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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 188 journals)

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Showing 1 - 188 of 188 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACCORD Occasional Paper     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 4)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 2)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AFFRIKA J. of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.128, h-index: 4)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 21)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 2)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Business and Economic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Democracy and Governance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.327, h-index: 10)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African J. of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Plant Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Yearbook of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agriprobe     Open Access  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Consumer Confidence Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Consumer Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Intermediate Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Business Tax and Company Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.414, h-index: 22)
Cardiovascular J. of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clean Air J. = Tydskrif vir Skoon Lug     Full-text available via subscription  
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Comparative and Intl. Law J. of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.127, h-index: 6)
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
De Rebus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Educare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
FarmBiz     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmer’s Weekly     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmlink Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Food Manufacturing Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Gender Questions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghanaian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
HR Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Inside Mining     Full-text available via subscription  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. for Religious Freedom     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of African Foreign Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of African Union Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Gender, Information and Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
J. of Somali Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Strategic Studies : A J. of the Southern Bureau of Strategic Studies Trust     Full-text available via subscription  
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Litnet Akademies : 'n Joernaal vir die Geesteswetenskappe, Natuurwetenskappe, Regte en Godsdienswetenskappe     Open Access  
Management Dynamics : J. of the Southern African Institute for Management Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Technology SA     Full-text available via subscription  
Meditari : Research J. of the School of Accounting Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
MNASSA : Monthly Notes of the Astronomical Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Monographs of the Transvaal Museum     Full-text available via subscription  
Musicus     Full-text available via subscription  
Neotestamentica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 6)
New Coin Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Voices in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Obiter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 2)
Occupational Health Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Old Testament Essays     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Personal Finance Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 13)
Politeia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Accountant     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Nursing Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Progressio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psycho-analytic Psychotherapy in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Quest     Open Access  
ReSource     Full-text available via subscription  
Retail and Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rostrum : Newsletter of the Entomological Society of Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SA Irrigation = SA Besproeiing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SA Mercantile Law J. = SA Tydskrif vir Handelsreg     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SABI Magazine - Tydskrif     Full-text available via subscription  
Scriptura : Intl. J. of Bible, Religion and Theology in Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Scrutiny2     Full-text available via subscription  
Servamus Community-based Safety and Security Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Shakespeare in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African Actuarial J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Computer J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Food Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Gastroenterology Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
South African Health Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African J. for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.186, h-index: 7)
South African J. of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 8)
South African J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Diabetes and Vascular Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African J. of Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.335, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African J. of Labour Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
South African J. of Wildlife Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.583, h-index: 24)
South African J. on Human Rights     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
South African Music Studies : SAMUS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Ophthalmology J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Forestry J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 11)
Southern African J. of Accountability and Auditing Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern African Review of Education with Education with Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Stilet : Tydskrif van die Afrikaanse Letterkundevereniging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Economics and Econometrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tax Breaks Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
TAXtalk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
TD : The J. for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
The Dairy Mail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transport World Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Unisa Latin American Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Veld & Flora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Water & Sanitation Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Without Prejudice     Full-text available via subscription  
