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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 188 journals)

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Showing 1 - 188 of 188 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACCORD Occasional Paper     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 4)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 2)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AFFRIKA J. of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.128, h-index: 4)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 21)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 2)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Business and Economic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Democracy and Governance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.327, h-index: 10)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African J. of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Plant Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Yearbook of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agriprobe     Open Access  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Consumer Confidence Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Consumer Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Intermediate Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Business Tax and Company Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.414, h-index: 22)
Cardiovascular J. of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clean Air J. = Tydskrif vir Skoon Lug     Full-text available via subscription  
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Comparative and Intl. Law J. of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.127, h-index: 6)
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
De Rebus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Educare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
FarmBiz     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmer’s Weekly     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmlink Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Food Manufacturing Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Gender Questions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghanaian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
HR Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Inside Mining     Full-text available via subscription  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. for Religious Freedom     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of African Foreign Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of African Union Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Gender, Information and Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
J. of Somali Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Strategic Studies : A J. of the Southern Bureau of Strategic Studies Trust     Full-text available via subscription  
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Litnet Akademies : 'n Joernaal vir die Geesteswetenskappe, Natuurwetenskappe, Regte en Godsdienswetenskappe     Open Access  
Management Dynamics : J. of the Southern African Institute for Management Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Technology SA     Full-text available via subscription  
Meditari : Research J. of the School of Accounting Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
MNASSA : Monthly Notes of the Astronomical Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Monographs of the Transvaal Museum     Full-text available via subscription  
Musicus     Full-text available via subscription  
Neotestamentica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 6)
New Coin Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Voices in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Obiter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 2)
Occupational Health Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Old Testament Essays     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Personal Finance Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 13)
Politeia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Accountant     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Nursing Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Progressio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psycho-analytic Psychotherapy in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Quest     Open Access  
ReSource     Full-text available via subscription  
Retail and Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rostrum : Newsletter of the Entomological Society of Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SA Irrigation = SA Besproeiing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SA Mercantile Law J. = SA Tydskrif vir Handelsreg     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SABI Magazine - Tydskrif     Full-text available via subscription  
Scriptura : Intl. J. of Bible, Religion and Theology in Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Scrutiny2     Full-text available via subscription  
Servamus Community-based Safety and Security Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Shakespeare in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African Actuarial J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Computer J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Food Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Gastroenterology Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
South African Health Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African J. for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.186, h-index: 7)
South African J. of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 8)
South African J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Diabetes and Vascular Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African J. of Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.335, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African J. of Labour Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
South African J. of Wildlife Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.583, h-index: 24)
South African J. on Human Rights     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
South African Music Studies : SAMUS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Ophthalmology J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Forestry J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 11)
Southern African J. of Accountability and Auditing Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern African Review of Education with Education with Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Stilet : Tydskrif van die Afrikaanse Letterkundevereniging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Economics and Econometrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tax Breaks Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
TAXtalk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
TD : The J. for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
The Dairy Mail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transport World Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Unisa Latin American Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Veld & Flora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Water & Sanitation Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Without Prejudice     Full-text available via subscription  
Word and Action = Woord en Daad     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover African Journal of Wildlife Research
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 2410-7220 - ISSN (Online) 2410-8200
   Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [188 journals]
  • Zoonotic parasites of wildlife in Africa : a review
    • Authors: Paul O. Odeniran; Isaiah O. Ademola
      Abstract: Most neglected tropical diseases have their origins from wildlife species. Emphases over the years on causal organisms have been on bacteria and viruses. However, with the emergence of zoonotic parasites, it is important to consider the wildlife reservoir and the spectrum of their zoonotic parasites. Human activities have increased contact with game, thus humans serve either as intermediate, reservoir or accidental host in the sylvatic cycle. The epidemiological information of these zoonotic wildlife parasites are scanty due to poor surveillance strategies in Africa, therefore prevalence studies are necessary to develop control measures and to conduct consequence assessments in cases of outbreaks. This review emphasizes the role that wildlife plays in spreading zoonotic parasites to other animals and humans and the consequences in Africa. It summarizes the present knowledge about the prevalence and spectrum of zoonotic parasites of wildlife and the human population at risk in Africa. It also gives insight into the dynamics of zoonotic parasites of wildlife. It will also increase our risk perception of zoonotic diseases and help to formulate effective control measures in Africa.
