for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 7706 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (196 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (111 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (318 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (21 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (208 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (258 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (155 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (115 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (145 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (38 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (171 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (128 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (145 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (147 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (94 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (1960 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (314 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (191 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (357 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (126 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (153 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (81 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (100 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (254 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (149 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (780 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (186 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (96 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (66 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (74 journals)
    - SURGERY (369 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (138 journals)

MEDICAL SCIENCES (1960 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 3562 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access  
3D Printing in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ABCS Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
ACIMED     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Acta Bio Medica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Bioethica     Open Access  
Acta Bioquimica Clinica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Facultatis Medicae Naissensis     Open Access  
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Medica (Hradec Králové)     Open Access  
Acta Medica Bulgarica     Open Access  
Acta Medica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Médica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Medica Indonesiana     Open Access  
Acta Medica International     Open Access  
Acta medica Lituanica     Open Access  
Acta Medica Marisiensis     Open Access  
Acta Medica Martiniana     Open Access  
Acta Medica Nagasakiensia     Open Access  
Acta Medica Peruana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Médica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Acta Medica Saliniana     Open Access  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Acupuncture and Natural Medicine     Open Access  
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adıyaman Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi / Health Sciences Journal of Adıyaman University     Open Access  
Adnan Menderes Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advanced Health Care Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Science, Engineering and Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Medical Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Molecular Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access  
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Regenerative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Wound Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
AJOB Primary Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
AJSP: Reviews & Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical Journal     Open Access  
Alexandria Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription  
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Biomedical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Biomedicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Chinese Medicine, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Clinical Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Managed Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Medical Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
American Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American medical news     Free   (Followers: 3)
American Medical Writers Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Amyloid: The Journal of Protein Folding Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Anales de la Facultad de Medicina     Open Access  
Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguay     Open Access  
Anales del Sistema Sanitario de Navarra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Anatolian Clinic the Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Anatomical Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Anatomy     Open Access  
Anatomy Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ankara Medical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ankara Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Mecmuası     Open Access  
Annales de Pathologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales françaises d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie et de Pathologie Cervico-faciale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Annals of Biomedical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Antibiotics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Antibodies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Antibody Technology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuradhapura Medical Journal     Open Access  
Anwer Khan Modern Medical College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Apmis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Clinical Research, Clinical Trials and Regulatory Affairs     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Medical Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arak Medical University Journal     Open Access  
Archive of Clinical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives Medical Review Journal / Arşiv Kaynak Tarama Dergisi     Open Access  
Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medical Laboratory Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archivos de Medicina (Manizales)     Open Access  
ArgoSpine News & Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências da Saúde     Open Access  
Arquivos de Medicina     Open Access  
Ars Medica : Revista de Ciencias Médicas     Open Access  
ARS Medica Tomitana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Arterial Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Artificial Intelligence in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Artificial Organs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ASHA Leader     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asian Bioethics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asian Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Pharmaceutical Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention     Open Access  
ASPIRATOR : Journal of Vector-borne Disease Studies     Open Access  
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Atención Familiar     Open Access  
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atti della Accademia Peloritana dei Pericolanti - Classe di Scienze Medico-Biologiche     Open Access  
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Auris Nasus Larynx     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Autopsy and Case Reports     Open Access  
Avicenna     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Avicenna Journal of Clinical Medicine     Open Access  
Avicenna Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Biochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover
American Journal of Medicine
Number of Followers: 45  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-9343 - ISSN (Online) 1555-7162
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3159 journals]
  • Ethico-Legal Challenges of Drug Packing—A Case Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Elijah Verheyen, Tal Shachi, Karan Sud, Bashar Mourad, Paru Patrawalla
       
  • Estimating Time Physicians and Other Health Care Workers Spend with
           Patients in an Intensive Care Unit Using a Sensor Network
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Rachel Butler, Mauricio Monsalve, Geb W. Thomas, Ted Herman, Alberto M. Segre, Philip M. Polgreen, Manish Suneja BackgroundTime and motion studies have been used to investigate how much time various health care professionals spend with patients as opposed to performing other tasks. However, the majority of such studies are done in outpatient settings, and rely on surveys (which are subject to recall bias) or human observers (which are subject to observation bias). Our goal was to accurately measure the time physicians, nurses, and critical support staff in a medical intensive care unit spend in direct patient contact, using a novel method that does not rely on self-report or human observers.MethodsWe used a network of stationary and wearable mote-based sensors to electronically record location and contacts among health care workers and patients under their care in a 20-bed intensive care unit for a 10-day period covering both day and night shifts. Location and contact data were used to classify the type of task being performed by health care workers.ResultsFor physicians, 14.73% (17.96%) of their time in the unit during the day shift (night shift) was spent in patient rooms, compared with 40.63% (30.09%) spent in the physician work room; the remaining 44.64% (51.95%) of their time was spent elsewhere. For nurses, 32.97% (32.85%) of their time on unit was spent in patient rooms, with an additional 11.34% (11.79%) spent just outside patient rooms. They spent 11.58% (13.16%) of their time at the nurses' station and 23.89% (24.34%) elsewhere in the unit. From a patient's perspective, we found that care times, defined as time with at least one health care worker of a designated type in their intensive care unit room, were distributed as follows: 13.11% (9.90%) with physicians, 86.14% (88.15%) with nurses, and 8.14% (7.52%) with critical support staff (eg, respiratory therapists, pharmacists).ConclusionsPhysicians, nurses, and critical support staff spend very little of their time in direct patient contact in an intensive care unit setting, similar to reported observations in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Not surprisingly, nurses spend far more time with patients than physicians. Additionally, physicians spend more than twice as much time in the physician work room (where electronic medical record review and documentation occurs) than the time they spend with all of their patients combined.
       
