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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 189 journals)

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ACCORD Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, h-index: 17)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
African Human Rights Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African J. of Farm Child and Youth Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.552, h-index: 8)
African J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.105, h-index: 0)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Markets Overview     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Plant Protection     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agriprobe     Full-text available via subscription  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arms Control : Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CME : Your SA J. of CPD     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Codicillus     Full-text available via subscription  
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa = Communicare : Tydskrif vir Kommunikasiewetenskappe in Suider-Afrika     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Full-text available via subscription  
Crime Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Dairy Mail Africa : Publication for the Dairy Industry in Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Educare     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription  
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enterprise Risk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HR Highway     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indo-Pacific J. of Phenomenology     Open Access  
Injury and Safety Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. SportMed J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 7)
Investment Analysts J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.237, h-index: 3)
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
J. for Estate Planning Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Juta's Business Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance
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     ISSN (Print) 1117-4315
     Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [189 journals]
  • Knowledge, attitude and practices of substance use among university
           students
    • Abstract: Author: Ajao, B. F.C. Anyanwu, Akinsola, H.A. Tshitangano, T.G. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 214-224 Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitude and practices of University of Venda students regarding substance use. It is a quantitative descriptive study which involved 332 students (194 females and 138 males) who were selected using simple and systematic sampling techniques. Data were collected using a self administered questionnaire. Two hundred and fourteen (64.1%) participants had high knowledge about the substances that can alter mood and just above half (52.6%) had high knowledge concerning substances that can lead to reduced concentration, less than half (42%) had high knowledge about the negative social effects and effects on educational career that may result from drug addiction. Two hundred and four (61.3%) had high knowledge of the methods through which people use illicit substances. Slightly more than half (52.9%) of the males and 68.1% of the females either disagreed or strongly disagreed that when students engage in drugs and alcohol they get a lift and feel of comfort. Majority of the participants (84.2% of males and 86.5% females) agreed or strongly agreed that using illicit substances would make a student vulnerable to HIV infection, and 63.0% of the males and 73.3% of the females either agreed or strongly agreed that illicit substance use among students may lead to poor academic performance. Sixty six (47.8%) of the male participants have ever used a psychoactive substance before compared with 58 (29.9% ) of their female counterparts. However, 32.4% of the male participants and 17.6% of the female participants are currently using different types of psychoactive substances. This study found that University of Venda students' knowledge about illicit substances and its resulting complication is just above average and their involvement in substance use is high. Most of the drugs is consumed in the evening, a period when the students should be concentrating on what they had learnt during the day. This on the long run may result to poor school performance. Therefore a programme to educate the students on the ills of illicit substance use and promote a drug free environment is needed.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:40Z
       
  • A review of assessment and skill training methods used in sports vision
    • Abstract: Author: Mashige, Khathutshelo Percy Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 204-213 Abstract: Sports vision tests help athletes to determine how well their eyes perform, beyond a basic ability to see letters and objects clearly, and vision training helps their eyes perform better for athletic activities. The sports vision tests that assess how well an athlete sees can also be used to train them and improve their visual function. Many successful athletes employ sports vision training to improve their sporting performance, and this often requires the assistance of a sports vision practitioner. Comparisons of performances between amateur and elite athletes have generated much research interests in the recent past. Literature also indicates that some sports require specific visual skills, many of which are tested in sports vision. These include hardware skills (e.g. visual acuity, depth perception, eye motility, focus flexibility, fusion, contrast sensitivity and colour perception) and software skills (e.g. central-peripheral awareness, eye-hand, eye-body coordination, visualization, visual concentration and visual reaction time). The purpose of this paper is to review the current assessment and skill training methods used in sport vision. This review will be useful to sport scientists, coaches and optometrists in improving their ability to recognize and diagnose sports vision related problems, and provide appropriate visual skills training to their athletes. This will in turn improve the sporting performance of the athletes.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:40Z
       