      PubDate: 2016-04-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Resource selection on woody plant species by vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus
           pygerythrus) in mixed-broad leaf savanna
    • Authors: Alan S. Barrett; Louise Barrett, Peter Henzi, Leslie R. Brown, Louise Barrett Peter Henzi
      Abstract: Understanding how vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) select resources provides information for effectively managing them and the environments they live in, which may reduce conflict with humans. This study investigates resource selection on woody plant species by two vervet monkey (vervet) troops living in human-modified mixed-broad leaf savanna in South Africa. Our findings indicate that one troop's home range was more diverse in terms of woody plant species than the other. No relationship between the frequency of occurrence of resource items in the diet and the availability of those items was found for either troop, suggesting that food selection is not based on availability. However, resource items were selected in proportion to their energy content, indicating that vervets are potentially energy maximizers (species that select resource items based on energy content). This was noticeable for the vervets living in the more diverse home range. Vervets in the less diverse home range displayed less clear preference for higher energy food items. Despite this disparity between the troops, our findings suggest that both troops used whatever resource items were available to them, and that it is important to maximize the tree diversity in vervet habitats to ensure population persistence and reduce conflict with humans.
      PubDate: 2016-04-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Usage of specialized fence-gaps in a black rhinoceros conservancy in Kenya
    • Authors: Marc Dupuis Desormeaux; Edwin Kisio, Zeke Davidson, Mary Mwololo Suzanne E. MacDonald
      Abstract: Fencing is increasingly used in wildlife conservation. Keeping wildlife segregated from local communities, while permitting wildlife access to the greater landscape matrix is a complex task. We investigated the effectiveness of specially designed fence-gaps on animal movement at a Kenyan rhinoceros conservancy, using camera-traps over a four-year period. The fence-gap design restricted the movement of black (Diceris bicornis) and white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum simum) but permitted the movement of other species. We documented over 6000 crossing events of over 50 000 individuals which used the fence-gaps to enter or leave the conservancy. We recorded 37 mammal species and two species of bird using the fence-gaps. We conclude that this fence-gap design is effective at restricting rhinoceros movement and at permitting other wildlife movement into and out of the conservancy. Were commend that fenced-in rhinoceros conservancies that desire enhanced connectivity consider this fence-gap design to help re-connect their reserves to the outside landscape matrix while continuing to provide enhanced protection for their rhinoceroses.
      PubDate: 2016-04-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Quantifying the impact of off-road driving on root-area distribution in
           soils
    • Authors: Gerhardus P. Nortje; Wouter v. Hoven, Wouter v. Hoven, Michiel C. Laker Johanna C. Jordaan
      Abstract: Studies on the effects of off-road driving on soils were conducted in the Makuleke Contractual Park of the Kruger National Park. The studies were conducted on three different soils with different textures and soil compactibilities. Traffic pressure was applied with a game drive vehicle loaded with 10 sand bags, each weighing 70 kg, plus the driver. This gave a total vehicle mass of 3795 kg, simulating a vehicle fully laden with tourists. The results of the study reported here included comparing of the effects of four different tyre pressures on the root area distribution below each tyre pressure. At all sites, root density fractions under the tracks were reduced significantly at all tyre pressures, compared with the control values. Results indicated that root penetration percentage and root area distribution were reduced drastically as tyre pressure increased. Our work reaffirms previous research showing that higher tyre pressures cause higher sub-soil compaction than lower tyre pressures. Thus, driving with lower tyre pressures when driving off-road should be considered when developing management strategies for off-road driving in wildlife protected areas.