Word and Action = Woord en Daad     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover Southern African Review of Education with Education with Production
  [2 followers]  Follow
    
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   ISSN (Print) 1563-4418
   Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [188 journals]
  • Editorial notes
    • Authors: Aslam Fataar
      Abstract: This issue of the Southern African Review of Education is my last as editor of the journal. It has been a privilege and an honour to serve in this position. I offer a couple of end-of-term comments at the end of these Notes.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Using agency-space and aspiration-scape to interpret grassroots
           perspectives on secondary education in South Africa
    • Authors: David Balwanz
      Abstract: In South Africa, debate about secondary education is largely framed by three topics: National Senior Certificate pass rates and standards, university access and, for non-university-bound youth, skills development. This article draws on an agency-focused capabilities approach to offer an alternative perspective to dominant constructions of secondary education. It argues that in many poor and working-class communities in South Africa formal secondary schooling offers insufficient space for youth to craft their own learning agenda, express agency and develop their capability to aspire. This article draws on recent scholarship and empirical research grounded in a capabilities approach to identify features of the current education system that suppress or enhance agency and aspiration, and, based on interviews with youth and teachers, recognises alternative perspectives on how secondary education could contribute to human well-being. Using Appadurai's concepts of 'scapes', an interpretation of the capabilities approach that recognises how global cultural flows influence youth agency and aspiration is argued for.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • The organisation of schools that succeed against the odds
    • Authors: Ursula Hoadley; Jaamia Galant
      Abstract: This article is concerned with the link between school organisation and performance, and attempts to produce a relational understanding of school organisation and management. The research on which it is based focused on a sample of schools in poor communities that were achieving 'against the odds'. Looking at organisation and management, the analysis shows the development of a novel framework for the analysis of the school as an institution, as well as the empirical insights gained into the relationship between school organisation and performance. The central argument of the article is that, if specialised knowledge is to be transmitted, certain organisational configurations optimise better outcomes. We identify three school 'types' in the research, the 'epistemic', the 'bureaucratic' and the 'communitarian' school, and discuss some of the implications of these types.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Towards a 'self-schooled' habitus : high school students' educational
           navigations in an impoverished rural West Coast township
    • Authors: Jerome Joorst
      Abstract: This article focuses on how poor, rural working-class youth experience their education as they move through the spaces of their home, community and school. It entails an analysis of high-school students against the background of fast-changing social-reproductive contexts of rural families, communities and schools in South Africa in the post-apartheid era. By making use of multi-site ethnographic study methods, an analysis is offered of what rural youth do to mediate between the structural reproductive influences of their learning environments and their educational aspirations. The article uses Bourdieu's theoretical lens of field, (self-schooled) habitus and capital to argue that many working-class students are not merely passive receivers of global influences and changing social structures, but are active creators of their local realities. The purpose of the article is to shed light on the way in which rural working-class students, positioned in disintegrating socialisation structures, create a future for themselves amid poverty.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Making place: High school girls' place-making practices and
           identifications in the light of the 'expressive culture' of their
           independent school in peri-urban Cape Town
    • Authors: Elzahn Rinquest
      Abstract: This article focuses on the place-making practices and identifications that school students assemble at a high school on the outskirts of Cape Town. Their school is the site at which I explore the place-making of five selected girls in their informal out-of-classroom high-school spaces. The article is based on an ethnographic research approach. I utilised participant observation, unstructured and semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions to gather in-depth qualitative data with the purpose of illustrating the complexity of their place-making. I employ Nespor's (1997) spatial lenses of 'emplacement', 'displacement' and 'mobility' to analyse the five girls' personal socialisation, place-making practices and consequent place identifications. The article suggests that there is a formative and symbiotic relationship between the 'expressive culture' of their school and the manner in which the girls are able to develop their individual place-making and project-specific place identities. The manner in which the girls inhabit and 'make place' in the school's out-of-classroom spaces is determined by the particular networks, movements and practices that they mobilise in these spaces, which in turn have an influence on their identifications in the school.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Chasing curricular justice : how complex ethical vexations of
           redistributing cultural capital bring dialectics to the door of aporia
    • Authors: Lew Zipin
      Abstract: This article argues that approaching social justice through school curriculum is a daunting prospect that compels 'us' (educators who care for justice) to pursue contradictory imperatives. To 'do justice' with learners from power-marginalised communities, we are compelled to recognise and make use of knowledge that has cultural familiarity and meaning (use-value) in their lives. At the same time, following Bourdieu, we cannot ignore that, in a capitalist society, curriculum is bound up in high-stakes competition for life-chances, coded to select for those who inherit powerful cultural capital (exchange-value). This requires us to give serious curricular effort to redistributing the codes of 'winning' cultural capital to those who, by accident of birth, do not inherit it in their families. The article therefore argues for a both/and approach to curricular justice: both work with use-valued cultural knowledge, and redistribute exchange-valued knowledge (cultural capital). However, the article analyses acute ethical vexations associated with formidable powers of the logic of capital to co-opt efforts to distribute it, in which 'dialectical' impulses of a both/and approach encounter the 'aporia' of their impossibility. Following Derrida, the article invokes an ethical attitude of 'madness', or courage of conviction, to pursue the possibility of the impossible.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Moosa's aporia : a critical interrogation of the text What is a
           Madrasa?
