Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8442 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (212 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (119 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (330 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (230 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (291 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (163 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (119 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (41 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (183 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (135 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (153 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (167 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (98 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2305 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (360 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (206 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (379 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (137 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (164 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (81 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (97 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (272 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (154 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (818 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (191 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (102 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (75 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (79 journals)
    - SURGERY (398 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

MEDICAL SCIENCES (2305 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 3562 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
3D Printing in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
4 open     Open Access  
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
ABCS Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AboutOpen     Open Access  
ACIMED     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Acta Bio Medica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Bioethica     Open Access  
Acta Bioquimica Clinica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Científica Estudiantil     Open Access  
Acta Facultatis Medicae Naissensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Herediana     Open Access  
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access  
Acta Medica (Hradec Králové)     Open Access  
Acta Medica Bulgarica     Open Access  
Acta Medica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Médica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Medica Indonesiana     Open Access  
Acta Medica International     Open Access  
Acta medica Lituanica     Open Access  
Acta Medica Marisiensis     Open Access  
Acta Medica Martiniana     Open Access  
Acta Medica Nagasakiensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Medica Peruana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Médica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Acta Medica Saliniana     Open Access  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Acupuncture and Natural Medicine     Open Access  
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Adıyaman Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi / Health Sciences Journal of Adıyaman University     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Adnan Menderes Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advanced Health Care Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advanced Science, Engineering and Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Advanced Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Cell and Gene Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Clinical Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Medical Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Medical Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Molecular Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access  
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Regenerative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Wound Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Thoracic and Critical Care Medicine     Open Access  
African Journal of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
AJSP: Reviews & Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Qadisiah Medical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ALERTA : Revista Científica del Instituto Nacional de Salud     Open Access  
Alexandria Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription  
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Althea Medical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Biomedical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Biomedicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Chinese Medicine, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Clinical Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Managed Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American Journal of Medical Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
American Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American medical news     Free   (Followers: 3)
American Medical Writers Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Amyloid: The Journal of Protein Folding Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Anales de la Facultad de Medicina     Open Access  
Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguay     Open Access  
Anales del Sistema Sanitario de Navarra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anatolian Clinic the Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Anatomica Medical Journal     Open Access  
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Anatomical Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomy Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ankara Medical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ankara Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Mecmuası     Open Access  
Annales de Pathologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales des Sciences de la Santé     Open Access  
Annales françaises d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie et de Pathologie Cervico-faciale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Annals of Biomedical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Clinical Hypertension     Open Access  
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Annals of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Annals of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of the College of Medicine, Mosul     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Annual Review of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Antibiotics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Antibodies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Antibody Technology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Antibody Therapeutics     Open Access  
Anuradhapura Medical Journal     Open Access  
Anwer Khan Modern Medical College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Apmis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Clinical Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Clinical Research, Clinical Trials and Regulatory Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Clinical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives Medical Review Journal / Arşiv Kaynak Tarama Dergisi     Open Access  
Archives of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology     Open Access  
Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medical Laboratory Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archivos de Medicina (Manizales)     Open Access  
ArgoSpine News & Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos de Ciências da Saúde     Open Access  
Arquivos de Medicina     Open Access  
Ars Medica : Revista de Ciencias Médicas     Open Access  
ARS Medica Tomitana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Arterial Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Artificial Intelligence in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Artificial Organs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ASHA Leader     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Family Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asian Bioethics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asian Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Medical and Pharmaceutical Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention     Open Access  
ASPIRATOR : Journal of Vector-borne Disease Studies     Open Access  
Astrocyte     Open Access  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of the Medical Sciences
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.767
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-9629
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3207 journals]
  • Why Did The Original Jones Criteria Not Emphasize Streptococcal
           Infection'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Stanford T. ShulmanAbstractT. Duckett Jones’ 1944 Jones Criteria for the diagnosis of Acute Rheumatic Fever did not require preceding group A streptococcal infection despite widely accepted strong evidence by Alvin Coburn and others.We reviewed relevant literature, previously unknown 1943 T. D. Jones correspondence, and Coburn's autobiography and archival material. New information concerning the fraught Jones-Coburn personal relationship very likely explains Jones’ unwillingness to accept Coburn's 1931 discovery of the crucial streptococcal link. Shortly after Jones’ 1954 death, the Jones Criteria were revised to emphasize the essential streptococcal role. Despite clear evidence in his correspondence that Jones fully understood the strength of the group A Streptococcal-Rheumatic Fever link before 1944, he failed to acknowledge this in the original Jones Criteria and denied it to his death in 1954. This episode demonstrates how interpersonal relationships have the potential to interfere with acceptance of new medical data.
       
  • Utility of circulating tumor cells for detection of early-stage luminal A
           breast cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Yang Zhang, Ji Qi, Jianyi Li, Shi Jia, Yitong Wang, Qiang Sun, Ye Kang, Yushi Liu, Yanan Cao, Jiaxin YuABSTRACTBackgroundPatients with early-stage luminal A breast cancer (LABC) have better prognoses. However, follow-up examinations are frequent and remain complex. The present study examined whether circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection could be used as an earlier and more reproducible indicator of disease status among patients with early-stage LABC, and given China's healthcare resource challenges, whether it could periodically replace follow-up routine imaging.MethodsA total of 135 postoperative Chinese patients with early-stage LABC were randomly assigned to a CTC group (68 patients underwent alternating assessments using CTC detection and routine re-examination) or control group (67 patients underwent only routine re-examination). The prognosis and patient-covered costs of the various assessments were calculated for the two groups.ResultsNo patients had normal CTCs and simultaneous abnormal imaging findings. There were no differences in overall survival, disease-free survival, and total patient-covered cost of follow-up between the two groups (all P> 0.05). However, there was a significant difference in the average patient-covered cost (P < 0.001). Furthermore, significant inter-group differences were observed in the total and average hospitalization times (P < 0.05).ConclusionsAmong Chinese patients with low-risk LABC, CTC detection was highly reliable and relatively low cost. Therefore, CTC detection may be used to reduce the number of routine imaging follow-ups.
       
