Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8642 journals)
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MEDICAL SCIENCES (2392 journals)            First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Showing 1201 - 1400 of 3562 Journals sorted alphabetically
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forensic Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Gandaki Medical College-Nepal     Open Access  
Journal of Generic Medicines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geographical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hand Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Head & Neck Physicians and Surgeons     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health & Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Health and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Design     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Economics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior     Open Access  
Journal of Health Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of health sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences / Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health Sciences and Surveillance System     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Health Specialties     Open Access  
Journal of Health Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Helminthology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of HIV for Clinical and Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hospital Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology [Medical Sciences]     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Rhythm     Open Access  
Journal of Human Transcriptome     Open Access  
Journal of Ideas in Health     Open Access  
Journal of Inflammation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Inflammation Research     Open Access  
Journal of Injury and Violence Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Institute of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Insulin Resistance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interventional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Investigative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamabad Medical & Dental College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Karnali Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Kathmandu Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of King Abdulaziz University : Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Laryngology and Voice     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Lasers in Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Limb Lengthening & Reconstruction     Open Access  
Journal of Lumbini Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Materials Science : Materials in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medical Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Cases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Colleges of PLA     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Medical Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ethics     Partially Free   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Medical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Medical Hypotheses and Ideas     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Imaging and Health Informatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Investigation and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Laboratory and Diagnosis     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Law and Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Medical Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Screening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Signals and Sensors     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Systems     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medicinal Botany     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medicine and the Person     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medicine in Scientific Research     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine in the Tropics     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine Research and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Medicines Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Metabolomics & Systems Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Movement Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nanotechnology in Engineering and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Nanotheranostics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Medicines     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nature and Science of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Negative and No Positive Results     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalgunj Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Neurocritical Care     Open Access  
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Neurorestoratology     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroscience and Neurological Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Nobel Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Obesity and Bariatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Occupational Health     Open Access  
Journal of Occupational Therapy Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral Health and Craniofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Orofacial Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, Hearing and Balance Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ovarian Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ozone Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Paramedical Sciences & Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Participatory Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Patan Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Pathogens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Patient Experience     Open Access  
Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes     Open Access  
Journal of Periodontal Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Personalized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physiobiochemical Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physiology-Paris     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pioneering Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Pregnancy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health     Open Access  
Journal of Primary Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Prosthodontic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prosthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Receptor, Ligand and Channel Research     Open Access  
Journal of Regenerative Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Research in Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Science and Applications : Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Scientific Innovation in Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Scientific Perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Arthroplasty     Open Access  
Journal of Sleep Disorders : Treatment & Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of South American Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences : Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stomal Therapy Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Surgical Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Surgical and Clinical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Case Reports     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report     Open Access  
Journal of Systemic Therapies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of The Academy of Clinical Microbiologists     Open Access  
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Certified Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American College of Clinical Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Anatomical Society of India     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Anus, Rectum and Colon     Open Access  
Journal of The Arab Society for Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Ceylon College of Physicians     Open Access  
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the College of Community Physicians of Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Journal of The Egyptian Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Formosan Medical Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

  First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2549-1172
Published by Universitas Sebelas Maret Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Health Belief Model on the Predictors of Healthy Sex Behavior among
           Commercial Female Sex Workers in Surakarta, Central Java

    • Authors: Syarifah Syarifah, Argyo Demartoto, Ruben Dharmawan
      Pages: 116 - 125
      Abstract: Background: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diseases that are now a global issue because they are the entrance to HIV transmission. Female sex workers (WPS) have a high risk of contracting and transmitting STIs and HIV / AIDS due to unsafe sex behavior. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship of safe sex behavior for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections in female sex workers in Surakarta.Subjects and Method: A cross-sectional study was conducetd in Surakarta, Central Java, from December 2017 to January 2018. A sample of 105 female sex workers was selected by fixed disease sample. The dependent variable was safe sex behavior. The independent variables were perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefit, perceived barrier, perceive threat, cues to action, and self-efficacy. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multiple logistic regression.Results: Safe sex behavior among female sex worker increased with strong perceived benefit (b= 0.18; 95% CI= 0.74 to 0.28; p= 0.001) and strong self-efficacy (b=0.51; 95% CI=0.25 to 0.76; p<0.001). Safe sex behavior decreased with strong perceived barrier (b= 0.15; 95% CI= -0.27 to  -0.03; p=0.012). Terdapat hubungan antara persepsi manfaat, efikasi diri dan persepsi hambatan dengan perilaku seks yang aman (F= 10.351; 95% CI= 6.70 to 17.00; p<0.001; R2=23.5%).Conclusion: Safe sex behavior among female sex workers increases with strong perceived benefit and strong self-efficacy. Safe sex behavior decreases with strong perceived barrier.Keywords: sex behaviour, safe sex, sexually transmitted infections, female sex workersCorrespondence: Syarifah. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas MaretJournal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(2): 116-125
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.02.05
      PubDate: 2019-09-19
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Effectiveness of Health Promotion by Indonesian Breastfeeding Association
           in Increasing Exclusive Breastfeeding Coverage in Surabaya City, East Java
           