  • Association of Anemia with Venous Thromboembolism in Acutely Ill
           Hospitalized Patients: An APEX Trial Substudy
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Gerald Chi, C. Michael Gibson, Adrian F. Hernandez, Russell D. Hull, Syed Hassan A. Kazmi, Ahmed Younes, Sargun S. Walia, Anmol Pitliya, Amandeep Singh, Farima Kahe, Arzu Kalayci, Tarek Nafee, Mathieu Kerneis, Fahad AlKhalfan, Alexander T. Cohen, Robert A. Harrington, Samuel Z. Goldhaber BackgroundAnemia is a common finding and independent predictor for adverse outcomes in hospitalized patients with medical illness. It remains unclear whether anemia is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism and whether the presence of anemia can refine risk assessment for prediction of venous thromboembolism, thereby adding incremental utility to a validated model.MethodsIn the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban trial (APEX), 7513 hospitalized medical patients were randomized to receive either betrixaban or standard-of-care enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis. Baseline hemoglobin concentrations were obtained in 6861 patients, with a follow-up of 77 days. Symptomatic venous thromboembolism events, including symptomatic deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and venous thromboembolism–related mortality, were compared between low-hemoglobin and normal-hemoglobin groups (normal range: 12.5-17.0 g/dL for males and 11.0-15.5 g/dL for females). The relationship between anemia and venous thromboembolism events was assessed by fitting a univariable and multivariable logistic regression model composed of thromboprophylaxis and risk factors. Venous thromboembolism risk refinement by hemoglobin measurement was evaluated in the International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism (IMPROVE) risk assessment model.ResultsLow hemoglobin at baseline was associated with a greater risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (relative risk [RR] 1.94 [95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.98]; P = .002), symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (RR 2.29 [1.12-4.68]; P = .019), and nonfatal pulmonary embolism (RR 2.63 [1.22-5.65]; P = .010) but not venous thromboembolism–related mortality (RR 1.47 [0.71-3.04]; P = .30). After adjusting for thromboprophylaxis, history of previous venous thromboembolism, intensive or coronary unit admission, and D-dimer, low hemoglobin (as a categorical or continuous variable) remained associated with an increased likelihood of venous thromboembolism (adjusted odds ratio 1.71 [95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.69]; P = .020). Low hemoglobin also improved risk discrimination and reclassification after inclusion in the IMPROVE model.ConclusionsAnemia was independently associated with a greater risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolism among acutely ill medical patients despite the provision of thromboprophylaxis. Hemoglobin measurement also improved risk stratification by the IMPROVE venous thromboembolism risk score.
       
  • Reducing Hospital Toxicity: Impact on Patient Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Richard V. Milani, Robert M. Bober, Carl J. Lavie, Jonathan K. Wilt, Alexander R. Milani, Christopher J. White BackgroundCircadian rhythms are endogenous 24-hour oscillations in biologic processes that drive nearly all physiologic and behavioral functions. Disruption in circadian rhythms can adversely impact short- and long-term health outcomes. Routine hospital care often causes significant disruption in sleep-wake patterns that is further compounded by loss of personal control of health information and health decisions. We wished to evaluate measures directed at improving circadian rhythm and access to daily health information on hospital outcomes.MethodsWe evaluated 3425 consecutive patients admitted to a medical-surgical unit comprised of an intervention wing (n = 1185) or standard control wing (n = 2240) over a 2.5-year period. Intervention patients received measures to improve sleep that included reduction of nighttime noise, delay of routine morning phlebotomy, passive vital sign monitoring, and use of red-enriched lighting after sunset, as well as access to daily health information utilizing an inpatient portal.ResultsIntervention patients accessed the inpatient portal frequently during hospitalization seeking personal health and care team information. Measures impacting the quality and quantity of sleep were significantly improved. Length of stay was 8.6hours less (P = .04), 30- and 90-day readmission rates were 16% and 12% lower, respectively (both P ≤ .02), and self-rated emotional/mental health was higher (69.2% vs 52.4%; P = 0.03) in the intervention group compared with controls.ConclusionsModest changes in routine hospital care can improve the hospital environment impacting sleep and access to health knowledge, leading to improvements in hospital outcomes. Sleep-wake patterns of hospitalized patients represent a potential avenue for further enhancing hospital quality and safety.
       