    • Authors: Aslam Fataar
      Abstract: This article is an overview and critical interrogation of the main arguments of a key text on Muslim education that was recently published by Ebrahim Moosa, renowned reformist Islamic scholar. I start by providing an overview of his text, What is a Madrasa? This is followed by a consideration of two issues that I have identified as germane to the author's intellectual task. First, I develop the view that the text represents a harbinger for very difficult but necessary intercultural conversation between the epistemological traditions of the West and non-West. The book opens space for speaking across the vast epistemic chasm that exists, especially in the West, about the knowledge traditions of the non-West, in this case the knowledge and performative transfer modalities of a key Muslim educational institution. The second is a consideration of the texts, knowledge and functional arrangement of this type of institution. I argue that Moosa makes a persuasive case for suggesting that madrasa knowledge is performed on the body of its students, which in effect suggests a thoroughly ontologised account of its knowledge traditions and transfer modalities. I conclude with the suggestion that Moosa's attempt at establishing the intellectual terms for an intercultural dialogue as well as a reformist approach to internal madrasa reorganisation represents an aporia, a madness which yet has to be pursued if madrasas are able to be harnessed for complex modern living.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Can Foucault liberate madrasa knowledge from commodification practices? :
           a critical engagement with Ebrahim Moosa's concept of madrasa knowledge
    • Authors: M. Noor Davids
      Abstract: Ebrahim Moosa's notion of madrasa knowledge is expounded in his book What is a Madrasa? (2015). Madrasa knowledge is understood to be performed on the Muslim mind and body for purposes of salvation. Moosa argues that madrasa knowledge needs reforming to include knowledge of everyday living and intercultural dialogue. Contiguous to Moosa's notion of 'salvation practices', I argue, are 'consumption practices', i.e. commodification, another dimension of salvation. The growth of disciplinary power and creation of docile bodies are vital requirements for capitalism (Dreyfus and Rabinow 1983). Madrasa knowledge plays a disciplinary role when transforming the body as object into a Muslim subject. The main purpose of discipline is to increase individuals' mastery over their bodies. As madrasa knowledge is performed on the body, it expresses itself as disciplinary power when bio-power exerts agency in everyday life, as when the body becomes a consumer to fulfil its salvation and economic needs. Given an extended enunciation of salvation practices as inclusive of consumption practices, I pose the question: Can madrasa knowledge be liberated from commodification through critical pedagogy? Although Moosa's book is not dedicated to pedagogy per se, he offers pedagogical solutions to address reform and the unequal epistemological relationship between Western and madrasa knowledge. Foucault's (1995) notion of bio-power and Habermas' (1972) notion of critical theory are employed to assess how critical pedagogy can liberate madrasa knowledge from rampant commodification.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • What is a Madrasa? Unveiling narratives from the margins
    • Authors: Hasina Banu Ebrahim
      Abstract: The book What is a Madrasa? offers multi-dimensional insights into the madrasa world and beyond. Moosa uses lived experiences and insider perspectives to foreground madrasas as institutions of religious learning and also as sites in need of reform to address the challenges in the contemporary world. He also raises the point that madrasas are sites targeted for correction by those who uncritically benchmark from Muslims with radical intent. Additionally, narrow Western interpretive frames of reference are used to make sense of the work of madrasas. This review is framed by the metaphoric unveiling of the narratives at the margins. Such a response was necessary in order to illuminate dominant ideas/practices as well as those that are at the fringes. The themes of positional stances underpinned by reflexivity, madrasas as public good and tensions and hope are used as organisers to facilitate a critical discussion on the key issues raised by Moosa. In order to move the madrasa into a third space, Moosa offers the solution of dialogue and its related practices to bring disparate worlds into a communicative space for mutual enrichment. This review shows that such a response is complex and mostly tied to a web of intentions and actions.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • University Access and Success. Capabilities, Diversity and Social Justice,
           Merridy Wilson-Strydom : book review
    • Authors: Alejandra Boni
      Abstract: University Access and Success represents an extremely valuable contribution to the higher education literature related to access to universities. But, contrary to the mainstream approaches to access, which rely on school performance and admissions tests, Wilson-Strydom poses at the centre of the analysis the issue of social justice.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Engaging Schooling Subjectivities across Post-Apartheid Urban Spaces,
           Aslam Fataar : book review
    • Authors: Jyothi Chabilall
      Abstract: Fataar's use of the concept 'pedagogy of hope' demonstrates South African school-based subjectivity post-1994. In making the argument for active social engagement Fataar seeks to encourage social and academic communication and knowledge-sharing that would ultimately inform school- and classroom-based activities. This cogent exposition brings to the fore exclusion criteria that invariably impact upon deficient educational techniques that fail to respond especially to complex suburban youth. He is mindful of persistent suggestions that South Africa is experiencing an 'endemic education crisis' (p. 9), recognising that ill-fated schools consistently underperform as a result of communal poverty, social disruptions, violence and the lack of cultural capital.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Contents of previous issues of SARE