  • Prognostic utility of monocyte to high-density lipoprotein ratio in
           patients with acute coronary syndrome: A meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Miying Sun, Dongming Zhao, Yanqi Zhang, Yujia Zhai, Mingzhe Ye, Xinpeng Wang, Lina Zheng, Liying WangAbstractBackgroundThe monocyte to high-density lipoprotein ratio (MHR) has been used to predict adverse clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the prognostic utility of MHR in patients with ACS.MethodsWe comprehensively searched for relevant studies in Pubmed, Embase, CNKI, WanFang, and VIP databases until March 12, 2019. Epidemiological studies investigating the association between MHR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) or all-cause mortality in patients with ACS were included. Pooled effect was expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the highest versus the reference lower MHR group.ResultsEight studies involving 6,480 patients with ACS were included and analyzed. Meta-analysis indicated that the highest MHR was significantly associated with higher risk of MACE (RR 1.65; 95%CI 1.36–2.02) and all-cause mortality (RR 2.61; 95%CI 1.29–4.89) after adjusting for the conventional confounders. The prognostic values of MACE with the highest MHR caused no significant changes in the in-hospital follow-up (RR 1.76; 95%CI 1.34–2.32) and>6 months follow-up (RR 1.68; 95%CI 1.08–2.62) subgroups. Furthermore, ST elevation myocardial infarction patients with the highest MHR had a 2.07-fold higher risk of in-hospital MACE (RR 2.07; 95%CI 1.52–2.80).ConclusionsElevated MHR is independently associated with an increased risk of MACE and all-cause mortality in patients with ACS. MHR may serve as a potential prognostic indicator for ACS prognosis.
       
  • Causes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotics: Are the Most
           Commonly Reported Causes the Most Common'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Mohamed Shoreibah, C Mel Wilcox
       
  • Re: “Gender Disparity in Authorship of Peer Reviewed Medical
           Publications” Bernardi et al.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Halah Ibrahim, Sophia Archuleta, Dora J. Stadler, Joseph Cofrancesco
       
  • Feasibility and Reliability of Rapid Diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Gregory Engel, Stanley G. RocksonABSTRACTBackgroundPrevailing hospital practice dictates a protracted phase of observation for patients with chest pain to establish or exclude the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction may improve patient care and reduce both complications and hospital costs. A study was performed to investigate the feasibility of early diagnosis of myocardial infarction within the first 9 hours of the hospital stay.MethodsThe records of all patients admitted with chest pain within one calendar year were analyzed. The timing of creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) quantification was determined with reference to the initial phlebotomy (time 0). An enzymatic diagnosis of myocardial infarction was assigned if any determination of CK-MB exceeded the upper limit of normal, and the diagnosis of each patient at or before 9 hours (early diagnosis) was compared to the ultimate diagnosis at 14 to 24 hours (final diagnosis) beyond initial assessment.ResultsOf the 528 included patients, 523 patients (99.1%) had identical early and final diagnostic outcomes; 5 patients (0.9%) had conflicting results. An early diagnosis of myocardial infarction was assigned to 195 of the 528 patients (36.9%). Of these, 190 achieved the diagnosis within 9 hours (sensitivity 97.4%). The negative predictive value was 98.5%.ConclusionStandard CK-MB mass measurements within 9 hours of arrival provided an accurate clinical assessment in> 99% of the cases. The high sensitivity and negative predictive values suggest that early diagnosis of myocardial infarction is feasible and reliable.
       
  • Abnormal Chest Radiograph in Asymptomatic Patient: Intrapericardial
           Herniation of Colon
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Adam Austin, Wafic Itani, Curtis Adams, Scott H. Beegle
       
  • Ivermectin Augments the In Vitro and In Vivo Efficacy of Cisplatin in
           Epithelial Ovarian Cancer by Suppressing Akt/mTOR Signaling
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Xiaohong Zhang, Tingting Qin, Zhengyan Zhu, Fan Hong, Yang Xu, Xiongjie Zhang, Xiaohong Xu, Aiping MaAbstractBackgroundThe poor outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer necessitate new treatments. In this work, we systematically analyzed the inhibitory effects of ivermectin and the molecular mechanism of its action in ovarian cancer.MethodsThe effects of ivermectin alone and its combination with cisplatin on growth and survival were examined using cultured ovarian cancer cells and a xenograft mouse model. The molecular mechanism of action of ivermectin, focusing on Akt/mTOR signaling, was elucidated.ResultsIvermectin arrested growth in the G2/M phase and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in ovarian cancer, regardless of specific cellular and molecular differences. Ivermectin significantly augmented the inhibitory effect of cisplatin on ovarian cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, ivermectin suppressed the phosphorylation of key molecules in the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in ovarian cancer cells. In addition, overexpression of constitutively active Akt restored ivermectin-induced inhibition of Akt/mTOR, growth arrest and apoptosis. In an ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model, ivermectin alone significantly inhibited tumor growth. In combination with cisplatin, tumor growth was completely reversed over the entire duration of drug treatment without any toxicity. Furthermore, the concentrations of ivermectin used in our study are pharmacologically achievable.ConclusionsOur work suggests that ivermectin may be a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for ovarian cancer and that targeting Akt/mTOR signaling is a therapeutic strategy to increase chemosensitivity in ovarian cancer.
       