  • Effects of Voltaren Emulgel and cryotherapy on the relief of DOMS
    • Abstract: Author: Heyns, R.I. Botes, N.Z. Hammill, H.V. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 189-203 Abstract: The ability of Voltaren® Emulgel® and Cryotherapy in the reduction of the signs and symptoms of DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) was tested and compared. Fourty-two participants were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (n=17) received ice treatment. Group 2 (n=19) received Voltaren Emulgel treatment and Group 3 (n=6) was a control group which received a placebo cream treatment. DOMS was induced through a protocol involving repeated eccentric loading of the bicep brachii during an eccentric bicep curl. ROM (Range of motion), pain and circumference measurements were taken before the exercise session, directly thereafter, 24 hours post-exercise, as well as 48 hours post exercise. Voltaren Emulgel group, Cryotherapy group as well as the Controls showed similar reductions in swelling over the 24-hour and 48-hour periods. A similar increase in pain is shown by all three groups during the pre-test to post-test period. From the post-test to the 24-hour measurement the pain rating decreased in both the Cryotherapy and Control groups, with a similar increase in pain noted for the 24 to 48-hour period. The Voltaren Emulgel group followed a different pattern and showed a gradual increase in pain throughout the experiment. All three groups revealed a reduction in ROM after performing the bouts of eccentric exercise. There was, however no significant increase in ROM in the recovery period. This study confirmed findings from previous investigations that application of the therapeutic modalities tested in this study over short duration is ineffective in reducing DOMS.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:40Z
       
  • Attitudes of midwives towards the implementation of Choice on Termination
           of Pregnancy Act
    • Abstract: Author: Nohaji, E.N. Yako, E.M. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 225-235 Abstract: The aim of this study was to explain and compare the attitudes of midwives towards the of implementation of Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act (CTOP) at the Umtata General (UG) and St Lucy's (SH) Hospitals in Umtata in the O.R. Tambo District (ORTD), Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The sample consisted of 60 randomly selected midwives from these hospitals. Data were collected with an 18-item Likert type questionnaire and analysed using SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. Independent t-test was used to analyse differences between the attitudes of the midwives at both hospitals towards the implementation of termination of pregnancy (TOP) services. The demographic characteristics of the participants were similar, excepting age (UG: 46. 3± 8.9 years; S39.3 ± 8.9; p< 0.5). The means of the combined attitude scores from both hospitals was 58.3 ±13.4 (UG: 57.6± 15.6; SL: 58.9 ±11.2; p> 0.05). Overall, the participants in this study had positive attitudes towards the implementation of the CTOP Act. It is recommended that the hospitals in the ORTD should be provided with both material and human resources. The midwives performing termination of pregnancy services should be encouraged to continue with the services by giving them some incentives, and through support by colleagues and the community. These strategies will, in turn, improve the quality of care rendered to patients who choose to terminate their pregnancies.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:40Z
       
  • Evaluation of a heartmath workshop for physiological and psychological
           variables
    • Abstract: Author: Edwards, Stephen D. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 236-245 Abstract: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of a HeartMath workshop on physiological coherence as well as sense of coherence, health and spirituality perceptions. Integral psychological, mixed, quantitative and qualitative methods in a pre- and post-test, quasi experimental and matched control group, outcome evaluative design was employed to assess changes in physiological and psychological variables. Data collected from 10 workshop participants were compared with data from a matched control group. Significant improvements in physiological coherence, accompanied by significant decreases in breath rate occurred in workshop participants from pre-test to post-test. Compared to the control group, workshop participants improved significantly in sense of coherence, health and spirituality perceptions. Participants' positive experiences and evaluations of the workshop were unanimous. Findings are discussed in relation to previous and future research.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:40Z
       
  • A comparative time review of recruitment and retention at a University in
