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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 188 journals)

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Showing 1 - 188 of 188 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACCORD Occasional Paper     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 4)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 2)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AFFRIKA J. of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.128, h-index: 4)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 21)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 2)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Business and Economic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Democracy and Governance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.327, h-index: 10)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African J. of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Plant Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Yearbook of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agriprobe     Open Access  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Consumer Confidence Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Consumer Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Intermediate Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Business Tax and Company Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.414, h-index: 22)
Cardiovascular J. of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clean Air J. = Tydskrif vir Skoon Lug     Full-text available via subscription  
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Comparative and Intl. Law J. of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.127, h-index: 6)
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
De Rebus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Educare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
FarmBiz     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmer’s Weekly     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmlink Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Food Manufacturing Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Gender Questions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghanaian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
HR Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Inside Mining     Full-text available via subscription  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. for Religious Freedom     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of African Foreign Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of African Union Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Gender, Information and Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
J. of Somali Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Strategic Studies : A J. of the Southern Bureau of Strategic Studies Trust     Full-text available via subscription  
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Litnet Akademies : 'n Joernaal vir die Geesteswetenskappe, Natuurwetenskappe, Regte en Godsdienswetenskappe     Open Access  
Management Dynamics : J. of the Southern African Institute for Management Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Technology SA     Full-text available via subscription  
Meditari : Research J. of the School of Accounting Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
MNASSA : Monthly Notes of the Astronomical Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Monographs of the Transvaal Museum     Full-text available via subscription  
Musicus     Full-text available via subscription  
Neotestamentica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 6)
New Coin Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Voices in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Obiter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 2)
Occupational Health Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Old Testament Essays     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Personal Finance Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 13)
Politeia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Accountant     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Nursing Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Progressio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psycho-analytic Psychotherapy in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Quest     Open Access  
ReSource     Full-text available via subscription  
Retail and Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rostrum : Newsletter of the Entomological Society of Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SA Irrigation = SA Besproeiing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SA Mercantile Law J. = SA Tydskrif vir Handelsreg     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SABI Magazine - Tydskrif     Full-text available via subscription  
Scriptura : Intl. J. of Bible, Religion and Theology in Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Scrutiny2     Full-text available via subscription  
Servamus Community-based Safety and Security Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Shakespeare in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African Actuarial J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Computer J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Food Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Gastroenterology Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
South African Health Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African J. for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.186, h-index: 7)
South African J. of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 8)
South African J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Diabetes and Vascular Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African J. of Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.335, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African J. of Labour Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
South African J. of Wildlife Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.583, h-index: 24)
South African J. on Human Rights     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
South African Music Studies : SAMUS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Ophthalmology J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Forestry J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 11)
Southern African J. of Accountability and Auditing Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern African Review of Education with Education with Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Stilet : Tydskrif van die Afrikaanse Letterkundevereniging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Economics and Econometrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tax Breaks Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
TAXtalk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
TD : The J. for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
The Dairy Mail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transport World Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Unisa Latin American Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Veld & Flora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Water & Sanitation Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Without Prejudice     Full-text available via subscription  