  • Effect of Using the Rapid Shallow Breathing Index as Readiness Criterion
           for Spontaneous Breathing Trials in a Weaning Protocol
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Juan B. Figueroa-Casas, Ricardo Montoya, Jose Garcia-Blanco, Angelica Lehker, Ahmed M. Hussein, Haider Abdulmunim, Giselle Kabbach, Antonyos MahfoudABSTRACTBackgroundThis study aimed to compare the effect of using versus not using the Rapid-Shallow Breathing Index (RSBI) as a readiness criterion for Spontaneous Breathing Trials (SBT) on SBT success.Materials and MethodsDaily readiness screens were performed within a respiratory therapist-driven weaning protocol. Patients who passed these screens underwent a one-time measurement of the RSBI and then a SBT regardless of RSBI result. The proportion of passed readiness screens reaching SBT success was compared to the proportion that would have been obtained if RSBI ≤ 105 br/min/L had been used as an additional screen criterion.ResultsTwo hundred and fifty SBTs performed on 157 patients were analyzed. The sensitivity of RSBI ≤ 105 br/min/L to predict SBT success was 94.8% (95% CI 90.6-97.5). Relative to potentially using RSBI, 14.4% additional SBTs were performed. A third of these were successful, and no complications were detected in the rest that failed. The proportion of passed readiness screens reaching SBT success would have been 4% (95% CI 1.2-6.8) (P = 0.002) lower if RSBI had been used.ConclusionsThe inclusion of the RSBI in a readiness screen may not be useful in a weaning protocol.
       
  • Risk Factors Associated With Invasive Fungal Infections in Kidney
           Transplant Patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Sara Leitheiser, Andrew Harner, Jennifer L. Waller, Jake Turrentine, Stephanie Baer, Mufaddal Kheda, N. Stanley Nahman, Rhonda E. ColomboAbstractBackgroundKidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for developing invasive fungal infections (IFI). We queried the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) for risk factors for IFI in these patients.MethodsPatients who underwent a kidney transplant between 2005 and 2008 were queried for an IFI diagnosis using ICD-9 codes. An IFI was defined as at least one documented diagnosis from one of the following: (1) Candida (candidemia); (2) Histoplasmosis; (3) Aspergillosis; (4) Cryptococcosis; (5) “Other” mycoses. Potential risk factors included demographics, certain comorbidities and immunosuppressive medications. To examine the relative risk (RR), simple bivariate models were used, followed by a comprehensive full model to estimate the adjusted RR (aRR).ResultsOf 57,188 kidney transplant patients, 1,218 had 1,343 IFI diagnoses, with a median time to infection of 495 days. “Other” mycoses accounted for the most IFI diagnoses (37%), followed by aspergillosis (22%). The risk for any IFI was increased with age ≥65 years. Diabetes (aRR = 1.71), bacterial pneumonia (aRR = 1.62) and UTI (aRR = 1.34) were the top 3 clinical risk factors for infection. Each of the IFI groups was also associated with individual risk factors. Therapy with mycophenolate mofetil was associated with a decreased risk of candidemia.ConclusionsRisk factors for IFI in renal transplant patients include demographic, medication-associated and clinical data, as well as organism-specific factors. These results offer an extensive clinical profile of risk for IFI, and may thus help inform the diagnosis and presumptive therapy of invasive fungal infections in renal transplant recipients.
       
  • The Prognostic Value of Endotoxemia and Intestinal Barrier Biomarker ZO-1
           in Bacteremic Sepsis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Stelios F. Assimakopoulos, Karolina Akinosoglou, Anne-Lise de Lastic, Aikaterini Skintzi, Athanasia Mouzaki, Charalambos A. GogosAbstractBackgroundIntestinal barrier dysfunction exerts a pivotal pathophysiological role in the development of multiple organ dysfunction in sepsis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the potential role of serum intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) levels as biomarkers of intestinal barrier dysfunction in bacteremic sepsis.MethodsSeventy-five patients with bacteremic sepsis of abdominal origin (n = 34) or nonabdominal origin (n = 41) and 12 healthy controls were retrospectively studied. Blood samples collected upon sepsis diagnosis were analyzed for serum ZO-1, I-FABP and endotoxin levels. Prognostic scores Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), quickSOFA and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II) were determined over the first 24 hours after sepsis diagnosis and patients’ outcome in terms of 28-day mortality was recorded.ResultsSerum ZO-1 levels were significantly higher in bacteremic septic patients as compared to controls with no difference between patients with abdominal or extra-abdominal source of infection. Serum I-FABP levels were significantly lower in septic patients as compared to control and this reduction was more evident in patients with bacteremic abdominal sepsis. Serum ZO-1 and endotoxin concentrations were found significantly higher in patients who did not survive from sepsis. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, both endotoxin and ZO-1 predicted 28-day mortality. In addition, ZO-1 and endotoxin were correlated with the prognostic scores of qSOFA, SOFA and APACHE II.ConclusionsThe results of this study indicate that serum ZO-1 might be a reliable biomarker of gut barrier dysfunction in sepsis, not affected by the abdominal or extra-abdominal site of infection. ZO-1, measured early at sepsis diagnosis, might represent a valuable additional prognostic tool for patients’ outcome.
       
