Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8642 journals)
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MEDICAL SCIENCES (2392 journals)            First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Showing 1201 - 1400 of 3562 Journals sorted alphabetically
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forensic Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Gandaki Medical College-Nepal     Open Access  
Journal of Generic Medicines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geographical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hand Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Head & Neck Physicians and Surgeons     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health & Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Health and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Design     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Economics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior     Open Access  
Journal of Health Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of health sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences / Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health Sciences and Surveillance System     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Health Specialties     Open Access  
Journal of Health Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Helminthology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of HIV for Clinical and Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hospital Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology [Medical Sciences]     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Rhythm     Open Access  
Journal of Human Transcriptome     Open Access  
Journal of Ideas in Health     Open Access  
Journal of Inflammation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Inflammation Research     Open Access  
Journal of Injury and Violence Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Institute of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Insulin Resistance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interventional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Investigative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamabad Medical & Dental College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Karnali Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Kathmandu Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of King Abdulaziz University : Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Laryngology and Voice     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Lasers in Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Limb Lengthening & Reconstruction     Open Access  
Journal of Lumbini Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Materials Science : Materials in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medical Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Cases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Colleges of PLA     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Medical Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ethics     Partially Free   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Medical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Medical Hypotheses and Ideas     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Imaging and Health Informatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Investigation and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Laboratory and Diagnosis     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Law and Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Medical Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Screening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Signals and Sensors     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Systems     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medicinal Botany     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medicine and the Person     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medicine in Scientific Research     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine in the Tropics     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine Research and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Medicines Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Metabolomics & Systems Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Movement Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nanotechnology in Engineering and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Nanotheranostics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Medicines     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nature and Science of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Negative and No Positive Results     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalgunj Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Neurocritical Care     Open Access  
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Neurorestoratology     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroscience and Neurological Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Nobel Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Obesity and Bariatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Occupational Health     Open Access  
Journal of Occupational Therapy Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral Health and Craniofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Orofacial Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, Hearing and Balance Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ovarian Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ozone Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Paramedical Sciences & Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Participatory Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Patan Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Pathogens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Patient Experience     Open Access  
Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes     Open Access  
Journal of Periodontal Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Personalized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physiobiochemical Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physiology-Paris     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pioneering Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Pregnancy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health     Open Access  
Journal of Primary Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Prosthodontic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prosthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Receptor, Ligand and Channel Research     Open Access  
Journal of Regenerative Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Research in Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Science and Applications : Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Scientific Innovation in Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Scientific Perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Arthroplasty     Open Access  
Journal of Sleep Disorders : Treatment & Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of South American Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences : Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stomal Therapy Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Surgical Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Surgical and Clinical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Case Reports     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report     Open Access  
Journal of Systemic Therapies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of The Academy of Clinical Microbiologists     Open Access  
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Certified Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American College of Clinical Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Anatomical Society of India     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Anus, Rectum and Colon     Open Access  
Journal of The Arab Society for Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Ceylon College of Physicians     Open Access  
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the College of Community Physicians of Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Journal of The Egyptian Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Formosan Medical Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.388
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2212-4268
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3207 journals]
  • Are changes in the stomatognatic system able to modify the eye balance in
           dyslexia'
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): Mettey Alexandre, Bouvier Anne-Marie, Jooste Valérie, Boucher Yves, Quercia Patrick ObjectivesTo clarify the link between eye muscle function and oral information by comparing 21 dyslexic readers (DR) and 14 normal readers (NR).MethodsChanges in vertical heterophoria (VH) were measured using the Maddox Rod Test performed according to oral modifications and postural conditions. The Spearman correlation was used to assess whether reading delay was correlated with the lability index.ResultsOverall, 50% of NR children and 81% of DR experienced at least one variation in visual perception (p = 0.053). Among DR, the less reading delay they had, the higher their index of lability (p = 0.026), whereas there was no significant correlation among NR. Changes in the Maddox Test were more frequent in DR than in NR after the addition of sensory and postural stimuli, except for one specific posture. For sensory stimuli, the mean lability index was 1.35 in NR and 4.19 in DR, (p = 0.001). For postural stimuli, it was 0.71 and 2.61, (p = 0.003).ConclusionsIt is possible to modify visual perception by changing sensory or mechanical stimuli. Changes are more frequent in DR than in NR. Postural control can be improved with guided oral stimulations.SignificanceThese results reinforce the importance of professional cooperation in the care of dyslexic readers.
       
  • Risk of cognition alteration and emotional frailty via circulating
           transcriptome in treatment naïve head and neck squamous cell cancer
           patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): A.M. Anusa, Rooban Thavarajah BackgroundThere is a dearth of research examining the association between differential expression (DE) of genetic transcritome associated with cognition alteration (CA) and emotional frailty (EF) in treatment naïve head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The present study was undertaken to identify the DE of mRNA of CA-EF in HNSCC tumor and correlate with clinical and other known genetic factors that promote oncogenesis as well as CA-EF.Material and methodsUsing Genome-Wide Association Studies, putative genes associated with CA-EF(Prixie Fixie score ≥0.10) were identified. The DE of the mRNA of the thus selected genes were obtained from The CANCER GENOME ATLAS – HNSCC patients along with clinical details. The DE of mRNA pertaining to known factors such as inflammation, serotonergic and dopaminergic functions as well as clinical parameters were studied for association with the risk of DE of CA-EF. Appropriate statistics were performed and P ≤ 0.05 was taken as significant.ResultsA total of 520 HNSCC patients formed study group. There were 77 (14.81%) patients at risk for CD, 41 (7.9%) for CI and 113 (21.73%) for EF risk. In all, 103 (19.81%) HNSCC patients of this cohort had DE of mRNA of genes associated with CA. Inflammation, circadian genes, mTOR pathway, invasion and metastasis set of genes had a significant association with the risk of DE of CA-EF.DiscussionTranscriptome's have been postulated to mediate CA-EF by targeted action on human brain. Differential Expression of putative genes associated with CA-EF have been demonstrated in HNSCC tumor. These DE could predispose the patients to CA-EF by the action of gene-environmental as well as psycho-social constructs. As CA-EF could adversely influence the treatment and alter the quality of life among survivors, screening for CA-EF at HNSCC presentation becomes imperative.
       
  • Institutional microbial analysis of odontogenic infections and their
           empirical antibiotic sensitivity
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): Aneesh Sebastian, P.G. Antony, Mathew Jose, Arun Babu, Jubin Sebastian, Abraham Kunnilathu Most purulent orofacial infections are of odontogenic origin. It is well established that odontogenic infections are polymicrobial in nature. Empiric antibiotics were administered before the culture and sensitivity test results were obtained and specific antibiotics were administered based on the culture and sensitivity test results. But resistance was a challenging problem all throughout along with development of more virulent strains of microorganisms which were more infectious and resistant to many known antibiotics.ObjectiveTo identify the causative aerobic and anaerobic micro-organisms responsible for orofacial infections and to evaluate the resistance against empirical antibiotics used in the treatment of space infections.Method142 patients with head and neck fascial space infections of odontogenic origin were randomly taken, the pus samples and aspirates were collected aseptically from patients for aerobic and anaerobic microbiological study.ResultsIn this study the most common aerobic organism isolated was streptococcus viridians (34.49%), most common anaerobe was peptostreptococci, (61.11%) and the most common mixed organism was streptococcus with peptostreptococci (30%). Amoxicillin was the most commonly used empirical drug in all cases and showed highest resistance (96.55%) for all the organisms. But linezolid (100%) was sensitive to all the aerobic, anaerobic and mixed group of organisms. Metronidazole (100%) turned out to be sensitive to the entire anaerobic group. Clindamycin (100%) appeared sensitive to the entire aerobic group.ConclusionKnowledge about the pathologic flora involved in head and neck infection in a locality and their sensitivity and resistance to commonly used antibiotics will help the clinician in administering appropriate antibiotics.
       