           South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Moeketsi, Rosemary M.H. Mgutshini, Tennyson Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 246-264 Abstract: Student recruitment and retention represent two important indicators that are often studied in order to explain patterns in student success. Recent years have seen a growing and asserted emphasis on the massification of education as part of a wider commitment to the social justice mandate of ensuring the inclusion of previously under-represented groups. Even so, many of the recruited students dropout before completion of their studies. The current piece presents a qualitative case study of a program at one the world's mega universities (The University of South Africa) and specifically asks the question about the factors that are associated with completion and/or attrition among students. Interestingly, the study considers issues related to completion at two chronological points (in 2006 and 2011) and by so doing, reflects on whether the factors that influence completion have transitioned with the passage of time. To verify the impressions of factors related to dropout, a total of 24 students were interviewed individually and in-group settings to elicit insider perspectives on their experiences of study in 2006. The latter comparative aspect is based on a desktop review of recent data on student success and speaks to how the domination of Information Communication Technologies (ICT's) has impacted the factors that determine success and/or failure among students. This comparative process reveals that many of the factors associated with success and/or drop out have remained unchanged over time with the exception of the fact that internet access and the possession of ICT skills have become increasingly important factors in determining the risk of dropout among students. Even so, among students who are equally deprived, access to ICTs is itself not a primary predictive factor in dropout. Critical perspectives presented here suggest that student recruitment has progressively become the primary priority of universities without an equally clear commitment to their retention and successful completion.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:40Z
       
  • The injury and posture profiles of male high school water polo players in
           Johannesburg, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Gradidge, Philippe Jean-Luc Neophytou, Natalia Benjamin, Natalie Forbes, Kayla Karam, Erin Constantinou, Demitri Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 179-188 Abstract: Water polo is a physically demanding aquatic contact sport, which involves swimming, aggressive play and throwing actions which may predispose players to poor posture and acute and chronic injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the posture and injury profiles of male high school water polo players with a known high volume of weekly exercise load, and to investigate the relationship between these two variables. A cross-sectional, observational study investigating the injury and posture profiles of competitive male high school water polo players in Johannesburg, South Africa was undertaken. Posture was categorised (poor, fair and good) and scored, and an injury profile questionnaire elicited answers regarding arm/leg dominance, level of play, training volume (training sessions per week and total amount of training hours), injury location, injury severity, mechanism of injury and management. Thirty-six adolescent competitive water polo playing males participated in this study (mean age of 16.9 ± 0.86 years), and most were right arm dominant. Good posture was noted in the abdomen, lower back and hip regions, however, the shoulder region presented with only fair posture. Notably, 25% had previous injuries in the shoulder region and 8% had recent (within 1 month) shoulder injuries, treated predominantly with physiotherapy related modalities. Shoulder injuries were noted in the water polo players, related to poor shoulder and elbow posture. The high volume of repetitive overhead training could be a contributing factor to poor posture in the upper extremity, which could be curbed by a well periodised training schedule.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • A comparison of muscular activity of the quadriceps muscles with
           whole-body vibration and a stable platform
    • Abstract: Author: Cara, N. Delbridge, M. Travill, A.L. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 164-170 Abstract: Whole body vibration has become a popular addition to the traditional training regimes employed in health and fitness centres and a key component of the training programmes of many sportspeople. Despite numerous research projects on whole body vibration, uncertainty still exists about the potential benefits of whole body vibration as a training method. The aim of this study was to determine differences in muscular activity in the thigh muscles during a static squat and a squat using whole body vibration at different frequencies. A total of 31 participants were part of two stages of testing, one which involved a squat on a stable platform and the other one the squat performed on the Power Plate® at frequencies of 30Hz, 35Hz, and 40Hz. Both squats were static and isometric, as this has been shown to produce higher muscle activation over a 30sec period. Results showed that the squat performed on the Power Plate® resulted in a greater increase in muscular activity at 30Hz and 35Hz (p< .05) but not at 40Hz. Although some studies have shown a greater response at higher frequencies, differing exercise activities used may be the cause and therefore health practitioners should use a combination of low and high frequencies as well as exercise activities when using vibration rehabilitation or training. Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that vibration training can be used as an additional form of strength and conditioning training for health and sport practitioners.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • The effects of physical activity on the self-perception of males between
           the ages of 20 and 40 years