Word and Action = Woord en Daad     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover Perspectives in Education
  [SJR: 0.228]   [H-I: 13]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0258-2236
   Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [188 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Loyiso Jita
      Abstract: Many of the articles published in our 2016 edition have focused on the issue of quality education from a number of different perspectives. The current issue continues this journey and exploration but focuses more closely on three important aspects of the quality education debate: first, the focus is on higher education. Zeroing in on two professional programmes, one for teachers and another for engineers, several of the articles probe pertinent questions about the graduates' knowledge, competences and attributes. Taking the position that universities are critical to the development of knowledgeable, competent and well-disposed graduate professionals, the studies raise important concerns that challenge the entire higher education community to reflect more deeply on the relevance, designs and outcomes of the current programmes on offer, especially the professional programmes in teacher education and chemical engineering, in particular. Second, the focus is on exploring the possibilities and likely impact of more innovative designs and strategies, including new technologies and work- or school-based learning for teaching and learning of various subjects in the schools and universities. Third, the focus is on the broader question of quality education for what? Several of the articles begin to answer this question by pointing towards the overall objective of promoting quality education in pursuit of a broader social agenda on social justice.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Ontologies and possibilities of human rights : exploring dissensus to
           facilitate reconciliation in post-conflict education contexts
    • Authors: Petro Du Preez; Anne Becker
      Abstract: In light of growing critique of human rights and human rights education, this article explores ontologies of human rights, the possibilities they present for dissensus and how this could influence human rights education in post-conflict education contexts towards reconciliation. We draw on Dembour's (2010) categorisation of the different schools of human rights and Ranciere's (2004) two forms of rights to explore possible constructing points of dissensus. The data obtained in a NRF funded project Human rights literacy: A quest for meaning (Roux, 2012), indicate that student-teachers are disillusioned by human rights and perceive a conflict between what human rights are (contextual) and could (idealistic) be. While we concur with Keet (2015) that there is a need for "Critical Human Rights Education" (Keet, 2015) we focus on human action and the structuring of dissensus within political, social and educational spaces as crucial to the continual formulation, claims, rejection, amendments and recognition of human rights. In conclusion, we pose that human rights education should be a continual dissonant process, enabling moments of dissensus within intersecting spaces of (non)existing rights.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Pre-service teachers' competence to teach science through information and
           communication technologies in South Africa
    • Authors: Thuthukile Jita
      Abstract: Research suggests that there is a need for better training of prospective teachers on information and communication technologies (ICTs) in order to encourage their use for teaching and learning in schools. This paper presents findings on the self-perceptions of competence by pre-service teachers to use ICTs for teaching science content. A mixed method approach was used where 103 final year pre-service teachers completed a questionnaire on their competence to use ICTs for teaching and 21 of them participated in focus group interviews concerning their experiences with ICTs during teaching practice. Results show that pre-service teachers seem to be more competent in the non-technology related skills compared to the technology related knowledge fields and that there are significant variations in their ICT competences. These variations largely result from the uneven opportunities to learn that are provided to the pre-service teachers. More significantly, the directional trend shown by the correlations indicates that the more lecturers or mentor teachers use ICT tools to teach, the more pre-service teachers learn to use ICT tools in their own teaching. The paper concludes with a discussion on the implication of these findings for policy and practice and specifically suggests that there is a need to review the policy guidelines on the development of the teacher education programmes to be more deliberate in their inclusion of ICTs. The key recommended contribution is for teacher preparation programmes at universities to be restructured in order to improve the training of future teachers on the use of ICTs to teach science.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Promoting student teachers' adaptive capabilities through community
           engagement
    • Authors: Dipane Hlalele; Cias T. Tsotetsi
      Abstract: The gap between student teachers and their ability to adapt to the school situation remains a challenge. The literature further indicates that there is an under-utilisation of students' abilities in an ever-changing curriculum that should be responsive to the challenges with which communities are faced. This paper aims to report on the students' adaptive capabilities through a school-initiated community engagement project. Approximately nine students were placed at schools on Saturdays while offering lessons to grade nine learners. A focus group interview was held with the students who offered natural sciences, mathematics and social sciences after the initiative. Findings of this study included raising the students' awareness for the need and ability to improvise in order to attend to the needs of the school and their ability to go out and seek information from other schools, the university and experienced teachers. The students were also able to leave the handouts they had designed for the school. The study provides insights into the adaptability of students in schools and recommends further empowerment spaces for student teachers and the school community.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Why do they want to become English teachers : a case study of Taiwanese
           EFL teachers
    • Authors: Chih-Min Shih
