Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8642 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (218 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (120 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (338 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (234 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (293 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (164 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (150 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (42 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (188 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (138 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (157 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (174 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (99 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2392 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (364 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (207 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (384 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (140 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (170 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (83 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (100 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (275 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (158 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (833 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (192 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (104 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (79 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (81 journals)
    - SURGERY (406 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (155 journals)

MEDICAL SCIENCES (2392 journals)            First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Showing 1201 - 1400 of 3562 Journals sorted alphabetically
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forensic Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Gandaki Medical College-Nepal     Open Access  
Journal of Generic Medicines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geographical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hand Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Head & Neck Physicians and Surgeons     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health & Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Health and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Design     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Economics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior     Open Access  
Journal of Health Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of health sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences / Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health Sciences and Surveillance System     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Health Specialties     Open Access  
Journal of Health Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Diseases     Open Access  
Journal of Helminthology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of HIV for Clinical and Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hospital Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology [Medical Sciences]     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Rhythm     Open Access  
Journal of Human Transcriptome     Open Access  
Journal of Ideas in Health     Open Access  
Journal of Inflammation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Inflammation Research     Open Access  
Journal of Injury and Violence Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Institute of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Insulin Resistance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interventional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Investigative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamabad Medical & Dental College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Karnali Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Kathmandu Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of King Abdulaziz University : Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Laryngology and Voice     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Lasers in Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Limb Lengthening & Reconstruction     Open Access  
Journal of Lumbini Medical College     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Materials Science : Materials in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Maternal and Child Health     Open Access  
Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medical Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Cases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Colleges of PLA     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Medical Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ethics     Partially Free   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Medical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Medical Hypotheses and Ideas     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Imaging and Health Informatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Investigation and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Laboratory and Diagnosis     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Law and Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Medical Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Screening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Signals and Sensors     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medical Society     Open Access  
Journal of Medical Systems     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medical Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medicinal Botany     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201)
Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicine and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medicine and the Person     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medicine in Scientific Research     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine in the Tropics     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine Research and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Medicines Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Metabolomics & Systems Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Movement Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nanotechnology in Engineering and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Nanotheranostics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Medicines     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nature and Science of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Negative and No Positive Results     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalgunj Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Neurocritical Care     Open Access  
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Neurorestoratology     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroscience and Neurological Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Nobel Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Obesity and Bariatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Occupational Health     Open Access  
Journal of Occupational Therapy Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Oral Biology and Craniofacial Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Oral Health and Craniofacial Science     Open Access  
Journal of Orofacial Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, Hearing and Balance Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ovarian Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ozone Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Paramedical Sciences & Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Participatory Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Patan Academy of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Pathogens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Patient Experience     Open Access  
Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews     Open Access  
Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes     Open Access  
Journal of Periodontal Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Personalized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physiobiochemical Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physiology-Paris     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pioneering Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Pregnancy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health     Open Access  
Journal of Primary Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Prosthodontic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prosthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Receptor, Ligand and Channel Research     Open Access  
Journal of Regenerative Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Research in Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Science and Applications : Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Scientific Innovation in Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Scientific Perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College     Open Access  
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Arthroplasty     Open Access  
Journal of Sleep Disorders : Treatment & Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of South American Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences : Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Stomal Therapy Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Surgical Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Surgical and Clinical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Case Reports     Open Access  
Journal of Surgical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report     Open Access  
Journal of Systemic Therapies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of The Academy of Clinical Microbiologists     Open Access  
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Certified Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American College of Clinical Wound Specialists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Anatomical Society of India     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Anus, Rectum and Colon     Open Access  
Journal of The Arab Society for Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Ceylon College of Physicians     Open Access  
Journal of the Chinese Medical Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the College of Community Physicians of Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Journal of The Egyptian Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Formosan Medical Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

  First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2382-1205
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1089 journals]
  • Increasing Internal Medicine Resident Confidence in Leading Inpatient
           Cardiopulmonary Resuscitations and Improving Patient Outcomes