    • Abstract: Contents of previous issues of SARE
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial notes
    • Authors: Aslam Fataar
      Abstract: This issue of the Southern African Review of Education contains a thought-provoking set of articles. It starts with an article by Gerard Guthrie, a comparativist of long standing, on the chequered career of progressivist-inspired educational reform. He considers why there has been a stubborn faith in progressivism as an axiomatic panacea for educational and curriculum reform, especially in developing countries. He argues, provocatively, that the progressive paradigm has become a delusional intellectual straightjacket heavily distorted by perceptual processes, the complexities of cultural environments, culture-bound constructs, research limitations and value judgments that have led irrationally to a cumulative hallucination in which a vicious circle of misinformation is provided by recommendations for continuing the irrational pursuit of the unattainable. Guthrie's article challenges firmly held, yet conceptually and empirically under-explored, views about the nature and impact of progressivist-inspired educational reform.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Special issue - Southern African Review of Education Sustainable
           Educational Ecologies : call for papers
    • Abstract: This special issue is intended to encourage and to celebrate research in sustainable educational ecologies problematising, among others, the 17 United Nations' 2015 Sustainable Development Goals, while at the same time addressing (i) the shift from access to quality education in post-2015 development agendas as in the SACHES 2015 conference theme, and/or (ii) the strengthening of educational research for sustainable futures, which anchors SAERA's 2015 conference. This volume will thus be a platform to analyse the history and contemporary trajectories of sustainable educational ecologies with the aim of informing policy directions for the future. Comparative education lenses will also be used to understand these ecologies from the local, national and international perspectives.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • On the cosmology of cumulative progressive hallucination
    • Authors: Gerard Guthrie
      Abstract: Progressivism is an international travelling policy often supported by national governments and local innovators in 'developing' countries. Despite a lack of methodologically sound evidence demonstrating long-term survival of progressive reforms in primary and secondary schools, 'paradigm reversal' has not occurred and progressive theory has not realigned with formalistic classroom reality. A question that arises is: Why the stubborn and long-lasting faith in progressivism as an axiomatic panacea and the cognitive dissonance generated by findings about its failures? Five regressive delusions cage many reforms and their evaluations: denial that progressivism, consciously or unconsciously, is part of cultural imperialism in the international culture wars; irrational confusion setting reform goals as changes to teaching styles, not student achievement; implicit failure to understand the cultural depths of resistance to progressivism; ritual recommendations that further inputs will remedy problems found in pilot projects; and cost-free recommendations that inputs are financially sustainable in poorer countries. The progressive paradigm has become a delusional intellectual straightjacket heavily distorted by perceptual processes, the complexities of cultural environments, culture-bound constructs, research limitations and value judgments that have led irrationally to a cumulative hallucination in which a vicious circle of misinformation is provided by recommendations for continuing the irrational pursuit of the unattainable.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Of false-starts, blind spots, cul-de-sacs and legitimacy struggles : the
           curriculum debate in South African higher education
    • Authors: Crain Soudien; Crain Soudien
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to attempt to bring into fuller perspective than has hitherto been done the issues of the affective in the curriculum debate in higher education in the post-apartheid period. The article poses the question of how the curriculum engages the domain of the affective or that which one might describe as the emotional states of mind that have been left behind since the 1994 settlement that was arrived at between the African National Congress (ANC) and the National Party (NP). It uses the events surrounding the Rhodes Must Fall Movement (RMF) at the University of Cape Town, sparked by the continued presence on the university's campus of the statue of Cecil John Rhodes, and the emergence during the event of what protesting students referred to as 'black pain'. The article attempts to explain this 'pain', to critically review the relevance of existing curricula innovations in the country in relation to it, and to suggest possible ways in which the curriculum discussion with respect to it could be taken forward.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Education, science and mental difference in South Africa
    • Authors: Azeem Badroodien
