for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 185 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last

ACCORD Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, h-index: 17)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Farm Child and Youth Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.552, h-index: 8)
African J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.105, h-index: 0)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Markets Overview     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Plant Protection     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agriprobe     Full-text available via subscription  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arms Control : Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Consumer Confidence Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Consumer Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Economic Prospects : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Intermediate Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CME : Your SA J. of CPD     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Codicillus     Full-text available via subscription  
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa = Communicare : Tydskrif vir Kommunikasiewetenskappe in Suider-Afrika     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Full-text available via subscription  
Crime Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Dairy Mail Africa : Publication for the Dairy Industry in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Educare     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription  
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enterprise Risk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
HR Highway     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Injury and Safety Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. SportMed J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 7)
Investment Analysts J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.237, h-index: 3)
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. for Estate Planning Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Juta's Business Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Journal Cover African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education
   [9 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1028-8457
     Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [185 journals]
  • Scientific literacy and the South African school curriculum
    • Abstract: Author: Lelliott, Anthony Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 311-323 Abstract: The notion of scientific literacy is contested terrain, particularly when the term is used in school curricula. Using a scientific literacy framework of Vision I (covers science products and processes) and Vision II (based on science-related situations as a starting point for discussion), the article analyses the Natural Science (grades 7-9) curricula in South Africa developed and implemented over the past two decades. The Revised National Curriculum Statement (RNCS) and the Curriculum and Policy Statement (CAPS) were scrutinised for indicators of each vision. Findings indicate that, while the RNCS espoused the concept of scientific literacy, the CAPS made little mention of it. While both curricula are dominated by Vision I indicators, particularly science products and processes, the CAPS document focuses almost exclusively on these. The implications of highly specified content and narrow interpretations of scientific literacy have consequences for teacher education and textbooks authors, as well as learners who will exit the school system before grade 10 and who need to be scientifically literate to function effectively as citizens in South Africa's nascent democracy.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Primary teachers' experiences relating to the administration processes of
           
    • Abstract: Author: Graven, Mellony Venkat, Hamsa Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 299-310 Abstract: In this paper we highlight teacher experiences of the administration of high-stakes testing, in particular, of the 2012 Annual National Assessments (ANAs). The exploration is based on data gathered across two primary numeracy teacher development projects in the Eastern Cape and Gauteng in the form of open-ended questionnaires designed to elicit teacher experiences of the 2012 Numeracy ANAs (at Grades 1-3) and Mathematics ANAs (Grades 4-6). Fifty-four teachers across 21 schools (including fee-paying and non-fee-paying schools) completed the questionnaire. Using a grounded approach to the analysis of data, we note that, while teachers state support for the purpose of the ANAs, several concerns emerge in relation to their administration. These concerns fall largely into two categories: concern for learner experiences and concern for the implications of the administration processes (including the use of exemplars and the marking process) for teacher practices. The primary purpose of the paper is to raise awareness of the need for further discussion and research into the way in which ANAs result in possible unintended consequences.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Evaluating the success of a science academic development programme at a
           research-intensive university