  • Effect of periodontal therapy on disease activity in patients of
           rheumatoid arthritis with chronic periodontitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): Shalini Kaushal, Anita Kumari Singh, Nand Lal, Siddharth K. Das, Abbas Ali Mahdi BackgroundEvidence have been proposed a positive association between severity of Periodontitis and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) activity, individuals with advanced RA are more likely to develop periodontal problems compared to their non-RA counterparts, and vice versa. Studies have been suggested that RA manifest as a result of an inflammatory imbalance and autoimmunity. In this perspective, treatment modalities that lead to inhibition of proinflammatory mediators, may prove beneficial for reducing the severity of RA. This study examined the effects of non surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on disease activity of RA.MethodsDiagnosed patients of active rheumatoid arthritis with chronic periodontitis were recruited in this study and divided in to treatment and controls groups, both groups were similar in all demographics assessed. Treatment group (n = 20) and controls group (n = 20) underwent assessment for periodontal clinical parameters (plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level), Rheumatologic clinical (simplified disease activity index) and biochemical parameters(C-reactive protein, Rheumatoid factor, Anti-cyclic citrullinated protein) at baseline and 8 weeks. Serum levels of biochemical parameters were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).ResultsThe statistically significant (p  0.05) changes from baseline to reassessment (8 weeks) in both groups.ConclusionsThe improvement in RA disease activity may occurs after non surgical periodontal therapy.
       
  • A comparative biomechanical evaluation of different osteosynthesis
           techniques used for intracapsular condylar head fractures
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): T. Pavlychuk, M. Shydlovsky, A. Kopchak PurposeThe aim of the present experimental study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior in different types of osteosynthesis (titanium screws, bioresorbable pins and miniplates) used in management of intracapsular condylar head fractures.MethodExperimental models of the condylar head fractures were simulated on 15 dry human cadaveric mandibles. Osteotomized mandibles were randomly divided into three groups with different fixation systems used: 1) 15 mm long titanium screws, 2) 15 mm long bioresorbable pins Sonic Pins Rx, 3) T-shaped titanium miniplate and 7 mm long titanium screws. Mandibles were loaded in TIRAtest testing machine (Germany). The main types of deformations, including torsion, bending and shearing, were simulated to study the biomechanical characteristics of the fixation systems.ResultsTitanium bicortical screws demonstrated the highest stiffness in standard loading conditions. The fixation with bioresorbable pins showed lower stiffness in both frontal and sagittal loads. This is indicative of the fact that resorbable pins, which have numerous advantages for clinical usage, cannot provide adequately stable fixation in maximal masticatory loads. The mandibles fixed with T-shaped plate had the lowest stiffness.ConclusionScrew or pin fixation, regardless of the material used, was not resistant to rotational loads. On the contrary, the stiffness of T-shaped plates was quite significant. In real clinical conditions, if rotational displacements are not effectively compensated by irregularities in the fracture surface and precise repositioning of the bone fragments, combined use of miniplates and bicortical titanium screws or two screws can be beneficial.
       
  • Authors' awareness of concepts in the authorship
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): Beuy Joob, Viroj Wiwanitkit
       
  • A comparative evaluation of cyclic fatigue resistance for different
           endodontic NiTi rotary files: An in-vitro study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): Akanksha Bhatt, Balakrishnan Rajkumar AimThis in-vitro study evaluated and compared the flexural fatigue resistance for Hero Shapers, Hyflex CM, One Shape, Profile Vortex and Protaper Next rotary NiTi files.Method and materialsTotal 25 rotary NiTi files allocated to each experimental group were tested in a simulated constructed apparatus with an angle of curvature 60° & radius of curvature 5 mm. Each experimental file was coated with EDTA gel and was placed in endodomotor handpiece with rubber stopper at support steel cylinder and its end between two shaping steel cylinders on the simulated apparatus. File was then rotated at 400 rpm, 2.5 N/cm torque and simultaneously digital stop watch was started. Time taken (in seconds) until the file got fractured was recorded.ResultsTime taken to fracture ranged from 7 to 58 s in different groups. Analysis of variance show a statistically significant intergroup difference (p 
       
  • The roadmap for quality improvement from traditional through competency
           based (CBE) towards outcome based education (OBE) in dentistry
    • Abstract: Publication date: April–June 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 2Author(s): Richa Khanna, Divya Mehrotra
       
  • Oral Health & Quality of Life in preadolescents with hearing impairment in
           Uttarakhand, India
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Aditi Singh, Anubha Agarwal, Himanshu Aeran, Preeti Dhawan Background“Better teeth better health” is a guiding dictum for the 21st century that has been well adopted by WHO and emulated world over by numerous health care agencies. Hence its of paramount importance to assess the impact of oral health on the quality of life. Keeping this in mind the present study was done to gauge the impact of prevalence of dental diseases amongst 9–15 year old institutionalized hearing impaired children in districts of Uttarakhand, India.Materials & methodology250 hearing impaired institutionalized 9–15 year old children were examined using WHO type III clinical examination for DMFT/dmft, Traumatic dental injuries using TDI index and dentofacial anomalies using Angle's classification of malocclusion. The Hindi version of the C-OIDP questionnaire was used in this study.ResultsThere was a high dental caries prevalence of 56% with significant male predilection. TDI index was 40.8% and the most common molar relation was class I with 90.4%. With 49.6% crowding was the most common dentofacial anomaly. Deformity of face or mouth has maximum impact on the daily life of these children. The overall oral health related quality of life was less favorable in this group.ConclusionOral health has a significant impact on daily life of these children with hearing impairment and those children having dental diseases showed unfavorable OHRQoL.
       
  • Comparative evaluation of instrumentation timing and cleaning efficacy in
           extracted primary molars using manual and NiTi rotary technique –
           Invitro study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Rachita Mehlawat, Rishabh Kapoor, Kapil Gandhi, Dipanshu Kumar, Ritika Malhotra, Shilpa Ahuja AimTo compare the timing of instrumentation and cleaning efficacy between manual K files and NiTi rotary files in extracted primary molars.Study designin-vitro study was conducted in 90 root canals of extracted primary molars which were subdivided in three groups viz. Control (No instrumentation), Manual (K files), Rotary (ProFiles) with 30 canals in each group. Mesiobuccal (MB) and Mesiolingual (ML) canals of mandibular molars, and MB and Distobuccal (DB) canals of maxillary molars were included in the test group whereas Distal canals in mandibular molars and Palatal canals in maxillary molars were included in the control group.MethodTeeth were mounted and canals were injected with India ink to stain the canal walls. Canal preparation was done as per the group. After instrumentation, teeth were demounted, decalcified and cleared to make them transparent for scoring according to the extent of removal of India ink. Timing of instrumentation and cleaning efficacy of canals in coronal, middle and apical thirds were assessed in each sample.ResultsMean timing of instrumentation in rotary group was 3.54 ± 1.14 min and 4.32 ± 1.04 min in manual group. Mean cleaning efficacy scores in manual and rotary groups were 2.03 and 1.66 in coronal third, 1.08 and 1.18 in middle third and 0.67 and 1.08 in apical third respectively. Inter-group comparisons showed no statistically significant difference in cleaning efficacy among test groups in all thirds of root canals.ConclusionNiTi rotary technique has comparable cleaning efficacy, with significantly less timing of instrumentation compared to manual K-files.
       