    • Authors: Diani Octaviyanti Handajani, Eti Poncorini Pamungkasari, Uki Retno Budihastuti
      Pages: 1 - 15
      Abstract: Background: Breastfeeding is essential for health, development, and child survival by preventing child illness. However, exclusive breastfeeding has not reached the desired target. Health promotion by Indonesian Breastfeeding Association (AIMI) participation is one way to increase exclusive breastfeeding coverage. There are several causative factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding, which can be explained by the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of health promotion through the Association of Indonesian Breastfeeding Mothers (AIMI) in increasing coverage of exclusive breastfeeding in Surabaya, East Java.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a cohort retrospective design. The study was conducted at AIMI Surabaya branch office and 6 community health centers in Surabaya, East Java, from December 2017 and January 2018. A total sample of 120 lactating mothers was selected for this study by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was breastfeeding. The independent variables were AIMI participation, maternal knowledge, maternal education, maternal attitude, family support, and peer support. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Exclusive breastfeeding increased with AIMI participation (b= 1.02; 95% CI= -0.19 to 2.24; p=0.101), better maternal knowledge (b= 1.48; 95% CI= 0.15 to 2.79; p=0.029), positive maternal attitude (b= 2.22; 95% CI= 1.03 to 3.38; p<0.001), and stronger family support (b= 2.69; 95% CI= 1.25 to 4.11; p<0.001). Maternal attitude increased with AIMI participation (b= 0.69; 95% CI= -0.18 to 1.57; p=0.116), better maternal knowledge (b= 1.56; 95% CI= 0.72 to 2.39; p<0.001), and higher maternal education (b= 0.71; 95% CI= -0.11 to 1.52; p=0.089). AIMI participation increased with higher education (b= 1.07; 95% CI= 0.26 to 1.87; p=0.009). Family support increased with stronger peer support (b= 2.24; 95% CI= 0.73 to 3.75; p=0.004).Conclusion: Exclusive breastfeeding increases with AIMI participation, better maternal knowledge, positive maternal attitude, and stronger family support.Keywords: exclusive breastfeeding, PRECEDE-PROCEED model, Indonesian Breastfeeding Association (AIMI)Correspondence: Diani Octaviyanti Handajani. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: diani.octaviyanti@gmail.com. Mobile: +628563328666Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 1-15
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.01 
      PubDate: 2018-03-07
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Health Belief Model on the Determinants of Human Papilloma Virus
           Vaccination in Women of Reproductive Age in Surakarta, Central Java

    • Authors: Yulia Fitriani, Ambar Mudigdo, Rita Benya Andriani
      Pages: 16 - 26
      Abstract: Background: Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that develops in a woman's cervix. Cervical cancer is caused by a human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer ranked fourth against most women's cancer. The incidence of cervical cancer was estimated at 528,000 (7.9%) cases worldwide causing 266,000 deaths in 2012. The HPV vaccine can protect women from HPV infection, thus lowering the risk of cervical cancer. This study aimed to analyze the determinants of HPV vaccination in women of reproductive age in Permata Harapan Oncology Clinic, Surakarta, Central Java, using Health Belief Model.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a case-control design. This study was conducted at Permata Harapan Oncology Clinic, Surakarta, from January to February 2018. A total study of 200 study subjects was selected by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was HPV vaccination. The independent variables were knowledge, perceived seriousness, perceived susceptibility, perceived barrier, perceived benefit, family income, and family support. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multiple logistic regression.Results: HPV vaccination increased with better knowledge (OR=7.97; 95% CI= 1.50 to 42.38; p= 0.015), perceived seriousness (OR=22.81; 95% CI= 6.06 to 85.86; p<0.001), perceived susceptibility (OR=4.03; 95% CI= 1.25 to 13.09; p=0.020), , perceived benefit (OR­=6.57; 95% CI= 1.88 to 22.98; p=0.003), family income (OR=5.32; 95% CI= 1.57 to 18.07; p=0.007), and family support (OR=6.86; 95% CI= 1.55 to 30.36; p= 0.011). HPV vaccination decreased with perceived barrier (OR=0.14; 95% CI= 0.04 to 0.51; p=0.003).Conclusion: HPV vaccination increases with better knowledge perceived seriousness, perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit, family income, and family support, but decreases with perceived barrier.Keywords: HPV vaccination, knowledge, perceived seriousness, perceived susceptibility, perceived barrier, perceived benefit, family income, family supportCorrespondence: Yulia Fitriani. Masters Program in Public Health, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: yuliafitriani38@gmail.com. Mobile: 085655708946.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 16-26
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.02 
      PubDate: 2018-03-08
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • The Effect of Depression, Stigma, and Peer Support Group, on the Quality
           of Life of People Living with HIV/AIDS in Solo Plus Peer Support Group,
           Surakarta, Central Java

    • Authors: Yuli Lutfatul Fajriyah, Argyo Demartoto, Bhisma Murti
      Pages: 27 - 36
      Abstract: Background: People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) often face tough social problems, such as social rejection, stigma, and discrimination. Factors that affect PLWH’s quality of life may include psychosocial factors, economic status, immunological status, social support, and co-morbidity. This study aimed to determine the effect of depression, stigma, and peer support group on the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS in Solo Plus peer support group, Surakarta, Central Java.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted at Solo plus peer support group, Surakarta, Central Java, from January to February 2018. A sample of 100 PLWH was selected for this study by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was a quality life of PLWH. The independent variables were healthy behavior, depression, family income, stigma, peer support, and social support. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Quality of life of PLWH increased with involvement in peer support group (b= 3.40; 95% CI= 0.71 to 6.10; p=0.001), social support (b= 0.70; 95% CI= 0.01 to 1.40; p=0.046), and healthy behavior (b=9.33; 95% CI= 5.30 to 13.36; p<0.001). Quality of life of PLWH decreased with stigma (b= -1.10; 95% CI=-1.84 to -0.36; p=0.003), and depression (b=-4.23; 95% CI=-6.62 to -1.83; p=0.001). Quality of life of PLWH was indirectly affected by income (b=0.06; 95% CI=10.14 to 18.61; p<0.001).Conclusion: Quality of life of PLWH is affected by healthy behavior, depression, stigma, peer support group, social support, and income.Keywords: Quality of life, PLWH, stigma, peer support group, social support Correspondence: Yuli Lutfatul Fajriyah. Masters Program in Public Health, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, 57126, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: yuli.luth.15@gmail.com. Mobile: +6285712200298.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 27-36
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.03 
      PubDate: 2018-03-09
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Biopsychosocial Determinants of Long-term Contraceptive Use in Women of
           Reproductive Age in Surakarta, Central Java

