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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 185 journals)

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ACCORD Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
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Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, h-index: 17)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Farm Child and Youth Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.552, h-index: 8)
African J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.105, h-index: 0)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Markets Overview     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Plant Protection     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arms Control : Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CME : Your SA J. of CPD     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Codicillus     Full-text available via subscription  
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa = Communicare : Tydskrif vir Kommunikasiewetenskappe in Suider-Afrika     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Full-text available via subscription  
Crime Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
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English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
HR Highway     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Injury and Safety Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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J. for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Juta's Business Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [9 followers]  Follow    
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     ISSN (Print) 1028-8457
     Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [185 journals]
  • Research as praxis : perspectives on interpreting data from a science and
           indigenous knowledge systems project
    • Abstract: Author: Nhalevilo, Emilia Afonso Ogunniyi, Meshach Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 210-218 Abstract: This article presents a reflection on an aspect of research methodology, particularly on the interpretation strategy of data from a Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Project (SIKSP) in a South African university. The data interpretation problem arose while we were analysing the effects of a series of SIKSP-based workshops on the views of a group of participating science teachers concerning the importance and place of their religious, cultural and philosophical beliefs relative to their professional practice. When interpreting the data we noticed what seemed to us to be an incongruity in the data. In one instance teachers seemed to favour subjectivity in science teaching, but in another instance the views of science from the same teachers were distinctly objective. For some time we tried to make sense of this incongruity. In the midst of the confusion an emergent perspective surfaced concerning our own subjectivities in interpreting the data. We postponed the initial intention in interpreting the data - to evaluate the impact of the workshops - and our problem became the contradiction found in the data. Our emergent research questions underlying this article thus focused on methodological issues in terms of: (1) which epistemological standpoint did we take in analysing the data? (2) what possible different standpoints were taken by the subjects? and (3) what are the implications if different standpoints are taken? The purpose of this article, therefore, is to present our developing engagement with the data, a meta-reflection about the lenses we used in interpreting the data.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Comparing Grade 11 Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy learners'
           algebraic proficiency in temperature conversion problems
    • Abstract: Author: Mbonambi, Martin Sipho Bansilal, Sarah Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 198-209 Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore and compare the proficiency of Grade 11 Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy (ML) learners in solving two problems based on the temperature conversion formula. The first was a result-unknown problem that asks for the result of a formula for a given input. The second was a start-unknown problem in which the result of a formula is presented and the input is required. The sample for the study was 94 Mathematics and 339 ML Grade 11 learners from four rural schools in North Durban. The results indicate that 80% of the Mathematics group and 76% of the ML group solved the result-unknown problem while 32% of the Mathematics group and 7% of the ML group solved the start-unknown version. The findings reveal that the vast majority of the ML learners and most of the Mathematics learners did not have the requisite algebraic skill to manipulate the formula in order to arrive at a solution. Instead, more than half of the alternative solution strategies are classified as 'number grabbing' and 'swopping variables'. It is recommended that interventions to improve learners' algebraic proficiency should be targeted at lower grades.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • 'We won't know it since we don't teach it' : interactions between
           teachers' knowledge and practice
    • Abstract: Author: Brodie, Karin Sanni, Rasheed Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 188-197 Abstract: Much of the work on teacher knowledge suggests that content knowledge shapes pedagogical content knowledge, and in fact is primary in the relationship between the two forms of knowledge. In this paper we challenge this view, arguing from a situated perspective on knowledge and learning, that pedagogical content knowledge strongly shapes content knowledge, and in fact, may be primary in some cases. We develop this argument theoretically and illustrate it with data from two contexts: Nigeria and South Africa. The data from the Nigerian context come from scenario-based teacher knowledge interviews, which we used to explore teacher knowledge in geometry. The data from the South African context come from interactions in professional learning communities of mathematics teachers. We make two, related, arguments. First, practising teachers' knowledge is strongly influenced by their practice, so that they come to know well what they teach regularly. Second, learning new pedagogical content knowledge can precede learning new content knowledge. We argue that taking the relationships between practice and knowledge seriously may help researchers develop non-deficit understandings of teachers' knowledge and at the same time work to improve both teachers' and learners' mathematical understandings.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Potential gaps during the transition from the embodied through symbolic to
