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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 185 journals)

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ACCORD Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, h-index: 17)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Farm Child and Youth Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.552, h-index: 8)
African J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.105, h-index: 0)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African Markets Overview     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Plant Protection     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agriprobe     Full-text available via subscription  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Arms Control : Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
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BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CME : Your SA J. of CPD     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Codicillus     Full-text available via subscription  
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa = Communicare : Tydskrif vir Kommunikasiewetenskappe in Suider-Afrika     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Full-text available via subscription  
Crime Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Dairy Mail Africa : Publication for the Dairy Industry in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
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Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription  
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enterprise Risk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
HR Highway     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Injury and Safety Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. SportMed J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 7)
Investment Analysts J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.237, h-index: 3)
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. for Estate Planning Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Juta's Business Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover   African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance
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   ISSN (Print) 1117-4315
   Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [185 journals]
  • Erratum
    • Abstract: Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1665 Abstract: In AJPHERD Supplement (September 2) 2014 the article entitled, "Role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the promotion of cardiopulmonary health and rehabilitation" was published. However, the article was incorrectly titled, "A review of the cardiopulmonary-related benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy" in the table of contents. AJPHERD regrets the error.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • List of AJPHERD Reviewers 2014
    • Abstract: Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1666 Abstract: AJPHERD expresses its profound gratitude to the highly esteemed academics and professionals who volunteered their services to review the articles that were published in volume 20(1-4) and supplements in 2014. Your precious and most valuable times are gratefully acknowldeged.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • An argument for the struggles to de-racialise South African sport : the
           Olympic Movement's response, 1896-1946
    • Abstract: Author: Nongogo, P. Goslin, A.E. Van Wyk, J.G.U. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1637-1664 Abstract: This historical review examines the background to the struggles against inequality, discrimination and the fight to deracialise South African sport. South Africa has a long history of racial discrimination. The struggles for political freedom and for all-race-inclusive or non-racial sport were generally intertwined. The sports struggle's methods and tactics evolved with time given their duration and complexity. This review aims to undertake an historical overview of the influences and precursors to the initiation of the struggles to deracialise South African sport, which culminated in the sports boycott in the 1960s. This is critical particularly if the view that history teaches respect for insights from the past is held and appreciated. Britain and South Africa have always been strategically linked and important to each other and as such the former became the main target of black people's diplomatic efforts after 1910. By the 1950s, the oppressed people's hope had shifted to the United Nations, the newly-independent African states and the Olympic Movement. South Africa's official participation in the Olympic Games between 1908 and 1960 racially discriminated against black sportspersons; the early challenge to this problem was observed in the 1940s but radical struggles began in the 1950s. The Non-Racial Sports Movement (NRSM) and the Anti-Apartheid Movement undertook protracted struggles to deracialise South African sport. The NRSM petitioned and challenged the constituents of the Olympic Movement, locally and abroad, for support to resolve the racial problem in the country's sport, until the International Olympic Committee expelled the racist National Olympic Committee of South Africa in 1970. The sports struggles however continued until they were controversially halted in the early 1990s. This is a literature study and is grounded in a qualitative, historical descriptive research design, with the aim of generating a body of knowledge to contextualise the background influences to the initiation of the early challenge to South Africa's racial sports problem, between 1890s and the 1940s.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Knowledge and use of antiretroviral treatment among pregnant women
           attending health centres in Amathole district, Eastern Cape Province,