    • Authors: Nathan T Douthit, Christine M McBride, Erin Coleman Townsley
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Introduction:Residents do not feel confident or competent in leading inpatient resuscitations. This is a crucial part of training future internists. Our objective was to develop a low-cost intervention to improve resident confidence in leading cardiopulmonary resuscitations and patient outcomes.Methods:A “code-conference” including a lecture on a high-yield topic, a low-fidelity simulation, and review of resident-led resuscitations was created at our institution for the 2017-2018 academic year. Patient outcomes were assessed using objective measures of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival to discharge (sDC). Confidence was assessed via survey before and after the intervention, with a focus on beginning postgraduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents.Results:In 2017, 8 out of 8 (100%) PGY-2 residents responded, while in 2018, 8 out of 10 (80%) responded. Patient outcomes did not show a statistically significant improvement. There was a trend toward positive outcomes in the resident group alone. Return of spontaneous circulation increased from 63% to 79% (P = .08, total n = 97). Resident confidence was not improved in a statistically significant way, but there was a trend toward improvement and residents agreed it was an important part of their training.Discussion:There was no statistically significant improvement in code-blue outcomes; however, there was a positive trend with increased ROSC and stable sDC for resident-led resuscitations, despite hospital-wide decreases in both. Resident confidence also showed a positive trend with no statistical significant changes. It is possible to institute a low-cost high-yield intervention to improved resident confidence in leading code-blue resuscitations. It may also improve patient outcomes; however, further studies are needed to determine if it can improve patient survival outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T07:06:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520923716
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • A Faculty Development Graduate Medical Education Retreat to Teach and
           Address Social Determinants of Health

    • Authors: Johanna Martinez, Alice Fornari, Venice VanHuse, Ethan Fried, Omolara T Uwemedimo, Eun Ji Kim, Joseph Conigliaro, Andrew C Yacht
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:Social determinants of health (SDH) account for a large percentage of health outcomes. Therefore, ensuring providers can address SDH is paramount yet curricula in this area is limited.Aim:The authors aimed to raise awareness, identify learning opportunities, foster positive attitudes, and equip educators to implement SDH curriculum.Setting and participants:This retreat occurred at a large academic institution and had over 130 participants who represented 56 distinct training programs and over 20 disciplines.Program description:The retreat was titled “Social Determinants of Health: Walking in Your Patients’ Shoes.” The retreat was holistic and used a multidimensional approach that included traditional learning, team-based learning, reflective practice, and prompted action.Program evaluation:The evaluation of this retreat included electronic surveys and both qualitative and quantitative data. The retreat’s quality and effectiveness at improving participants’ knowledge and skill in addressing SDH was highly rated and resulted in numerous programs, including surgical and subspecialty programs reporting adopting SDH curricular and clinical workflow changes.Discussion:The retreat was successful and reached a wide and diverse set of faculty educators and can serve as an education model to the graduate medical education community on how to start to develop “physician-citizens.”
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-05-15T10:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520915495
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Case-Based Learning as an Effective Tool in Teaching Pharmacology to
           Undergraduate Medical Students in a Large Group Setting

    • Authors: Gurleen Kaur, Jagdeep Rehncy, Karamdeep Singh Kahal, Jaspreet Singh, Vidushi Sharma, Prithpal Singh Matreja, Harmandeep Grewal
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:The need for case-based learning in basic subjects is being recognized world over. Early clinical illustrations and actual clinical exposure enable students to associate basic science and real patient situations, probably increasing their retention of knowledge. The study was conducted to introduce an alternate method of teaching-learning in pharmacology in a large classroom setting to integrate pharmacology into clinical setting for better learning and understanding of the subject.Methods:Ninety-four students of second professional MBBS of a medical college in Punjab were divided into 2 groups and were taught a 2-hour topic in pharmacology using case-based learning (CBL) method and didactic lecture (DL) method using a crossover design. Their attendance and written test score at the end of teaching session were compared. Feedback from students and faculty was taken by prestructured questionnaires.Results:There was an increase in students’ attendance (P = .008) in CBL sessions but insignificant difference in their performance (P = .98) in the tests. Most (84%) of the students felt that CBL is a better method of teaching-learning than traditional DL. The teaching faculty felt that the students looked more interested and were themselves more motivated for the newer method of teaching.Conclusions:Case-based learning led to improvement in student motivation, satisfaction, and engagement. Most students and faculty accepted that CBL was an effective learning tool for pharmacology teaching in a large group setting and supported the incorporation of CBL into traditional DL teaching.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T06:45:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520920640
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Medical Student Workshop Improves Student Confidence in Working With
           Trained Medical Interpreters