  • “Expression of p16 in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma
           and correlation of its expression with individual atypical features”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Anshita Agarwal, Mala Kamboj, Balasundari Shreedhar
       
  • Efficacy of Chitosan in promoting wound healing in extraction socket: A
           prospective study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Akshat Gupta, Vidya Rattan, Sachin Rai PurposeChitosan has been shown to promote wound healing and induce bone formation. The aim of this split-mouth study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chitosan based dressing in wound healing after lower third molar extraction.MethodAsymptomatic symmetrical mandibular third molars were extracted simultaneously in 27 patients and Chitosan dressing was placed into the extraction socket in the test side. Pain scores were recorded on VAS using a 0 to 10 pain score. Wound healing was compared between right and left side. Radiographic findings were evaluated by observing lamina dura and density of extraction socket.ResultsTest group had more pain than control at all time intervals and unerupted tooth sites showed mean pain score significantly more than erupted tooth sites. Test group was superior to control in event of wound healing. Healing was significantly better in erupted tooth than unerupted tooth. At second week 12 sites showed better radiographic findings in chitosan treated group compared to 3 sites in the control group. At third month, 14 sites showed improved bone formation in chitosan treated group compared to 4 in control group. None of the unerupted teeth group showed better radiographic finding in test side at 2 week and 3 month compared to erupted teeth group.ConclusionChitosan is effective in promoting wound healing and early osteogenesis in erupted tooth socket after extraction. We recommend that chitosan dressing should be used in the sockets of erupted tooth after extraction but should be avoided in unerupted or impacted teeth cases.
       
  • Cyclosporine A – Induced gingival overgrowth and proliferating cell
           nuclear antigen expression in experimental periodontitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Lucilene Hernandes Ricardo, Renata Falchete do Prado, Yasmin Rodarte Carvalho, Felipe da Silva Peralta, Debora Pallos The most important microscopic characteristic of Cyclosporine A-induced gingival overgrowth is fibroepithelial hyperplasia. Objective: The objective was to investigate the influence of previous exposure to Cyclosporine A over gingival epithelium in experimental periodontitis in rats. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats with 12 weeks-old were divided into four groups with 5 animals each: Control Group (CG); Cyclosporine Group (CsAG); Ligature group (LG) and Cyclosporine and Ligature Group (CsALG). Daily doses of CsA (10 mg/kg) were applied to CsAG and CsALG during 60 days since the beginning of the experiment and, a ligature was placed in LG and CsALG 30 days after the beginning of the experiment. After 60 days, animals were euthanized and gingival tissue was processed to histomorphometric analysis of epithelial thickness (mm2), immunohistochemical expression of PCNA (%) and inflammatory response. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney at 0.05 significance level. Results: Considering epithelial thickness, CG was thinner than all groups, CsALG was the largest and CsAG and LG were similar between each other. Regarding the PCNA expression CG (16.46 ± 9.26) was similar to CsAG (34.47 ± 19.75) and, LG (59.02 ± 10.33) was similar to CsALG (40.59 ± 18.25). Significant difference (p 
       
  • The effect of compressive force combined with mechanical vibration on
           human alveolar bone osteoblasts
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Chatchai Chatmahamongkol, Anute Pravitharangul, Srisurang Suttapreyasri, Chidchanok Leethanakul ObjectiveThis study aimed to investigate the effects of compressive force combined with mechanical vibration on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that promote osteoclastogenesis and related to orthodontic tooth movement acceleration in human alveolar bone osteoblasts in vitro.MethodsOsteoblasts were subjected to compressive force (C), mechanical vibration (V), compressive force combined with mechanical vibration (CV), or no force as a control for 12, 24 and 48 h. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-Β ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA and protein expression were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.ResultsIn C and CV groups, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA and protein expression were significantly higher and OPG mRNA and protein expression were significantly lower than control and V groups. However, the expressions were not different between C and CV groups. RANKL mRNA and protein expression were not different between any groups. While, OPG mRNA and protein expression in V group were significantly higher than control group.ConclusionsVibration neither enhanced nor inhibited the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, RANKL and OPG in compressed human alveolar bone osteoblasts.
       
  • To investigate the affiliation of XRCC-1 Gene Arg194Trp polymorphism in
           alcohol and tobacco substance users and loco-regionally progressed
           Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Raturi Vijay Parshuram, Rajendra Kumar, Madan Lal Brahma Bhatt, Rahul Singh, Devendra Parmar, Jalaj Gaur, Dewesh Kishan, Mandira Saha, Roopali, Pranay Katepogu, Prasad Senthamizh, Tridiv Katiyar ObjectivesThe correlation of XRCC-1 Gene Arg194Trp polymorphism with alcohol and tobacco substance user and with loco-regionally progressed squamous cell cancer of the larynx (LSCC) was assessed in this research study. The result of this research study is described herein.Material and methodsA tertiary hospital-based observational case-control research was carried out. DNA segregation and Genotype examination were done from the blood sample of the control group and cases to know the correlation between XRCC-1 gene polymorphism with loco-regionally progressed LSCC and with hazard factors tobacco and alcohol.ResultsIn the cases, the existence of DNA repair XRCC-1 gene polymorphic variants (Hetero CT and Mutant TT) was recognizable in contrary to the control group arm. The XRCC-1 gene polymorphic hetero (CT) genotype (O.R-1.96; 95% C.I: 1.23–3.13; P 
       
  • Evaluation of the styloid process in a Sri Lankan population using digital
           panoramic radiographs
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Pilana Vithanage Kalani Shihanika Hettiarachchi, Rasika Manori Jayasinghe, Manil Christopher Fonseka, Ruwan Duminda Jayasinghe, Chinthani Deepthi Nanayakkara ObjectiveThe objectives of this study were to evaluate the normal radiographic length of the styloid process (SP), prevalence and type of elongation, and angulation of the styloid process in relation to sex and side on digital panoramic radiographs in a Sri Lankan population.MethodsA total of 100 digital panoramic images selected from the database at the Division of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka were evaluated for the radiological features of the styloid process. Lengths greater than 30 mm were consider as elongated. Elongated styloid processes were also classified into three types based on Langlais classification (elongated, pseudo articulated; and segmented).ResultsThe mean radiological length of the SP on the right and left side was 25.8 mm ± 7.5 mm and 23.2 mm ± 9.0 mm respectively. The prevalence of elongated styloid process in males and female were 34.9% and 24.6%. The maximum length observed on right and left sides were 43.2 mm and 41 mm respectively. However, the differences between the genders and the sides were statistically not significant (P = 0.199). The most frequently observed type of elongation was type I (elongated) according to the Langlais classification.ConclusionThis study provides valuable knowledge of the anatomical variations of the SP which may help clinicians from various specialties to diagnose the Eagle syndrome.
       