    • Abstract: Author: Cresswell, J.S. Travill, A.L. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 171-178 Abstract: It has been shown that physical activity has a positive effect on both physiological and psychological health. Self-perception is considered to be a component of self-esteem. However, the research supporting the positive effects of physical activity on self-perception has many shortcomings such as inconclusive results, inadequate measurements, and lack of domain specific research. The intent of this research was to investigate the effects of physical activity on the selfperception of males between the ages of 20 and 40 years and to assess whether the mode of physical activity affects the level of self-perception. It was hypothesised that physical activity increases self-perception in males. It was further hypothesised that individuals who participate in weight training will show higher levels of self-perception in relation to other modes of physical activity. Trained (n=25) and untrained (n=25) males aged 20 to 40 years completed the Physical Self-Perception Profile questionnaire which has five subscales, namely sport competence, strength, body conditioning, personal self-worth and body attractiveness. The results indicated that the trained subjects were significantly higher (p
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Release parameters across player position in elite male Zimbabwe
           basketball players
    • Abstract: Author: Tapera, E.M. Amusa, L.O. Gundani, M.P.D. Makaza, D. Goon, D.T. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 145-152 Abstract: The game of basketball is a popular in Zimbabwe, and all over the world. Shooting, passing, dribbling, rebounding are essential skills in basketball. Shooting, however is more important than the other skills, with the jump shot (JS) being the most frequently used shot in open play. There is a low conversion rate of the JS in league basketball games, indicating that Zimbabwean league basketball players have problems in executing the JS. This study investigated release parameters (RPs) (angle of release(AOR), velocity of release(VOR), height of release (HOR) and spin of release (SOR) in the playing positions (PPS) forwards, guards and centres. The study further investigated if there were any statistical differences in the RPs for PPS forwards, guards and centres. Twenty six players were randomly sampled from the Bulawayo Basketball Association. Each subject executed ten successive uncontested JSs from the free throw (FT) line. These shots were videotaped in the sagittal plane, using standard videography protocols and a Panasonic camera (model VDR D1160) placed 10.7 m away from, and perpendicular to the plane of motion of the subjects, and mounted on a tripod 1.9 metres high. Mean (± s.d.) values of AOR, VOR, HOR and SOR were computed to describe the JS of forwards, guards and centres. The study found that the RPs (AOR, VOR, HOR and SOR) for PPS forwards, guards and centres to be 52.0±8.8°,57.8±8.1°,53.8±7.4°;5.3±1.4m/s, 5.9±1.9m/s, 5.1±1.4m/s; 2.5±0.3m, 2.6±1.0m, 2.3±0.3m and 3.3±1.6Hz, 3.2±1.5Hz, 3.4±1.2Hz, respectively. The study also found that there are statistically significant differences (p:S0.05) in AOR between PPS guards and forwards, and guards and centres VOR between PPS guards and forwards, and guards and centres HOR between PPS guards and centres. The study found that AOR is important for JS accuracy in Zimbabwe league players. It was concluded that Zimbabwe league basketball players should utilize height, among other factors to allocate players into playing positions.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotypes, allele frequency, C-reactive
           protein, uric acid in female Zulu South African soccer, netball and
           Bulgarian soccer players
    • Abstract: Author: Mugandani, S.C. Djarova, T. Andreeva, L. Petrov, L. Atanasov, P. Watson, G. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 153-163 Abstract: Athletes of various ethnicities and gender have been genotyped for Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D (insertion/deletion) genetic variants. The I allele is related to endurance and D allele to power performance. The study purpose was to investigate the ACE genotypes and allele frequency and possible association with C-reactive protein (CRP) and uric acid (UA) in female soccer and netball players. Players from University of Zululand, RSA (n=16, age= 20.8±3.1years) and from National Sports Academy, Bulgaria (n=23, age 22.6±2.0 years) and control groups of 23 and 42 female students respectively were genotyped for ACE polymorphism. CRP and UA were measured at rest. Chi2 - test, Fisher's exact test and Student t - test were used for statistical analysis. No statistical differences were found between netball and soccer players. Null II genotype was found in Zulu players. They displayed higher 62.5% DD genotype and 82% D allele frequency compared to 40% DD genotype and 45% D allele in Bulgarians and to respective controls and ACE population genetic study. CRP and UA levels were within the normal range. CRP was higher in Zulu players (2.80±1.2 mg/l) compared to Bulgarians (1.37±1.03 mg/l), but lower than respective Zulu controls (4.0±1.36 mg/l). In Zulu players UA levels (217.5±60.0 µmol/l) were lower compared to 259.6±32.8 µmol/l in Bulgarians. Findings of null II ACE genotype, 62.5% DD genotype and 82% D allele frequency related to low CRP and UA, favour strong sprint/power performance in Zulu athletes. Bulgarian players showed 12% II and 67% ID ACE genotypes and 45% D and 55% I allele frequency.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • South African journalists' experiences of reporting at the 2010 FIFA World
           Cup South Africa&#153;