      Abstract: Although it has been argued that knowledge on initial motivation for choosing teaching as a career is necessary for improving teacher education programmes and teacher education policies, there is a lack of research investigating this issue in the fields of English as a second language (ESL) and English as a foreign language (EFL). Grounded in Watt and Richardson's (2007) Factors Influencing Teaching Choice (FIT Choice) framework, which laid its foundation on expectancy-value theory, this study fills that research gap by examining why EFL teachers chose teaching as a career. Thirty-eight EFL teachers with diverse backgrounds were interviewed. The results indicated that the participants became EFL teachers mainly for complicated, multi-layered reasons. They were attracted to teaching because of its intrinsic career value and its salary. The former refers to the fact that they enjoyed English or that they wanted to become a teacher since childhood. The latter applied to those who were either pleased with the salary or who could strike a balance between work and life, work and study or work and health while earning a competitive salary. Surprisingly, the participants rarely mentioned personal utility value (e.g., job security) as motivation. This study suggests that ESL/EFL teachers require intrinsic and extrinsic motivations to commit to teaching.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Work integrated learning competencies : industrial supervisors'
           perspectives
    • Authors: Thobeka Pearl Makhathini
      Abstract: Research on student-learning outcomes indicates that university graduates do not possess relevant skills required by the industry such as leadership, emotional intelligence, problem solving, communication, decision-making skills and the ability to function in a multicultural environment. Currently, engineering graduates are expected to perform within a diverse working environment, hence the need to possess appropriate professional competencies and attributes. This paper seeks to identify strengths and potential shortfalls of work integrated learning (WIL) for students placed in the engineering sector. It presents findings from a study of workplace supervisors of chemical engineering students at one university of technology on the coastal seaboard. Supervisors from a variety of chemical industries completed a WIL students' competency assessment, which measures 23 work-related competencies using a 4-point Likert scale. The competencies were organised under two broad themes of cognitive and behavioural skills. The two themes were further broken down into five sub-themes, namely ability, performance, judgement, attitude and suitability. This defines the common characteristics of superior performers within the workplace. The results show that most students meet the standard expectation on the cognitive or 'hard' skills but seem to lack the behavioural or 'soft' skills. There were statistically significant differences between cognitive and behavioural skills. The findings from this study suggest that cooperative education programmes need to do more in developing the students' soft skills before they go out for WIL placement to ensure effectiveness and broad-based technical competence.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Smartphones in public secondary schools : views of matric graduates
    • Authors: Francis Z. Mavhunga; Israel Kibirige, Benard Chigonga Manthiba Ramaboka
      Abstract: Many schools in South Africa ban smartphones. The decision does not take into account the views of the learners. The purpose of this paper was to elicit learners' views regarding smartphones in schools. A survey design was used and data were collected from 93 learners using a questionnaire consisting of closed- and open-ended items. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics for the closed-ended items and taxonomical analysis was used for the open-ended items. The results indicate that 55.9% of learners are of the view that smartphones should be allowed in schools. The results from the open-ended items show that information searching and processing were the most prevalent views among learners. While the learners acknowledged possible distractions using smartphones in classrooms, their views included setting rules to limit any misuse of smartphones in schools. This study recommends further study on learners' views regarding smartphones in schools.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • The effects of translanguaging on the bi-literate inferencing strategies
           of fourth grade learners
    • Authors: Vukile Desmond Mgijima; Leketi Makalela
      Abstract: Previous research suggests that enhanced cognitive and metacognitive skills are achieved when translanguaging techniques are applied in a multilingual classroom. This paper presents findings on the effects of translanguaging techniques on teaching grade 4 learners how to apply relevant background knowledge when drawing inferences during reading. It examines the efficacy of simultaneously using the learners' home language and second language in reading development among bilingual Xhosa-English readers in a rural school in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. The study adopted a quasi-experimental design where the participants attempted pre-tests in the targeted languages and then after an intervention were provided interventions using translanguaging techniques, thereafter they attempted post-tests. The findings indicate improved performance in terms of learners' use of background knowledge when drawing inferences, instead of heavily relying on the reading text. The researchers argue for a literacy model that integrates skills and practices drawn from all accessible linguistic repertoires of learners when dealing with reading development at elementary grades since this helps learners develop a sense of self, which in return allows them to be active participants in their learning.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Dialogical habitus engagement : the twists and turns of teachers'
           pedagogical learning within a professional learning community
    • Authors: Aslam Fataar; Jennifer Feldman
      Abstract: The focus of this article is on the pedagogical learning of five teachers in a professional learning community (PLC). The PLC was conceptualised as a means of generating pedagogical learning and change among the participating teachers in consonance with a socially just educational orientation. The two authors of this article participated in the PLC as participants and facilitators. This article discusses the difficulty that the PLC encountered as it engaged with the 'hardness' of pedagogical change among the teachers. We suggest that the dialogical approach of the PLC, as a form of 'habitus engagement', has the potential to capacitate the form of adaptation and change required by the teachers. The article discusses the twists and turns involved in the PLC's struggle to deliberate productively about pedagogical change. It describes an absence of a didactic language and pedagogic reflexivity among the teachers that caused the PLC conversations to remain 'stuck' in discussions that revolved around issues external to pedagogical knowledge transfer, mainly regarding keeping order and discipline in their classes. We describe how introducing a pedagogical tool into the PLC deliberations enabled the teachers to move towards a more participatory approach in their teaching practices. The exemplifying basis of our article is our deliberations with the five teachers in the PLC and the article describes the 'methodo-logic' of the PLC process that incorporated an emphasis on reflexive dialogue and ongoing interaction to establish a generative pedagogical platform for social justice pedagogies.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Thank you
    • Abstract: We would like to thank the assessors who assisted us by reviewing articles submitted in 2016.