    • Authors: Donna Coetzee, Anne G. Pereira, Johannah M Scheurer, Andrew PJ Olson
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Introduction:Many physicians care for patients whose primary spoken language is not English, and these interactions present challenges in physician-patient communication. These challenges contribute to the significant health disparities experienced by populations with limited English proficiency (LEP). Using trained medical interpreters is an important step in addressing this problem, as it improves communication outcomes. Despite this, many medical education programs have little formal instruction on how to work effectively with interpreters.Methods:To address this gap, we created an interactive workshop led by professional trained interpreters and faculty facilitators for medical students in their clinical years. Students were asked to evaluate the session based on relevance to their clinical experiences and helpfulness in preparing them for interactions with patients with LEP.Results:Immediately after the session, students reported that the clinical scenarios presented were similar those seen on their clinical clerkships. They also reported increased confidence in their ability to work with interpreters. On later follow-up, students reported that the instruction helped prepare them for subsequent patient interactions that involved interpreters.Conclusion:A workshop is an effective method for improving medical student comfort and confidence when working with interpreters for populations with LEP.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-05-11T04:35:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520918862
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Inequities Faced by Female Doctors Serving Communities of Need

    • Authors: Ana Motta-Moss, Zainab Hussain
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      The reasons for sex inequity in medicine are complex and partly interface ethnic background, specialty choice, and practice location. Multiple factors influence career choices including cultural values, balancing family responsibilities with professional growth, and career mentoring and support. Over the last 40 years, the Sophie Davis/CUNY School of Medicine (CSOM) has pursued a mission to increase diversity in medicine at the same time in which it has fostered the importance of primary care and service in underserved areas of New York State. Data from 1524 CSOM graduates show an increase in the number of women and underrepresented groups, with about a quarter of them working in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs). When compared with their male counterparts, our female graduates report lower income for similar work hours, with this disparity increasing slightly between female and male doctors working in HPSAs. In addition, our female graduates have chosen primary care specialties at a ratio of nearly 2:1 when compared with their male peers. Despite these inequities, our female graduates report satisfaction with their career choices, primarily due to a strong commitment to serving back patients in those communities where some of them come from. More research is needed to identify specific factors that perpetuate pay inequity at the state level to minimize the implications of disparity for women doctors, particularly those working in low-income communities.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-04-23T06:17:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520915895
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Training in Interventional Radiology: A Simulation-Based Approach

    • Authors: Indrajeet Mandal, Utkarsh Ojha
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Innovations in medical technology have revolutionised both medical and surgical practice. Indeed, with such innovations, training for specific specialties has become more advanced and streamlined. However, despite these novel approaches to train students and specialist trainees, training for interventional radiology (IR) is lagging. While the reason for this lag remains contentious, one of the primary reasons for this issue may be the lack of standardisation for IR training due to a scarcity of specific guidelines for the delivery of IR procedural training. Interventional radiologists manage a vast array of conditions and perform various procedures. However, training for each procedure is largely dependent on the centre and access to a range of cases. Recently, the use of simulation technology has allowed this issue to be addressed. Simulation technology allows trainees to participate in a range of procedures regardless of their centre and availability of cases. Specialties such as cardiology and vascular surgery have already adopted simulation-based technology for trainees and have commented positively on this approach. However, simulation-based training is still lacking in the IR training pathway. Here, we evaluate why IR training can benefit from a more simulation-based approach. We further consider the cost-effectiveness of implementing simulation-based training nationally. Finally, we outline the potential pitfalls that may arise of introducing simulation-based training for IR trainees. We conclude that despite its disadvantages, simulation training will prove to be more cost-efficient and allow standardisation of IR training.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-04-13T07:31:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520912744
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Teaching “Shock Pathophysiology” by Flipped Classroom: Views
           and Perspectives