           South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Dekeda, Kolelwa Felicia Vellem, N.M. Tshotsho, N. Goon, D.T. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1613-1620 Abstract: The purpose of the study was to determine the knowledge and use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) among pregnant women attending health centres in Amathole district, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The study involved a non-probability sample of 70 HIV positive pregnant women on antiretrovirals attending antenatal care clinic in the tertiary hospital in Buffalo City Metropolitan, Eastern Cape, South Africa. A self- designed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. About 99% participants were able to follow up ART therapy regimen and inform about the importance of taking treatment (ART) regularly, 77% side effects and drug interactions of the drugs (ART) while 31% never heard about the side effects of the drugs and its interactions. About 97% approved the use of ART, while 3% disapproved them. Majority of participants 50% felt healthy ever since they took ART, 32% gained more weight after starting ART and 18% experienced no frequent illnesses. Also, majority (97%) of the participants were optimistic about prevention of their unborn child by ART, while 3% were not sure about prevention of their unborn child. HIV positive pregnant women on ART exhibited a good knowledge and use of ART. This is encouraging and should be sustained by continuous community awareness campaigns to empower the communities about HIV/AIDS, prevention to mother to child transmission programme and ART and extensive training of health care providers.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Sources of stress and coping strategies of Kenyan university athletes :
           implications for coaches
    • Abstract: Author: Rintaugu, E.G. Litaba, S.A. Muema, E.M. Monyeki, M.A. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1621-1636 Abstract: The debate on whether participation in college sports is a "buffer" or "stressor" to student-athletes has not yielded conclusive consensus. The purpose of this study was to assess the sources of stress and coping strategies utilized by Kenyan university athletes. It was predicted that the sources of stress and coping strategies will not differ based on the university athletes' gender, age, and level of study. Data were collected through the use of modified version of COPE inventory from 210 university athletes (males 60.7% and females 38.9%). Data were analysed through independent t-test and one way ANOVA. Results showed that university athletes' sources of stress were mainly interpersonal and environmental sources. These sources of stress varied significantly based on age (F3,201=3.32, p
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • HIV prevalence, knowledge, attitude, perception and behaviour among
           students at Walter Sisulu University, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Twaise, N. Dana, P. Abaver, D.T. Goon, D.T. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1598-1612 Abstract: This cross-sectional, unlinked anonymous HIV survey among WSU students was a follow-up to a national study conducted in 2009 by the Higher Education HIV and AIDS Programme (HEAIDS) amongst Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL), in which 13.3% students of Walter Sisulu University were HIV positive. This study was conducted to determine whether there has been a change in the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of WSU students after some interventions were introduced. The study involved 456 students (2.2% of the student population), 131 males and 322 females aged 17-39 years. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire, after which a blood sample was drawn from each participant who agreed to the HIV test by qualified WSU clinic nurses. The male participants reported having debuted into sexual activeness much earlier in their lives. Condom use was highest among the participants below the age of 25 years. Regarding multiple and concurrent partnerships (MCP), 33.6% of males versus 10.9% of females who practised MCP reported having more than one sexual partner in the past month. Most of the participants had a partner younger than 10 years of age (64.8%). Less than half of the participants admitted to drinking alcohol (43.6%) while 3.1% reported using drugs. More than 70% of the participants knew about the Centre for HIV and AIDS and the campus clinics and that, they provide HIV and AIDS-related activities and programmes. Although majority of the participants knew of these centres, only 49.8% attended HIV and AIDS functions held on campus. HIV testing results showed a 4.3% positivity rate, with all of the participants who tested HIV positive being females. The prevalence of HIV infection among WSU students is very low and their overall knowledge about HIV/AIDS prevention, transmission and treatment is encouraging. The students do not consistently use condom for sex, especially when they perceived the relationship to be steady and long. Also, the finding indicates the practice of homosexuality among the students. There is need to incorporate HIV/AIDS in the curriculum of the university in order to create better awareness of higher-risk practices among the students. Findings from this study provide a 'more intensify approach-call' for WSU concerning HIV/AIDS interventions in the community.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Collaboration between physiotherapists and biokineticists in managing low