  • A Worm Hole: Liver Abscess in Ascariasis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Mohd Ilyas, Mohd Yaqoob Wani, Kifayat Hussain Ganaie, Gh. Mohammad Wani, Musaib Ahmad Dar
       
  • Caught in the Act: Thrombus Wedged in a Patent Foramen Ovale
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Yasmeen K. Tandon, Prasanna Sengodan, Narendrakumar Alappan, Gustavo A. Heresi, Michael Zhen-Yu Tong, Rahul D. Renapurkar
       
  • At the Root: Cutaneous Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Roberto Maglie, Margherita Vannucchi, Lavinia Quintarelli, Marzia Caproni, Daniela Massi, Emiliano Antiga
       
  • Chamber-Made: Mural Endocarditis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Christine Rutlen, Srikanth Vallurupalli
       
  • Blood Is Thicker: Hyperviscosity Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Rabih M. Geha, Lawrence M. Tierney
       
  • Breaking Away: Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolus
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Carlo Foppiano Palacios, David J. Riedel
       
  • Optimizing Order Entry Automaticity Reduces Inpatient Laboratory
           Utilization
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Alison B. Lane, Sara L. Robinson, Nora C.E. Maddy, William T. Shimeall, Brett W. Sadowski
       
  • Oral Anticoagulation for Primary Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism in
           Patients with Cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Wilbert S. Aronow, Tatyana A. Shamliyan
       
  • Contemporary Management of Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: A Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Yader Sandoval, Paul Sorajja, Kevin M. Harris Ischemic mitral regurgitation occurs relatively frequently in patients with coronary artery disease and is associated with an increased long-term risk. The pathophysiology of ischemic mitral regurgitation is vexing and poses both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, leading to the need for a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The management is largely focused on medical therapy, and for those eligible, coronary revascularization or cardiac resynchronization therapy may be considered. In select patients, mitral valve surgery or catheter-based therapy may be undertaken with careful consideration of the underlying pathophysiology, surgical risk, and expected long-term outcomes. The appropriate evaluation of patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation involves a careful multidisciplinary approach that carefully considers symptomatology, the etiology and severity of the mitral regurgitation, and the assessment of comorbidities and operative risk to individualize the care of these patients.
       
  • Emerging Trends in Pain Medication Management: Back to the Future: A
           Focus on Ketamine
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Meredith W. Crumb, Candace Bryant, Timothy J. Atkinson Providers face many challenges when faced with pain management. Pain is complex, difficult to understand and diagnose, and especially enigmatic to manage. The discovery of nonopioid agents for pain management has become particularly important considering the ongoing opioid epidemic. This review is focused on revisiting ketamine, an agent that has historically been used for anesthesia, in new ways to manage pain. Ketamine has unique pharmacologic properties that may prevent the development of pain as well as reduce chronic pain. This has led to the use of ketamine for perioperative analgesia as well as chronic pain syndromes. In select patients with pain refractory to other treatment modalities, ketamine may provide much needed relief.
       
  • Brain Tumors
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): J. Ricardo McFaline-Figueroa, Eudocia Q. Lee Brain tumors are common, requiring general medical providers to have a basic understanding of their diagnosis and management. The most prevalent brain tumors are intracranial metastases from systemic cancers, meningiomas, and gliomas, specifically, glioblastoma. Central nervous system metastases may occur anywhere along the neuroaxis, and require complex multidisciplinary care with neurosurgery, radiation oncology, and medical oncology. Meningiomas are tumors of the meninges, mostly benign and often managed by surgical resection, with radiation therapy and chemotherapy reserved for high-risk or refractory disease. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor, with a limited response to standard-of-care concurrent chemoradiation. The new classification of gliomas relies on molecular features, as well as histology, to arrive at an “integrated diagnosis” that better captures prognosis. This manuscript will review the most common brain tumors with an emphasis on their diagnosis, oncologic management, and management of medical complications.
       