    • Authors: Rehana Rehman, Satwat Hashmi, Rozmeen Akbar, Syeda Sadia Fatima
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Flipped classroom (FCR) is an active learning pedagogical method in which the students prepare prior to class using different modalities, for example, reading materials and videos, and afterward spend the time in class discussing the content and reinforcing the concepts. We chose to replace one problem-based case on “Shock” with flipped-style teaching in the respiration circulation module of a private medical university. Our objective was to use the clinical presentation of “Shock” to open a window to interrelate basic science concepts of cardiovascular physiology and pathology. It aimed to merge the case-based discussion with small-group discussions in the form of FCR activity. The qualitative study gives an overview of comments of facilitators, observers, and leadership of the Department and University obtained during focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis of responses emphasized the importance of FCR as an effective teaching learning modality, which can be made more effective by careful selection of topic and provision of facilities to support technology-enhanced learning. The discussions with facilitators, observers, and leadership revealed its usefulness through student’s engagement and increased participation to build learning of the key concepts. Student satisfaction in these activities can be enhanced by construction of knowledge acquired in non–face-to-face component with substantial pre-reading materials, videos, peer discussions, quizzes, and prompt feedback.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-03-02T10:57:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520910853
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Scaffolding Clinical Reasoning of Health Care Students: A Qualitative
           Exploration of Clinicians’ Perceptions on an Interprofessional Obstetric
           Ward

    • Authors: Cora LF Visser, Anouk Wouters, Gerda Croiset, Rashmi A Kusurkar
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Purpose:Interprofessional education (IPE) on a ward supports students to generate interprofessional patient care plans as a means to learn about the roles, responsibilities, and clinical reasoning of other professions. We investigated how clinicians guide the clinical reasoning of students from their own and other professions and whether clinicians from nursing, midwifery, and medicine could scaffold students from all professions, that is, by providing just-in-time and tailored support.Methods:Nine supervising clinicians from medicine, nursing, and midwifery were interviewed and a repeat interview held 3 to 15 weeks later; one nurse supervisor was interviewed only once. Using conventional content analysis, themes were identified inductively. Next, we applied an existing scaffolding framework to conceptualise how clinicians supported the clinical reasoning in an IPE setting.Results:Themes were clinicians’ interventions and intentions, results of interventions and of IPE, characteristics of students and clinicians, interactions between clinicians and students, and logistics. Clinicians applied various interventions and expressed several intentions to guide the learning of students from all professions. Clinicians stimulated students’ clinical reasoning by structuring meetings, asking students to explain their thoughts to each other and through giving group assignments. Thus, clinicians used peer-assisted learning for the students. By collaborating with other supervising clinicians regarding the form and amount of guidance to give to the students, clinicians applied peer-assisted learning for themselves as well.Conclusion:Clinicians can learn to scaffold the clinical reasoning of students from different professions, when they are provided with training, good examples, and structures. An existing scaffolding framework can serve as an overview of aims and interventions to provide just-in-time guidance to students from all professions. The scaffolding framework is useful for training clinicians and for depicting the pedagogical approach for IPE wards.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T08:51:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520907915
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Implementing a Competency-Based Approach to Anatomy Teaching: Beginning
           With the End in Mind

    • Authors: Alireza Jalali, Dahn Jeong, Stephanie Sutherland
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:The shift in the medical education system from a time-based to a competency-based model has encouraged its adoption and application in competency-based education in anatomy classrooms, such as team-based learning models and flipped classroom models. This pilot study aimed to build on previous work of the linkages between anatomy-based learning (a flipped classroom model inspired by a modified team-based learning) and student learning and engagement, and further to assess the linkage between anatomy-based learning and academic performance.Methods:A sequential mixed-methods design was employed to first gather and analyse quantitative data, including confidential student first semester scores in anatomy: gender, stream, anatomy-based learning, and final anatomy overall mark. The quantitative phase was followed by a qualitative phase in which a series of 8 anatomy laboratories were observed (4 anatomy-based learning and 4 traditional). Thematic analysis was performed on the observation data.Results:Aggregate anatomy-based learning and traditional stream tests, and final unit scores were compared. The anatomy-based learning and final unit scores showed little difference between students in the anatomy-based learning and students in the traditional stream. Students using anatomy-based learning had an aggregate score of 1.15 and final aggregate mark of 72, whereas students in the traditional section had an aggregate score of 1.19 and final mark of 79. Qualitative phase was undertaken to try to assess the linkages between anatomy-based learning and student learning. Observations showed that students in the anatomy-based learning section spent more time on task as compared with their peers in the traditional stream. The anatomy-based learning students also seemed to practice more self-directed learning and employed more multimodal learning strategies than the traditional section stream.Discussion/conclusions:Although the quantitative results of this study showed no significant difference in mean scores between anatomy-based learning and traditional designs, it was possible to observe the potential of flipped classroom model in engaging students in individual preparation, in team-based learning, and in consensus-based learning approaches.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-02-19T06:29:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520907899
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Integration of Latin American Complementary and Alternative Medicine
           Topics Into a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum and Survey of Student
           Attitudes and Behaviors