           back pain in an urban setting in South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Chetty, V. Dunpath, T. Bhagwandin, Rahista Dlamini, Nhlakanipho Hawke, Amanda Naidoo, Kresan Vilana, Zandile Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1587-1597 Abstract: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most disabling musculoskeletal conditions, affecting functional ability and quality of life. The interdisciplinary collaboration between the physiotherapist and biokineticist is essential to holistic rehabilitative care and optimal patient outcomes, on which a paucity of literature exists. This study aimed at collaboration in the management of LBP. A qualitative interpretive approach was used to understand the phenomena that existed in the professional's subjective rehabilitative practice. Two focus group discussions were held separately with five biokineticists and eight physiotherapists who were purposively selected from the eThekwini District. Data was thematically analysed to explore individual and interrelated themes. Three themes emerged from discussions and were seamless between professional groups: professional rehabilitative practice ambiguity, environmental construct, and curbing the professional divide. The uncertainty of the roles in various phases of rehabilitation by each professional group i.e. acute, sub-acute and chronic LBP was dominant and lead to professional tension. Professionals working together in a multi-centre clinical setting appeared to facilitate good collaboration, being facilitated by education, good communication and focusing on patient centred care. Participants advocated for undergraduate training to include collaborative professional learning and guidance by higher education committees through continuous professional training.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Validation of the Children's Leisure Activities Study Survey Questionnaire
           for 12-year old South African children
    • Abstract: Author: Tian, Haili Du Toit, Dorita Toriola, Andabel L. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1572-1586 Abstract: This study evaluated the reliability and construct validity of a modified Children's Leisure Activities Study Survey (CLASS) questionnaire for 12-year old South African children. Test-retest reliability of the questionnaire was examined in 108 (n=45 boys; n=63 girls) school children aged 12 years at 3 weeks interval. Construct validity was assessed by comparing data on the reported minutes spent in physical activities (PAs) obtained from the CLASS questionnaire responses with ten physical fitness (PF) parameters, assessed using the Eurofit test battery. Cronbach alpha's test of internal consistency, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and the paired t-test were used to determine reliability. Validity was evaluated with the Spearman correlation coefficients. Substantial internal consistency and significant Intra-class correlations estimates for all intensities of PA and sedentary time (ST) were found (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.71 to 0.84, p < 0.05; ICC ranged from 0.73 to 0.95, p < 0.05). Non-significant differences were found in the means of test and retest measurements. BMI had moderate negative correlations with both moderate and total PA (r = -0.34, r = -0.36, respectively, p < 0.05). Aerobic fitness was significantly correlated with all intensities of PA and ST (r = 0.63, 0.57, 0.43 and -0.34, respectively; p < 0.05). ST was significantly and negatively associated with sit-ups (r = -0.38, p < 0.01) and shuttle run (r = -0.29, p < 0.05). Similarly, the results of the shuttle run (10x5 meter run), sit-ups, bent arm hang, and standing broad jump tests, had significant associations with vigorous PA. The CLASS questionnaire is a valid and reliable measure of PA in 12-year old South African children.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Children's perceptions of parental involvement in sport at public township
           schools in Tshwane, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Pule, R.E.J. Drotsky, G.A.P. Toriola, A.L. Kubayi, N.A. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1564-1571 Abstract: Within the sport domain, parents play an important role in youth sports. Previous research has shown that children are more likely to participate in sport if they receive parental support. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate children's perceptions of parental involvement in sport at primary and secondary public township schools in Tshwane, South Africa. A total of 773 school children aged 12-18 years volunteered to participate in the study. Data were collected using validated structured questionnaires. Overall, the results showed that the primary school pupils perceived that they received more parental support for participating in sport than the secondary school students. In terms of gender, boys viewed parental support more positively than girls. The results of the study provide implications for school sport policy reconfiguration and planning parental education programmes in schools.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Analysis of physical activity and health profiles and the utilization of
           the Biokinetic Humanitarian Project among senior university students
    • Abstract: Author: Noorbhai, M.H. Goolam Hoosen, T. Lategan, L. Noakes, T.D. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1551-1563 Abstract: Minimal research has investigated physical activity and health profiles among university students in Africa. Research has however shown the need for health intervention programmes across all domains to advocate both physical activity participation and exercise education. The purpose of this study was to objectively analyse physical activity and health profiles among senior university students in Cape Town, South Africa. A secondary aim was to investigate the use of the non-profit organisation, the Biokinetic Humanitarian Project (BHP) (which provides complimentary exercise testing, exercise prescription and health education) to improve selected health measures in this population. A cross-sectional research study was employed whereby male and female university residence students (n=19) were screened for health and fitness measures at baseline and after a 6-month intervention period. Physical activity and health education was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire guidelines. The 6-month intervention comprised of both gym and home-based exercise programmes. Descriptive and comparative/interferential statistics were used to analyse the results. The level of significance was set at p≤0.05 for both genders. Significant improvements (p≤0.05) were observed for waist and hip measurements and for resting heart rate. Males demonstrated significant differences (p≤0.05) in hip circumference, heart rate and blood glucose. These findings suggest that the 6-month BHP intervention resulted in significant improvements in selected health and fitness parameters among university students. Future investigations should include bigger samples and be conducted among other public and private university settings.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Sport fans and athlete celebrity endorsers : relationships between