  • Transcriptional Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor β1 by Glucose:
           Investigation into the Role of the Hexosamine Biosynthesis Pathway
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Marc C. Daniels, Donald A. McClain, Errol D. CrookABSTRACTBackgroundThe hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) is hypothesized to mediate many of the adverse effects of hyperglycemia. We have shown previously that increased flux through this pathway leads to induction of the growth factor transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and to insulin resistance in cultured cells and transgenic mice. TGF-β is regulated by glucose and is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. We therefore hypothesized that the HBP was involved in the regulation of TGF-β by glucose in rat vascular and kidney cells.MethodsA plasmid containing the promoter region of TGF-β1 cloned upstream of the firefly luciferase gene was electroporated into rat aortic smooth muscle, mesangial, and proximal tubule cells. Luciferase activity was measured in cellular extracts from cells cultured in varying concentrations of glucose and glucosamine.ResultsGlucose treatment of all cultured cells led to a time- and dose-dependent stimulation in TGF-β1 transcriptional activity, with high (20 mM) glucose causing a 1.4- to 2.0-fold increase. Glucose stimulation did not occur until after 12 hours and disappeared after 72 hours of treatment. Glucosamine was more potent than glucose, with 3 mM stimulating up to a 4-fold increase in TGFβ1-transcriptional activity. The stimulatory effect of glucosamine was also dose-dependent but was slower to develop and longer lasting than that of glucose.ConclusionsThe metabolism of glucose through the HBP mediates extracellular matrix production, possibly via the stimulation of TGF-β in kidney cells. Hexosamine metabolism therefore, may play a role in the development of diabetic nephropathy.
       
  • Acknowledgment of Reviewers
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s):
       
  • How American Medicine Got to This Place
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Richard D. deShazo
       
  • Lung to Lung Cannonball Metastasis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 2Author(s): Chun-Hsien He, Yu-Jang Su
       
  • A Rare Presentation of Gout: Achilles Tendinopathy, Ultrasonographic
           Assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Cevriye Mülkoğlu, Barış Nacır, Hakan Genç
       
  • Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Conditions Disparities in Medicare
           Beneficiaries in the State of Michigan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): John M Clements, Mariana Rosca, Carla Cavallin, Shelby Falkenhagen, Thomas Ittoop, Christina K Jung, Megan Mazzella, Joseph A Reed, Megan Schluentz, Caleb VanDykeABSTRACTBackground: This study aimed to describe the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and combinations of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) that are leading causes of death (LCD) and confirm that disparities exist between groups based on race and sex.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using 2012 Medicare claims data from beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes over the age of 65 in the state of Michigan.Results: Female beneficiaries have type 2 diabetes and one or more MCCs that are LCD more often than males. Most type 2 diabetes patients have diabetes alone without MCCs, while a large proportion have at least one additional chronic condition that is a LCD. One in three patients have three or more chronic conditions. The most prevalent type 2 diabetes coexisting MCCs are congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Asian/Pacific Islanders have the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes without MCCs, and the highest prevalence of diabetes plus CHF. While fewer black beneficiaries have diabetes alone or one additional MCC, the prevalence of three or more MCCs in blacks generally exceeds the prevalence in other races. In beneficiaries with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, COPD and CHF are the first new chronic conditions to be diagnosed after an initial type 2 diabetes diagnosis.Conclusions: Race and sex disparities occur in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and MCCs that are LCD in Medicare beneficiaries in the state of Michigan.
       
  • Acarbose vs. Repaglinide in Diabetes Treatment: A New Appraisal of Two Old
           Rivals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Reza Pishdad, Parisa Pishdad, Gholam Reza PishdadAbstractBackgroundAcarbose and repaglinide are two safe and effective anti-diabetic agents that are especially in wide use in Asian and Middle Eastern countries. These two prandial agents share some outstanding qualities that their newer counterparts don't: While globally available in generic versions, both are oral and cheap. There is a paucity of data regarding their comparative efficacy. Herein, a head-to-head comparison of the efficacy of the two in treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia of newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) is investigated.Methods164 newly-diagnosed T2D patients with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels of 10 mmol/L (180 mg/dL) were consecutively alternated between acarbose- and repaglinide-treatment for 6 months.ResultsPer protocol analysis, 67% of acarbose-treated patients vs. 85% of repaglinide-treated patients achieved 2hPPG levels of
       
  • Reinterpreting renal hemodynamics: the importance of venous congestion and
           effective organ perfusion in acute kidney injury
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Csaba Kopitkó, Tibor Gondos, Tibor Fülöp, László MedveAbstractThe significance of effective renal perfusion is relatively under-emphasized in the current literature. From a renal standpoint, not only cardiac output should be optimized but also the renal perfusion maximized. In the critical ill patients’ several additional variables, such as the intraabdominal pressure, the presence of venous congestion and elevated central venous pressures as well as airway pressures generated by mechanical ventilation do affect net renal perfusion. These forces represent both a potential danger and an ongoing opportunity to improve renal outcomes in the critically ill and an opportunity to move beyond the simplified viewpoint of optimizing volume status. Therefore, to optimize nephron-protective therapies, nephrologists and intensive care physicians should be familiar with the concept of net renal perfusion pressure. This review appraises the background literature on renal perfusion pressure, including the initial animal data and historical human studies up to the most current developments in the field, exploring potential avenues to assess and improve renal blood supply.
       