    • Authors: Paul M Boylan, Andrea Murzello, Jayesh Parmar, Nicholas K Chow
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      One in 3 adults report using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and as many as 7 in 10 Hispanic patients report CAM use. Pharmacists often encounter patients who use CAM products and therefore college of pharmacy curricular standards require both CAM and cultural competence training; however, there is little guidance for colleges on how to best deliver this material. In Fall 2017, Larkin University College of Pharmacy implemented a curricular change wherein first professional (P1) year pharmacy students selected, researched, and presented on a CAM product from Latin America. Pre-post surveys were administered to the students to measure their attitudes and behaviors toward CAM before and after completing their project. Survey results showed that student attitudes and behaviors toward CAM were largely unchanged; however, post-survey results showed that students agreed that they knew where to search for Latin American CAM information (P 
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-02-03T11:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520904121
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Goal-Setting on a Geriatric Medicine Rotation: A Pilot Study

    • Authors: Jillian Alston, Evelyn Cheung, Dov Gandell
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:Formal goal-setting has been shown to enhance performance and improve educational experiences. We initiated a standardized goal-setting intervention for all residents rotating through a Geriatric Medicine rotation.Objectives:This study aims to describe the feasibility of a goal-setting intervention on a geriatric medicine rotation, the resources required, and the barriers to implementation. As well, this study aims to describe the learning goals residents created regarding content and quality.Methods:A pilot goal-setting intervention was initiated. A goal-setting form was provided at the beginning of their rotation and reviewed at the end of the rotation. Residents were invited to complete an anonymous online survey to gather feedback on the initiative. Goals were analysed for content and quality. Feedback from the survey results was incorporated into the goal-setting process.Results:Between March and December 2018, 26 of 44 residents completed the goal-setting initiative. Explanations for the poor adherence included limited protected time for faculty and residents to engage in coaching, its voluntary nature, and trainee absence during orientation. Reasons for difficulty in achieving goals included lack of faculty and trainee time and difficulty assisting residents in achieving goals when no clinical opportunities arose. Although only 59% of residents completed the intervention, if goal-setting took place, most of the goals were specific (71 of 77; 92%) and 35 of 77 (45.5%) goals were not related to medical knowledge.Conclusions:This pilot study outlines the successes and barriers of a brief goal-setting intervention during a Geriatric Medicine rotation. Adherence was limited; however, of those who did complete the intervention, the creation of specific goals with a short, structured goal-setting form was possible. To enhance the intervention, goal-setting form completion should be enforced and efforts should be made to engage in mid-rotation check-ins and coaching.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T10:46:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519893989
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Measuring Students’ Perceptions of the Medical School Learning
           Environment: Translation, Transcultural Adaptation, and Validation of 2
           Instruments to the Brazilian Portuguese Language

    • Authors: Rodolfo F Damiano, Aline O Furtado, Betina N da Silva, Oscarina da S Ezequiel, Alessandra LG Lucchetti, Lisabeth F DiLalla, Sean Tackett, Robert B Shochet, Giancarlo Lucchetti
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:Although learning environment (LE) is an important component of medical training, there are few instruments to investigate LE in Latin American and Brazilian medical schools. Therefore, this study aims to translate, adapt transculturally, and validate the Medical School Learning Environment Scale (MSLES) and the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES) to the Brazilian Portuguese language.Method:This study was carried out between June 2016 and October 2017. Both scales have been translated and cross-culturally adapted to Brazilian Portuguese Language and then back translated and approved by the original authors. A principal components analysis (PCA) was performed for both the MSLES and the JHLES. Test–retest reliability was assessed by comparing the first administration of the MSLES and the JHLES with a second administration 45 days later. Validity was assessed by comparing the MSLES and the JHLES with 2 overall LE perception questions; a sociodemographic questionnaire; and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21).Results:A total of 248 out of 334 (74.2%) first- to third-year medical students from a Brazilian public university were included. Principal component analysis generated 4 factors for MSLES and 7 factors for JHLES. Both showed good reliability for the total scale (MSLES α = .809; JHLES α = .901), as well as for each subdomain. Concurrent and convergent validity were observed by the strong correlations found between both scale totals (r = 0.749), as well as with both general LE questions: recommend the school to a friend (MSLES: r = 0.321; JHLES: r = 0.457) and overall LE rating (MSLES: r = 0.505; JHLES: r = 0.579). The 45-day test–retest comparison resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.697 for the JHLES and 0.757 for the MSLES.Conclusions:Reliability and validity have been demonstrated for both the MSLES and the JHLES. Thus, both represent feasible options for measuring LE in Brazilian medical students.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-27T10:52:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520902186
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Enriching Medical Student Learning Experiences