  • Do Most Obese People with Exercise Intolerance and a Normal Ejection
           Fraction Have Treatable Heart Failure'
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Milton Packer
       
  • House Calls
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): William H. Frishman
       
  • Social Media and Physician Conflict of Interest
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Cian P. McCarthy, Matthew DeCamp, John W. McEvoy
       
  • Work–Life Balance, Burnout, and the Electronic Health Record
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Andrew George Alexander, Kenneth Alan Ballou
       
  • Socrates on Quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Strength in Numbers: A Team-Based Approach to Managing Patients with
           Hyponatremia
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Kirkwood Adams, Michelle Kearney, Kiwon Lee, Denise Rhoney, K. Melissa Smith This virtual patient panel provides learners with real-world application of best practices among various members of the healthcare team in the management of patients with hyponatremia. A patient case is provided, followed by discussion among the team members to provide insight into and context for why particular courses of action were chosen. (Online access: https://courses.elseviercme.com/hyponatremia17).
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Larry A. Weinrauch, John A. D'Elia, Matthew R. Weir, Suphamai Bunnapradist, Peter V. Finn, Jiankang Liu, Brian Claggett, Anthony P. Monaco
       
  • New Onset Diabetes After Transplant: Data from the Folic Acid for Vascular
           Outcome Reduction in Transplantation Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Amisha Wallia, Mark E. Molitch
       
  • Concerning A Service Commitment to Fund Your Medical Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Louis N. Pangaro, William Gilliland, Leon Moores, Lisa Moores
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Adopting the Quadruple Aim: The University of Rochester Medical Center
           Experience: Moving from Physician Burnout to Physician Resilience
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Allen P. Anandarajah, Timothy E. Quill, Michael R. Privitera BackgroundThe high rates of burnout among medical professionals in the United States are well documented. The reasons for burnout and the factors that contribute to physician resilience among health care providers in academic centers, however, are less well studied.MethodsHealth care providers at a large academic center were surveyed to measure their degree of burnout and callousness and identify associated factors. Additional questions evaluated features linked to resilience. The survey assessed demographic variables, work characteristics, qualifications, experience, and citizenship.ResultsA total of 528 surveys were sent out; 469 providers responded, and 444 (84%) completed the survey. High burnout was reported by 214 providers (45.6%), and callousness was noted among 163 (34.8%). Rates of burnout and callousness were higher among advanced practice providers than physicians. Lack of support, lack of respect, and problems with work-life balance were themes significantly associated with a risk for burnout. Rates of burnout (P < .05) and callousness (P < .001) were also significantly higher among those who spent more than 80% of their time in patient care. Participation in patient care was the most sustaining factor, followed by teamwork, scholarly activities, autonomy, and medicine as a calling.ConclusionsAcademic physicians enjoy patient care and value scholarly activities, but lack of support, lack of respect, workload, and problems with work-life balance prevent them from finding a sense of meaning in their professional work. Changes at the organizational level are needed to overcome these impediments and recreate joy in the practice of medicine.
       
  • Acute Onset Unilateral Proptosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Firas El Chaer, Zeba N. Singh, Ying Zou, Pranshu Mohindra, Maria R. Baer, Jennie Y. Law
       
  • Persistent Profound Lactic Acidosis: an Unusual Case
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Eric A. Coomes, Steven Shadowitz
       
  • Sudden Creatine Kinase Elevation When an Athlete Starts Boxing: Looking
           Deeper Prior to Knocking the Statin Out
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Aakash Bavishi, Travis Howard, Amanda Rosen, Neil J. Stone
       
  • Purulent Pneumococcal Pericarditis: An Uncommon Presentation in the
           Vaccination Era
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Bruno Ali Lopez Luis, Dehydra Monserratt Leon-Tavares
       
  • Acute Epigastric Pain as the Cause of Urgent Gastrectomy in a Healthy
           Patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Estela Soria López, Ana Villar Puertas, Yolanda María Sánchez Rodríguez, Francisco Granados Pacheco, José Miguel Rosales Zábal, Fátima Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Teresa Pereda Salguero, Francisco Martín Carvajal, Julio Bercedo Martínez
       
  • Unusual Cause of Persistent Cough: 'Pill Aspiration'
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Simant Singh Thapa, Himmat Grewal, Kevin Martin
       
  • Pulmonary Tumor Microembolism: When the Pathologist Looks Further Than the
           Radiologist
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 131, Issue 8Author(s): Julien De Greef, Philippe Hainaut
       