  • A fuller evaluation of the underlying causes of persistent iron deficiency
           anemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Oscar M.P. Jolobe
       
  • Response: Letter to the Editor by Jolobe
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Samuel Dickey, Don C. Rockey
       
  • Identification of hub genes and analysis of prognostic values in
           hepatocellular carcinoma by bioinformatics analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Liangfei Xu, Tong Tong, Ziran Wang, Yawen Qiang, Fan Ma, Xiaoling MaAbstractBackgroundHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent cancers in the world. In this study, differentially expressed genes between tumor tissues and normal tissues were identified using the comprehensive analysis method in bioinformatics.MethodsWe downloaded three mRNA expression profiles from the Gene Expression Omnibus database (GEO) to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. The Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was performed to understand the function of DEGs. OncoLnc, which was linked to TCGA survival data, was used to investigate the prognostic values of hub genes. The expression of selected hub genes was validated by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR).ResultsA total of 235 DEGs, consisting of 36 up-regulated and 199 down-regulated genes, were identified between tumor tissue and normal tissue. The GO and KEGG analysis results showed the up-regulated DEGs to be significantly enriched in cell division, mid-body, ATP binding, and oocyte meiosis pathways. The down-regulated DEGs were mainly involved in epoxygenase P450 pathway, extracellular region, oxidoreductase activity, and metabolic pathways. Ten hub genes, including AURKA, CDC20, FTCD, UBE2C, CCNB2, PTTG1, CDKN3, CKS1B, TOP2A, and KIF20A, were identified as the key genes in HCC. Survival analysis found the expression of hub genes to be significantly correlated with the survival of patients with HCC.ConclusionsThe present study identified hub genes and pathways in HCC that may be potential targets for diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic prediction.
       
  • Osseous sarcoid mimicking metastatic cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Gurinder Sidhu, Yamen Homsi
       
  • Pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm caused by lung abscess
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Susumu Saito, Tsukasa Kadota, Mina Gochi
       
  • Acute onset hyperammonemic encephalopathy related to fibrolamellar
           carcinoma: another one bites the dust
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Rodrigo C.T. Surjan, Sergio P. Silveira, João Lucas S. Pinheiro, Pedro Henrique S. Pinheiro, Mauricio F.A. Barros, Silvia Regina P. Soares
       
  • E-cigarettes and vaping associated lung injury: a case series and brief
           review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Robert Hilton, Ross Summer, Jesse Roman, Baskaran Sundaram, Gautam George
       
  • An unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding-mycotic aneurysm with
           aortoduodenal fistula
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Chien-Hung Liu, Chun-Kai Fu
       
  • Demethylation of H3K4me2 is inhibited by GCN5-induced acetylation of LSD1
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Mingwen Jiao, Lijian Xia, Jingbo Chen, Zhonghui CuiAbstractBackgroundHistone demethylase lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) potentiates cancer process through inducing demethylation of di-methylation of lysine 4 on histone 3 (H3K4me2). Here, we aimed to investigate whether general control non-depressible 5 (GCN5) has an activity to induce acetylation of LSD1, and the function of acetylated LSD1 was further explored.MethodsImmunoblotting was applied to detect GCN5 and LSD1 in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (SW48 and SNU-C1). GCN5 or LSD1 expression was altered in the cells by transfection. Co-immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays were carried out to examine the association between LSD1 and GCN5. Activity of GCN5 to acetylate LSD1 was determined in vitro. The association between LSD1 and histone was examined, as well as alteration in demethylation of histone, through immunoblotting assay. The complex function of GCN5 and LSD1 was explored by assessing the cellular growth and tumor volume in mice.ResultsLSD1 was acetylated in SW48 and SNU-C1 cells, which was accompanied by the high expression of GCN5. GCN5 induced the acetylation of LSD1 at lysine 433 site. LSD1 has an activity to induce the demethylation of histone, which was not affected by GCN5-induced acetylation. However, GCN5-induced acetylation of LSD1 affected the activity of LSD1 to associate with nucleosome. GCN5 promoted the cellular growth and increased the tumor volume of colon cancer, whereas GCN5-induced acetylation of LSD1 maintained the methylation of histone and repressed cancer process.ConclusionGCN5-induced acetylation of LSD1 impeded progression of colon cancer by inhibiting the demethylation of histone.
       
  • An unexpected case of lagochilascariasis: interdisciplinary management and
           use of 12S and 18S rDNA analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Fernando Martinez-Hernandez, Hector Manuel Prado-Calleros, Juan Pablo Ramirez-Hinojosa, Vladimir Figueroa-Angel, Maria Teresa Lopez-Reynoso, Maria del Carmen Jimenez-Andrade, Isaias Estrada-Moscoso, Nancy Rivas, Javier Escobedo-Ortegon, Ana Flisser, Mirza Romero-Valdovinos, Pablo MaravillaAbstractA Mexican 24-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital due to increased left retroauricular volume with skin fistulisation, resembling an infection by the uncommon worm Lagochilascaris minor. The patient was submitted to lateral skull base surgery. No adult worms or eggs were observed during light and scanning electron microscopy analysis, as well as by histopathologic examination of the small piece of removed tissue, only L3 stage larvae of Lagochilascaris spp. were identified. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequencing assays were performed using primers for the mitochondrial 12S and the nuclear 18S rDNA gene. DNA of some L. minor adults, previously identified, were used as control. The molecular analysis identified the worm as L. minor. According to previous reports, lagochilascariasis is a complicated infection that requires an interdisciplinary management by different clinical specialists. This is the first time that 12S and 18S rDNA genes are reported as molecular markers for diagnosis of L. minor.
       