      PubDate: 2016-09-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: M.G. (Sechaba) Mahlomaholo
      Abstract: This issue of Perspectives in Education (PiE) demonstrates the need of always searching for quality enhancement strategies in all education contexts. UNESCO's 17 Sustainable Development Goals seem to provide the logical backdrop in research geared towards this aim as reported in this issue. The papers focus mainly on how quality education can be achieved by understanding the learners/students and teachers' views as the starting point. Towards this end, they also indirectly talk to ways in which social inclusion of all human beings can be achieved. It is interesting to note how all the papers come from different theoretical positions, also in terms of the research questions they investigate but ultimately reach findings that relate to how quality in education can be enhanced.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • A measurement scale for students' usage of online networks
    • Authors: Rachel Barker; Derek Ong
      Abstract: Studies suggest that students are increasingly turning to information and communication technologies as learning tools in which they can present multiple identities quite explicitly tied to context, knowledge and understanding within online networks. Hence it is imperative for educational institutions to understand how twenty-first-century learners use online networks for their identity formation and learning experiences. Through a systematic review of existing instruments, constructs and elements were identified and used to develop a new conceptual research framework which was quantitatively tested on a convenience sample of students (n=300) at Sunway University in Malaysia. Based on the results, a measurement scale was developed and analysed through structural equation modelling and confirmatory factor analysis. The responses of the students revealed they are more likely to use online networks for identity formation than for the learning experience and that there is a relationship between identity formation, the learning experience and the use of online networks.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Insights from traditional initiation teachers (Basuwe) on the influence of
           male traditional initiation (lebollo) on the behaviour of schoolboys
    • Authors: Sello Martin Blase Mohlaloka; Lynette Jacobs Nita Corene De Wet
      Abstract: This article aims to describe the outcomes of traditional initiation schools (lebollo), identify reasons for initiates' deviant behaviour at school after returning from lebollo and offer some suggestions on how to reduce deviant behaviour that may be linked to lebollo. The literature review has shown that lebollo aims to equip initiates with competencies that are necessary for adulthood. A content analysis of data emanating from interviews with two traditional initiation teachers (basuwe) identify initiates youthfulness, inadequate time spent at the initiation school, the erroneous view of initiates that they are adults, initiates' unwillingness to embrace the teaching of their elders, alcohol abuse and the inappropriate conduct of parents as reasons for initiates' misbehaviour. The study emphasises the need for close cooperation between formal schools' disciplinary committees and basuwe, as well as between the parents of initiates and basuwe to reduce initiates' misbehaviour.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Shifting from disorientation to orientation : reading student discourses
           of success
    • Authors: Nicola Cloete; Catherine Duncan
      Abstract: Academic success in higher education is generally evaluated by means of concrete and measurable criteria that function as an institutional discourse of success. However, a parallel discourse of success that is far less evident is the languaging and identification of success or failure that students hold and circulate. This paper investigates what counts as success from students' perspectives using a critical lens informed by Stuart Hall's discursive analysis and James Gee's inclusive articulation of discourse. We argue that students tend to describe and evaluate their success in a consistent way, making it more than a highly individualised set of statements. Being well versed in terms of "what counts" for the institution, we consider "what counts" for the students: what do they endorse, contest or negotiate as markers of success? We subsequently tease out the similarities and distinctions in these two discourses that function in parallel and read the recurring themes and nuances of (dis)orientation that come through in the interviews as markers for an alternative discourse of success or failure that stands alongside of (and occasionally in opposition to) the institutional discourse.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Teaching and learning of Mandarin as a foreign language in South African
           schools
    • Authors: Norma Nel