           celebrity familiarity and endorser-brand fit with brand attitude and brand
           purchase intentions
    • Abstract: Author: Dhurup, M. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1537-1550 Abstract: Celebrities are a common feature in contemporary marketing, often becoming the face or image of the products advertised and for organisations as well. Researchers have suggested that celebrities have likeable qualities who may add value to an endorsed product because of their status in society. This study investigates the influence on endorser familiarity and endorser brand-fit on brand attitude and brand purchase intentions. The study adopted a quantitative research approach. A structured questionnaire was administered among 202 student sport fans. Moderate to strong correlations were found among endorser familiarity, endorser band fit with brand attitude and brand purchase intentions. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was undertaken to examine the goodness of fit measures among the constructs. CFA analysis showed a good fit of the constructs measured. Through structural path analysis endorser familiarity, endorser brand fit showed positive associations with brand attitude. Brand attitude also showed direct positive relationship with brand purchase intentions indicating the likelihood of purchase. Strategies to create stronger connections between consumers and celebrity endorsers should focus on emphasising the need for relatedness as consumer attachment to celebrities evokes a positive brand attitude and subsequent brand purchases. Marketing practitioners need to develop effective strategies in choosing sport celebrities who are familiar and have an appropriate fit with the brand in order to ensure strong brand attitude towards the brand which may enhance brand purchase of the advertised brand.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Leisure education and the role of schools : Planning and implementation in
           times of change
    • Abstract: Author: Sivan, A. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1524-1536 Abstract: Leisure education, be it process, content, context, or a combination of all, is significant for enhancing the quality of life of individuals and societies. As major socialization agents for children and adolescents, schools have been advocated to undertake the role of leisure educators. Despite this advocacy, aspects related to leisure education are often marginalized within the school curriculum. While initial calls were made for leisure education in schools in the West, its implementation has been hindered by the priority given to the study of literacy and numeracy and the emphasis on preparation for the world of work. At the same time, recent developments in educational systems in non-Western contexts have been paving the way for schools to educate for leisure as part of their curricula. These include a growing emphasis on whole person development, life wide and lifelong learning. The present paper depicts these trends and examines how and to what extent leisure education is practised in times of educational and curriculum changes. Examples are provided from a recent study undertaken by the author on secondary school students in Hong Kong which explored the different ways in which schools educate for leisure. Implications are drawn for ways to utilize the reformed school system for further enhancement of leisure education in schools.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:47Z
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: i Abstract: Advancements in science and technology as well as its concomittant influences on culture, environment, politics and economy, have continued to impact on all facets of human life in contemporary society.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:46Z
       
  • Leisure in transformation : meta-trends changing the world
    • Abstract: Author: Edginton, Christopher R. Jalloh, Abubakarr Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1510-1523 Abstract: A Greek preposition, the term "meta" may be interpreted as the state beyond our current way of being. Meta-trends refer to those transformations that are underway yet unseen. They are invisible at one moment yet become widespread, shaping the way we live, work and play. Meta-trends often arise from underlying shifts in social, cultural, political, environmental and economic forces which serve to shape the human experience. Reflecting new directions, meta-trends impact individuals, communities and nations as a whole, as well as influencing worldwide attitudes, values, behaviours and actions. A transcendent phenomenon, understanding meta-trends helps reveal how the future will be unfold. Such forces give way to new movements, actions or activities that lead to social, cultural, political and economic changes. A meta-trend is distinctly different from mega-trends that are large changes that have occurred and are evident to all. This presentation discussed the impact of several key meta-trends on leisure, quality of life and community livability including: 1) demographic changes and shifts; 2) social media, technology and universal connectivity; 3) economic globalization; 4) urbanization, smart cities and migration; 5) new forms of governance; 6) education and learning; 7) environment and energy consumption; 8) transactional transparency; 9) global cultural integration; and 10) leisure, happiness, quality of life and community livability.