      PubDate: 2016-04-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Diet composition of the large herbivores in Mkambati Nature Reserve,
           Eastern Cape, South Africa
    • Authors: Jan A. Venter; Margaret J. Kalule-Sabiti
      Abstract: We used stable carbon isotopes from faeces to investigate the proportional contribution of C3 and C4 plant forms to the diet of the herbivores in Mkambati Nature Reserve, a grassland dominated ecosystem on the east coast of South Africa. Our results indicate that Equus burchellii, Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi, and Alcelaphus buselaphus utilize mainly C4 grasses. Tragelaphus oryx, Potamochoerus larvatus, Tragelaphus scriptus and Antidorcas marsupialis utilized mainly C3 plant forms but Redunca arundinum utilized an approximately equal amount of C3 and C4 plants. The results indicated similar trends compared to the more arid savanna systems (i.e. Kruger National Park in South Africa and several national parks in Kenya) with a few notable differences in some species (i.e. red hartebeest, southern reedbuck, eland, bushbuck and bushpig).
      PubDate: 2016-04-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Obituary : Neil Fairall 29 March 1936 - 25 May 2015
    • Authors: Elma Marais
      Abstract: Neil Fairall passed away on 25 May 2015 at the age of 79 years. His death ended his honorary life membership with the Southern African Wildlife Management Association (SAWMA). Apart from being one of the founder members of SAWMA, he was the longest serving council member by frequently serving on the SAWMA council in various capacities, including president and scientific journal editor. He will be remembered by many as a man with high standards, total honesty, and committed to nature conservation, research and the environment in general.
      PubDate: 2016-04-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Population estimates of spotted hyaenas in the Kruger National Park, South
           Africa
    • Authors: Sam M. Ferreira; Paul J. Funston
      Abstract: Spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta) experience a range of influences that affect their demography and are generally regulated by density-dependent mechanisms. Although widely distributed across sub-Saharan Africa surprisingly few spotted hyaena populations have reliable estimates of population sizes, and almost nothing is known about the trends in hyaena numbers. In most areas, threats due to anthropogenic disturbance or diseases are therefore not possible to evaluate. We calibrated a call-up method designed to achieve unbiased counts of African lions (Panthera leo) to estimate spotted hyaena numbers simultaneously. This greatly reduces the time and cost of surveys for these two dominant large carnivores in African savannas. We evaluated the effect of preferred prey biomass, lion density and disease on spotted hyaena population abundance in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, and found evidence only for an effect of prey biomass. Our results suggest that the persistence of spotted hyaena is not threatened in the Kruger National Park.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Using a binomial mixture model and aerial counts for an accurate estimate
           of Nile crocodile abundance and population size in the Kunene River,
           Namibia
    • Authors: Arnaud Lyet; Ruhan Slabbert, William F. Versfeld, Alison J. Leslie, Piet C. Beytell Pierre Du Preez
      Abstract: The Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus, is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, including Namibia, Botswana and Angola. The species was transferred from CITES Appendix I to Appendix II in 2004, although it is recognized as peripherally endangered in Namibia due to diminishing habitat availability primarily from human encroachment. In 2013, a species management plan was approved in Namibia to assess the management of the Namibian Nile crocodile populations. During 2012, an aerial survey was conducted to provide an estimate of Nile crocodile population numbers. A recently developed N-mixture model for estimation of abundance and spatial variation was used. Detection probability correlated to animal size and environmental covariates. Our data also suggest that small crocodiles are easier to detect during the spring. The abundance for different size classes was influenced by river complexity (vegetation, depth, channels) and the distribution of human settlements. An estimated 806 individuals were counted along the 352 km Namibian portion of the Kunene River system with a conservative estimate of 562 crocodiles regardless of size. The parameter estimates generated by the analysis suggested that the class-structured model can produce reliable estimates of total abundance and of local abundance for this section in the Kunene River system.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Socioeconomic and health implications of human wildlife interactions in
           Nthongoni, Eastern Kenya
    • Authors: Danson K. Mwangi; Mercy Akinyi, Fredrick Maloba, Maina Ngotho, Stanislaus Kivai, Fredrick Maloba, John Kagira David Ndeereh