      Abstract: Globalisation has influenced the demand for the acquisition of Mandarin. As a proactive response, the South African Department of Education included Mandarin as a second additional language in the National Curriculum Statement grades R-12 in March 2015. The research reported on in this article was context specific. It entailed a case study of a school in Gauteng that had introduced Mandarin as a foreign language. Chomsky's language theory, the interactionist theory and Vygotsky's socio-cultural theory are acknowledged. A qualitative inquiry strategy was employed; individual and focus group interviews, questionnaires and observations were used as data gathering tools. Content analysis was done manually. Themes, categories and subcategories were identified. The research culminated in a case study narrative elaborating on the main themes, namely motivation and beliefs, teaching Mandarin, and learners' learning experiences.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Theorising a capability approach to equal participation for undergraduate
           students at a South African university
    • Authors: Talita M.L. Calitz; Melanie Walker Merridy Wilson-Strydom
      Abstract: This article applies a capability approach to the problem of unequal participation for working-class, first-generation students at a South African university. Even though access to higher education institutions is increasing for historically excluded students, when race and class disaggregate completion rates, there are persistent patterns of unequal participation. In the first part of the article, the capability approach is used to conceptualise dimensions of equal participation, which include resources, agency, recognition and practical reason. In the second part of the paper, these four principles are applied to an empirical case study, which is drawn from a longitudinal research project that tracked the equality of participation of undergraduate university students at a South African university. The article makes the case for pedagogical and institutional arrangements that enable equal participation for students who are precariously positioned at higher education institutions.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Interconnectedness of technology teachers' perceptions of the design
           process to learner creativity
    • Authors: Asheena Singh-Pillay; Frank Ohemeng-Appiah
      Abstract: The design process (DP) is key to technology education and is considered as synonymous with problem solving, hence it undergirds all its learning aims and objectives. The Curriculum Assessment and Policy Statement (CAPS) document envisages that the design process will promote problem solving, critical thinking and creativity in learners. However, a paucity of empirical studies within the South African context illuminates the interconnectedness of DP to problem solving, critical thinking and creativity in learners for which the CAPS policy advocates. Further, there is a need to explore the interconnectedness of teachers' perceptions of the DP, their enactment of the DP and its impact on learner creativity. This paper reports on a study that explored that interconnectedness and addressed the following research questions: What are grade 9 technology teachers' perceptions of the design process? How do these perceptions relate to teachers' reported enactment of the DP and creativity in learners? The conceptual framework used to model the interconnectedness that exists between teachers' perceptions and reported enactment of the design process is Shulman's pedagogical content knowledge model (PCK). This interpretivist study was located in the Umlazi district of KwaZulu-Natal. A case study design was used to collect qualitative data via an open-ended questionnaire and a semi-structured interview from 30 purposively selected technology teachers. Content analysis of data was undertaken in line with the conceptual framework. Our findings reflect that teachers' perception and reported enactment of DP and the flexibility of the learning environment have an impact on opportunities for problem solving, critical thinking and creativity in learners. Our findings raise questions about the type of professional development teachers need to enact the envisaged goals of the CAPS document in respect of the DP in technology education.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • One teacher's experiences of teaching reading in an urban multi-grade
           foundation phase class
    • Authors: Colleen Sampson
      Abstract: Many teachers have been confronted by the demanding situation of teaching two or more year groups in the same classroom although data on this multi-grade phenomenon is scarce. The purpose of this study attempts to answer the research question: What are the experiences of one foundation phase teacher when teaching reading in an urban multi-grade foundation phase class? The theoretical framework central to answering the research question was based on Lave and Wenger's (1991) community of practice. The literature review highlights the physical setting of urban multi-grade classrooms, debates the limitations and benefits of urban multi-grade teaching and finally briefly outlines the old and the new South African curriculum policies with regard to reading. A qualitative interpretive case study research design was formulated to explore the complex phenomenon of reading practices in the foundation phase. Data were collected using interviews and observations, which were video recorded. In conclusion, this unique study reveals that despite evidence from provincial tests indicating poor reading results in multi-grade teaching of reading, this teacher proved that reading in urban multi-grade classes does work. In her classroom, she showed that multi-grade teaching of reading fosters the emotional, intellectual, social and academic well-being of learners.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Race, gender and sexuality in student experiences of violence and