      PubDate: 2015-02-23T13:19:46Z
       
  • Sport event management curricular outcomes in the South African higher
           education context
    • Abstract: Author: Steyn, E. Hollander, W. Roux, C.J. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1492-1504 Abstract: Since the 1980s, when it became apparent that the end to apartheid was inevitable, the South African higher education system has undergone much change. Governments increasing focus on education has resulted in the urgent reform of the education and training system, endeavouring to find various means of ensuring young people attend school, provide a wider range of individuals with a secondary education and to prepare a higher percentage of learners for higher education to meet the skills needs of the economy. Unfortunately, South Africa's education often reveals many problems directly related to curricula, with concern placed on the lack of a relevant knowledge base as well as pertinent training programmes to prepare sport managers for the contemporary sport events industry. For South Africa to compete within a global economic society, the quality of both education and the work force will have to improve. A gap exists between the current event management curricula outcomes at higher education institutions (HEIs) in South Africa and the expected competencies of sport event managers in practice. Hence, the aim was to develop guidelines for sport event management training in Higher Education Institutions in South Africa, in particular curricular outcomes on various levels of the Higher Education Qualification Framework (HEQF) to address the competencies required by managers. A descriptive and comparative approach was followed utilizing both qualitative and quantitative methods. The sample included academics and practitioners from HEIs in South Africa and sport event managers from selected sport companies in Gauteng. The research was conducted through a web-based search to identify sport companies. The research provided outcomes for sport event management training in higher education institutions at various HEQSF levels, to address the competencies required by managers for the South African context.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Adventure tourism in South Africa : the case of bungee jumping
    • Abstract: Author: Mckay, Tracey Morton Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1473-1491 Abstract: Although bungee jumping is a global phenomenon, Africa lags the world in terms of this particular sub-sector of adventure tourism, with commercial bungee jumping only taking place in Uganda, Zambia and South Africa. As South Africa's bungee sector is the most developed, research was undertaken in order to establish the nature of both the supply of, and demand for, this iconic form of hard adventure. The study found that bungee jumping stimulates local economic growth by generating substantial employment opportunities and spawning other adventure tourism activities and side businesses. Seasonality, combined with the global economic downturn has forced the operators to be entrepreneurially creative, in particular, to find ways of attracting more domestic tourists and day trippers. Thus, the financial base of bungee jumping in South Africa rests on domestic tourism. The demographic and socio-economic profile of the bungee jumpers is also presented, alongside factors which they identified as important with regards to the future growth of the industry. It is argued that a clean safety record and gold standard safety features could be adopted to expand the industry, as South Africa's commercial bungee jumping sector is globally competitive. However, the sector lacks official regulation and official safety standards, which is both a serious shortcoming and a hinderance to the development and growth of the sector.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • A creative tourism approach to the cultural-heritage re-generation of
           District Six, Cape Town
    • Abstract: Author: Spencer, J.P. Jessa, S. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1455-1472 Abstract: The survey aimed at determining whether the potential existed for further developing cultural and heritage tourism activities in the redeveloping District Six. A past, rich and diverse in cultural-heritage, provided the basis from which the study examines whether the implementation of a cultural-heritage tourism plan in the area, if appropriate, would help address issues of restitution and ultimately contribute to the country's cultural, heritage and tourism asset-base. Currently no formal tourism plan exists for District Six. A historical study provided an assessment of the areas' cultural and heritage assets, manifested in politics, music and dance, art, literature, and architecture. A search of existing cultural and heritage tourism literature was conducted in order to gain insight into the descriptive, theoretical and conceptual study questions identified. Relevant development policies and frameworks impacting and supporting potential tourism development in the area were examined. These included the Development Framework for District Six (2011) and the National Heritage Tourism Strategy (2012). Creative tourism was further examined as a tool to augment the tourism product and positively contribute to cultural regeneration. Business and functional linkages to assist the integration of District Six tourism into the broader economy were also identified. A comparative analysis of the introduction of a cultural-heritage tourism plan in Genadendal was made, an area which experienced similar socio-political and historical conditions as District Six. Parallels of the potential challenges were drawn and opportunities identified. Furthermore, an empirical survey in the form of in-depth interviews was administered during 2013 to seventeen relevant academics, heritage and tourism practitioners, resident representatives and development consultants. The methodology included obtaining qualitative data through transcribing interviews and thematically presenting and analysing the data.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • The outcomes of a sport-based intervention on risky sexual behaviours