    • Authors: K James Kallail, Pam Shaw, Tyler Hughes, Benito Berardo
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objective:Medical students should develop skills in assessing their own learning needs and developing strategies to meet those needs. Medical curricula should be designed to provide active and enriching ways to explore medicine beyond the classroom. The program should enrich the elements of motivation, discovery, innovation, social services, cultural exploration, and personal development. The University of Kansas School of Medicine instituted a new curriculum in 2017 called ACE (Active, Competency-based, and Excellence-driven). Eight 1-week courses of enrichment experiences are embedded within the first 2 years of the curriculum.Methods:After each of 8 medical content blocks, students are required to participate in a 1-week, nongraded enrichment experience according to their own learning needs and interests. Students choose the type of enrichment activities including clinical experiences, professional development, leadership development, research and scholarly activity, and community engagement. Students select their top enrichment choices and a computer lottery makes the assignments from their designations. Students engaged in research and scholarly activity are guided to appropriate research mentors.Results:A total of 196 enrichment activities at 3 campuses were developed for 211 students during the first 2 years of medical school. Most students selected clinical experiences with enrichments available in most medical specialties and subspecialties. Students also use enrichment weeks to conduct research/scholarly activity, particularly those students pursuing the Honors Track. A total of 2071 enrichment experiences were completed in the first 2 years.Conclusions:Most enrichments involved clinical experiences, although research/scholarly activity and professional development enrichments also were popular. Evaluations from students and antidotal data suggested enrichments are popular among students and a good change of pace from the usual rigorous activities of the curriculum. Because of the large number of experiences required to conduct the enrichment weeks, a continuous process of evaluation is required to maintain the program. Therefore, flexibility is required to administer the program.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120520902160
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • The Efficiency of Online “Inked” Videos Versus Recorded PowerPoint
           Lectures on Teaching Pathophysiology to Medical Students in Pre-Clerkship
           Years: A Pilot Study

    • Authors: Regina Liu, Anju Relan, Jason Napolitano
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:As online learning develops an increasingly important role in medical education, new online teaching modalities are arising all the time. One such teaching modality that is gaining popularity among medical students is the “inked” video, a type of animated video that utilizes a virtual blackboard. Student reviews suggest that the dynamic style of the inked video allows it to teach more efficiently than traditional teaching modalities, but currently there is no quantitative evidence to support or guide the use of this teaching modality.Hypothesis:When compared to the traditional recorded PowerPoint lecture, online inked videos teach the same pathophysiology concepts to pre-clerkship medical students in a shorter amount of time.Method:A randomized, crossover-design study was conducted with second-year medical students at the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (n = 22). Students were randomized to 2 groups. Each group received 2 lessons on 2 different pathophysiology topics: one via a shorter inked video and the other via a longer recorded PowerPoint lecture. Two sets of dependent variables were used to test modality effects: immediate post-tests scores and delayed retention post-test scores. A perceptions survey was also administered to assess student preferences between the 2 teaching modalities.Results:Students performed similarly on immediate and delayed post-tests for the shorter inked videos and the longer recorded PowerPoint lectures (P > .05). Students reported greater engagement (P 
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519897031
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • A Novel Peer-Directed Curriculum to Enhance Medical Ethics Training for
           Medical Students: A Single-Institution Experience