    • Authors: Ratna Arifiana, Uki Retno Budihastuti, Isna Qadrijati
      Pages: 37 - 47
      Abstract: Background: Family planning allows people to attain their desired number of children and determine the spacing of pregnancy. Long-term contraceptive methods are more effective, safe, with fewer contraindications than others contraceptive method. This study aimed to investigate the biopsychosocial determinants of long-term contraceptive use in women of reproductive age in Surakarta, Central Java, using a theory of planned behavior.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a case-control design. The study was conducted in Surakarta, from January to February 2018. A sample of 210 women of reproductive age was selected for this study by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was long-term contraceptive use. The independent variables were age, parity, education, employment status, knowledge, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavior control, husband support, family income, and health counseling. The data was collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Long-term contraceptive use increased with positive attitude (b=3.49; 95% CI= 1.88 to 5.11; p<0.001), supportive subjective norm (b= 2.91; 95% CI= 1.10 to 4.73; p=0.002), strong perceived behavior control (b=3.09; 95% CI= 1.29 to 4.88; p=0.001), and strong husband support (b=2.68; 95% CI= 1.04 to 4.33; p=0.001). Long-term contraceptive use was indirectly affected by knowledge, health conselling, and education level.Conclusion: Long-term contraceptive use increases with a positive attitude, supportive subjective norm, strong perceived behavior control, and strong husband support.Keywords: long-term contraceptive, the theory of planned behavior, path analysisCorrespondence: Ratna Arifiana, Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: arifianaratna1301@gmail.com.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 37-47
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.03 
      PubDate: 2018-03-09
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • A Path Analysis on Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV/ AIDS
           Patients at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta using Health Belief Model

    • Authors: Dyah Ayu Agustin, Afiono Agung Prasetyo, Bhisma Murti
      Pages: 48 - 55
      Abstract: Background: HIV / AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is still a health problem in the world including in Indonesia. Approximately 36.7 people are infected with HIV in the world and in Indonesia until March 2017 recorded 242,699 cases. The recorded amount does not reflect the real number in the community because HIV infection often does not show specific symptoms before entering the stage of AIDS. This study aimed to examine the application of the health belief model on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV/ AIDS patients in Surakarta, Central Java.Subject and  Method: This was a cross sectional study conducted at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta, Central Java, on February 2018. A total sample of 284 HIV/AIDS patients was selected for this study by exhaustive sampling. The dependent variable was ARV Adherence. The independent variables were perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy. The data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed by a path analysis.Results: Adherence directly increased with self-efficacy (b= 2.10; 95% CI = 0.85 to 3.34; p= 0.001), perceived benefit (b= 2.08; 95% CI= 1.15 to 3.00; p <0.001), and cue to action (b= 3.61; 95% CI= 0.86  to 6.36; p= 0.010) but decreased with higher perceived barrier (b= 2.08; 95% CI= 1.15 to 3.00; p<0.001). Adherence indirectly decreased with higher perceived severity and perceived susceptibility.Conclusion: Self-efficacy, perceived benefit, perceived barrier,  and cue to action directly affect the adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Perceived severity and perceived susceptibility indirectly affect the adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Keywords: ARV adherence, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action, self-efficacyCorrespondence: Dyah Ayu Agustin. School of Health Sciences Kendedes, Malang, East Java. Email: ayuagustin20@gmail.com. Mobile: +6281316337006.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 48-55
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.05 
      PubDate: 2018-06-06
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Socioeconomic Factors and Sexual Behavior Associated with HIV Infection in
           Population, in Kebumen District, Central Java

    • Authors: Tri Subaeti, Argyo Demartoto, Bhisma Murti
      Pages: 56 - 65
      Abstract: Background: Globally, the number of people infected with Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) was estimated at 36.7 million. This study aimed to examine the social economic determinants of HIV status in Kebumen district community.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational with a case-control design. This study was conducted in Kebumen District, Central Java, from January to February 2018. A sample of 81 HIV positive cases and 162 negative controls were selected for this study by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was HIV status. The independent variables were age, sex, marital status, income, education, ignorance of the HIV status, health worker support, number of sexual partners, and sexual transmitted infection (STI). Data on HIV status were taken from medical record. The data of other variables were collected by questionnaire. The data were analyzed by logistic regression.Results: HIV positive status increased with higher income (OR= 2.94; 95% CI= 1.04 to 8.26; p= 0.041), age ≥24 years (OR=4.33; 95% CI= 1.19 to 15.8; p= 0.026), ignorance of HIV status (OR=0.21; 95% CI= 0.09 to 0.51; p= 0.001), lack of health worker support (OR= 5.62; 95% CI= 0.88 to 35.58; p= 0.067), multiple sexual partner (OR= 6.59; 95% CI= 2.69 to 16.18; p<0.001), and presence of STI (OR= 14.19; 95% CI= 5.06 to 39.85; p<0.001).Conclusion: HIV positive status increases with higher income, age ≥24 years, ignorance of HIV status, lack of health personnel support, multiple sexual partner, and presence of STI.Keywords: socioeconomic, determinant, HIVCorrespondence: Tri Subaeti. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, 57126, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: etisoegito@gmail.com. Mobile: +6281226785111.Journal of Health Promotion and Public Health (2018), 3(1): 56-65
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.06
      PubDate: 2018-07-09
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Biopsychosocial Determinants of Human Papilloma Virus Immunization in
           Women of Reproductive Age in Surakarta, Central Java

