen L Bagot, Bart M Demaerschalk, Gordian Hubert, Lee Schwamm, Caroline L Watkins, Catherine Elizabeth Lightbody, Joosup Kim, Michelle Vu, Nancy Pompeani, Jeffrey Switzer, Juanita Caudill, Juan Estrada, Anand Viswanathan, Nikolai Hubert, Robin Ohannessian, David Hargroves, Nicholas Roberts, Timothy Ingall, David C Hess, Annemarei Ranta, Vasantha Padma, Christopher F Bladin
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-15T04:05:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19899262
       
  • A systematic review of electronic mental health interventions for
           Indigenous youth: Results and recommendations
    • Authors: Elaine Toombs, Kristy R. Kowatch, Lauren Dalicandro, Stephanie McConkey, Carol Hopkins, Christopher J. Mushquash
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-15T04:05:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19899231
       
  • Telenephrology and on-site nephrology: Comparable adequate dialysis care
           to patients living in remote Pacific Islands
    • Authors: Laurie-Mathilde Michel, Noémie Barroux, Luc Frimat, Nicolas Quirin
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-08T04:08:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19896680
       
  • Concordance study between regular face-to-face dental diagnosis and dental
           telediagnosis using fluorescence
    • Authors: Camille Inquimbert, Shidu Hirata-Tsuchiya, Shinji Yoshii, Nicolas Molinari, Erika Nogue, Clement Roy, Takahiko Morotomi, Ayako Washio, Frederic Cuisinier, Herve Tassery, Bernard Levallois, Chiaki Kitamura, Nicolas Giraudeau
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-06T07:33:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19894111
       
  • Provider-to-provider telemedicine improves adherence to sepsis bundle care
           in community emergency departments
    • Authors: Nicholas M Mohr, Kalyn D Campbell, Morgan B Swanson, Fred Ullrich, Kimberly AS Merchant, Marcia M Ward
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-06T07:33:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19896667
       
  • Tele-ophthalmology for screening for eye diseases in older patients with
           cognitive complaints
    • Authors: Anne-Sophie Boureau, Helene Masse, Guillaume Chapelet, Laure de Decker, Pascal Chevalet, Sophie Pichierri, Michel Weber, Gilles Berrut
      Abstract: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
      PubDate: 2020-01-03T06:15:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1357633X19893883
       
 
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