  • A clinico-microbiologic study comparing the efficacy of locally delivered
           chlorhexidine chip and diode LASER as an adjunct to non-surgical
           periodontal therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Vrishti Bansal, Rajan Gupta, Parveen Dahiya, Mukesh Kumar, Japnit Kaur Samlok BackgroundConsidering the microbial etiology of the periodontal disease, the periodontal therapy aims to control or abolish the pathogenic microbes. The gold standard scaling and root planing procedure has been used since time immemorial but the drawbacks associated with it have led to the development of various adjunctive means. The current study was therefore, performed to comparatively assess the efficacy of local delivery of chlorhexidine and 808-nm diode LASER as an appurtenance to scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis.MethodsIn a randomized split mouth evaluation, 30 patients having probing depth of ≥5 mm which bled on probing at least at 3 different sites were included. At baseline, the evaluation of plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level was done and the microbial samples were collected for the assessment of spirochetes, motile rods and coccoid cells. The 3 selected sites of each subject were allocated to 3 different groups A, B, C viz; Scaling and root planing (SRP) + chlorhexidine chip, SRP + diode LASER and SRP respectively. The patients were recalled after 4 weeks to re-evaluate the clinical and microbiological parameters.ResultsAll the parameters significantly reduced from baseline to 4 weeks in all the 3 groups. Intergroup comparisons revealed remarkable difference between group A and C and group B and C, respectively; no notably significant difference was found between group A and B.ConclusionThe additional use of LASER and chlorhexidine chip assures anti-inflammatory effect and anti-microbial effect that allows reduction in bacterial counts and promotes healing. The use of adjuncts have been found to be efficacious in controlling disease and promoting periodontal health and thereby reducing the need for surgical procedures to be undertaken.
       
  • Evaluation of Glypican-3 expression in benign and malignant salivary gland
           tumors
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Azadeh Andisheh-Tadbir, Mohammad Javad Ashraf, Ali Gudarzi, Razieh Zare IntroductionGlypican-3 (GPC3) is involved in regulation of cell proliferation and morphogenesis. It is abundant in embryonic tissue, but limited in most adult tissues. GPC3 deletion or mutation can disturb the balance between cell apoptosis and proliferation, which may result in tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the GPC3 expression in salivary gland tumors (SGTs) and the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues.MethodsThis study reviewed 50 samples of salivary tumors from the archive of Khalili Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, including 17 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PA), 16 cases of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), and 17 cases of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC); as well as a control group of 23 cases of normal salivary gland tissues. GPC3 expression was investigated through immunohistochemistry.ResultsGPC3 expression was significantly higher in malignant tumors (MEC and ACC) than in PA, and higher in PA than in the normal salivary glands (P 
       
  • P120 catenin expression and its correlation with E-cadherin in salivary
           gland neoplasms
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Ekarat Phattarataratip, Nicha Kositkittiwanit, Pruch Kajornkiatkul, Pataraporn Yeunyong, Ratanatip Ratanapitak ObjectivesAltered P120 catenin expression has been associated with E-cadherin loss and poor prognosis in several cancers. The objectives of this study were to examine the P120 catenin expression in salivary gland neoplasms in correlation with E-cadherin and assess the relationships between their expression levels and pathologic characteristics.MethodsFifty-two cases of salivary gland neoplasms, i.e. 25 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC), 13 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC), 12 pleomorphic adenomas (PA) and 2 polymorphous adenocarcinomas (PAC) were included. The expression of P120 catenin and E-cadherin was investigated immunohistochemically.ResultsBoth P120 catenin and E-cadherin were overexpressed in salivary gland neoplasms, compared to normal tissue. P120 catenin was primarily detected on the membrane of neoplastic cells in most cases. A significant correlation between levels of expression of both proteins was noted in MECs. In ACCs and PA, ductal cells showed positive immunoreactivity, whereas myoepithelial cells variably expressed both proteins. Increased P120 catenin expression was significantly associated with the solid subtype of ACCs.ConclusionsThe cadherin-catenin complex is preserved in the heterogenous tumor cell population in salivary gland neoplasms. Overexpression of P120 catenin may be involved in the progression to solid ACCs.
       
  • Cephalometric appraisal of the effects of orthodontic treatment on total
           airway dimensions in adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Maj Raj kumar Maurya, Col Prasanna Kumar, Lt Col Mohit Sharma, Lt Col Karan Nehra, Harpreet Singh, Prabhat Kumar Chaudhari AimThis retrospective study was performed to rule out any jeopardizing effect of extraction therapy of four first premolars on airway at any level of its anatomic course.Materials and methodsLateral cephalograms of 50 adolescent patients divided into two groups of 25 each, based on orthodontic treatment by first premolar extraction as group I and without extraction as group II, were selected for the study. 13 angular and 11 linear measurements were compared pre-and post-treatment via statistical analyses using SPSS (Version 17.5, SPSS, Chicago) software. Paired ‘t’ tests were used to assess the variability. P-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.ResultsComparison of angular parameters showed that the average percentage (%) change in SNA, SNB, ANB, IMPA, FMA, saddle, articulare, gonial, total angle and hyoid did not differ significantly across two study groups (P > 0.05), but values of UI/LI, UI/NA, LI/NB, differed significantly among both groups. Similarly, linear parameters showed that the average % change in nasopharyngeal airway space (NAS) and width of soft palate differed significantly across two study groups (P-value0.05). However, no significant differences were observed during intragroup and intergroup comparisons of the combined angular and linear measurements of both groups.ConclusionsPresent study showed no significant change on airway after therapeutic orthodontic tooth movement with or without extraction treatment.
       
  • MCM3 and Ki67 proliferation markers in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Zohreh Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Fatemeh Mehranmehr, Elham Roosta BackgroundMCM3 is a marker of proliferation that has been used as a diagnostic or prognostic marker in many pathologic lesions.PurposeThe purpose of this study is to investigate the proliferative activity of dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma using minichromosome maintenance 3 (MCM3) and compare it with Ki-67 proliferation marker.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, 40 cases including 11 cases of dentigerous cyst, 14 odontogenic keratocyst, and 15 ameloblastoma were included. Immunohistochemical expression of MCM3 and Ki-67 were investigated and compared statistically using ANOVA, Chi-square, Tukey and Spearman's correlation tests.ResultsAll subjects were positive for Ki-67 and MCM3. There was a significant difference in MCM3 and Ki-67 expression among all groups. Compared to Ki-67, MCM3 exhibited a higher level of expression. Ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst revealed higher expression rate of both markers in comparison to dentigerous cysts.ConclusionThe results showed MCM3 and Ki67 expression in the most common odontogenic cysts and tumors, especially more aggressive lesions. MCM3 might have a role in pathogenesis of these lesions and could be a reliable marker for assessing proliferation activity.
       