    • Authors: Gabriela Advitri Febriani, Setyo Sri Rahardjo, Bhisma Murti
      Pages: 66 - 77
      Abstract: Background: Cervical cancer ranks second as the cause of death in women worldwide. Cervical cancer is preventable by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) immunization. It was hypothesized that use of HPV immunization is determined by biopsychosocial factors as involved in the Health Belief Model and Social Learning Theory. This study aimed to analyze the determinants of HPV immunization use in women of reproductive age.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted at Permata Harapan Clinic and Budi Sehat Laboratory Clinic, Surakarta, Central Java. The data were collected from February to March 2018. A sample of 200 women was selected by random sampling, consisting of 50 women undertaking screening and 150 women not undertaking screening. The dependent variable was HPV immunization. The independent variables were perceptions of susceptibility, seriousness, benefit, barrier, respectively, and self-efficacy, education, family income, employment status, family support, social environment, and cervical cancer screening. Data on HPV vaccine use were taken from medical record. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Use of HPV immunization was directly associated with perceived susceptibility (b= 2.01; 95% CI= 1.03 to 3.00; p<0.001), perceived seriousness (b= 1.52; 95% CI 95%= -0.08 to 3.13; p=0.063), self efficacy (b= 1.55; 95% CI= 0.05 to 3.05; p=0.043), and perceived barrier (b= -2.25; 95% CI= -3.22 to -1.28; p<0.001). It was indirectly associated with perceived benefit, education, family income, employment status, family support, social environment, and cervical cancer screening.Conclusion: Use of HPV immunization is directly associated with perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, self-efficacy, and perceived barrier. It is indirectly associated with perceived benefit, education, family income, employment status, family support, social environment, and cervical cancer screening.       Keywords: Human Papilloma Virus, immunization, women of reproductive age, health belief model, social learning theoryCorrespondence: Gabriela Advitri Febriani. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta, Indonesia. Email: gabrielaadvitri8@gmail.com. Mobile: +6285743809055.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 66-77
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.07
      PubDate: 2018-07-23
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Factors Associated with Pre-Marital Sexual Behavior Among Adolescents in
           Bima, West Nusa Tenggara: Theory of Planned Behavior

    • Authors: Mulya Tarmidi, Argyo Demartoto, Eti Poncorini Pamungkasari
      Pages: 78 - 85
      Abstract: Background: Adolescent reproductive health is a major global challenge. Studies have reported around 16 million women 15–19 years old give birth each year, 11% of all births worldwide.95% of these births occur in low- and middle income countries. This study aimed to examine factors associated with pre-marital sexual behavior among adolescents in Bima, West Nusa Tenggara, using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB).Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Bima, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia, from April to June 2018. A sample of 200 senior high school students was selected by proportional stratified random sampling. The dependent variable was healthy pre-marital sex behavior. The independent variables were intention, attitude, maternal education, subjective norm, peer norm, perceived behaviour control (PBC), and reproduction health information center (PIK-KRR). The data were analyzed by path analysis.Results: Healthy pre-marital sex behavior was directly increased with intention (b= 0.56; SE= 0.03; p<0.001) and PBC (b= 0.07; SE= 0.03; p= 0.025). Healthy pre-marital sex behavior was indirectly affected bysubjective norm, attitude, maternal education, subjective norm, peer norm, and health information center. Conclusion: Healthy pre-marital sex behavior is directly increased with intention and PBC. Healthy pre-marital sex behavior is indirectly affected bysubjective norm, attitude, maternal education, subjective norm, peer norm, and health information center.Keywords: pre-marital sex behaviour, reproduction health information center, Theory of Planned Behavior, path analysisCorrespondence: Mulya Tarmidi. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email:bluedaeng@gmail.com.Mobile: +6285238609735.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 78-85
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.08
      PubDate: 2018-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Path Analysis: Factors Associated with Self Preventive Care among Patients
           with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Surakarta

    • Authors: Ummy Prasetyowati, Didik Tamtoto, Bhisma Murti
      Pages: 86 - 93
      Abstract: Background: Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality from several conditions, such as cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or kidney diseases and heart failure. In ad­d­ition, economic analysis indicates that mean total costs associated with microvascular complications have almost doubled compared with those for patients without these complications. This study aimed to analyze factors associated with self preventive care among patients with type 2 dia­betes mellitus in Surakarta, using a path analysis model.Subjects and Method: A cross sectional study was conducted at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Su­rakarta, Central Java, from March to April 2018. A sample of 200 type DM patients was selected by to­tal sampling. The dependent variable was self preventive care. The independent variables were per­ceived severity, susceptibility, threat, benefit, cues to action, self efficacy, attitude, and family sup­port. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Self preventive care directly increased with perceived threat (b= 3.21; 95% CI= 1.98 to 4.44; p<0.001), perceived benefit (OR= 0.68; 95% CI= -0.11 to 1.47; p=0.092), and self efficacy (OR= 0.14; 95% CI= 0.01 to 0.26; p=0.029). Self preventive care was indirectly associated with perceived severity, attitude, family support, and cues to action.Conclusion: Self preventive care directly increases with perceived threat, perceived benefit, and self efficacy, and is indirectly associated with perceived severity, attitude, family support, and cues to action.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, self preventive care, Health Belief ModelCorrespondence: Ummy Prasetyowati. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: ummyprasetyowati@gmail.com. Mobile:+6281227225939.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(2): 86-93
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.02.01 
      PubDate: 2018-09-05
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Parental Communication, Peer Role, and the Contextual Effect of School on
           Safe Sex Behavior among Adolescents in Mojokerto, East Java