           resistances on a university campus
    • Authors: Josephine Cornell; Kopano Ratele Shose Kessi
      Abstract: With the dismantling of apartheid in 1994, significant changes were made to higher education in South Africa. Access to higher education has expanded and student bodies are now more representative in terms of gender and race. However, demographic change alone is insufficient for higher education transformation. As in other parts of the world, within dominant educational discourses ideal students are still typically represented as white, middle-class, male, cisgender and heterosexual. Furthermore, students who occupy these categories tend to hold symbolic power within these institutions. Recently, student movements, starting with RhodesMustFall (RMF) at the University of Cape Town (UCT), have begun to challenge this and draw attention to these issues of transformation. This study was critically and empathically provoked by engagements around the RMF movement and aimed to examine students' experiences of transformation in higher education relating to race, gender and sexuality at UCT. Photovoice methods (involving focus groups, personal reflections, photographs and written stories) were used to explore two groups of students' experiences of non-direct, symbolic violence (i.e. issues of bathrooms, residences and campus art) and direct, physical violence on campus as well as these students' resistances and disruptions to the violence they encountered.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Map literacy and spatial cognition challenges for student geography
           teachers in South Africa
    • Authors: Rhoda Larangeira; Rhoda Larangeira Clinton David Van der Merwe
      Abstract: South African geography student teachers should master map skills to teach mapwork effectively in their future classrooms. Spatial cognition, prior learning of map skills and map interpretation at secondary school-level are highlighted as being important in furthering map literacy, which is required by geography student teachers. A mixed-method research framework investigated the causes of map literacy difficulties experienced by first year geography student teachers. Lecturers who train prospective teachers should be aware of the conceptual and/or skills-based difficulties associated with poor map literacy amongst their own students in order to address these problems. This paper outlines problems experienced by first year geography student teachers associated with their own acquisition and understanding of mapwork. Furthermore, it argues that without deeper comprehensive development of their own mapwork content knowledge, the geography student teachers' ability to teach map skills effectively will be adversely affected.
      PubDate: 2016-06-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Why academic depth and rigour in university-based coursework matters for
           prospective teachers
    • Authors: Lee Rusznyak; Robert Balfour, Willie Van Vollenhoven Lungi Sosibo
      Abstract: Initial teacher education (ITE) programmes are expected to prepare teachers who have the capacity to develop conceptually strong, responsive and inclusive teaching practices. The extent to which ITE programmes have been successful in this endeavour has been questioned both internationally (e.g. Lancaster & Auhl, 2013) and within the South African context (Council on Higher Education [CHE], 2010). In retrospect, it is not surprising that the review of initial teacher education (ITE) programmes conducted by the CHE between 2005 and 2007 found that the sector was experiencing tension between "the theoretical and conceptual rigour expected of a professional degree and the vocation-specific training of teachers" for classroom readiness (CHE, 2010: 103). The institutional mergers between teacher training colleges, faculties of education and universities of technologies meant that teacher educators were encountering approaches to the preparation of teachers very different to the ones they had previously used (Gordon, 2008; Kruss, 2008). The first national policy governing the provision of teacher education, the Norms and Standards for Educators (Department of Education, 2000) posed additional challenges to the newly merged sector: it stipulated that ITE programmes should prepare prospective teachers for 7 different 'roles of the educator'. By the end of their ITE, qualifying teachers should have achieved 10 exit level outcomes, verified against a set of 89 assessment criteria. South African teacher educators thus found themselves grappling with how to organise coursework and practicum expectations around these (extensive) lists of discrete roles, outcomes and competences (e.g. Fraser, Killen & Nieman, 2005). The CHE review noted that tensions around academic depth and contextual relevance were particularly prominent in programmes where a conceptual framework was absent.