  • Analysis of stromal mucin in oral epithelial dysplasia & oral squamous
           cell carcinoma- A histochemical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Ankita Sahni, Shweta Rehani, Priyanka Kardam, Sneha Sethi, Rashmi Kumari, Yulia Mathias BackgroundMucins are glycoproteins that act as a selective molecular barrier and its alterations usually accompany the carcinogenesis.AimTo evaluate the transition of mucins in the grades of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using histochemical stains.Materials & MethodA total of 66 samples of variable grades of OED and OSCC and each section was stained with PAS, Alcian blue- PAS (AB-PAS) and Aldehyde fuschin – Alcian blue (AF-AB). Mucins pattern and intensity were examined at 5 randomly selected fields on 10x magnification.Results1. PAS stain – Predominantly OED and OSCC showed a diffuse pattern with a gradual decrease in intensity in OED and overall a weak intensity in OSCC. 2. AB-PAS stain – Neutral mucins showed gradual increase in its intensity in grades of OED and OSCC with no predominant pattern. The intensity for the acid mucins remains weak in all the grades of OED and OSCC with diffuse distribution, except in higher grades of OED and OSCC. 3. AF- AB stain - For sulphated mucins, in OED a focal and diffuse pattern was observed in OSCC with minimal intensity. The carboxylated mucin was absent in both.ConclusionMucins undergo change in its pattern and intensity in varying grades of OED/OSCC. Although in GIT and other mucosa, the expression of altered mucin is a recognized factor, seldom research has been done in OED and OSCC. Thus, the present study could be the stepping stone in the exploration of mucinous alteration in OED and OSCC.
       
  • Crouzon syndrome: Genetic and intervention review
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): N.M. Al-Namnam, F. Hariri, M.K. Thong, Z.A. Rahman Crouzon syndrome exhibits considerable phenotypic heterogeneity, in the aetiology of which genetics play an important role. FGFR2 mediates extracellular signals into cells and the mutations in the FGFR2 gene cause this syndrome occurrence. Activated FGFs/FGFR2 signaling disrupts the balance of differentiation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis via its downstream signal pathways. However, very little is known about the cellular and molecular factors leading to severity of this phenotype. Revealing the molecular pathology of craniosynostosis will be a great value for genetic counselling, diagnosis, prognosis and early intervention programs. This mini-review summarizes the fundamental and recent scientific literature on genetic disorder of Crouzon syndrome and presents a graduated strategy for the genetic approach, diagnosis and the management of this complex craniofacial defect.
       
  • Antifungal efficacy of herbs
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Fahad M. Samadi, Shaista Suhail, Manjari Sonam, Neeta Sharma, Shruti Singh, Sushil Gupta, Ashwini Dobhal, Harsha Pradhan Candida carriage was reported to be common in oral cancer patients, with C. albicans being the predominant species. The prevalence of diseases caused by Candida species have been found to increase in recent years. Aim: The aim of our study was to find the antifungal activities at MIC of selected fifteen plant leaves extracts prepared in three different solutions (methanol and ethanol) against the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans isolated from oral cavity infections. It may also help the clinician to treat the patient not only for the particular lesion that is present, but also to treat the infection by Candida albicans so as to reduce its potential to malignant transformation. Material n methods: Leaves extract of selected plant prepared in methanolic and eethanolic solution have been chosen for the investigation of in vitro antifungal activity which acts as expectorant and not having toxic properties on humans while for comparison or control, antifungal drugs have been taken. Results showed that Candida albicans shows most sensitivity towards the standard antibiotic cotrimoazol but very less towards other drugs like Fluconazole, minocycline, erythromycin respectively which indicated Candida albicans shows some resistance character towards drugs while the herbal extracts of Lawsonia inermis, Withania somnifer, Curcuma longa, Cymbopogon citrates and Zingiber officinale gives the best inhibitory effect and they have the potential to control growth of Candida albicans.
       
  • Analysis of bite marks in food stuffs by CBCT 3D-reconstruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Sachidanand Giri, Anurag Tripathi, Ranjitkumar Patil, Vikram Khanna, Vandana Singh
       
  • Estimation of salivary and serum basic fibroblast growth factor in treated
           and untreated patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Archana Gupta, Anurag Tripathi, Ranjitkumar Patil, Vijay Kumar, Vikram Khanna, Vandana Singh ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate salivary and serum basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) level in OSCC patients to provide a reliable biomarker for the early detection, monitoring, and prognosis of OSCC patients.Materials and methodsThe study enrolled 90 subjects, equally grouped as recently diagnosed & untreated OSCC patients (Group I), treated OSCC without any recurrence (Group II) & as control (Group III). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was employed to measure bFGF concentrations in saliva and serum samples of all three groups. The results were tabulated and analyzed statistically.ResultsGroup I showed high-level of bFGF expression profile in saliva (8.80 ± 1.26 pg/ml) whereas the levels of bFGF in group II (2.69 ± 0.17 pg/ml) and Group III (3.17 ± 0.43 pg/ml) are significantly lower than group I. Serum bFGF levels were also high in group I (6.33 ± 0.81 pg/ml) and decreased significantly in group II (3.52 ± 0.45 pg/ml) however, the control group showed elevated range of levels (7.63 ± 0.88 pg/ml).ConclusionsThis study demonstrates the reliability of salivary bFGF marker as diagnostic as well as prognostic marker. Serum bFGF could also be used as prognostic marker only in Oral Squamous cell carcinoma patients.
       
  • Ceramic soft tissue trimming bur: A new tool for gingival depigmentation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Rohini Negi, Rajan Gupta, Parveen Dahiya, Mukesh Kumar, Vrishti Bansal, Japnit Kaur Samlok ObjectivePigmentation of the gingiva plays a negative role in an otherwise acceptable “smile window”. In the present world, people are more concerned about their aesthetics. Several techniques have been employed such as scalpel surgery, electrosurgery, cryosurgery, chemical agents, abrasion and LASER method for the removal of melanin hyper-pigmentation. The present study is aimed at comparing the efficacy of LASER and soft tissue trimmer for gingival depigmentation.MethodsA randomized split-mouth study was conducted for twenty patients with gingival pigmentation. Dummet Oral Pigmentation Index (DOPI), Gingival Pigmentation Index (GPI) for pigmentation, bleeding factor, wound healing factor, gingival colour and visual analogue scale (VAS) score for pain were evaluated for both the groups at baseline, 7th day, 1st month and 6th month.ResultsIntra-group comparison between baseline and 6th month showed highly significant difference for both LASER and bur groups. There was no statistically significant difference found between both the groups at 6th month using gingival pigmentation index.ConclusionIt can be concluded that LASER and soft tissue trimmer both are comparable in achieving aesthetic satisfaction. Hence, the soft tissue trimmer could also be used for depigmentation as it is very cost effective, readily available and acceptable by the patients.
       
  • Psychometric properties of Hindi version of child oral impact on daily
           performances (C-OIDP) index amongst school children in North India
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Preeti Dhawan, Aditi Singh, Anubha Agarwal, Himanshu Aeran AimTo assess validity and reliability of Hindi version of Child Oral impact on daily performances (C-OIDP) index among school children in North India.Material and methodologyDescriptive cross sectional study was conducted amongst 250, 11–12 year old school children in primary schools of Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. The study was done in two phases: first phase included assessment of Psychometric and linguistic properties of hindi version of C-OIDP index which was then pilot tested on study subjects. Phase two comprised of the actual main study which included the re-assessment of Hindi C-OIDP index on the entire study population. The pilot study comprised of 40 school children while the main study was conducted on 250 school children.ResultsThe inter-item correlation coefficient ranged from 0.1 to 0.786 while corrected item total correlation coefficient ranged from 0.176 (smiling) to 0.843 ((cleaning). The standardised Cronbach's Alpha coefficient was 0.88. Moreover, the alpha coefficients didn't increase upon deleting any of the items. Weighted kappa was 0.85 & ICC was 0.9. Children with higher scores were less satisfied with their mouth (p- 0.001) in case of concurrent validity.ConclusionHindi Child Oral Impact on Daily Performances index can be used as a valid and reliable instrument in measuring OHRQoL. of Paediatric North Indian population.
       