    • Abstract: Author: Engelbrecht, Johann Harding, Ansie Potgieter, Marietjie Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 287-298 Abstract: Academic development (AD) programmes for students not complying with the entrance requirements of mainstream programmes in science have been running at a number of universities in South Africa. In this study we contribute to the debate on criteria for the success of AD programmes, specifically in the context of research-intensive universities in South Africa. We identify five quantitative criteria for evaluating such a programme: retention, completion rate, migration to other faculties, comparison with other institutions and enrolment in graduate studies. Most of these criteria are relatively common in evaluating similar programmes whereas the extent of migration to other faculties is particular to this study. We illustrate the use of these criteria evaluating the BSc Four Year Programme at the University of Pretoria based on the group of students who registered for the programme in 2008. We found that around 15% of this group had completed their studies in the minimum time while the eventual completion rate of students getting degrees is expected to be in the order of 50%. The attrition rate across the four year science degree programme was high (43%), but the majority of students who terminated their studies did so during the first year. Of those still enrolled in their fourth year a high percentage of students remained in science-related programmes (79%). The fact that more than half of first graduates had enrolled for postgraduate programmes in 2012 is a criterion for success that is especially important for a research-intensive university.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Third-year university mathematics education students' metaphorical
           understanding of mathematics teaching and learning
    • Abstract: Author: Kaphesi, Elias Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 276-286 Abstract: This paper reports on the metaphors that 36 third-year university mathematics education students have about mathematics. These metaphors were investigated through a questionnaire with five open-ended items. An inductive analysis of the students' metaphors for mathematics indicated that students had well developed and complex metaphors about mathematics, mathematics learning, mathematics teaching and the mathematics teacher. Several common themes emerged, including the view that hard work, patience and perseverance are needed for success in mathematics. Some students emphasised their role in learning mathematics as active while others view their role of the teacher as crucial. Three mental images are common: firstly, the notion that mathematics learning is challenging and may involve anxiety; secondly, that perseverance is needed as continuing effort will bring reward; and lastly, that positive or negative mental images of mathematics are related to the perception of and the active vs passive role of the learner. Considering that the metaphors were collected from students with an extensive engagement with mathematics learning, the findings implied that these metaphors reflect the students' mental images formed as a result of experiencing mathematics learning.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Identifying tensions around gender-responsive curriculum practices in
           science teacher education in Zimbabwe : an activity theory analysis
    • Abstract: Author: Chikunda, Charles Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 264-275 Abstract: The physical sciences, mathematics and technology subjects in Zimbabwe, like in most other African countries, are still male dominated. This is despite numerous efforts over the years directed towards gender equality in these disciplines. Many studies point at teacher education as not doing enough to assist future teachers in these disciplines with knowledge, skills, attitudes and values required for gender-responsive curriculum practices. This article focuses on science, mathematics and technical subjects in a pre-service teacher education college in Zimbabwe. The aim was to generate insight about surfacing tensions that may constrain the implementation of gender-responsive curriculum practices in the department. Cultural Historical Activity Theory provided a theoretical lens to generate and analyse data. The department was heuristically the activity system, hypothetically taking gender-responsive curriculum practices as the object. A total of 36 lecturers participated in the study through six in-depth individual interviews, four with purposively sampled middle managers and two with lecturers to represent academic (science and mathematics) and practical (technical) subjects. Two focus group discussions were held with 30 lecturers who were sampled in a stratified manner. Findings revealed that habitus as defined by Bourdieu and produced by patriarchal social conditioning plays a very important role in teacher educators' identities and this influences their curriculum practices, constraining implementation of gender-responsive curriculum practices in science, mathematics and technical subjects in this teacher education college. Instrumentalist views of science on the part of teacher educators were also identified as having regulatory properties impacting negatively on gender-responsive curriculum practices in the activity system. This is despite numerous gender-related policies available with the potential to transform the curriculum. The study recommends a curriculum transformation exercise in teacher education that goes beyond policy formulation, but engages with intended policy implementers such as teacher educators in a manner that will help them to reflect on cultural norms and values in relation to gender and curriculum practice.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Teacher approaches to introducing indigenous knowledge in school science
           classrooms
    • Abstract: Author: Naidoo, Premella Devie Vithal, Renuka Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 253-263 Abstract: Recognition of the critical role of indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) in science in the new South African national curriculum for schools affirms the importance of IKS, particularly in the natural, physical and life sciences, as they are included in its policy. This paper explores the question of how teachers implement IKS in their science teaching when provided with the opportunity to do so. The study draws on a theoretical methodological framework developed for researching educational possibilities that take account of the current situation, the imagined situation for introducing IKS in science, and an arranged situation created to study 'what is not yet but could be' in science classrooms. Drawing on a range of data sources that began with a survey of teachers taking a postgraduate science education module, followed by IKS-related task analysis and interviews, three teachers from diverse science classrooms were selected for observations and further interviews. The analysis revealed three approaches to engaging IKS, which may be characterised as: an incorporationist approach that brings selected indigenous knowledge into science by seeking how 'best IKS fits into science'; a separatist approach that holds IKS 'side-by-side' with scientific knowledge; and an integrationist approach that makes 'connections' between IKS and science.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Fostering disciplinary literacy? South African physics lecturers'