      Abstract: The human population in Kenya has doubled over the last 25 years and is expected to rise twofold by 2050. Thus, pressure for human space has led to encroachment into wildlife habitats, increasing human wildlife interactions. Such interactions pose serious health risks to both humans and wildlife, yet studies to understand these risks are limited in Kenya. To understand the possible predisposing factors for zoonoses at the human-wildlife interface, a survey was carried out in Nthongoni, an area bordering Tsavo and Chyulu Hills national parks in Kenya. Questionnaires were administered to 11 key informants and 200 residents from 35 villages. Our results indicate that the majority (75%) of the respondents suffered from crop raids and livestock depredation by wildlife. On their part, residents killed wildlife for: subsistence (41%), revenge (35%), bush-meat trade (22%), and other undisclosed reasons. Nineteenper cent of the respondents were knowledgeable about disease transmission through bush-meat. Qualitative data revealed helplessness, bitterness and revenge tendencies by farmers due to wildlife losses, which contributed to their poverty. This study enhances our understanding of human-wildlife interactions and the associated socioeconomic, health and conservation implications. It demonstrates the predicaments communities living adjacent to wildlife areas face and the need to involve them in sustainable management of the areas. We recommend identification of appropriate alternative livelihoods, to mitigate illegal bush-meat and agricultural practices that attract wildlife, leading to conflicts. In addition, responsive health and conservation education, and participatory research aimed at advising policy, are necessary to cushion the communities from wildlife damages.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Physical and chemical characteristics of warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)
           meat
    • Authors: Monlee Swanepoel; Alison J. Leslie, Marieta Van der Rijst Louwrens C. Hoffman
      Abstract: The common warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) has been introduced to parts of South Africa outside of its known range. The species is considered an agricultural pest and a threat to the natural environment. As some farmers are employing a shoot on sight strategy, our study aimed to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of warthog meat according to sex. Five muscles from male warthogs had higher shear force values (i.e. were less tender) compared to females. All muscles had a total protein content >20% and total lipid content
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Large carnivores as tourism flagship species for the Zimbabwe component of
           the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area
    • Authors: Esther Van der Meer; Muchaneta N. Badza Aldwin Ndhlovu
      Abstract: Wildlife tourism provides an opportunity to offset conservation costs and promote co-existence between people and wildlife. To promote conservation through wildlife tourism, one can use flagship species; charismatic species that increase awareness and public recognition of a site, and stimulate financial and political support for conservation. Due to their large area requirements and sensitivity to disturbance, promoting conservation of large carnivores automatically promotes conservation of other species, and the use of large carnivores as flagship species has been positively related to ecosystem conservation. In this study, we interviewed wildlife tourists to determine which large carnivores could serve as flagship species for the Zimbabwe component of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA), an area that is expected to become a premier tourist destination and make a significant contribution to conservation. Based on likability and the possibility to raise funds and promote the area, lion (Panthera leo) was the most suitable flagship species, closely followed by leopard (Panthera pardus). Spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta) was the least suitable flagship species. Despite its endangered status, African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) did not seem to have a high potential to serve as a flagship species for the area. Although cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) was less often mentioned as a species tourists were hoping to see or a favourite species seen, cheetah was liked as much as lion and leopard and provided similar potential to raise funds and promote the area. Flagship species status does not have to apply to a single species, it can also successfully apply to a cohort of species. With the KAZA TFCA being in the unique position of harbouring the largest free-roaming cheetah population in Zimbabwe, it would be appropriate if the area was promoted by using large cats as a flagship species cohort.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Re-introduction success of black rhinoceros in Marakele National Park :
           short communications
    • Authors: Sam M. Ferreira; Cathy Greaver
      Abstract: Re-introduction is a key conservation management response and forms the backbone of several species recovery programmes (Armstrong & Seddon, 2008). The south-central black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor ) (black rhino hereafter) epitomizes this conservation response with several genetically connected strongholds in Zimbabwe and South Africa (Kotze et al., 2014). The Kruger National Park and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Game Reserve are home to key populations. The population in the Kruger National Park was created through re-introduction of 81 black rhinos between 1971 and 1990 (Ferreira, Greaver & Knight, 2011). Within South Africa, the Black Rhino Range Expansion Project (Sherriffs, 2003) seeks to create several populations in addition to 10 already established populations, as part of implementing the National South African Black Rhino Management Plan (Knight, Balfour & Emslie, 2013).