    • Abstract: Author: Human, Lourens Van Niekerk, Stephen Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 133-144 Abstract: During mega-sport events, such as the Fédération Internationale de Football Association's (FIFA) World Cup and the Olympic Games, the focus is often on football players and athletes respectively. Other important role-players, such as volunteers, journalists and spectators who make mega-sport events a success, are not in the lime light. The goal of this study was to describe South African journalists' experiences of reporting at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, with the purpose of learning from their experiences in view of the upcoming 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. The study was conducted from a phenomenological position with five South African journalists. The data for this research was produced by means of written essays and interviews and analysed according to the Duquesne Phenomenological Research Method (DPRM). The results indicated that the journalists' experienced the 2010 FIFA World Cup as an enormous event that challenged them to move into unfamiliar territory during their preparation for and participation in this event, which lead to the readers of their newspapers moving into unfamiliar territory. Reflecting back on the event the journalists' experienced growth in their confidence as journalists and were proud of being South African.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Internet marketing benefits among sport organisations in South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Mafini, C. Dhurup, M. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 118-132 Abstract: Internet marketing has gained prominence as an effective practice in the sport industry. This has lead to the adoption of Internet marketing by many sport organisations that intend to receive the pertinent paybacks associated with the practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of Internet marketing among sport organisations in South Africa and to establish whether Internet marketing benefits vary across gender. This subject has not received sufficient empirical investigation in the past. A self-administered survey questionnaire was used to collect information from a sample of 164 website owners, web administrators or webmasters based in Gauteng Province, South Africa. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and independent t-tests. The findings of the study indicate that that all nine benefits identified for the purposes of the study were important to sport organisations. These are: reaching out to the demographics of the region, establishing customer loyalty, reaching global markets, creating brand positioning, creating a data base of information, enabling one-to-one marketing, reducing marketing costs, reducing marketing costs, gaining website marketing experience and accessing online purchases/buyers. Among these, accessing online buyers emerged as the most important benefit to sport organisations. The result of the independent sample t-tests reveal that two Internet marketing benefits namely customer loyalty and one-to- one marketing vary across gender.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • The relationship between psychological skills and specialised role in
           cricket
    • Abstract: Author: Jooste, Julius Toriola, Abel L. Van Wyk, Johannes G.U. Steyn, J.M. Barend Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 106-117 Abstract: Psychological skills related to positional play are evident in sport. It is believed that specific demands associated with playing position or role within a team sport require a unique set of psychological skills. This study examined the relationship between psychological skills and specialised role amongst 127 South African cricket players. The subjects were divided into 4 primary role groupings namely batsman (n=30), bowler (n=32), all-rounder (n=61) and wicket keeper (n=4). The wicket keeper group's results were excluded from the analysis due to an under-representation of wicketkeepers in the sample. Psychological skills were assessed by means of the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 (Smith et al., 1995) and Bull's Mental Skills Questionnaire (Bull et al., 1996). One-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) indicated no significant differences between the psychological skills of the various role groupings. However, there were tendencies for all-rounders to be more psychologically skilled than bowlers and batsmen. It was concluded that there is no distinctive psychological profile for classifying cricket players into performing specialised roles in the sport.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • The prevalence of athlete hostility, anger, verbal and physical aggression
           within South African sport
    • Abstract: Author: Dubihlela, Job Chinomona, Richard Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 89-105 Abstract: The majority of research examining the interplay between athlete hostility, anger verbal aggression and physical aggression in competitive sporting environments has focused on Western populations and only on selected sporting codes (e.g. Rugby; ice hockey). Research involving African, particularly South African athletes is sparse. Thus, this study examines the prevalence of athletes' hostility, anger, verbal aggression and physical aggression in South African sport. A total of 233 athletes in Gauteng province, South Africa, were selected. Descriptive statistics as well as Smart PLS software for structural equation modelling (SEM) technique were applied. The results indicated that the relationship between athletes' hostility and anger, verbal aggression and physical aggression were significantly positive; while insignificantly positive association was observed between athletes' hostility and verbal aggression. The results also suggest that the experience of hostility, angry emotions, verbal aggressive behaviours and physical aggression of South African athletes are similar to Western populations, but that sport psychology practitioners should be aware of some potentially important differences, such as the general tendency of South African athletes to disapprove of aggressive behaviour. The research paper concludes by discussing both academic and managerial implications of the results, and future research directions are suggested.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Siyadlala delivering community sport in Gauteng : delivery and uptake