    • Authors: Feny Lianawati, Argyo Demartoto, Rita Benya Adriani
      Pages: 94 - 99
      Abstract: Background: Globally, youth are particularly vulnerable to the negativeconsequences of sexual behavior, such as unwanted pregnancies, AIDS and other STDs. The importance of school contextual effects on health and well‐being among young people is increasingly recognized. This study aimed to examine the effects of parental communication and peer role on safe sex behavior among adolescents in Mojokerto, East Java, with special consideration of the contextualeffect of school.Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at 15 senior high schools in Mojokerto, East Java, from April to May 2018.A sample of 200 students was selected by stratified random sampling.The dependent variable was safe sex behavior. The independent variables were parental communication and peer role. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multilevel analysis.Results: Parental communication role (b= 1.00; 95% CI= -0.56 to 1.44; p<0.001) and peer role (b=0.84; 95% CI=0.41 to 1.27; p<0.001) positively affected safe sex behavior among adolescents. School had a contextual effect on safe sex behavior with ICC= 9.6%.Conclusion: Parental role and peer role positively affect safe sex behavior among adolescents. School has a considerable contextual effect on safe sex behavior.Keywords: safe sex behavior, parental communication, peer role,multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Feny Lianawati. Masters Program on Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: fenyliana188@gmail.com. Mobile:+6282143157071.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(2): 94-99
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.02.02
      PubDate: 2018-09-05
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Health Belief Model on the Choice of Medical Doctor among Mothers of
           Children with Diarrhea

    • Authors: Prita Yuliana Irnawati, Harsono Salimo, Yulia Lanti Retno Dewi
      Pages: 100 - 108
      Abstract: Background: Diseases among young children are the major causes of morbidity and mortality particularly in the developing countries. An estimated 13 million infants and children die annually in developing countries. In most developing countries, the health of the children is strongly dependant on maternal healthcare behavior. Evidence on health seeking behavior has been lacking in Central Java, Indonesia, particularly mother’s choice to visit pediatrician rather than general practitioner for her ill child. The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the choice of medical doctor among mothers of children with diarrhea, using Health Belief Model.Subjects and Method: A case control study was carried out at Sangkrah community health center, Surakarta, Central Java, in January 2017. A sample of 164 mothers was selected by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was mother’s choice to visit doctor. The independent variables were perceived susceptibility, seriousness, threat, benefit, and barrier. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: The chance of mother decided to visit pediatrician rather than general practitioner was directly increased with strong perceived threat (b= 0.91; 95% CI= 0.24 to -1.57; p= 0.008), strong perceived benefit (b= 0.85; 95% CI= 0.19 to 1.50; p= 0.012), and decreased with strong perceived barrier (b= -0.67; 95% CI= -1.36 to 0.01; p= 0.053). Mother’s choice to visit pediatrician was indirectly affected by perceived susceptibility and perceived seriousness.Conclusion: Mother’s choice to visit pediatrician rather than general practitioner is directly increased with perceived threat, perceived benefit, and decreased with perceived barrier. Mother’s choice to visit pediatrician is indirectly affected by perceived susceptibility and perceived seriousness.Keywords: mother’s choice, pediatrician, general practitioner, diarrhea, health believe model, childrenCorrespondence: Prita Yuliana Irnawati. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: pritayuliana@gmail.com. Mobile: +6287835140534.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(2): 100-108
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.02.03
      PubDate: 2018-09-05
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Factors Affecting Safe Sex Behavior Among Female Sex Workers in Surakarta,
           Central Java

    • Authors: Saras Vati Manvatarini Sugma, Aris Sudiyanto, Argyo Demartoto
      Pages: 109 - 115
      Abstract: Background: Earlier studies often focus solely on clients as female sex worker (FSW) risky sexual partners, ignoring the possible risks FSWs face from steady sex partners. Thus, further study is needed identifying strategies to reduce the potential increased risk of HIV/STI transmission between FSWs and their steady partners. This study aimed to determine factors affecting safe sex behavior among female sex workers in Surakarta, Central Java.Subjects and Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Banjarsari, Surakarta, Central Java, from April to May 2018. A sample of 134 female sex workers was selected by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was safe sex behavior. The independent variables were subjective norm, perceived behavior control, intention, attitude, education, and age. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Safe sex behavior increased with strong intention (b= 0.08; SE= 0.04; p=0.041). Safe sex behavior indirectly increased with older age, positive attitude, positive subjective norm, and strong perceived behavior control. Conclusion: Safe sex behavior directly increases with strong intention, and indirectly increases with older age, positive attitude, positive subjective norm, and strong perceived behavior control.Keywords: safe sex behavior, Theory of Planned BehaviorCorrespondence: Saras Vati Manvatarini Sugma. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: sarasvatims@gmail.com. Mobile: +6282186653675.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(2): 109-115
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.02.04
      PubDate: 2018-09-05
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Perceived Benefit of Condom Use Domination on the Perceived Benefit of
           Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening on Queer in Yogyakarta