  • SAPHO Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 1Author(s): Takanobu Hirosawa, Shinichi Katsukura, Taro Shimizu
       
  • Pseudo-Wellens’ Syndrome Temporally Associated With Immune Check
           Point Inhibitors Use
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 1Author(s): Mohamad Muhailan, Ghassan Al-Shbool
       
  • Relation of Decreased Circulating Sortilin Levels With Unfavorable
           Metabolic Profiles in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes
           Mellitus
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 1Author(s): İsmail Demir, Ozden Yildirim Akan, Aslı Guler, Giray Bozkaya, Behnaz Aslanipour, Mehmet CalanAbstractBackgroundSortilin, a pluripotent peptide hormone, plays a role in glucose and lipid metabolism. A link between sortilin and insulin sensitivity has been implicated. However, the clinical implications of this link remain elusive. Our aims were to investigate whether sortilin levels were altered in subjects with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (nT2DM) compared with subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and to determine whether a link exist between sortilin levels and metabolic parameters.Materials and MethodsA total of 150 subjects including 75 nT2DM patients and 75 subjects with NGT who were matched in age, body mass index, and sex were enrolled into this case-control study. The circulating levels of sortilin were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used for diagnosis of T2DM. Metabolic parameters of enrolled subjects were also determined.ResultsThe circulating levels of sortilin were found to be significantly lower in subjects with nT2DM than in controls (138.44 ± 38.39 vs. 184.93 ± 49.67 pg/mL, P < 0.001). Sortilin levels showed a negative correlation with insulin resistance and unfavorable lipid profiles, while they were positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in subjects with nT2DM. Linear regression analysis showed an independent and inverse link between sortilin and insulin resistance and unfavorable lipid profiles. Moreover, logistic regression analysis revealed that the subjects with the lowest sortilin levels had an increased risk of nT2DM compared with those subjects with the highest sortilin levels.ConclusionsDecreased circulating levels of sortilin were associated with unfavorable metabolic profiles in subjects with nT2DM.
       
  • An Exceptional Case of Bilateral Atrophic Squirrhus of Breast
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 359, Issue 1Author(s): Wala Ben Kridis, Afef Khanfir
       
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Marina Kristy Ibraheim, Rukma Reddy Govindu
       
  • Exercise capacity and ventilatory efficiency in patients with pulmonary
           embolism after short duration of anticoagulation therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Dandan Huang, Jian Guo, Wenlan Yang, Jinming LiuAbstractBackgroundAlthough anticoagulation therapy can reduce the risk for pulmonary embolism (PE) recurrence, symptoms such as exertional dyspnea or pain can persist for several months to years. Therefore, we aimed to assess the improvement of ventilatory efficiency and exercise capacity during cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in PE patients after short duration of anticoagulant therapy.MethodsPulmonary function testing (PFT), Arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) and CPET were performed in 30 PE patients after anticoagulant therapy of 4 weeks (early phase) and after 6 months (late phase). In addition, another thirty healthy volunteers underwent the same tests.ResultsPercentage of forced vital capacity (FVC %pred) improvement was evident in the PE group (P
       
  • Arterial Complications Associated with Renal Cell Carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Jack Hua, David Pointer, Jonathan Silberstein, Albert D. Sam
       
  • Posterior mediastinal mature cystic teratoma-Known but Rare Entity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Qianqian Feng, Yan Xiao, Fugang Han
       
  • Collagenous Sprue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Jared Rejeski, Jason Conway, Yi Zhou
       
  • Brachiocephalic Vein Thrombosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Takanobu Hirosawa, Taro Shimizu
       
  • Different statin effects of ST-elevation versus non-ST-elevation acute
           myocardial infarction in Korean after stent implantation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Yong Hoon Kim, Ae-Young Her, Myung Ho Jeong, Byeong-Keuk Kim, Sung-Jin Hong, Seunghwan Kim, Chul-Min Ahn, Jung-Sun Kim, Young-Guk Ko, Donghoon Choi, Myeong-Ki Hong, Yangsoo JangABSTRACTBackgroundIntensive statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome. The data concerning the long-term clinical impacts of statin therapy between ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI (NSTEMI) after drug-eluting stents (DES) implantation are limited. We compared the 2-year clinical outcomes between these two groups after statin therapy.MethodsA total of 30616 Korean acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients were enrolled. Among them, 13686 patients were classified as the group A (STEMI statin user), 3824 patients were as the group B (STEMI statin non-user), 10398 patients were as the group C (NSTEMI statin user), and 2708 patients were as the group D (NSTEMI statin non-user). The major clinical endpoint was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as all-cause death, recurrent myocardial infarction (re-MI), and any repeat revascularization during a 2-year follow-up period.ResultsAfter adjustment, the cumulative risks of MACE (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.112 [1.002-1.235]; P = 0.047), all-cause death (aHR = 1.271 [1.054-1.532]; P = 0.012), and target vessel revascularization (TVR, aHR = 1.262 [1.049-1.518]; P = 0.014) in the group C were significantly higher than group A. The cumulative risks of MACE, all-cause death, and cardiac death of the statin non-user group (group B and D) were significantly higher compared with statin user group (group A and C).ConclusionsStatin therapy was more effective in reducing the cumulative risks of MACE, all-cause death, and TVR in the STEMI group than NSTEMI group in Korean AMI patients after successful DES implantation.
       