  • Mutagenicity potential (affect) of new atraumatic restorative treatment
           (ART) material incorporated with Azadirachta indica (Neem) against
           Salmonella typhimurium
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): P. Divya Kumari, A. Veena Shetty, Shahnawaz Khijmatgar, Avidyuti Chowdhury, Edward Lynch, Chitta R. Chowdhury BackgroundThe mutagenicity potential of a new atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) material against Salmonella typhimurium without metabolic activity using the Ames test (genotoxicity) was carried out.Methods and materialsThe potential mutagenicity of new atraumatic restorative treatment materials (ART-I and ART-II) was analyzed using the Ames test. The materials were eluted in dimethyl sulphoxide, 0.9% NaCl solution and sterilized de-ionized water and the aliquots were used after an incubation period of 24 h at 37 °C. Mutagenic effects of the materials were tested on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 using the standard assay, and in absence of S9 fraction from rat liver.ResultNo mutagenic effects were detected for these new ART materials on S. typhimurium TA100. The incubated DMSO extract and 0.9% NaCl extract (50 μl/plate) of the ART-I exhibited a weak mutagenic potential on S. typhimurium TA 98. In particular, Aqua extract (50 μl/plate) of ART-II, was associated with a weak mutagenic potential on S. typhimurium TA98.ConclusionBoth ART materials (ART–I and II) exhibited weak mutagenic effects on S. typhimurium TA98 whereas no mutagenic effect was detected on S. typhimurium TA100. ART-II is safer than ART-I.
       
  • Effect of sodium chloride on gene expression of Streptococcus mutans and
           zeta potential of demineralized dentin
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Ali Akbar Nagavi-alhoseiny, Maryam Torshabi, Morteza Rasoulianboroujeni, Lobat Tayebi, Fahimeh Sadat Tabatabaei PurposeIn this work, the effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) on gene expression of planktonic Streptococcus mutans cells are investigated. Also assessed are the effects of NaCl on zeta potential of sound and demineralized dentin.MethodsThe relative level of glucosyltransferase B (gtfB), gtfC and gtfD transcription of S. mutans in the presence of NaCl was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The osmolality of varying salt (NaCl) concentrations and their influence on the zeta potential of sound and demineralized dentin was investigated as well.ResultsNaCl significantly reduced the expression of gtfB and C genes in planktonic S. mutans; whereas, gtf D gene expression significantly increased in the presence of NaCl (P 
       
  • Implication of embolization in residual disease in lateral extension of
           juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Anupam Mishra, Veerendra Verma A few studies have reported incomplete resection of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) following embolization. The likely effects of embolization, viz. shrinkage/reduced tensile strength may have increased the fragility of tumour, leaving remnants postoperatively particularly across hour-glass constriction of sphenopalatine foramina. This paper describes the likelihood of residual disease being left following embolization and hence the importance of extended surgery for complete excision.
       
  • Tramadol hydrochloride: An alternative to conventional local anaesthetics
           for intraoral procedures- a preliminary study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Shoeb Kasim Jendi, Abhishek Talathi PurposeTo evaluate and compare the soft tissue anaesthesia produced by tramadol hydrochloride on gingival tissues in maxilla.MethodsA total of 50 ASA physical status I subjects between 18 and 35 years of age, both male and female were included in the study. Each individual received 0.5 ml of 50 mg tramadol in the soft tissues over maxillary canine tooth as local infiltration on one and 0.5 ml of 20 mg lignocaine on the contralateral side in a double-blinded fashion. After completing the injection, the author recorded pain on injection, the onset of action, duration of anaesthesia, side effects, and feedback from patient.ResultsThe mean onset of anaesthesia for tramadol was 172.00 s (standard deviation 39.898) while for lignocaine it was 162.60 s (standard deviation 35.098) and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.214). The mean duration of anaesthesia for tramadol group was 45.70 min with a standard deviation of 8.512 min whereas for lignocaine group it was 44.70 min with a standard deviation of 8.107 min. There was no statistical relevant difference between the two groups in duration of anaesthesia (p = 0.549). None of the subjects reported any side effect in both the groups. There was no significant difference in pain on injection between the two groups.ConclusionsTramadol has a local anaesthetic effect similar to lignocaine when injected as infiltration in oral soft tissues.
       
  • Low-grade intraductal carcinoma of salivary glands: A systematic review of
           this rare entity
    • Abstract: Publication date: January–March 2019Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research, Volume 9, Issue 1Author(s): Francesco Giovacchini, Caterina Bensi, Stefano Belli, Maria Elena Laurenti, Martina Mandarano, Daniele Paradiso, Michele Giansanti, Antonio Tullio BackgroundLow-grade intraductal carcinomas are rare, malign tumors of salivary glands most commonly affecting parotid gland. It is a slow-growing tumor considered with a favourable prognosis after surgical excision.MethodsTo define the characteristics and management of low-grade intraductal carcinoma a systematic review was performed using the electronic databases Pubmed, Cochrane and Scopus. A new case report was also described.ResultsIncluding this case the review of literature identified only 54 cases reported thus far. Demographics, clinical presentation, diagnostic tools, treatment, follow-up and recurrence rate, histological and immunohistochemical patterns of this kind of tumor were summarized.ConclusionLow-grade intraductal carcinoma has already been well defined but is important to focus on the fact that in few cases component of high-grade infiltrations have been reported: this may modify surgical approach because a simple tumorectomy may not be enough.
       
  • Soft tissue facial profile changes after orthodontic treatment with or
           without tooth extractions in Class I malocclusion patients: A comparative
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Benedito V. Freitas, Vandilson P. Rodrigues, Mariana F. Rodrigues, Heloiza V.F. de Melo, Pedro C.F. dos Santos ObjectiveTo analyze the soft tissue facial profile changes in Class I malocclusion patients after orthodontic treatment with or without tooth extraction.MethodsForty lateral cephalograms of 20 individuals with Angle Class I malocclusion submitted to orthodontic treatment were included in this study. The individuals were divided in two groups: no tooth extraction (Group A) and extraction of four first premolars (Group B). Cephalometric measurements related to the soft tissue facial profile (Nasolabial Angle, Mentolabial Angle, Interlabial Angle, Facial Convexity Angle, Total Facial Convexity Angle, Lower Face Angle, MAFH/LAFH Proportion, Lower Face Vertical Proportion, H.NB Angle, Ricketts E Line) were collected in two stages (pre-treatment and post-treatment). The Student T, Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests analyzed the results. The significance level was 5%.ResultsAmong the cephalometric variables evaluated, only the measurements Interlabial Angle and H.NB Angle showed statistically significant changes during treatment. Increase was observed in the Interlabial Angle and decrease in H.NB Angle in both groups, resulting in a less convex facial profile with lip retraction.ConclusionThe findings suggest that changes in the soft tissue facial profile are similar in Class I patients treated with or without tooth extraction.
       