           educational responses to their students' lack of representational
           competence
    • Abstract: Author: Linder, Anne Airey, John Mayaba, Nokhanyo Webb, Paul Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 242-252 Abstract: Recently, the South African Institute of Physics undertook a major review of university physics education. The report highlighted the necessity for further transformation of the teaching of physics, particularly in relation to the teaching of under-prepared students. In this article we examine how physics lecturers in South Africa reported how they respond to the teaching challenges that they face in terms of representational competence. We argue that the goal of any undergraduate degree is the production of disciplinary literate graduates, where disciplinary literacy refers to the ability to competently deal with the various representational formats used within the discipline. For physics the development of disciplinary literacy involves competence in a wide range of representations, such as written and oral languages, diagrams, graphs, mathematics, apparatus and simulations. Our interest in this study was the way in which individual physics lecturers described how they deal with their students' lack of representational competence. To this end, we interviewed 20 physics lecturers from five purposefully selected representative South African universities about their students' lack of representational competence and the educational strategies they use for dealing with this problem. These interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed for potential patterns. Iterative, interpretive analysis resulted in the identification of six qualitatively different response strategies that South African physics lecturers indicate they invoke to deal with their students' lack of representational competence. We suggest that an understanding of this range of possible response strategies will allow physics lecturers to better understand their own responses and those of their peers, and that this, in turn, may lead to changes in educational practice. Based on the differences in individual response strategies that we find, we further argue that inter- and intra-faculty discussions about undergraduate disciplinary literacy goals have the distinct potential for reforming South African undergraduate physics. Here, we suggest that the disciplinary literacy discussion matrix that we used to initiate dialogue in our interviews may also double as a useful starting point for such faculty discussions.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Identifying systems of interaction in mathematical engagement
    • Abstract: Author: Brown, Bruce J.L. Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 231-241 Abstract: Mathematical engagement is a complex process of interaction between the person and the world. This interaction is strongly influenced by the concepts and structure of the mathematical field, by the practical and symbolic tools of mathematics and by the focus of investigation in the world. This paper reports on research that involves a detailed analysis of the process of mathematical engagement by two postgraduate education students working together to solve a number of mathematical puzzles. A process model of mathematical engagement was developed, identifying coherent systems of 'thinking in action'. Both mathematical and everyday systems were identified, as well as systems that mediated the interaction between the two. Four fundamental subsystems relate to the mathematical system: subsystems oriented to mathematical objects; mathematical actions; mathematical representations; and mathematical patterns and relationships. A further four functional subsystems relate to the interaction between the mathematical and everyday: subsystems relating to linking; orientation; evaluation; and strategic control. These subsystems are detailed through the analysis of a particular episode in the engagement data.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
  • Rhetoric and reality : science teacher educators' views and practice
           regarding science process skills
    • Abstract: Author: Molefe, Leonard Stears, Michele Vol 18 Issue 3 Publication: 2014 Page: 219-230 Abstract: The importance of teaching science process skills in science education is well documented in the literature. Yet the issue of process skills had also been associated with debates on validity of a process approach to science education. This research was conducted to explore views of science teacher educators in initial teacher education programmes with regard to the importance of science process skills and how their beliefs of teaching influence their teaching of these skills. The study is located within an interpretive paradigm as an in-depth study of the views of six teacher educators was undertaken. Written responses to questions and interviews produced the necessary data. While the findings reveal that teacher educators have differing opinions regarding what constitutes process skills and differ with regard to the importance of such skills, they do identify a number of core skills as being most important, including some generic skills. The findings further show that, while science process skills are regarded as important, lecturers hold pedagogical beliefs that privilege the development of conceptual understanding rather than the acquisition of science process skills within their teaching practice. Their rhetoric regarding the importance of process skills does not therefore always match their self-reported practice, lending support to the continuing debate around science process skills.
      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:52:30Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014