  • Thoracic Splenule (Posttraumatic Autotransplantation of Splenic Tissue)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Abdulmonam Ali, Naga Srinivas Sirikonda
       
  • Effects of Half- or Whole-Night Shifts on Physiological and Cognitive
           Parameters in Women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Pinar Cakan, Sedat YildizABSTRACTBackgroundThe study assessed the effects of whole- or half-night shifts on leptin, melatonin, sex hormones, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, hematological parameters, sleep quality and attentional performance in women working in the health sector.Materials and MethodsWomen working whole-night shifts (16:00-08:00 hours, n = 20), half-night shifts (16:00-24:00 hours, n = 20) or day shifts (08:00-16:00 hours, n = 20) participated in the study. Blood pressure, respiratory rate, proximal skin temperature (forehead), blood glucose, leptin, melatonin, estradiol, progesterone, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 concentrations, complete blood count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured in the beginning and at the end of the shifts. The participants filled in sleep quality questionnaires and performed visual attention tests.ResultsHalf- and whole-night shifts caused problems in sleep duration and quality and disturbed the melatonin rhythm. Women working both half- and whole-night shifts had significantly higher nucleated erythrocytes (P = 0.006), eosinophils (P = 0.031), lymphocytes (P = 0.001) and leptin concentrations (P = 0.001) but had lower ESR (P = 0.046) and neutrophil percentage (P = 0.001) than that of day-time workers. Whole-night shifts caused additional changes including lower attentional performance (P = 0.035), lower platelet counts (P = 0.000) and lower estradiol levels (P = 0.029), but higher TNF-α levels (P = 0.000), than the control group. Moreover, whole-night shifts increased IL-1β levels before the shift (P < 0.001) and increased IL-6 levels over the half-night shifts (P < 0.05).ConclusionsHalf-night shifts disturbed sleep parameters and the melatonin rhythm, perturbed blood cell turnover and increased leptin levels. Whole-night shifts caused additional problems including suppressed estradiol, activated inflammatory responses and decreased visual attention. All together, the data suggest that night shifts, especially whole-night shifts, should be refrained from or countermeasures should be taken.
       
  • The American Journal of the Medical Sciences—A Repository of the
           History of American Medicine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Jesse Roman
       
  • THE EVOLUTION OF THE ENZYMATIC DIAGNOSIS OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Todd M. Brown, Sumanth D. Prabhu
       
  • TGF-β and Diabetic Nephropathy: Lessons Learned over the Past 20
           Years
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Leslie S. Gewin
       
  • THE AJMS IN THE BEGINNING – NATHANIEL CHAPMAN, WILLIAM OSLER, AND
           THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Salvatore Mangione
       
  • The AJMS Celebrates # 200!
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Suzanne Oparil
       
  • Renal lipid metabolism and lipotoxicity in diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Laongdao Thongnak, Anchalee Pongchaidecha, Anusorn LungkaphinAbstractThe pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease is a complex process caused by both glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity, due to lipid accumulation. In cases of diabetic animals, lipid deposition is found in both tubular and glomerular portions of the kidneys, which are the major sites of diabetic nephropathy lesions. The aim of this review was to provide insights into the mechanisms that lead to the development of renal lipid accumulation and the effects of renal lipotoxicity in the diabetic condition. An increased number of lipogenic genes and a decreased number of lipid oxidation genes are also detected in diabetic kidneys, both of which lead to lipid accumulation. The induction of oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and apoptosis caused by lipid accumulation and lipid metabolites is called lipotoxicity. Renal lipotoxicity due to derangement in lipid metabolism may be a pathogenic mechanism leading to diabetic nephropathy and renal dysfunction.
       
  • Uric acid level as a predictor of long-term mortality in advanced age
           population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Marwan Abu Sneineh, Yuval Schwartz, Gideon Nesher, Yossi Freier Dror, Gabriel S. BreuerAbstractBackgroundHyperuricemia is associated with the development, progression and outcome of several diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the serum uric acid (UA) levels as predictor of long-term mortality in older population (age 60 years and above).MethodsPatients older than 60 years who were hospitalized in the departments of geriatrics and internal medicine in Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem during a period of 4 months (March-June 2014) were included in this observational study. Association between hyperuricemia and long-term mortality were analyzed using multiple logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regressions analysis.ResultsA total of 624 patients were included in our study with mean age of 77.2 ± 14.6 years. Overall, 381 patients died during the follow up period (61.1%). Mortality rate in the hyperuricemic group (> 7 mg/dl) was higher (69.1%) than in the normo-uricemic group 58.4%. (P = .004). The median survival for hyperuricemic patients was significantly shorter compared to normo-uricemic patients (606 and 1018 days, respectively, P < .0001). High levels of UA were significantly associated with higher long-term mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease at their admission (P < .000).ConclusionsElevated levels of UA in older patients in acute settings is a predictor of long-term mortality.
       