    • Authors: Brian T Sullivan, Mikalyn T DeFoor, Brice Hwang, W Jeffrey Flowers, William Strong
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:The best pedagogical approach to teaching medical ethics is unknown and widely variable across medical school curricula in the United States. Active learning, reflective practice, informal discourse, and peer-led teaching methods have been widely supported as recent advances in medical education. Using a bottom-up teaching approach builds on medical trainees’ own moral thinking and emotion to promote awareness and shared decision-making in navigating everyday ethical considerations confronted in the clinical setting.Objective:Our study objective was to outline our methodology of grassroots efforts in developing an innovative, student-derived longitudinal program to enhance teaching in medical ethics for interested medical students.Methods:Through the development of a 4-year interactive medical ethics curriculum, interested medical students were provided the opportunity to enhance their own moral and ethical identities in the clinical setting through a peer-derived longitudinal curriculum including the following components: lunch-and-learn didactic sessions, peer-facilitated ethics presentations, faculty-student mentorship sessions, student ethics committee discussions, hospital ethics committee and pastoral care shadowing, and an ethics capstone scholarly project. The curriculum places emphasis on small group narrative discussion and collaboration with peers and faculty mentors about ethical considerations in everyday clinical decision-making and provides an intellectual space to self-reflect, explore moral and professional values, and mature one’s own professional communication skills.Results:The Leadership through Ethics (LTE) program is now in its fourth year with 14 faculty-clinician ethics facilitators and 65 active student participants on track for a distinction in medical ethics upon graduation. Early student narrative feedback showed recurrent themes on positive curricular components including (1) clinician mentorship is key, (2) peer discussion and reflection relatable to the wards is effective, and (3) hands-on and interactive clinical training adds value. As a result of the peer-driven initiative, the program has been awarded recognition as a graduate-level certification for sustainable expansion of the grassroots curriculum for trainees in the clinical setting.Conclusions:Grassroots medical ethics education emphasizes experiential learning and peer-to-peer informal discourse of everyday ethical considerations in the health care setting. Student engagement in curricular development, reflective practice in clinical settings, and peer-assisted learning are strategies to enhance clinical ethics education. The Leadership through Ethics program augments and has the potential to transform traditional teaching methodology in bioethics education for motivated students by offering protected small group discussion time, a safe environment, and guidance from ethics facilitators to reflect on shared experiences in clinical ethics and to gain more robust, hands-on ethics training in the clinical setting.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519899148
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Integrating Digital Health into the Curriculum—Considerations on the
           Current Landscape and Future Developments

    • Authors: Timothy Dy Aungst, Ravi Patel
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      The intercession of widespread Internet access and use of mobile devices and wearables has increased the attention to the field of digital health as a novel means of providing patient care. Although substantial advancements have been made toward the development of novel technologies and identification of therapeutic areas of impact, the issue remains of how to educate future health professionals to work in an era of digital tools. This perspective piece seeks to highlight areas of concern related to subset areas of the digital health environment and provide potential educational pathways to prepare students.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519901275
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • A Bear in the Woods

    • Authors: Mara Feingold-Link
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      In medicine, we learn what questions to ask to best diagnose our patients. The My Life, My Story program helps participants learn what questions to ask to better empathize with patients.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519899391
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Multidisciplinary Integrated Pharmacotherapy Curriculum in a Doctor of
           Pharmacy Program: Educators’ Perceptions, Views, and Perspectives

    • Authors: Alian A Alrasheedy
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:In pharmacy education, an integrated curriculum in which the full spectrum of foundational and pharmaceutical sciences is integrated with pharmacotherapy and clinical pharmacy is considered relatively new. At Unaizah College of Pharmacy (UCP), Qassim University, Saudi Arabia, a 6-year PharmD program was developed with a multidisciplinary integrated pharmacotherapy curriculum. The integrated pharmacotherapy curriculum represents approximately half of the didactic curriculum.Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions, the views, and experiences of academic faculty members regarding the impact and implementation of the multidisciplinary integrated pharmacotherapy curriculum in the PharmD program.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted with all pharmacy faculty members involved in the integrated curriculum. The data-capturing technique in this study was a Web-based survey. In addition, the survey included an open-ended section in which the participants were encouraged to provide comments/feedback and share their experiences about the integrated curriculum.Results:The majority of participants (96.88%, n = 31) believed that the integrated curriculum is well suited for developing problem-solving skills needed in pharmacy practice. Similarly, 93.76% (n = 30) believed that the integrated curriculum results in better student learning experiences. Of the participants, 81.26% (n = 26) believed it results in a better understanding and application of pharmaceutical sciences in practice compared with traditional courses. Moreover, 71.88% (n = 23) considered that the required depth and breadth of the content related to their disciplines is achievable with this model. Of all participants, 96.88% (n = 31) believed that the successful implementation of this integrated curriculum needs strong collaboration, effective communication, good coordination between all departments, and a flexible, fully customizable, and effective e-learning system. Moreover, all participants believed that full integration requires careful design and implementation to ensure no overlapping or marginalization of topics/disciplines. In this study, 62.51% (n = 20) believed that the fully integrated curriculum results in a relatively higher workload compared with traditional courses.Conclusions:The majority of faculty members had positive perceptions regarding the multidisciplinary integrated pharmacotherapy curriculum. Moreover, the majority had positive views and experiences regarding the implementation of this integrated curriculum. The study identified several factors that helped in the successful implementation of this curriculum. Moreover, several challenges have been identified, including more investment in time and effort to implement this fully integrated curriculum.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519897279
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Physician Self-disclosure of Lived Experience Improves Mental Health
           Attitudes Among Medical Students: A Randomized Study