  • Relationship between VITAMIN D and chronic periodontitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Amitesh Bhargava, Pavitra Rastogi, Nand Lal, Rameshwari Singhal, Sajda Khatoon, Abbas Ali Mahdi IntroductionChronic periodontitis is a multifactorial disease primarily caused by plaque microorganisms, modified from the immune inflammatory response to chronic infection, which leads to the destruction of periodontal tissues in a susceptible host. It is very well known that vitamin D plays a vital role in bone homeostasis and immunity. There can be a biologic rationale to suspect that Vitamin D deficiency could negatively affect the periodontium. Present study was conducted to investigate any relationship between periodontitis and vitamin D.Material and methodThe clinico-biochemical relationship study was carried out in 168 subjects with Chronic Periodontitis. Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Probing Pocket Depth (PPD), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) are correlated with serum level of Vitamin D.ResultsStatistically significant relationship between serum 25(OH) D level and periodontal parameters namely GI, PPD and CAL were observed.No relationship between 25(OH) D levels and PI was observed.This study also revealed overall low levels of serum Vitamin D in patients with chronic periodontitis but the levels of Vitamin D did not decrease with the increase in the severity of periodontitis.ConclusionA statistically significant relationship between serum 25(OH) D level and periodontal parameters namely GI, PPD and CAL were observed. No relationship between 25(OH) D levels and PI was observed.
       
  • Quality management in healthcare: The pivotal desideratum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Anubha Aggarwal, Himanshu Aeran, Manu Rathee Health care is very complex sector and delivery of service is the fragmented care. Quality can be a common paradigm to address the need of all groups in health care. Quality improvement is the process approach to the organization’s operational challenges. The initiative to address the quality in health care has become a global phenomenon. A quality revolution for delivery of service with patient at the center and services around it is the demand of the time. This article comprehensively reviews the quality management in health care service and aims to sensitize the health care professionals towards achieving total quality.
       
  • High lingual split access osteotomy for ectopic third molar in mandibular
           ramus region – A case report and literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 June 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Cathrine Diana, Ranjeet Bodh, Pankaj Sharma, Anjali Verma Ectopic occurrence of mandibular third molar is a rare incidence. Usually found along with a cystic lesion or diagnosed incidentally during routine check-up. Owing to the rarity, only few cases were reported in the literature. The common site is the mandibular condyle followed by sigmoid notch, and often found in females. The frequent symptoms are obscure facial pain, trismus or the symptoms of the associated pathology like dentigerous cyst. The etiopathogenesis is uncertain and optimal management is still unclear. The symptomatic tooth should be removed either intraorally or extraorally. Here we report a case of ectopic mandibular third molar in ramus region surgically removed intra orally by high lingual split access osteotomy.
       
  • Evaluation of lower anterior dental changes in patients treated with
           self-ligating brackets
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Wendel M.M. Shibasaki, Lucas Hian da Silva, Acácio Fuziy, Tarcila Triviño, André L.F. Costa, Ana C.R. Nahás-Scocate The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare changes in linear distance and inclination of lower incisors and canines and intercanine distance after a 30 months orthodontic treatment with self-ligating appliances. Seven patients were treated orthodontically with a Roth prescription passive self-ligating bracket. To perform the measurements and comparisons, CBCT scans were taken before the start of the orthodontic treatment (T1) and after a period of 30 months treatment (T2). The following measurements were performed: (1) the lower incisors and canines inclination in relation to the mandibular plane, (2) intercanine linear distance in millimeters and (3) linear distance in millimeters of the incisal and apical part of lower anterior teeth to a plane (POGM) passing through pogonion point and perpendicular to the mandibular plane. No significant difference were observed between T1 and T2 for canine inclination (p = 0.835), incisors inclination (p = 0.149), canine incisal distance to POGM (p = 0.423) and incisors incisal distance to POGM (p = 0.966), however canine apical distance (p = 0.049) and incisors apical distance (p = 0.002) to POGM was lower at T1 than at T2. The intercanine distance was significantly lower (p = 0.022) at T1 when compared to T2. The use of passive self-ligating brackets in orthodontic treatment to solve 4 mm tooth crowding were able to produce dental arch expansion by bodily tooth movement.
       
  • Happiness among second year MBBS students and its correlates using Oxford
           Happiness Questionnaire
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Shivam Kamthan, Saurabh Sharma, Rahul Bansal, Bhawna Pant, Parul Saxena, Shivakshi Chansoria, Arvind Shukla ObjectivesInner happiness and the ability to fully receive joy is the utmost necessity to be healthy, to mature in professional life and eventually serving the mankind. Medical students are less ecstatic compared to other students in university because of concrete inculcation and work conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate happiness among medical students& its correlates.Materials and methodologyThe study was conducted among 115 medical students of MBBS (2nd year) of Subharti Medical College, Meerut. The information was gathered by using the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire which was distributed among the MBBS second year students present during the study at Subharti Medical College, Meerut. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used for the analysis.ResultsThe happiness distribution in regards to baseline characteristic showed that 60.8% of the selected medical students were in happy group. It was found that male students (51.4%) were happier than females (48.6%). It was seen that 85.7% of medical students who were happy, had never consumed drugs and this association was found to be statistically significant. It was observed that comparatively younger siblings were happier. Those who believed in higher power or universal consciousness were found to be more contented and happier.ConclusionOverall the medical students were found to be happy. To make a conducive environment for internal happiness, a belief in superpower was very helpful. All kind of drugs (alcohol and tobacco) should be discouraged as these may cause a temporary feeling of elation but not internal happiness.
       
  • Evaluation of McNamara’s analysis in South Indian (Tamil Nadu) children
           between 8–12 years of age using lateral cephalograms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 June 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Dhanalakshmi Ravikumar, Sanu N., Mahesh Ramakrishna, Ningthoujam Sharna, Waikhom Robindro
       
  • The comparative evaluation of 1% alendronate gel as local drug delivery
           system in chronic periodontitis in smokers and non smokers: Randomized
           clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Vidushi Sheokand, Vandana Srikrishna Chadha, Pooja Palwankar IntroductionPeriodontitis is a progressive disease of microbial origin involving the loss of supporting tissues of the teeth resulting from host inflammatory and immunologic reactions. The standard approach to the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases for a number of years has been mechanical therapy and if required surgical intervention Researcher thought of creating a treatment modality where by altering the host response, the destructive host mechanisms could be interfered affecting the final outcome of the disease process.AimThe present study aims to explore the efficacy of local delivery of a 1% Alendronate (ALN) gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of infrabony periodontal pockets in smokers and non-smoker with Chronic Periodontitis.Materials and method60 infrabony periodontal pockets in patients with chronic periodontitis between the age group of 30–50 years were selected. The study consisted of 2 groups smoker and nonsmoker. A gel based drug delivery system of Alendronate was formulated. 0.1 ml alendronate gel and 0.1 ml placebo gel was placed at the experimental and control sites respectively following root planing. Clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline, three months and six months.ResultsAlendronate was effective in improving clinical and radiographic parameters compared to placebo. Alendronate showed better result in non smoker group when compared with smoker group.ConclusionThis Study showed improvements in clinical parameters both at the control and experimental sites. However, the experimental sites (Alendronate) showed greater improvement as compared to the control sites (Placebo). A significant gain in alveolar crest height and defect fill was measured radiographically at non smoker Alendronate group.
       