  • Weight Gain and Health Affliction Among Former National Football League
           Players
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Timothy W. Churchill, Supriya Krishnan, Marc Weisskopf, Brandon Yates, Frank E. Speizer, Jonathan H. Kim, Lee E. Nadler, Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Ross Zafonte, Aaron L. Baggish BackgroundProfessional American-style football players are among the largest athletes across contemporary sporting disciplines, and weight gain during the years of football participation is common. At present, the health implications of this early-life weight gain remain incompletely understood. We sought to define weight trajectories of former professional American-style football athletes and to establish their relationship with 5 health afflictions common in this population (cardiovascular disease, cardiometabolic disease, neurocognitive impairment, sleep apnea, and chronic pain).MethodsA comprehensive health survey was distributed to former National Football League (NFL) players. Former players reported body weight at 4 key time points (high school, college, professional, and time of survey response) as well as maximal retirement weight. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between weight gain during and after football participation with health affliction.ResultsIn this cohort of former NFL players (n=3,506, age 53±14 years), mean total weight increase from high school to time of survey response was 40±36 pounds, with the majority of weight gain occurring during and not after football participation. The prevalence of self-reported health afflictions ranged from 9% for cardiovascular disease to 28% for chronic pain. Weight gain during periods of active football participation (high school to college and college to professional) was independently associated with risk of multiple later life health afflictions in models adjusted for football exposure, post-career lifestyle variables, and post-career weight gain.ConclusionsEarly-life weight gain among American-style football athletes is common and is associated with risk of adverse health profiles during later-life. These findings establish football-associated weight gain as a key predictor of post-career health and raise important questions about the central role of targeted weight gain in this population.
       
  • Fast, broad, and irregular: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Rakhee R. Makhija, Theodore Chow, Sandhya Venugopal, Ezra A. Amsterdam
       
  • B Minus: Wernicke's Encephalopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Christopher L. Robinson, Jayshil J. Patel 
       
  • The Fourth Edition of the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Quite a Stretch: Internal Oblique Muscle Hematoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Wen-Shan Chiu, Yu-Jang Su, Chih-Chun Huang
       
  • Medical Tourists: Incoming and Outgoing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): James E. Dalen, Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Contemporary Management and Outcomes of Patients with Massive and
           Submassive Pulmonary Embolism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Eric Secemsky, Yuchiao Chang, C. Charles Jain, Joshua A. Beckman, Jay Giri, Michael R. Jaff, Kenneth Rosenfield, Rachel Rosovsky, Christopher Kabrhel, Ido Weinberg Background: Few contemporary studies have assessed the management and outcomes of patients with massive and submassive pulmonary embolism. Given advances in therapy, we report contemporary practice patterns and event rates among these patients.Methods: We analyzed a prospective database of patients with massive and submassive pulmonary embolism. We report clinical characteristics, therapies and outcomes stratified by pulmonary embolism type. Treatment escalation beyond systemic anticoagulation was defined as advanced therapy. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify predictors of 90-day mortality.Results: Among 338 patients, 46 (13.6%) presented with massive and 292 (86.4%) with submassive pulmonary embolism. The average age was 63±15 years, 49.9% were female, 32.0% had malignancy and 21.9% had recent surgery. Massive pulmonary embolism patients received advanced therapy in 71.7% (30.4% systemic thrombolysis; 17.4% catheter-directed thrombolysis; 15.2% surgical embolectomy) and had greater 90-day mortality rates compared with submassive pulmonary embolism patients (41.3% versus 12.3%, respectively; p
       
  • An Oscillating Thrombus Inside the Inferior Vena Cava
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Christos Tourmousoglou, Gerasimos Gogas, Dimitrios Siskos, Dimitrios Zioutas
       
  • A Missing Link: Sarcoid-lymphoma syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Anand Kumthekar, Philipp W. Raess, Daniela Ghetie
       
  • A HOARSE WARNING: ORTNER'S SYNDROME
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Meng Ying Sim, Yong Chean Lim, Stephen Ching-Tung So, Junwei Zhang, Desmond B. Teo
       
  • Introduction to Neurogenetics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Angeliki Vgontzas, William Renthal Genetic variation can directly cause or increase susceptibility to neurological diseases. An explosion of new genetic technologies has enabled the characterization of specific genes responsible for many neurological diseases and has provided fundamentally new insight into their pathophysiology. These advancements, along with recent breakthroughs in gene therapy, are beginning to result in the translation of an individual's genetic sequence into targeted treatment strategies. This review aims to introduce key genetic concepts and to illustrate how these principles apply in cases of rare, single-gene neurological diseases as well as more common, polygenic diseases that are encountered frequently in clinical practice.
       