    • Abstract: Author: Burnett, Cora Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 76-88 Abstract: The paper reports on an impact assessment of the Siyadlala (community mass participation programme) offered in the different Gauteng clusters. Underpinned by a management systems approach, the strategy and delivery model was traced through case study analyses of one hub per cluster (including Westbury, Ratanda, Tembisa, Onverwacht and Munsieville). This entailed the profiling the hubs, strategic partnership and 'uptake' by staff and participant to provide evidence for strategic decision-making. A Participatory Action Research framework informed a multi-method approach, with questionnaires completed by 20 staff members, 79 secondary and 63 primary school participants. Nineteen managers were interviewed and 88 research participants from the different service constituencies (e.g. stakeholders, staff and participants) took part in focus group sessions. The events-driven model, stakeholder collaboration and youth development foci (for poverty-alleviation) delivered relatively high levels of participation (11 200) according to the size and locality (rural versus urban). School holiday programmes mostly afforded secondary school children access to safe spaces and various social (including life skill) benefits, while primary school children experienced improved social relationships and recognition. For contract workers, the lack of access to quality resources, the centralised governing system, implementation-focused training and ad hoc stakeholder participation limited their changes for meaningful upward social mobility and career opportunities associated with poverty alleviation.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • White water adventure tourism on the Ash River, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Mckay, Tracey J.M. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 52-75 Abstract: Kayaking and rafting on white water is viewed as core adventure activity in both the adventure recreation and adventure tourism literature. Additionally, many argue that the activity also represents a segment of extreme or lifestyle sport. This case study of the Ash River, South Africa demonstrates how, with specific reference to white water kayaking and rafting, the boundaries between adventure recreation, adventure tourism and extreme sports are blurred. That is, the various white water activities mutually support one another, with guides, operators and participants 'boundary hopping' between them. The Ash River is shown to be a significant white water adventure site for South Africa due to its flow volumes, speed, consistency, quality of rapids and unsurpassed water quality. Thus, the river draws in both local and international tourists, for some of whom the river was 'bucket list white water adventure site'. The result is that the white water adventure industry generates significant income, direct and indirect job opportunities, for the Bethlehem and Clarens area. The study also examined the demographic and socio-economic profiles of the kayaking and rafting tourists, as well as explored their motivations and experiences. It was found that there are some significant differences between the motivations and experiences of the kayakers compared to the rafters, between male and female rafters and between white and black rafters. Lastly, the age profile of the rafters seems to impact on what activities are undertaken.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Stakeholders' views of sustainable adventure tourism indicators : a
           cluster analysis methodology
    • Abstract: Author: Tshipala, Ndivhuwo N. Coetzee, Willie J.L. Potgieter, Marius Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 40-51 Abstract: Concerns around the globe have been raised about the impact adventure tourism could have on the environment and the proximate communities. There is a necessity to investigate the industry's significance in terms of its economic, recreation and leisure-related value. Benefits of utilising sustainable tourism indicators are diverse and can contribute to a sustainable industry in South Africa and include positive economic, social and environmental impacts. This study investigated the views of respondents regarding 8 sustainable tourism indicators that can assist with the development of sustainable adventure tourism. Tourists, government employees, business owners, and residents at Waterval Boven in Mpumalanga South African served as respondents groups for this study. Cluster analysis and Kruskall-Wallies tests were applied. In general, the respondents perceived the sustainable adventure tourism indicators in a positive manner and were divided into two cluster groups (Cluster 1 and 2) respectively. Cluster 1 was more optimistic about the indicators as compared to Cluster 2 who were less optimistic. This was influenced by the demographic factors in which they individually possess. This study presents future adventure tourism developers and managers with views of how stakeholders view sustainable adventure tourism development in order to take full advantage of the positives the industry can offer once sustained for generations to come.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • The availability of recreation policies and strategies for the provision