           among rural school-going adolescents
    • Abstract: Author: Awotidebe, Adedapo Monyeki, Andries Phillips, Julie Lens, Willy Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1436-1454 Abstract: The spread of HIV infection in sexually active adolescents and young adults has been attributed to the increasing risky sexual behaviours including early sexual activity, multiple sexual partnership, and irregular condoms use in this population. There are increasing calls to scale up youth-friendly HIV prevention programmes to assist youth in adopting safe sexual behaviours. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 12-week sports-based HIV prevention programme on the HIV-risk reduction outcomes among rural high school learners. Participants are 430 learners representing 250 learners in the intervention school and 180 learners in the control school respectively. The intervention was delivered in school using the Grassroot Soccer generation skills curriculum consisting of soccer-themed HIV prevention activities including knowledge about HIV risks, self-efficacy to be abstinent and resist peer pressure. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA conducted to compare risk behaviour reduction outcomes at Time 1 (prior to the intervention), Time 2 (following the 12-week intervention) and Time 3 (four-month follow up) showed improvement in HIV knowledge [F (2) = 72.57, p = 0.000], self-efficacy [F (2) = 6.63, p = 0.002] and negotiation skills [F (2) = 4.07, p = 0.02]. Logistic regression analysis comparing risk reduction outcomes between intervention and control group showed statistically significant difference only on self-efficacy scores [β = 1.43 (95% CI: 1.07-1.92); p = 0.018]. There were no significant findings regarding effect of sport-based HIV prevention programmes on risky sexual behaviours in rural school-going adolescents. The potential effect of the intervention on improvement of HIV knowledge, self-efficacy to refuse sex and negotiation skills for safe sex indicated that sport-based HIV prevention programmes could be used to modify risky sexual behaviours in South African adolescents and young adults.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Barriers to sport participation among learners at public township schools
           in Tshwane, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Pule, R.E.J. Drotsky, G.A.P. Toriola, A.L. Kubayi, N.A. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1414-1423 Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine barriers to sport participation among primary and secondary school children at public township schools in Tshwane, the capital city of South Africa. A total of 773 school children aged 12-18 years volunteered to participate in the study. Data were collected using validated structured questionnaires. The results of the study indicated that primary school children were more actively involved in school sport than those in secondary school. Overall, the results showed that the children's participation in school sports was constrained by the following factors: limited number of coaches, and managers, restricted sport participation opportunities, grossly inadequate sport facilities and equipment and lack of financial support from parents. The results of the study provide information for planning, policy reconfiguration and effective delivery of school sports programmes.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • The effects of supervised exercise training and self-directed active daily
           living on fitness and health parameters in elderly males with type II
           diabetes
    • Abstract: Author: Wehmeyer, C. Loots, J.M. Nortje, L. Lategan, L. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1424-1435 Abstract: There is limited data on the effectiveness of different exercise programmes in the elderly diabetic population. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of supervised exercise training and self-directed active daily living on selected fitness and health parameters in elderly males with type II diabetes. Twenty-nine elderly (>65y), sedentary males with type II diabetes were assigned to a Control Group (CG) (n=10), an active daily living (ADL) Group (n=11) and a Supervised Exercise Training (SET) Group (n=8). The intervention consisted of two different exercise prescriptions over an eight-week period. The SET Group performed aerobic, flexibility and resistance exercises three times per week, while the ADL Group was advised to accumulate 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity per day. The effects of the interventions on fitness and health were assessed by means of a blood test (HbA1c), resting blood pressure readings and the Senior Fitness Test. Statistical significance was set at a confidence level of 95% (p≤0.05). The results showed that the largest decrease in systolic blood pressure occurred in the SET group (p=0.028). There were statistically significant improvements in the aerobic endurance of both the SET and ADL groups (p=0.012 & p=0.011) as well as in the upper body flexibility of both groups (p=0.028 & p=0.023). The SET group also showed significant improvements in upper body strength (p=0.011) and in agility (p=0.012). The superior results that SET yielded demonstrate that it should form the cornerstone in the treatment of elderly males with diabetes type II.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • African musical rhythm : an overlooked factor in East Africa's middle and
           long distance running success?