    • Authors: Fika Lilik Indrawati, Argyo Demartoto, Ari Natalia Probandari
      Pages: 126 - 129
      Abstract: Background: The negative stigma is inherent in transvestites because it is referred to as one of the sources of the spread of STIs and HIV/ AIDS viruse. In their position as a sex worker who was considered very low and lack of knowledge about reproductive health, the transvestites were infected with STIs and the HIV virus from their sexual partners. This happened because of a lack of information about reproductive health and access to health services for queer. This study aimed to analyze perceived benefit of condom use domination on the perceived benefit of sexually transmitted infection screening on queer.Subjects and Method: This was a qualitative study with phenomenological approach. Seven representative informants were selected by purposive sampling. The data were collected by in-depth interview and focus group discussion. The number of informants at the focus group discussion was eight people.Results: Most of the informants believed that they were able to avoid or recover from STIs by using safety, namely condoms. They are more convinced that by applying condoms to their partners, it will be more useful as prevention of STIs compared to STI screening, on the grounds that practical condoms are easy to carry and do not hurt when having sexual intercourse.Conclusion: All transvestites believe that STI screening can be beneficial to their health, but the reality in their behavior is that they believe in condoms as a means of preventing STIs.Keywords: condom, STI screening service, queerCorrespondence: Fika Lilik Indrawati. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: fika.lilik.indrawati@gmail.comJournal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(2): 126-129
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.02.06
      PubDate: 2018-10-04
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants of Early Marriage in Ngawi, East
           Java: Application of PRECEDE-PROCEED Model

    • Authors: Noviana Ayumi Wijayati, RB. Soemanto, Ety Poncorini Pamungkasari
      Pages: 302 - 312
      Abstract: Background: Indonesia ranks 37 of the countries in the world with the highest rate of early marriage. Center for Gender and Sexuality Studies, University of Indonesia reported in 2015 that Indonesia rank the second highest rate of early marriage in South East Asia. Approximately 2 millions (7.3%) girls aged under 15  years old have been married and dropped out of school. This number is expected to become 3 million married girls in 2030. This study aimed to determine the effect of socioeconomic and cultural factors on early marriage in Ngawi, East Java.Subjects and Method: This was an analytical observational study with case control design. Study subjects consisted of 75 women of reproductive age who got married before 20 years old and 75 women of reproductive age who got married had 20-30 years of age. The dependent variable was early marriage. The independent variables were paternal education level, maternal education level, family income, family belief, culture, and peers. The data were collected by a set of questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis model.Results: Early marriage was positively affected by family belief (b=1.47; 95% CI= 0.44 to 2.50; p=0.005) and culture (b=1.56; 95% CI= 0.54 to 2.58; p=0.003). Early marriage was negatively affected by family income (b=-2.20; 95% CI= -3.18 to -1.21; p<0.001) and positive peers (b=-2.51; 95% CI= -3.58 to -1.44; p<0.001). Family income was affected by paternal education (b=2.24; 95% CI= 0.37 to 4.12; p=0.019) and maternal education (b= 6.53; 95% CI= 4.25 to 8.80; p<0.001). Family belief  was affected by paternal education (b= -1.20; 95% CI= -2.10 to -0.30; p= 0.009) and maternal education (b= -1.20; 95% CI= -2.10 to -0.30; p= 0.009).Conclusion: Early marriage is directly affected by family income, family belief, culture, and positive peers.Keyword: early marriage, family education, family income, family belief, culture, peersCorrespondence: Noviana Ayumi Wijayati. Masters Program in Public Heath, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: novianaayumi@gmail.com. Mobile: +6285645828766.Journal of Health Promotion and Behaviour (2017), 2(4): 302-312
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2016.02.04.02 
      PubDate: 2018-01-12
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Multilevel Analysis on the Predictors of Safe Sexual Behavior among Girl
           Adolescents in Karanganyar, Central Java

    • Authors: Melda Kumalaningrum, Eti Poncorini Pamungkasari, Ismi Dwi Astuti Nurhaeni
      Pages: 323 - 331
      Abstract: Background: Studies have shown that the number of adolescents who have premarital sex is increasing. Unsafe sex can increase the risk of sexual transmitted disease, unwanted pregnancy, and suicide in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the associations between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavior control, equal gender relation, and media exposure, on safe sexual behavior among girl adolescents in Karanganyar, Central Java.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic and observational study with cross-sectional design. The study was conducted in 25 senior high schools in Karanganyar, Central Java, from Desember, 2017 to January, 2018. A total sampel of 200 girl adolescents were selected by stratified random sampling, consisting of 8 girl adolescents from each of the 25 senior high schools. The dependent variable was safe sexual behavior. The independent variables were attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavior control, equal gender relation, and media exposure on safe sexual behavior. The data was collected using questionnaire and analyzed by multilevel analysis. The contextual effect of school, which distinguished rural and urban schools, on safe sex behavior was measured by intra-class correlation (ICC).Results: Positive attitude (b= 0.41; 95% CI= 0.14 to 0.69; p= 0.004), positive subjective norm (b=0.23; 95% Cl= 0.21 to 0.43; p= 0.031), strong perceived behavior control (b= 0.69; 95% Cl= 0.44 to 0.96 ; p< 0.001), equal gender relation (b= 0.41; 95% Cl =0.18 to 0.63; p<0.001), and exposure to media on safe sex behavior (b= 0.17; 95% Cl= -0.02 to 0.36; p= 0.085), predicted positively the likelihood of safe sexual behavior in girl adolescents. The contextual effect of school on safe sex behavior was small with ICC= 5.55%.Conclusion: Positive attitude, positive subjective norm, strong perceived behavior control, equal gender relation, and exposure to media on safe sex behavior, predict positively the likelihood of safe sexual behavior in girl adolescents.Keyword: predictor, safe sexual behavior, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Melda Kumalaningrum. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36A, Surakarta. Email: melda.kumalanigrum@gmail.com. Mobile: 6282134359845.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2017), 2(4): 323-331
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.04.04 
      PubDate: 2018-01-16
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Determinants of Successful Smoking Cessation in Surakarta