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Namibian farmland cheetahs (Acinonyxjubatus) demonstrate seronegativity
           for antibodies against Bacillus anthracis
    • Authors: Alexandra Switzer; Linda Munson, Linda Munson, Cari Beesley, Patricia Wilkins, Jason K. Blackburn Laurie Marker
      Abstract: The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is a vulnerable species, with estimates of only 6700 animals left in the wild. Namibia, an anthrax-endemic country, is home to the world's largest and most viable free-ranging population (~3000 animals), which predominantly resides on unprotected private farmlands (Durant, 2015). For over 170 years, anthrax has been reported in African wildlife species with sporadic outbreaks across Namibia (Beyer et al., 2012). Anthrax is regularly reported from zebra (Equus quagga), hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus), springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) and kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) (Turner et al., 2014; Wafula, Patrick & Charles, 2007); all cheetah prey species. Anthrax epidemics occur annually in Namibia's Etosha National Park (ENP), whereas the establishment of a government mandated livestock vaccination programme in 1973 reduced the occurrence of anthrax on the surrounding farmlands (Bellanet al., 2012; Schneider, 1994; Turner et al., 2013). However, sporadic epidemics still occur on private farmlands throughout Namibia (Shaanika, 2013).
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Game Ranch Management, J.du P. Bothma & J.G. du Toit (Eds.) : book
           review
    • Authors: Dan Parker
      Abstract: The sixth edition of the Game Ranching 'Bible' is here. Once again edited by Professor Emeritus J. du P. Bothma (Koos to many of us) and Dr J.G. du Toit, the now 1012 page tome is starting to rival its religious cousin. Nevertheless, this textbook continues to be required reading for wildlife ranchers, undergraduate and postgraduate students, and even the interested layperson.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Non-chemical techniques used for the capture and relocation of wildlife in
           South Africa : review article
    • Authors: Liesel L. Laubscher; Louwrens C. Hoffman, Neville E. Pitts Jacobus P. Raath
      Abstract: Annually, thousands of game animals are captured and relocated across South Africa. One of the biggest causes of mortality during these translocations is stress, and as such it is the responsibility of all stakeholders involved to ensure that appropriate techniques are applied for specific species and environments. It is therefore important that there is a thorough understanding of these methods not only from a management perspective but also in terms of applied animal welfare. This review provides detailed descriptions of the various non-chemical techniques that may be employed during game capture and relocation in a South African context and highlights both species suitability, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. It also gives a brief background to the South African game capture industry as well as discussing and giving guidelines for the transportation and holding of wildlife after capture.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Lost herds of the Highveld : evidence from the written, historical record
    • Authors: Andre F. Boshoff; Graham I.H. Kerley
      Abstract: Establishing historical baselines is important for informing present-day conservation and management actions. The historical literature was searched for information on the composition, abundance and distribution of the large ungulate fauna in the grassland-dominated Highveld region of north-central South Africa during the 19th century and early 20th century. The existence of large aggregations (herds comprising one or more taxa) is inferred from the written record, for the early historical period. These aggregations comprised one or more species of eight grazers or mixed feeders. There is weaker evidence of seasonal migratory, or partially migratory, behaviour by some of them. This synthesis highlights the existence of a major, but hitherto unrecognized and unheralded, grazer grassland system in the region, at least during the early period of colonial expansion. In global terms, this system may have rivalled similar extant migratory systems elsewhere in Africa and globally, if not in the numbers of animals involved then almost certainly in terms of the diversity of ungulates that were present. No records of large ungulate aggregations, or migrations, could be located for the post-1870s period, thus revealing the time of the collapse of this system, mainly as a result of over-hunting and loss of habitat. By the end of the 19th century the once widespread and abundant larger ungulate fauna of the Highveld had, barring a few individuals and small and scattered herds, of a few species, been virtually exterminated. Some ecological consequences of this collapse are briefly discussed.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • An inventory of vertebrate roadkill in the greater Mapungubwe