    • Authors: Andrés Martin, Julie Chilton, Doron Gothelf, Doron Amsalem
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Introduction:Depression and suicidal ideation are common among medical students, a group at higher risk for suicide completion than their age-normed peers. Medical students have health-seeking behaviors that are not commensurate with their mental health needs, a discrepancy likely related to stigma and to limited role-modeling provided by physicians.Methods:We surveyed second-year medical students using the Attitudes to Psychiatry (ATP-30) and Attitudes to Mental Illness (AMI) instruments. In addition, we asked questions about role-modeling and help-seeking attitudes at baseline. We then conducted a randomized trial of an intervention consisting of 2 components: (a) a panel of 2 physicians with personal histories of mental illness speaking about their diagnosis, treatment, and recovery to the students, immediately followed by (b) small-group facilitated discussions. We repeated the ATP-30 and AMI after the active/early group was exposed to the panel, but before the control/late group was similarly exposed.Results:Forty-three medical students participated (53% women). The majority of students (91%) agreed that knowing physicians further along in their careers who struggled with mental health issues, got treatment, and were now doing well would make them more likely to access care if they needed it. Students in the active group (n = 22) had more favorable attitudes on ATP-30 (P = .01) and AMI (P = .02) scores, as compared with the control group (n = 21).Conclusion:Medical students can benefit from the availability of, and exposure to physicians with self-disclosed histories of having overcome mental illnesses. Such exposures can favorably improve stigmatized views about psychiatry, or of patients or colleagues affected by psychopathology. This intervention has the potential to enhance medical students’ mental health and their health-seeking behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519889352
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
  • Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis on Sex and Gender in Preparatory
           Material for National Medical Examination in Germany and the United States
           

    • Authors: Helena Schluchter, Ahmad T Nauman, Sabine Ludwig, Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, Ute Seeland
      Abstract: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, Volume 7, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:Sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) should be a mandatory part of medical education. We compared the quantity and quality of sex- and gender-related content of e-learning materials commonly used by German and American medical students while preparing for national medical examinations.Methods:Quantitative, line-by-line analysis of the preparatory materials AMBOSS 2017 and USMLE Step 1 Lecture Notes (2017) by KAPLAN MEDICAL was performed between April and October 2017. Subjects were allocated to one of the three main fields: clinical subjects, behavioral and social science, and pharmacology. Qualitative analysis comprised binary categorization into sex- and gender-based aspects and qualification with respect to the presence of a pathophysiological explanation for the sex or gender difference.Results:In relation to the total content of AMBOSS and KAPLAN, the sex- and gender-based share of the clinical subjects content was 26.8% (±8.2) in AMBOSS and 21.1% (±10.2) in KAPLAN. The number of sex- and gender-based aspects in the behavioral and social science learning material differed significantly for AMBOSS and KAPLAN (4.4% ± 3.1% vs 10.7% ± 7.5%; P = .044). Most of the sex- and gender-related content covered sex differences. Most learning cards and texts did not include a detailed pathophysiological explanation for sex- or gender-based aspects. The knowledge provided in the preparatory documents represents only a small part of facts that are already known about sex and gender differences.Conclusions:The preparatory materials focused almost exclusively on biological sex differences and the sociocultural dimension in particular is underrepresented. A lot more evidence-based facts are known and should be integrated into the materials to reflect the importance of SGBM as an integral component of patient-centered medicine.
      Citation: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2382120519894253
      Issue No: Vol. 7 (2020)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.238.190.122
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-