    • Authors: Joko Tri Atmodjo, RB. Soemanto, Bhisma Murti
      Pages: 332 - 344
      Abstract: Background: Smoking cessation is not an easy endeavor as tobacco addiction is a group of behavioral, cognitive and physiological phenomena. This study aimed to analyze the determinants of successful smoking cessation using health belief model (HBM), PRECEDE-PROCEED model, and theory of planned behavior (TPB).Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with cross-sectional design. It was conducted in Surakarta, in December 2017. A sample of  165 study subjects consisting of 68 ex-smokers who were successful in smoking cessation and 97 smokers who were unsuccessful in smoking cessation, by snowball sampling. The dependent variable was smoking cessation. The independent variables were intention to quit smoking, attitude toward smoking cessation, outcome expectation, addiction, stress, perceived behavioral control (PBC), subjective norm, social support, family income, purchasing power, smoking duration, and access to cigarette. The data were collected using questionnaire and analyzed using path analysis.Results: Successful smoking cessation was directly affected by strong intention (b= 2.39, SE= 0.51, p <0.001), duration of smoking (≥10 years) (b= -3.46; SE= 0.57; p <0.001), and easy access to cigarettes (b= -1.28; SE= 0.52; p= 0.008). Intention is was affeced by positive attitude (b = 0.79, SE= 0.39, p= 0.046), positive PBC (b= 1.89, SE= 0.40; p<0.001), high purchasing power (b= -1.23; SE= 0.39; p= 0.002), and positive subjective norm (b= 1.38; SE= 0.40; p= 0.001). Positive PBC was affected by duration of smoking (≥10 years) (b= -2.32; SE= 0.47; p<0.001), positive outcome expectation (b= 1.04; SE= 0.49; p= 0.035), and addiction (b= -2.96; SE= 0.49; p<0.001). Positive attitude was affected by positive expectation outcomes (b= 1.09; SE= 0.34; p= 0.001). Positive subjective norm (b= 0.77; SE = 0.33; p= 0.020) and positive outcome expectation (b= 0.77; SE= 0.33; p= 0.020) were affected by social support. Smoking duration was affected by stress (b= 0.09; SE=- 0.04; p= 0.018). Cigarette purchasing power was affected by high income (b=2.78; SE= 1.43; p= 0.053).Conclusion: Successful smoking cessation is directly affected by intention, smoking duration, stress, and access to cigarette. Success smoking cessation is indirectly affected by attitude, addiction, PBC, subjective norm, social support, outcome expectation, family income, purchasing power.Keyword: smoking cessation, HBM, PRECEDE-PROCEED, TPBCorrespondence: Joko Tri Atmojo. School of Health Sciences Mamba'ul 'Ulum, Surakarta, Jl. Ring Road Utara, Tawangsari, Mojosongo, Jebres, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: jokotriatmojo1@gmail.com. Mobile: 081393319000.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2017), 2(4): 332-344
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.04.05 
      PubDate: 2018-01-24
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • A Qualitative Study on the Impact of Sexual Assault and Its Approach to
           Cope with in Female Teenage Victims in Surakarta, Central Java

    • Authors: Nila Widya Keswara, Bhisma Murti, Argyo Demartoto
      Pages: 345 - 349
      Abstract: Background: Studies have shown that sexual assault can lead to the profound impact on the victims. It may last short or long, and can even generate a "ripple effect" of negative symptoms in the affected workplace or living environment. This study aimed to explore the psychological and biological impacts of sexual assault and approach to cope with the trauma in female adolescent victims in Surakarta.Subjects and Method: This was a qualitative study conducted in Surakarta, Central Java. The informants were social workers working at Yayasan KAKAK, a non-government organization dealing with sexual harassment issues. The data were collected by in-depth interview. The informants provided information about psychological and biological impacts of sexual harassment as well as the approach to cope with the trauma in female adolescent victims in Surakarta.Results: The psychological impacts of sexual harassment included anger, fear, self-consciousness or embarrassment, difficulty sleeping, loss of appetite. According to the information provided by the informants, the victim’s life turned into a misery, and school became a place to be avoided. The sexual attacks led to feelings of demoralization and humiliation, causing loss of self-confidence and self-esteem. The victims were reported as having trouble studying or paying attention, less able to perform well, participating less, no longer going to study group, thinking about dropping a class or even leaving the school. Victims experienced symptoms such as headaches, stomach aches, nightmares and anxiety attacks. Yayasan KAKAK assisted victims by supporting and guiding about steps to be taken to protect victims and to cope with the aftermath.Conclusion: Sexual harassment has serious emotional and biological effects on adolescent victims. According to this research finding, one of the greatest mitigating factors to trauma is the acknowledgment that it is happening. Victims of sexual harassment should be assisted to find support and guidance about what steps can be taken to protect themselves and how to cope with the aftermath.Keywords: sexual harassment, female adolescent, copingCorrespondence: Nila Widya Keswara. Diploma Program in Midwifery, School of Health Polytechnics Dr. Soepraoen Hospital, Malang. Email: nilakeswara_purwanto@yahoo.com. Mobile: +6281235555056.https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.04.06
      PubDate: 2018-02-01
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • The Effect of Internal and External Factors on Preventive Reproductive
           Health Behaviors in Adolescents, in Banjarmasin, Kalimantan