           Transfrontier conservation area, South Africa
    • Authors: Wendy J. Collinson; Brian K. Reilly, Wendy J. Collinson, Dan M. Parker, Ric T.F. Bernard, Brian K. Reilly Harriet T. Davies-Mostert
      Abstract: Using a standard protocol, we conducted vertebrate roadkill surveys in the Greater Mapungubwe Transfrontier Conservation Area (GMTFCA), South Africa, which is a World Heritage Site. A total of 991 roadkill were recorded on the paved roads and 36 roadkill on the unpaved roads. Identifiable roadkill comprised 162 species from 24 orders and 65 families. Ninety-three roadkill could not be identified to species level. Roadkill counts were strongly influenced by road type and season. More roadkill was recorded on the paved than the unpaved roads. Irrespective of road type, the proportion of roadkill was greatest in the hot/wet season (4.3 paved roadkill/km/day paved and 1.3 roadkill/km/day unpaved) and lowest in the cold/dry season (2.0 roadkill/km/day paved and 0.1 roadkill/km/day unpaved). The high numbers of vertebrates identified as roadkill suggests that road traffic has the potential to directly and negatively affect biodiversity conservation in this part of South Africa. Were commend continued roadkill data collection across South Africa to assist with creating an inventory of species most likely to be at risk from roads. This will, in turn, better inform the implementation of potential mitigation measures.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Intramuscular fat characteristics of Namibian common eland(Tragelaphus
           oryx)
    • Authors: Louwrens C. Hoffman; Diana L. Van Schalkwyk, Kenneth W. McMillin, Radim Kotrba Radim Kotrba
      Abstract: The influence of sex on the intramuscular fat characteristics of eland harvested from the highland savanna in Namibia was investigated. No significant differences were observed between sexes for moisture, protein and ash content in the longissimus dorsi et lumborum (LDL). Fat content in LDL differed (P = 0.022) for male (1.2%) and female (2.0%) eland. Stearicacid was the most abundant fatty acid (26.1%) in males and differed from females (21.7%) whilst oleic acid was the most abundant fatty acid (39.1%) in females. Females contained more MUFA (41.6%) than males (26.4%). Eland had a PUFA to SFA ratio of 4-5. Males did not differ from females for the n-6:n-3 ratio (2.7-2.9). No significant differences for sex were observed in cholesterol content. The chemical composition of eland can serve as a reference standard for future studies as well as be of value for food labelling and marketing strategies.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Beefing up species richness' the effect of land-use on mammal
           diversity in an arid biodiversity hotspot
    • Authors: Gareth K.H. Mann; Juliette V. Lagesse, Dan M. Parker M. Justin O'Riain
      Abstract: The transformation and fragmentation of natural land are considered to be major drivers of biodiversity loss and local extinctions. In this study we compare medium-to-large mammal diversity on rangeland, game farms and natural land within the Little Karoo, South Africa. Mammal diversity was assessed using camera traps set up at 141 sites, and compared across the three land-use types. There were no significant differences in mammal diversity across land-use types, although rangelands typically supported fewer species. Game farms had similar species richness to natural areas, suggesting that the introduction of large ungulate species and the erection of game-proof fencing has had little impact on mammal diversity to date. Importantly, our results suggest that land used for low-intensity grazing by cattle (Bos taurus) can support similar mammalian species richness to natural areas, which indicates a high level of compatibility between current economic activities and biodiversity conservation in this area. Although specific to the Little Karoo, our findings can inform management and conservation decision-making on a broader scale, as they support evidence of the biodiversity value of economically active land.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • A standardized necropsy protocol for health investigations of small