           of recreation service delivery in the North West Province, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Mogajane, V.S. Meyer, C. Toriola, A.L. Amusa, L.O. Monyeki, M.A. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 24-39 Abstract: The promotion of recreation and leisure through coherent strategies and policy development is a significant move towards changing the quality lives of communities. The unavailability of recreation strategies and policies are associated with negative effect on the delivery of recreation services. The purpose of the study was therefore, to determine the availability of recreation strategies and policies in for the provision of recreation service delivery in North-West Province, South Africa. A mixed-method research design involving a questionnaire and a focus group were used to collect information from a targeted sample of 20 personnel who were responsible for managing recreation at local government levels. The results showed that the majority (75%) of the local governments are in the rural settings whilst 25% are located in urban areas with limited resources. 100% local governments do not have recreation strategic plans. Policy statements concerning finance (80%), provision of human resources (90%), provision of recreation facilities (65%), provision of recreation programme (80%), coordination, planning or implementation of recreation programmes (85%), the lease of recreation facilities (75%), the appointment of administrative or supportive service (95%) or the use of volunteers (80%) were not available. A practical significant effect (phi=0.540) between area and the policy statements regarding recreation provision was observed in the provision of recreation facilities where the availability of policy in urban areas is larger than in rural areas. Focus group and sport personnel also indicated the unavailability of policies as a major issue affecting recreation service delivery. The study concluded that local governments are challenged with the lack of various policies for recreation provision. The study recommended that local governments should develop recreation strategies and policies that address recreation service delivery can be addressed. In addition, collaboration between local and provincial governments should be strengthened to ensure effective recreation service delivery.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Measuring service quality of international tennis coach education courses
    • Abstract: Author: Goslin, Anneliese E. Davies, Karl Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 11-23 Abstract: Customer satisfaction with the quality of sport services contributes significantly to the sustained competitiveness of sport organisations, and customer retention. This study measured the perceived service quality of the International Tennis Federation (ITF) Starter-Beginner coach education courses. A purposive sample of four courses and 56 tennis coaches was drawn. A pre-course and post course SERVQUAL questionnaire together with a biographical questionnaire were administered. The findings of the current study suggest that tennis coaches are dissatisfied with four of the five SERVQUAL dimensions of service quality namely the reliability of the services, the responsiveness of the ITF as service provider, the tangibles of the course as well as the empathy of the ITF. Tennis coaches expressed overall satisfaction in the service dimension of assurance of service users. Satisfaction with service quality differed across the four different geographical course locations suggesting dissatisfaction with personal interaction between head tutors and participants. This study should be regarded as exploratory research in the area of tennis coach education service quality. Further research should determine the reliability and validity of the SERVQUAL instrument in sport coach education contexts.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: i-ii Abstract: Coach education plays a pivotal role in athlete preparation and long term athlete development programmes. In view of its critical role in the sport development process, many national and international federations have designed education programmes aimed at adequately preparing coaches who would normally play the required leadership role in training athletes for optimal sport competition. There are a myriad of areas and issues covered in a typical coach education programmme; some of which include ethics, talent identification and development, doping, coaching the child athlete, etc. However, of topical interest in recent years is the issue of service quality in coach education programmmes.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
  • Assessing the needs of coaches in developing a coach education framework
    • Abstract: Author: Morris-Eyton, H.F. Coopoo, Y. Vol 20 Issue 1 Publication: 2014 Page: 1-10 Abstract: The establishment of a global framework recognising coaching competencies and qualifications is part of the International Council for Coaching Excellence key objectives for the period 2009-2015. It is partly for this reason that the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) has developed a framework for Long-Term Coach Development in order to identify, recruit, support and provide recognition to coaches (SASCOC, 2011). As part of a study exploring the impact of coach education on coaching practice, a national survey of lifesaving coaches was conducted (n = 120). This was done using the Survey Monkey® internet tool and targeted all coaches and administrators listed on the Lifesaving South Africa's database. Survey questions focused on obtaining a demographic profile, coaching experience and the foci of athlete training. Questions also sought to gather information on the coach education process, its content and the way it was assessed. Results from the survey indicated that 81% of respondents are volunteer coaches with an age range between 18 and 60 years. 50% of sampled coaches had been coaching lifesaving for between two and five years, mostly at the club level (96%). Coaches were asked where they had learnt to coach, and the most common responses were drawing from their own sporting experiences, watching other coaches and being self-taught. The implementation of a coach education programme through Lifesaving South Africa was well received, although only 54% felt that certification should be mandatory. It was through this preliminary data that an understanding of what the coaches' require in a coach education programme was gained.
      PubDate: 2014-04-17T12:10:39Z
       
 
 
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