    • Authors: Azura Arisa, RB Soemanto, Setyo Sri Rahardjo
      Pages: 350 - 358
      Abstract: Background: Many adolescents had engaged in unhealthy sexual behavior that can result in unintended health outcomes. In theory, the adolescent sexual behavior is influenced by a complex set of interactions between biology, genetics, individual perception, personality characteristics, and sociocultural norms and values. This study aimed to determine the influence of internal and external factors on preventive reproductive health behavior in adolescents, in Banjarmasin, Kalimantan, using Health Belief Model.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with the cross-sectional design. The study was conducted at 10 senior high schools in Banjarmasin, Kalimantan. A total sample of 200 grade XI students was selected for this study by proportional stratified random sampling. The dependent variable was preventive reproductive health behavior. The independent variables were perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived threat, perceived benefit, perceived barrier, self-efficacy, the role of parents, peer role, and information access. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis. Results: The strong role of parents (b=0.05; SE= 0.01; p<0.001), perceived benefit (b=0.06; SE= 0.02; p=0.006), perceived threat (b=0.10; SE= 0.02; p<0.001), self-efficacy (b=0.13; SE= 0.01; p<0.001), and peer role (b=0.06; SE= 0.01; p<0.001) positively affected preventive reproductive health behavior. Perceived barrier (b= -0.03; SE= 0.01; p=0.026) negatively affected preventive reproductive health behavior. Perceived threat increased with increasing role of parents (b=0.05; SE= 0.02; p= 0.059), perceived susceptibility (b=0.21; SE= 0.05; p<0.001), perceived seriousness (b=0.10; SE= 0.04; p= 0.015), and self efficacy (b= 0.13; SE= 0.06; p= 0.040). Perceived barrier decreased with improving access of information (b=-0.16; SE= 0.05; p= 0.004). Perceived benefit increased with improving access of information (b=0.09; SE= 0.04; p= 0.030) and perceived susceptibility (b=0.20; SE= 0.06; p= 0.002). Perceived susceptibility (b=0.13; SE= 0.04; p= 0.004), perceived seriousness (b=0.10; SE= 0.05; p= 0.057), and self efficacy (b=0.09; SE= 0.03; p= 0.006) increased with access of information. Self efficacy increased with stronger role of parents (b=0.06; SE= 0.02; p= 0.018), and peer role (b=0.07; SE= 0.04; p= 0.062).Conclusion: Preventive reproductive health behavior among adolescents is affected by the role of parents, perceived of threat, self-efficacy, peer role, perceived of benefit, and perceived of a barrier. Health belief model can predict health preventive behavior.Keywords: Preventive behavior, reproductive health, health belief model, internal and external factorsCorrespondence: Azura Arisa, Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: azura.syakura@gmail.com.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2017), 2(4): 350-358
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.04.07 
      PubDate: 2018-03-07
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Path analysis on the Determinants of Pap Smear Utilization for Cervical
           Cancer Early Detection in Women of Reproductive Age

    • Authors: Gesit Kusuma Wardhani, Ambar Mudigdo, Isna Qadrijati
      Pages: 359 - 370
      Abstract: Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignant cancer among women after breast, colorectal, and lung cancers. Pap smear has been recognized as an effective strategy for reducing the incidence and mortality rate of cervical cancer. This study aimed to investigate the determinants of Pap smear utilization for cervical cancer early detection in women of reproductive age using path analysis model.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a case-control design. The study was conducted in Cilongok and Ajibarang Sub-districts, Banyumas, Central Java, from January 3 to February 3, 2018. A total sample of 200 women reproductive age was selected for this study by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was Pap smear utilization. The independent variables were education level, attitude, perception on the quality health care, access to the health center, family support, peer support, and health personnel support.  The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Pap smear utilization was positively and directly associated with education (b = 2.63; 95% CI= 1.77 to 3.48 p<0.001), perception on quality of health care (b= 1.04; 95% CI= 0.22 to 1.86; p= 0.012), attitude (b= 1.48; 95% CI= 0.51 to 2.44 p= 0.003), access to health center (b=1.02; 95% CI= 0.20 to 1.84 p= 0.015), family support (b= 1.29; 95% CI= -0.22 to 2.61; p= 0.029), and health personnel support (b= 2.02; 95% CI= 0.60 to 3.45 p= 0.005). Pap smear utilization was indirectly associated with peer support through perception on quality health care (b = 0.66; 95%= -0.01 to 1.33 p = 0.031).Conclusion: Education, perception on the quality of health care, attitude, access to the health center, family support, and health personnel support are directly associated with Pap smear utilization.Keywords: Pap smear, cervical cancer, path analysis, education, attitude, perception, family support, peer support, health personnel supportCorrespondence: Gesit Kusuma Wardhani. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, 57126, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: gesitkusuma92@gmail.com.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2017), 2(4): 359-370
      https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.04.08 
      PubDate: 2018-03-07
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
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