      Abstract: This article historicises and problematises policy developments that dealt with difference between learners and across different layers of the learner population in South Africa from the 1920s. In so doing it shows how notions of 'difference', 'subnormality', 'feeble-mindedness', 'mental defect' and 'behaviour deviates' became part of the education policy lexicon and highlights the implications for current policy thinking. The article provides a historical context for the current predominant view that it is necessary and appropriate in the public education system to separate learners with learning difficulties from other learners, as well as the normative view that the difficulties such learners experience are 'naturally' linked to their own deficiencies and are not the result (or burden) of the public schooling system. The main assertion in the contribution is that developments from the 1920s provided the policy infrastructure for key principles of classification and differentiation of children in South Africa to become firmly embedded within policy thinking, and to remain into the present. It did so by providing the emerging modern South African state with a 'scientific' mechanism to distinguish the 'normal' from the 'abnormal' and the 'normal' from the 'difficult' child within different communities and spaces. As such, race-making in South Africa and notions of inferiority and maladjustment did not take its main form as much within apartheid policy as within the scientific knowledge and language of the experts attached to different kinds of social institutions.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Formative elements in the making of a young radical teacher in an ethos of
           resistance to educational and broader social marginalisation in early
           twentieth-century Cape Town
    • Authors: Yunus Omar
      Abstract: This article traces aspects of the formative elements that influenced the making of a radical young teacher during the first half of the twentieth-century in South Africa. This period spawned a distinct, legislated system of differential education provision for children officially marked in racial and class terms. These discriminatory policy instantiations were actively rejected in the Cape by a group of radicalised teachers who, informed by a culture of ideas built around socialist ideals of freedom, inserted a historic challenge to the educational and broader political establishments, as well as within their own communities of origin. This article adds to the still sparse literature which asks questions around who precisely the teacher-actors in our classrooms are. Through an investigation of the emergence of one such teacher, Alie Fataar, this article contributes to a growing understanding that 'the teacher' is still generally an opaque object of analysis, and that more rigorous analytical work in this arena is crucial if we are to address issues around schooling success for, particularly, students who suffer the disadvantages of inadequately functioning schools in the post-apartheid era. By tracing the array of factors that impact on the 'coming to being a teacher' via the narrative constructions of teacher Alie Fataar, this article provides insights into the development of his core teaching identity amidst several competing, potentially essentialising identities, including race and religion. In tracing these complex routes to embodying a core teacher identity, the article adds to the literature that proposes a deeper research agenda into teacher identity formation if educational policies are to have meaningful traction in schools.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Comparing history textbooks in apartheid South Africa and the German
           Democratic Republic, 1950-1990
    • Authors: Linda Chisholm
      Abstract: Germany and South Africa - two countries that had their transitions at almost the same time. Curriculum and textbooks changed significantly in each society. But how teachers responded differed. Earlier work has argued that differences in the nature of curricula and textbooks prior to the transition were important in explaining subsequent responses to changes. The focus there was, however, on the changes post-1990/1994. This article compares the content and design of history textbooks in the German Democratic Republic and apartheid South African prior to 1990/1994. It draws on secondary literature in each context and supplements this with analysis of curricula and selected textbooks in use at both primary and secondary level, as well as key informant interviews to explore the differences in the inheritances in history education. In addition, it attempts to go beyond simple understandings of goodpast/badpresent and badpast/goodpresent by showing how textbook authors in the pre-1990/1994 contexts mediated broader social pressures in each context. Despite South Africa's relatively greater diversity of textbooks and different approaches to textbook content over time, its textbook design remained relatively traditional and contrasted significantly with that in the GDR, with potentially important consequences for teachers' ability to adapt to new curricula.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Experiences of parents with children diagnosed with reading difficulties
    • Authors: Lorna M. Dreyer
      Abstract: A significant amount of research has been carried out on poor reading levels in schools and the myriad possible reasons for this. While there is also an established body of research on parental involvement in schools, very little of the research has focused on the experiences of parents whose children have been identified as having a reading difficulty. In order to increase parental involvement in schools in a democratic South Africa, the Education White Paper 6 (2001) on Inclusive Education, as well as the Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support (SIAS) strategy (2014), requires parents to be collaborative decision-makers in developing an educational plan for their children. Epstein's model of overlapping spheres serves as a theoretical framework that underpins the argument for collaboration between families and school to support learners who face reading difficulties and the consequent general academic under-performance. Following a qualitative research design, data were collected for this article using structured individual interviews, observations and reflective notes. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data collected. The findings indicated a significant disjuncture between official policy and its implementation. This article highlights the importance of acknowledging parental voices and emotional responses as imperative for ensuring collaborative support for children with reading difficulties, particularly in high schools.