  • Subgingivally delivered coenzyme Q10 in the treatment of chronic
           periodontitis among smokers: A randomized, controlled clinical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Chetan P. Raut, Kunal S. Sethi, Bhagyashree Kohale, Alefiya Mamajiwala, Ayushya Warang BackgroundCoenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant whose efficacy in periodontal diseases is well known. However studies regarding its efficacy in smokers with periodontitis are few. Coenzyme Q10 serves as an endogenous antioxidant and its increased concentration in the diseased gingiva effectively suppresses advanced periodontal inflammation.ObjectivesThe aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in smokers with chronic periodontitis.MethodsTotal of 40 patients were enrolled for the study. The subjects were divided into control (Scaling and root planing only) and test group (Coenzyme Q10 plus Scaling and root planing). Clinical parameters such as plaque index, modified sulcular bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. These were assessed at baseline, at 1 month and 3 month. The results were subjected to appropriate statistical analysis.ResultsThere was a significant improvement in all clinical parameters in the test sites seen at the end of the 1 month and 3 month period.ConclusionsCoenzyme Q10 can be said to have a beneficial effect on smokers with periodontitis when used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing.
       
  • Preventive orthodontic approach for functional mandibular shift in early
           mixed dentition: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Divya S. Sharma, Samiksha Srivastava, Shobha Tandon The case reported here highlights the importance of examination of functional occlusion along with static occlusion. Any undetected malocclusion during early mixed dentition has potency to alter the growth and function of stomatognathic system. Premature contacts in primary canine region is the most prevalent cause of functional mandibular shift and can lead to TMJ problems for the prevalence of self correction of such malocclusion is very low if not intervened. A case of functional mandibular shift due to faulty canine guidance because of premature contacts is discussed here. Selective grinding of premature contacts and myofunctional exercise resulted in well balanced centric occlusion coinciding with centric relation.
       
  • Spectrum of features in Darier’s disease: A case report with emphasis on
           differential diagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 May 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Shwetha V, Sujatha S, Yashoda Devi B K, Rakesh N, Pavan kumar T, Priyadharshini R, Yashaswi Krishnamurthy Oral genodermatoses includes a spectrum of inherited dermatological disorders with varying oral mucosal manifestations. Darier’s disease is an autosomal dominant disorder with defect in desmosomal attachment. This case report presents oro cutaneous manifestations of Darier’s disease in a 40 year old female patient with a detailed review on etiology, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and management of the condition.
       
  • Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymorphisms as a risk factor for
           chronic periodontitis in North Indian population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Puja Debnath, Jayant Dewangan, Divya Tandon, Vivek Govila, Mona Sharma, Virendra Kumar, Smita Govila, Srikanta Kumar Rath ObjectivesImpaired plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), controlling coagulation and the fibrinolytic system is supposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. This study was performed to examine the association of PAI-1 gene polymorphisms with Chronic Periodontitis (CP) and alveolar bone loss severity involved with the disease and for understanding the role of genetic contributions in disease progression.Methods87 volunteers were included in the study. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood, subsequently, DNA samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion. Direct gene sequencing were performed for all the samples to identify genotype polymorphisms (rs 11560324) in the 3’ untranslated region of PAI-1 gene. For bone loss assessment full mouth IOPA was taken.ResultsStatistical analysis showed that for SNP PAI-I in 3’ UTR, genotype CC (homozygous mutant) and allele C (mutant) has a risk associated with CP, although statistically significant association was not found. An increased risk of association of disease severity with CG (heterozygous mutant) and CC (homozygous mutant) genotypes, i.e., an increased carriage rate of genotype CG and CC (homozygous mutant) was evident with the increase in the severity of CP, highlighting an increased susceptibility to CP due to this gene polymorphisms.ConclusionPAI-1 genotype has a risk association with CP and alveolar bone loss severity in North-Indian population.
       
  • Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the mandible – A case report and
           review of published case reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): Sachin C. Sarode, Gargi S. Sarode, Yashwant Ingale, Manjusha Ingale, A. Thirumal Raj, Shankargouda Patil The natural history of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is still heavily debated. It's anonymous natural history is precisely denoted by its new adapted terminology ‘undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS)’. Thus to diagnose a lesion as UPS, it is vital to correlate its histopathological features along with its immunohistochemical (IHC) expressions to confirm the tumor cell lineage. MFH is extremely rare in mandible with the literature search in PubMed database revealing only 13 case reports of MFH involving the mandible. Among these, only 7 case reports provide IHC details of the case. Without IHC data it is not possible to determine the accuracy of the diagnosis in the remaining 6 cases. Here we report an additional 8th case of MFH involving the ramus and angle of the mandible. Histopathology revealed proliferating malignant spindle cells interspersed with histiocyte-like cells. The tumor cells were strongly positive for vimentin and CD68 and were negative for S-100, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and cytokeratin (CK). The diagnosis was made by correlating the histopathological findings with the IHC profile. The report also provides the data (clinical, radiographic, histopathological, immunohistochemical features and treatment details) extracted from the 7 confirmed MFH case reports involving the mandible.
       
  • Expression of Ki-67, p53, α-SMA and COX-2 in lichen planus and
           related lesions: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2018Source: Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial ResearchAuthor(s): D.S. Sanketh, Karuna Kumari, Roopa S. Rao, Vanishree C. Haragannavar, Sachin C. Sarode, Gargi S. Sarode, A. Thirumal Raj, Shankargouda Patil BackgroundResearchers have struggled to understand the natural history of lesions presenting with both lichenoid features and epithelial dysplasia. Thus the present study was designed to differentiate between OLP, OLP with dysplasia, epithelial dysplasia and epithelial dysplasia with lichenoid features based on the expressions of ki-67, p53, COX-2, and α-SMA.Materials and methodsFormalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival specimens of OLP, OLP with dysplasia, epithelial dysplasia and epithelial dysplasia with lichenoid features were subjected to immunohistochemical staining with ki-67, p53, COX-2, and α-SMA.ResultsKi-67 exhibited strong positivity in 100% (6/6) of epithelial dysplasia cases, 71.4% (5/7) of lichenoid dysplasia cases, 57.1% (4/7) of OLP cases and 60% (3/5) of OLP with dysplasia cases. Strong p53 staining was evident in more cases of lichenoid dysplasia [42.8% (3/7)], while moderate staining was more frequent in OLP cases [42.8% (3/7)] and OLP with dysplasia cases [42.8% (3/7)] and mild intensity was more frequent in epithelial dysplasia cases [50% (3/6)] followed by lichenoid dysplasia cases [42.8% (3/7)], OLP cases [28.5 (2/7)] and OLP with dysplasia cases [40% (2/5)]. COX-2 strong positivity was more frequent in cases of epithelial dysplasia cases [57.1% (4/7)] and OLP [50% (3/6)]. Strong α- SMA staining was noted more frequently in lichenoid dysplasia cases [71.4 (5/7)], followed by OLP cases [42.8% (3/7)] and OLP with dysplasia cases [60% (3/5)].ConclusionsKi-67, p53, α-SMA and COX-2 expression do not differentiate between OLP, LP with dysplasia and epithelial dysplasia with lichenoid features.
       
 
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