           formal worlds of reflective symmetry
    • Abstract: Author: Mhlolo, Michael Kainose Schafer, Marc Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 125-138 : Even though reflective symmetry is heavily embedded in the everyday, learners continue to experience challenges when they mathematize concepts from this informal/everyday context. In this article we argue that symmetry exists in nature, it can also be symbolized algebraically and it can be abstracted into the world of axioms and theorems. We problematize this multiple nature of symmetry which on one hand is supportive and on the other acts as a contributory factor to learners' gaps in knowledge. Tall's three worlds of mathematics helped us to show the transition of symmetry from the embodied through symbolic to the formal world and the inherent gaps attributed to the shifts in thinking thereof. We then used this same framework to analyse learners' responses to a reflective symmetry task. The results show that many learner responses could be explained explicitly by the lack of flexibility in the applicability of experiences in the embodied world of reflective symmetry. Learners' responses were deeply rooted in the embodied world, which indeed remains helpful in some situations but tended to confuse them in others, hence inhibiting further application. The article recommends that teachers need to understand these subtle changes so that they can address the challenges explicitly.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Questions about answers : probing teachers' awareness and planned
           remediation of learners' misconceptions about electric circuits
    • Abstract: Author: Gaigher, Estelle Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 176-187 Abstract: This article reports an exploratory multi-case study on how science teachers understand and envisage addressing learners' misconceptions about electric circuits. Four teachers from schools in and around a large South African city participated in the study. An open-ended questionnaire was designed in a novel way, questioning teachers about wrong answers they expected from their learners in test items suitable for Grade 9. Semi-structured interviews supported the questionnaire results, providing insight into the teachers' understanding of learners' misconceptions, and their ideas about how learners' misconceptions should be addressed. Two of the teachers showed insight into learners' conceptual difficulties, reflecting on learners' thinking. Another teacher indicated some typical wrong answers but seldom understood the misconceptions leading to these mistakes, while the remaining teacher did not expect typical wrong answers corresponding to well-known misconceptions. All the teachers indicated that they would address learners' mistakes mostly by practical work or demonstrations, but only two of the teachers also referred to the importance of developing conceptual understanding. Results suggest that these teachers' understanding of learners' misconceptions relates to their own subject matter knowledge. Furthermore, the study showed that the technique of questioning teachers about anticipated learners' answers is a promising way of probing teachers' understanding of learners' misconceptions and the strategies they envisage using to address these misconceptions. It is recommended that learners' misconceptions be addressed explicitly in teacher preparation and professional development programmes as an avenue to develop teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK).
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Exploring methodologies for researching indigenous knowledge of plant
           healing for integration into classroom science : insights related to the
           data collection phase
    • Abstract: Author: Mpofu, Vongai Mushayikwa, Emmanuel Otulaja, Femi S. Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 164-175 Abstract: This article forms part of a major study being conducted in Zimbabwe to explore the possibilities of integrating indigenous knowledge of plant healing (Ikoph) into western-oriented classroom science. The article reports on an aspect of research methodology. This study explored appropriate strategies for gaining access to indigenous knowledge holders, and for generating indigenous knowledge data from these knowledge holders. It is a descriptive study rooted in an African indigenous research methodology. Data were generated through field-noted observations and audio-recorded conversations with 12 participants during the phases of attaining access and of data generation. The findings demonstrated that the participants hold a solid spiritual worldview alongside that of western science and Christianity. Ikoph occupies these participants' metaphysical knowledge zone, although when asked they initially display western science and Christian worldviews related to plant healing. The use of the knowledge holders' language, terminology and metaphors, and of socio-cultural research protocols and methods, was pivotal in accessing the indigenous knowledge of plant healing. It also emerged that spirits play a central role in penetrating this metaphysical knowledge zone. It is argued that classical interpretive research approaches are constricting research involving indigenous knowledge. A shift from such approaches to those that accommodate unique aspects of spirituality, language, methods and protocols of the researched - that is, indigenous African interpretive approaches - is being called for.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Using eye tracking to investigate first year students' digital proficiency
           and their use of a learning management system in an open distance