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Contents of previous issues of SARE
    • Abstract: Contents of previous issues of SARE
      PubDate: 2015-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial notes
    • Authors: Aslam Fataar
      Abstract: This issue of the Southern African Review of Education contains seven articles that cover a range of educational issues in three different county contexts (Ethiopia, South Africa and Malawi). They are based on a combination of qualitative approaches and document analysis. The articles range from the role of non-governmental organisations in local educational development and community involvement in school improvement to critical analyses of policy pertaining to curriculum implementation, teacher development programmes and teacher discourses.
      PubDate: 2014-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • A World of Their Own - A History of South African Women's Education,
           Meghan Healy-Clancy : book review
    • Abstract: This is the first book to explore the meanings of black women's education in the making of modern South Africa. It is an elegantly written social history of Inanda Seminary, embedded in the wider social and political context throughout, and skilfully brings together a vast array of information relating to 140 years of African women's schooling.
      PubDate: 2014-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Working for whose benefit? An analysis of local development NGOs in
           relation to the communities in Ethiopia
    • Authors: Yoshiko Tonegawa
      Abstract: In Ethiopia, local development NGOs have become increasingly powerful in recent years, and are now recognised as highly influential organisations in the basic education subsector. However, some studies suggest that the local communities have negative perceptions of local development NGOs and reflect a general mistrust of their work. Thus, it can be said that there are conflicting perceptions about local development NGOs. This study explores the reality of the relationships between local development NGOs and the communities in the basic education subsector in Ethiopia. The study also examines the perceptions that both communities and NGO workers have of local development NGOs, using case study methods to explore eight local development NGOs in Ethiopia. The study comprises collective and comparative analyses of selected samples using a triangulation approach with three data collection methods - interviews, observations and documentation - in order to gain an in-depth understanding of the phenomena being investigated.
      PubDate: 2014-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Engaging community members in enhancing educational quality : studies of
           the implementation of the Primary School Improvement Programme in Malawi
    • Authors: Mark Ginsburg; Rudi Klauss, Felix Nankhuni, Luka Nyirongo, Joan Sullivan Omowoyela, Emily Richardson, Reinier Terwindt Carrie Willimann
      Abstract: In 2010 Malawi initiated its Primary School Improvement Programme (PSIP) to expand equitable access, increase quality and relevance, and strengthen governance and management. Parents and other community members developed and implemented school improvement plans (SIPs) with funds in part from school improvement grants (SIGs). This article reports data collected in March 2012 from a) head teacher, community member and 'involved' parent interviews in 81 schools and b) primary education advisors' reports on SIG budget decisions for 1 084 schools. Findings indicate that community participation occurred and interviewees perceived that the SIPs contributed to achieving the three goals; interviewees reported using school indicators to develop SIPs, but these indicators were not predictive of the percentage of funds used for teaching assistants and instructional materials; and school communities sought to generate additional resources beyond the SIGs. The findings are linked to what is known about an internationally popular approach to educational reform: school-based management.
      PubDate: 2014-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
 
 
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