  • Pulmonary Mycobacterium Spindle Cell Pseudotumor in Patient with Liver
           Transplant
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Supavit Chesdachai, Prowpanga Udompap, Faqian Li, John R Lake, Mandip KCAbstractWe report a case of liver transplant patient who presented with lung masses, found to be Mycobacterium spindle cell pseudotumors. The masses demonstrated hypermetabolic activities on positron emission tomography. Core biopsy revealed sheets of spindle histiocytic cells with abundant acid-fast bacilli identified as Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex. This finding is a rare presentation of Mycobacterium infection, mainly non-tuberculous Mycobaterium. It is characterized by a benign, spindle cell mass-forming reaction. Most of the reported cases had acquired immune deficiency syndrome or organ transplant. Histopathology illustrating the proliferation of spindle cell shaped histiocytes containing numerous acid-fast bacilli is the gold standard for diagnosis. The standard treatment has not been well established; previously reported cases followed the standard treatment for Mycobacterium based on organ involvement. Our case is the first case to our knowledge that reports pulmonary Mycobacterium spindle cell pseudotumors in a liver transplant recipient.
       
  • Severe pneumonia advanced to lung abscess and empyema due to Rothia
           mucilaginosa in an immunocompetent patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Ling Yang, Ting Liu, Bi-Cui Liu, Chun-Tao Liu
       
  • Differential expression of renin-angiotensin system-related components in
           patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Yuangang Wu, Mingyang Li, Jun Zeng, Zhanzhan Feng, Jing Yang, Bin Shen, Yi ZengAbstractBackgroundThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-related components, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and atrial metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in synovial tissue and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA).MethodsThirty-four patients with RA and 41 patients with OA were included in the study. Renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), VEGF and MMP-13 protein levels in the synovial fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). qRT-PCR analysis, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 and type 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R), VEGF and MMP-13 in OA and RA. Additionally, the correlation was determined by Pearson's coefficient.ResultsIn synovial fluid, expression levels of renin, ACE, VEGF and MMP-13 in patients with RA were significantly higher than those in patients with OA. In synovial tissue, the RAS components VEGF and MMP-13 were also elevated in patients with RA. The results of immunohistochemistry in synovial tissue also showed that the RAS components VEGF and MMP-13 were significantly increased in patients with RA. Notably, the Pearson coefficient demonstrated that the levels of the RAS components were positively correlated with the expression of VEGF and MMP-13 in OA and RA.ConclusionsThe present results suggest that RAS-related components in RA and OA, including renin, ACE, AT1R and AT2R, are associated with increased expression of VEGF and play an important role in angiogenesis. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between the expression of VEGF and MMP-13.
       
  • Hydrogen Studies at ClinicalTrials.gov: The Dawn of a New
           Era'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Sergej M. Ostojic
       
  • Girolamo Fabrici d'Acquapendente and the Oplomochlion: the several
           applications of an effective rehabilitation tool
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Carlo Biz, Alessandro Brunati, Elisa Belluzzi, Pietro Ruggieri, Stefano Masiero, Maurizio Rippa BonatiAbstractGirolamo Fabrici d'Acquapendente (1533-1619) was an Italian anatomist, surgeon and physiologist and a protagonist of the scientific revolution of the Renaissance. He made anatomy a scientific discipline and is justly considered a precursor of modern orthopaedics. He invented and used several external corrective devices for the treatment of congenital and acquired deformities of the limbs and spinal column, especially those following tubercular infection and rickets, torticollis, vertebral caries kyphosis, scoliosis, and rachitic deformities of the leg, but also congenital dislocation of the hip and congenital club-foot. He ascribed the pathogenesis of the equinovarus supinated foot to the position taken by the foot of the fetus during intrauterine life. The Oplomochlion, shown in the Operationes chirurgicae and attributed to Fabrici, is actually a collection of very diverse orthotic, prosthetic and surgical metal instruments invented by Fabrici and arranged with a demonstrative purpose and a topographic criterion, as if on an exhibition dummy.
       
  • The potential protective effects of diosmin on streptozotocin-induced
           diabetic cardiomyopathy in rats
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: The American Journal of the Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Tarek Mohamed Ali, Osama M. Abo-Salem, Basem Hassan El Esawy, Ahmed El AskaryAbstractBackgroundDiabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a non-ischemic myocardial disorder characterized by metabolic disturbances and oxidative stress in diabetic patients. The present paper aims to determine the protective effect of the phlebotrophic drug, diosmin, on DCM in a model of high-fat diet-fed and streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes in the rat.Materials and MethodsThe animals were divided into 4 groups (8 rats/group) as follows: vehicle-treated non-diabetic control group, vehicle-treated diabetic group, diosmin (50 mg/kg)-treated diabetic group and diosmin (100 mg/kg)-treated diabetic group. Treatment was given once daily orally by gavage for 6 weeks. Oxidant and anti-oxidant stress markers, inflammatory markers and pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic gene expression using quantified real-time polymerase chain reaction were investigated.ResultsDiosmin treatment in diabetic rats lowered elevated blood glucose levels, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, cardiac creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymes, cardiac malondialdehyde and nitric oxide. Moreover, diosmin increased plasma insulin and c-peptide levels, cardiac glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase activities. Also, diosmin treatment significantly (P < 0.05) lowered the levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), down-regulated cardiac Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase 3 and 9 and up-regulated B-cell lymphoma 2 mRNA expression levels.ConclusionsDiosmin may have a sizeable therapeutic potential in the treatment of DCM due to antidiabetic, antioxidative stress, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects. Detailed studies are needed to disclose the precise mechanisms motivating the protective effect of diosmin‏.
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.232.125.29
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-