  • Advanced Therapies for Massive Pulmonary Embolism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): James E. Dalen
       
  • Serotonin Syndrome Masquerading as Ventricular Tachycardia Storm
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Ramzi Dudum, M. Imran Aslam, Jose Madrazo
       
  • Reform in House Staff Working Hours and Clinical Supervision: A Thirty
           Year Reflection following the Release of the Bell Commission Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): William H. Frishman, Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Misconceptions and Facts about Takotsubo Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Mario Rodríguez, Wojciech Rzechorzek, Eyal Herzog, Thomas F. Lüscher
       
  • See one, be one, teach one: How becoming a patient informed my role as a
           teaching physician
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Heather A. Thompson Buum
       
  • Motor Neuron Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Laura A. Foster, Mohammad Kian Salajegheh Patients with motor neuron diseases may present to primary care clinic or may be initially encountered in the inpatient setting. Timely diagnosis of these conditions is a key factor in early intervention and therapy, and accuracy of diagnosis is of extreme importance, in particular for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with its poor prognosis. The aim of this review article is to provide a clinical and diagnostic framework for the diagnosis and evaluation of motor neuron disease for primary care physicians.
       
  • A dangerous entrapment: pelvic aneurysms causing hydronephrosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Ami Schattner, Ina Dubin, Yair Glick
       
  • Career-Focused Mentoring for Early-Career Clinician Educators in Academic
           General Internal Medicine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Jonathan D. Kirsch, Alisa Duran, Alexander M. Kaizer, Heather Thompson Buum, William N. Robiner, Anne Marie Weber-Main
       
  • Not All It's CrAg-ed Up to Be: Disseminated Cryptococcosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Jessica Haraga, Melissa LeBlanc, Joseph Chiovaro
       
  • A Unifying Diagnosis: IgG4-Related Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Rachel Broderick, Angeliki Kazeros, Ainat Beniaminovitz, Ladan Fazlollahi, Pauline Yi, David Brogno, Katherine G Nickerson
       
  • Ideal cardiovascular health is inversely associated with non-alcoholic
           fatty liver disease: a prospective analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Long Wang, Mian Li, Zhiyun Zhao, Min Xu, Jieli Lu, Tiange Wang, Yuhong Chen, Shuangyuan Wang, Meng Dai, Yanan Hou, Xueyan Wu, Lina Ma, Lin Li, Shanshan Liu, Weiqing Wang, Yu Xu, Yufang Bi, Guang NingBackground and AimsCardiovascular health has been proved to be associated with major cardiometabolic diseases. However, little is known of associations between cardiovascular health and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).MethodsWe included 3,424 adults aged ≥40 years who were free of NAFLD at baseline from a community cohort followed for up to 5 years. Liver ultrasonography was conducted at baseline and at follow-up to diagnose incident NAFLD. Six metrics including smoking, physical activity, body-mass index, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting glucose were used to define cardiovascular health status. Associations of individual cardiovascular health metrics, number of cardiovascular health metrics, and overall cardiovascular health status at baseline, as well as changes in cardiovascular health during follow-up with risks of developing NAFLD were examined.ResultsA total of 649 participants developed NAFLD during follow-up. Risks of NAFLD reduced in a dose-response manner in participants with 3-4 ideal cardiovascular health metrics (odds ratio, OR 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI 0.41-0.61) and in participants with 5-6 ideal metrics (OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.22-0.51) compared with participants with 0-2 ideal metrics. An overall ideal or intermediate cardiovascular health was associated with 37% reduction in developing NAFLD compared with poor cardiovascular health. In addition, improving cardiovascular health during follow-up reduced the risk by 71% compared with deteriorating cardiovascular health. Furthermore, an overall ideal or intermediate cardiovascular health was significantly associated with lower fibrosis score in NAFLD patients compared with an overall poor cardiovascular health.ConclusionIdeal cardiovascular health was inversely associated with risks of NAFLD. While treatment of NAFLD and subsequent inflammation and fibrosis remains a challenge, cardiovascular health goals should be advocated for NAFLD prevention.
       
  • Intracardiac Metastasis as the Initial Presentation of Non Small Cell Lung
           Cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Carmel Moazez, Emily Howard, Azar Mehdizadeh, Raina Roy, Surabhi Amar
       
  • Are We Ready to Practice Lifestyle Medicine'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): James M. Rippe
       
  • The Meaning of Vermoulu in Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Leonard J. Hoenig
       
  • Public awareness and perceptions of palliative and comfort care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Trevor Lane, Deepa Ramadurai, Joseph Simonetti
       