      PubDate: 2016-03-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Thinking, language and learning in initial teacher education
    • Authors: Nick Taylor
      Abstract: Initial teacher education (ITE) serves as a bridge between prospective teachers exiting the school system to enrol in teacher education faculties, on the one hand and newly qualified teachers (NQTs) who are embarking on a career in schooling on the other. The present paper describes the language and thinking skills student teachers bring to their ITE programmes and the conditions faced by NQTs when they enter schools on the other side of the chalk face. This is the context within which we ask the question: To what extent are the universities providing the teachers required by the school system? While a review of the literature, together with new evidence emerging from the Initial Teacher Education Research Project (ITERP) study, indicates that the answer to this question is by no means unequivocally positive, the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) has issued new regulations aimed at addressing the gap between current programmes and the demands of schooling. We conclude by arguing that the quality of ITE will only be improved once teacher educators move their practices closer to those of practitioners in the strong professions, which are characterised by the development of a strong theoretical knowledge base, from which effective protocols of practice may be derived and which is continuously interrogated by the practitioners themselves. We suggest that the place to start on this quest is the instruction of prospective primary school teachers in early literacy and numeracy.
      PubDate: 2016-03-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Ensuring academic depth and rigour in teacher education through
           benchmarking, with special attention to context
    • Authors: H.J. Steyn; J.L. Van der Walt C.C. Wolhuter
      Abstract: Benchmarking is one way of ensuring academic depth and rigour in teacher education. After making a case for setting benchmarks in teacher education based on the widely recognised intra-education system contextual factors, the importance of also taking into account the external (e.g. the national-social) context in which teacher education occurs is highlighted. A five-step plan is offered for ensuring academic depth and rigour in teacher education through benchmarking. The process is illustrated with examples from the South African situation. The article concludes with an outline of the contextual conditions with which teacher educators in South Africa have to cope.
      PubDate: 2016-03-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Humanising pedagogy : an alternative approach to curriculum design that
           enhances rigour in a B.Ed. programme
    • Authors: Deidre Geduld; Heloise Sathorar
      Abstract: The minimum requirements for teacher education qualifications (MRTEQ) draws attention to the complexity of teaching as an activity that is premised upon the acquisition, integration and application of different types of knowledge practices or learning. As such, all initial teacher education programmes in South Africa should be designed such that they include disciplinary knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, practical knowledge, fundamental knowledge and situational knowledge. These types of knowledge underpin a teacher's ability to facilitate meaningful learning in the classroom, which in turn facilitates higher education's responsiveness to societal needs.In this article, we reflect on the faculty's recent curriculum renewal journey towards designing a coherent and rigorous B.Ed. programme. We locate our curriculum renewal journey in critical theory and our new curriculum itself is grounded in humanising pedagogies, critical reflection and inquiry. We also describe the consultation and collaborative processes we engaged in to ensure that our new B.Ed. programme would be responsive to the needs of our students and society.
      PubDate: 2016-03-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • The struggle for academic rigour in assessment education
    • Authors: Carola Steinberg; Tom Waspe
      Abstract: This article explores the meaning of academic rigour in relation to a fourth year assessment education course for pre-service teachers. We present the requirements for a course to be considered academically rigorous, describe the course we offered in the light of these criteria and then present the students' responses. Our findings indicate differing perspectives between lecturers and students on what it means to learn about assessment and to be academically rigorous. Whereas the lecturers were expecting engagement with assessment theory and practice from all students, many students 'tuned out' whenever the course did not engage them in practical examples related to their subject specialisation. Only exceptional students moved beyond compliance with course requirements. The struggle for academic rigour involves developing a better alignment between lecturer and student expectations. This has implications for more explicit explanation of course purposes as well as increased cooperation with subject specialisation methodology courses.
      PubDate: 2016-03-01T00:00:00Z
       
 
 
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