           environment
    • Abstract: Author: Mabila, Jabulisiwe Gelderblom, Helene Ssemugabi, Samuel Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 151-163 Abstract: The internet gives individuals access to learning through online technologies. The prolific use of Learning Management Systems (LMSs) in higher education institutions makes Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills or e-skills very important. ICT skill levels have been positively related to students' effectiveness and efficiency in using LMSs. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between digital proficiency and user performance of students studying End User Computing when using the LMS at the University of South Africa (Unisa), an open distance learning institution. Based on their performance in a simulated competence-based assessment, students were categorized into four groups of a digital proficiency framework, namely Digital Awareness, Digital Literacy, Digital Competence and Digital Expertise. Students then used the LMS in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) laboratory to perform three assigned tasks while eye tracking and usability testing data were collected. This evidence, including heat maps and gaze plots, was used to identify usability problems that the students experienced when using the LMS. The usability problems were then compared across the four digital proficiency groups to examine the relationship between students' digital proficiency and their performance in using the LMS. The findings show that the efficiency and effectiveness of using the LMS relate directly to students' proficiency levels. It is also clear that while some usability problems, especially visibility and language problems, were experienced by participants across all four levels of digital proficiency, other usability problems were specific to students with lower digital proficiency levels.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Electronic tutoring as a tool for promoting conceptual change : a case
           study of in-service science teacher workshops
    • Abstract: Author: Stott, Angela Case, Jennifer M. Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 139-150 Abstract: Electronic tutors able to respond appropriately to a user's input have been shown to be effective in improving learning in a number of contexts. This study extends this research into the context of conceptual change during in-service science teacher workshops. Quantitative data were collected from 1,049 South African grade 12 physical sciences teachers who attended 54 in-service teacher workshops held by the first author across all South African provinces and hosted by volunteer schools. These teachers completed pre- and post-tests about the force concept. The teachers from each workshop were assigned, by convenience, to one of three treatment groups. The individual group (n = 296) engaged with the software between answering the tests. The plenary group (559) was taught using the tutoring software as an aid. The control group (194) received no electronic tutoring intervention. Participants also answered questions about themselves and their schools. The findings suggest that individual use of the software can be effective in promoting conceptual change in the context of the in-service teacher workshop, especially for those who already have relatively high levels of prior knowledge. However, plenary use of this software, in this context, appears to have limited effectiveness in promoting conceptual change. The patterns of engagement indicate an evolutionary, slow and iterative process of conceptual change, with limited transfer of learning across contexts. The findings suggest that multiple short modules of varying levels of advancement are more advisable than fewer, longer, less varied modules.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • We would like to express our appreciation for all our reviewers for 2013
    • Abstract: Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 111-112 Abstract: We would like to express our appreciation for all our reviewers for 2013
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
  • Prospects and challenges of using the argumentation instructional method
           to indigenise school science teaching
    • Abstract: Author: Moyo, Partson Virira Kizito, Rita Vol 18 Issue 2 Publication: 2014 Page: 113-124 Abstract: Identifying an instructional tool for merging scientific and indigenous knowledge (IK) is problematic as there is no clear guidance on how this can be achieved. Argumentation is recommended as a possible integrative instructional theoretical methodology as it imbues notions of dialogue and persuasion, while at the same time embracing the scientific ideas of inference, logic and procedural rules. It offers a means for protecting individual beliefs within a rational dialogic frame of reference. To identify the benefits and challenges associated with indigenising science teaching in South African schools, 16 grade 10 learners were exposed to an instructional intervention programme where, through argumentation, their knowledge and beliefs about the nature of lightning were explored. The intervention programmme included a questionnaire soliciting learner beliefs on lightning, as well as classroom discussion sessions on stories related to lightning. Using Toulmin's Argumentation Pattern and the Contiguity Argumentation Theory as analytical tools, statements from the learners were analysed in terms of the learners' levels of argumentation and their understandings about science and/or indigenous knowledge worldviews. Initially, all learners explained the causes of lightning in terms of science only. After the intervention, learners accepted that science explanations of lightning were inadequate, and that other explanations, such as those based on indigenous knowledge, were needed to compliment the scientific explanations. The study results show that the use of dialogical argumentation instruction to integrate scientific and IK explanations can lead to a deeper understanding of natural phenomena. It offers a possible instructional tool for indigenising science teaching in South African schools. However, integrating science and IK is not easy.
      PubDate: 2014-07-14T14:02:23Z
       
 
 
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