  • Role of High-Dose Beta-Blockers in Patients with Heart Failure with
           Preserved Ejection Fraction and Elevated Heart Rate: High-dose
           beta-blocker and outcomes in HFpEF
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Phillip H. Lam, Neha Gupta, Daniel J. Dooley, Steven Singh, Prakash Deedwania, Michael R. Zile, Deepak L. Bhatt, Charity J. Morgan, Bertram Pitt, Gregg C. Fonarow, Ali Ahmed BackgroundBeta-blockers in high target doses are recommended for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) but not for preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Treatment benefits are often more pronounced in high-risk subgroups, and HFpEF patients with heart rate ≥70 beats/minute have emerged as such a high-risk subgroup. We examined associations of high-dose beta-blocker use with outcomes in these patients.MethodsOf the 8462 hospitalized patients with HFpEF (ejection fraction ≥50%) in Medicare-linked OPTIMIZE-HF registry, 5422 had discharge heart rate ≥70 beats/minute. Of these, 4537 had no contraindications to beta-blocker use, of which 2797 (2592 with dose data) received prescriptions for beta-blockers. Of the 2592, 730 received high-dose beta-blockers, defined as atenolol ≥100 mg/day, carvedilol ≥50 mg/day, metoprolol tartrate or succinate ≥200 mg/day, or bisoprolol ≥10 mg/day, and 1740 received no beta-blockers. Using propensity scores for the receipt of high-dose beta-blockers, we assembled a matched cohort of 1280 patients, balanced on 58 characteristics.ResultsAll-cause mortality occurred in 63% and 68% of matched patients receiving high-dose beta-blocker versus no beta-blocker during 6 years (median, 2.8) of follow-up, respectively (hazard ratio {HR}, 0.86; 95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.75–0.98; p=0.027). HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause readmission and the combined endpoint of all-cause readmission or all-cause mortality associated with high-dose beta-blocker use were 0.90 (0.81–1.02) and 0.89 (0.80–1.00), respectively.ConclusionsIn patients with HFpEF and heart rate ≥70 beats/minute, high-dose beta-blocker use was associated with a significantly lower risk of death. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to examine this association.
       
  • Applying Evidence-Based Medicine to Shared Decision Making: Value of
           Restricted Mean Survival Time
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Zachary R. McCaw, Ariela R. Orkaby, Lee-Jen Wei, Dae Hyun Kim, Michael W. Rich 
       
  • Dementia and Atrial Fibrillation: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and
           Therapeutic Implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Romain Chopard, Gregory Piazza, Seth Alan Gale, Umberto Campia, Ida Ehlers Albertsen, Jisoo Kim, Samuel Z. Goldhaber Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke by a factor of 4- to 5-fold, and dementia is a common consequence of stroke. However, atrial fibrillation has been associated with cognitive impairment and dementia, even in patients without prior overt stroke. Non-ischemic mechanisms include cerebral hypoperfusion, vascular inflammation, brain atrophy, genetic factors, and shared risk factors such as age or hypertension. Critical appraisal of studies evaluating the association between atrial fibrillation and dementia in stroke-free patients reveals that several suffer from methodological issues, such as not including silent stroke or anticoagulation therapy in multivariate analyses. Some studies show a close relationship between atrial fibrillation and dementia due to silent stroke, in the absence of overt stroke. Evidence is accumulating that anticoagulation may be effective to decrease the risk of dementia in atrial fibrillation patients. Overall, the pathogenesis linking atrial fibrillation to dementia is likely multifactorial. Cerebral infarctions, including silent stroke play a central role. These findings underscore the importance of stroke prevention measures in atrial fibrillation patients.
       
  • The Necessity of Sham Controls
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Vinay Prasad, Adam S. Cifu
       
  • Febrile Calcinosis in Scleroderma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Allan C. Gelber, Michael I. Brener, Kaelin O'Connell, Michael Wu, Julie J. Paik, Jemima F. Albayda
       
  • Recertification: A Tale of Good Intentions but Lots of Strife
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): James J Glazier, Amir Kaki
       
  • After the Match: Cultivating a Community of Support, Retention and
           Mentoring to Enhance Diversity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): C. Colford, M.S. Kraemer, M. Contarino, N. Denizard-Thompson, K. Evans, K. Hairston, R. Harris, D. Mcneill
       
  • More Sub-subs are Coming!
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): James E. Dalen, Kenneth J. Ryan, Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Pectus Excavatum and Right Ventricular Compression in a Young Athlete with
           Syncope
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Alejandro E De Feria, Navkaranbir S Bajaj, Donna M Polk, Akshay S Desai, Ron Blankstein, Muthiah Vaduganathan 
       