           cetaceansin southern Africa
    • Authors: Stephanie Plon; Morne De Wet, Peter Thompson, Emily Lane, Peter Wohlsein Ursula Siebert
      Abstract: Globally, the increasing need to conduct both research and surveillance of the health of wild animal populations has been recognized as an important tool in conservation and management. While such studies on terrestrial wildlife are frequent in the southern African sub-region, their counterparts in the marine environment seem to be largely lacking. Here we report on our experience in establishing and testing a standardized necropsy protocol for small cetaceans adapted for the local context, with the specific aim of sampling for health investigations and monitoring. The necessity, challenge and value of regional standardization in data collection specifically aimed at health investigations, inter-disciplinary collaboration, long-term data banking, and sample storage are discussed in addition to practical and safety considerations. The developed protocol, focusing on the necropsy technique and tissue sample collection, as well as a list of required equipment are available as online supplementary material.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • An assessment of spatial and temporal variation in the diet of Cape
           clawless otters (Aonyx capensis) in marine environments
    • Authors: Rowan K. Jordaan; Trevor McIntyre, Michael J. Somers Marthan N. Bester
      Abstract: We studied the diet of Cape clawless otters (Aonyx capensis) at three sites along the eastern and southern coast of South Africa to assess possible spatial variation along a community species richness and biomass gradient associated with rocky shores. A total of 309 spraints representing two seasons (summer 2013/2014 and winter 2014) were collected and subsequently analysed. The percentage occurrence and percentage dry mass of numerous prey categories were compared between sites and seasons. Variation in the importance of prey items was found between sites, whilst no variation was found between seasons within the same site. Crab was the most important prey item in the southernmost study area (Tsitsikamma National Park) and at the northernmost study site (KwaZulu-Natal Coast), whilst lobster was the most important prey item in the central area (Mkambati Nature Reserve). Fish was the second most important prey item at all three sites. Our results suggest that otters are opportunistic feeders that are likely able to adapt to potential prey species and abundance changes associated with current and future anthropogenically driven changes. Furthermore, long-term, site-specific stability in diet suggests that monitoring the diet of otters could provide some useful information on the status of shoreline communities.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • The relative abundance of invasive House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) in
           an urban environment in South Africa is determined by land use
    • Authors: Kholosa Magudu; Colleen T. Downs Kholosa Magudu
      Abstract: The House Sparrow, Passer domesticus, is invasive in many areas of the world, but is listed as a species of conservation concern in parts of its native range. This study assessed the effect of land-use type on the relative abundance of House Sparrows in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, an urban area where they are invasive. It was predicted that House Sparrows in an urban environment would be more abundant at shopping malls compared with other habitats. Spot counts were done at shopping malls, schools, factories and suburban gardens throughout the year. House Sparrows were recorded frequently at shopping malls and rarely in suburban gardens. Type of urban land use appears to determine food and possibly nest site availability. This in turn affects the density, relative abundance, and distribution of House Sparrows. There appears no need to regulate this urban House Sparrow population because it has different feeding and breeding requirements to native birds, is not predatory, and is largely restricted to heavily transformed landscapes.
      PubDate: 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z
       
 
 
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