  • Vitamin D Status and Exercise Capacity in Older Patients with Heart
           Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Ambarish Pandey, Dalane W Kitzman, Denise K Houston, Haiying Chen, M Kyla Shea Background: Older patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) have severe exercise intolerance. Vitamin D may play a role in cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function, and may therefore be implicated in exercise intolerance in HFpEF. However, there are few data on vitamin D status and its relationship to exercise capacity in HFpEF patients.Methods: Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and exercise capacity [peak oxygen consumption, (VO2), 6-minute walk distance] were measured in 112 older HFpEF patients (mean±SD age=70±8yrs) and 37 healthy age-matched controls. General linear models were used to compare 25(OH)D between HFpEF patients and Healthy Controls and to determine the cross-sectional association between 25(OH)D and exercise capacity. The association between 25(OH)D and left ventricular function was evaluated secondarily in HFpEF patients.Results: 25(OH)D concentrations were significantly lower in HFpEF vs Healthy Controls (11.4±0.6ng/ml vs 19.1±2.1ng/ml; p=0.001, adjusted for age, race, gender, BMI, season). Over 90% of HFpEF patients had 25(OH)D insufficiency (
       
  • Sleep duration and risk of fatal coronary heart disease, sudden cardiac
           death, cancer death and all-cause mortality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Hassan Khan, Danesh Kella, Setor K Kunutsor, Kai Savonnen, Jari A Laukkanen BackgroundSleep duration has been shown to be associated with all-cause mortality, however its relationship with cause-specific fatal events remains uncertain.We examined the relationship between sleep duration and risk of fatal coronary heart disease (CHD), sudden cardiac death, cancer related death and all-cause mortality.MethodsSleep duration was self-reported at baseline examinations performed between March 20, 1984 and December 5, 1989 in 2,361 men aged 42-61 years old from the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease study. Of these 1734 (73.4%) men were free from CHD and cancer at baseline.ResultsA total of 802 all cause deaths, 202 fatal coronary heart disease events, 141 sudden cardiac events and 229 cancer related deaths were reported during a median follow-up of 25.9 (IQR: 20.6-28.2) years. Multi-variable adjusted hazard ratios (HR) comparing the top quartile (> 10 hours) of sleep duration versus the bottom quartile (
       
  • Point-of-care ultrasound for the assessment of digital clubbing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Inka Toman, Peter Rye, Janeve Desy, Irene W.Y. Ma
       
  • Is Science Important'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Robert T. Lawrence
       
  • Reducing Unnecessary Vitamin D Screening in an Academic Health System:
           What Works and When
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Christopher M Petrilli, James Henderson, Jenna Keedy, Emily Dibble, Melissa Y. Wei, Julie K. Prussack, Grant Greenberg, Eve Kerr
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Muthiah Vaduganathan, Manan Pareek, Arman Qamar, Ambarish Pandey, Michael H Olsen, Deepak L Bhatt
       
  • Caught on Colonoscopy: Schistosomiasis Manifesting as a Single Colonic
           Polyp
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Jessica Seidelman, Edward F. Hendershot, Nancy Henshaw, Matthew Rein
       
  • Don't Move a Muscle: A Case of Diabetic Myonecrosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Margaret Ivanov, Bilal Asif, Rebecca Jaffe
       
  • A Grave Case of Vomiting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Ari B. Cuperfain, Eric A. Coomes, Edward Etchells
       
  • Not Just Another Infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Bingnan Zhang, Aashini K Master, Claire E Brown, Alexandra Drakaki
       
  • Duodenal Diverticula: Unusual Case of Upper Gastrointestinal Obstruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Gabriele Bellio, Laura Bernardi, Nicolò de Manzini
       
  • Utilization of Vasculoprotective Therapy for Peripheral Artery Disease: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Daniel G. Hackam, Manav V. VyasABSTRACTIntroductionPractice guidelines recommend that patients with peripheral artery disease receive antiplatelets, statins and ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). We sought to quantify rates of prescribing of these therapies in patients with peripheral artery disease in the literature.MethodsWe performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of treatment prescribing rates in observational studies containing peripheral artery disease patients published on or after the year 2000. We also assessed whether prescribing rates are increasing over time.ResultsA total of 86 studies were available for analysis. The aggregate sample size across all studies was 332,555. The pooled estimates for utilization of antiplatelets, statins and ACE inhibitors/ARBs were 75% (95% CI 71 to 79%), 56% (95% CI 52 to 60%) and 53% (95% CI 49% to 58%), respectively. Statin use was directly related to publication year (+2.0% per year, p
       
  • A case of Addison's disease nearly mistaken for anorexia nervosa
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Claire Feeney, Kevin Buell
       
  • A Case of Fulminant Lymphocytic Myocarditis Responsive to
           Immunosuppression
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Chris Reiff, Emil Missov
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Mary K. Rhee, Lawrence S. Phillips
       
  • A Vanishing Entity: Rheumatoid Vasculitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Joel Horton, Anand Kumthekar
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2018Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Robert M. Doroghazi, Samuel W. Bergin
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-