    • Abstract: Author: Van der Klashorst, E. Goslin, A.E. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1403-1413 Abstract: This review article presents the contribution of rhythm as socio-cultural contributor to the dominance of East-African distance athletes. It aimed to qualitatively review similarities between growing up in music, bodily participation in music performances, rhythmic structures, polyrhythms, hemiola and syncopation and flow as elements of music and success of East African distance runners. Results of the review in general, suggest that East African music reflects the rhythm of life and performs a crucial function by integrating rhythm and human movement, including distance running as specific manifestation of human movement. It seems if East African runners perceive the function of rhythm differently than western runners and could have the ability to weave complex rhythms together in their running by interlocking and crossing different rhythmic patterns and structures. Because East-African runners grow up with and within rhythm through their music traditions and bodily participation in music performances, they most likely succeed to "live" rhythm in their distance running as opposed to western athletes who often deconstruct the running motion into different elements and implement a "learn to run" approach. Experience in and exposure to the polyrhythms of drumming as significant element of East African music could contribute to the distance runners being able to experience "flow" in their running. The broad findings of this conceptual review could have several significant implications for distance training in western countries as well as sport coach education syllabi.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Influence of a prayer programme on physiological coherence, health and
           spirituality perceptions
    • Abstract: Author: Edwards, Stephen D. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1390-1402 Abstract: The goal of this study was to examine the influence of a prayer programme on physiological coherence, health and spirituality perceptions. A within group, pre-test and post-test, design was employed to assess changes in physiological and psychological variables. A convenience sample of 10 participants, 5 men and 5 women, with a mean age of 44.8 years and an age range from 23 to 78 years, completed the programme, which consisted of rest, intercessory, gratitude, contemplative and heart prayer conditions. Significant increases in physiological coherence and spirituality perceptions, as well as reported health improvements, were associated with the prayer programme in general and the heart prayer in particular. Findings are discussed in relation to previous and future research.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Sitting time and its associated factors in university students from 18
           low, middle and emerging economy countries
    • Abstract: Author: Peltzer, Karl Pengpid, Supa Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1379-1389 Abstract: Prolonged sitting is an emerging health risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sitting time and to explore relationships with sociodemographic, body mass index (BMI), well-being, and health risk behaviour variables among university students from 18 low, middle and emerging economy countries. In a cross-sectional survey we took anthropometric measurements and used a self-administered questionnaire among a sample of 9427 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD=2. 8, age range of 16-30 years) from 18 universities in 18 countries. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed with high sitting time (quartile 4: 501-1020 minutes) as the dependent variable. Results indicate that the mean reported sitting time was 363 minutes/day (SD=206). The proportion of students reporting 0-240 minutes/day was 36.1%, 241-360 minutes/day 22%, 361-500 minutes/day 21.9%, and 501-1020 minutes/day 20%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, younger age (16-19 years), residing off campus (either on their own or with parents or guardian), coming from a low income country (Bangladesh and Madagascar), depression symptoms, not currently using tobacco, and low physical activity were associated with the highest quartile of sitting time. Sitting is prevalent in university students across Africa, Asia and the Americas and merits attention by preventive interventions.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Prevalence of overweight and obesity among primary school children in
           Kampala central, Uganda
    • Abstract: Author: Chebet, Milton Goon, D.T. Nsibambi, Constance Otala, Justine Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1365-1378 Abstract: Worldwide, the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children is increasing at an alarming rate. While this phenomenon has been well documented in western countries, scanty information exists in African countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity among primary children aged 8-12 years in Kampala, Uganda. Participants included 958 pupils (435 boys and 523 girls) from five public and five private primary schools. Weight and height were measured and body mass index calculated. The prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity were 8.0%, 32.3% and 21.7%, respectively. Girls had higher percentage of overweight (64.4%) and obesity (52.9%) than boys (35.6%; and 47.1%, respectively). whereas underweight occurred more among the males (57.1%) compared with the females (42.9%). Normal weight was 50.3% and 49.7% for males and females, respectively. Children in private school had higher prevalence of overweight (16.6%) and obesity (11.5%) than those attending public schools, while children in public schools were more underweight (4.6%) compared to private school children (3.4%).The present study documents a considerably higher level of overweight, obesity concomitant with underweight in Ugandan school children; with overweight and obese occurring more in girls compared to the boys. Additionally, children in private schools were more overweight and obese compared to those in public schools. The high prevalence of body weight disorders found among the children has implications for their growth and development, thus intervention strategies are needed.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Knowledge, perception and behaviour of students towards the lesbian, gay,
           bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) community at Walter Sisulu
           University, Eastern Cape, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Abaver, D.T. Cishe, E.N. Twaise, N. Goon, D.T. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1353-1364 Abstract: The practice of homosexuality is a major concern to health service providers, given that this constitutes a risk-factor to HIV/AIDS, STDs, and STIs transmission. This study aims to explore knowledge, perception and behaviour of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) students regarding HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases and infections. A cross-sectional study was conducted in two campuses of Walter Sisulu University (WSU) in Eastern Cape: Mthatha and Potsdam. Data were collected with the aid of questionnaire, administered among students and staff in the two campuses. A total of 126 participants completed the questionnaire (56 male and 70 female) aged 18->40 years. Most (64.3%) students were aware of homosexuals in the community, while 74.6% believe having sex with same gender is abnormal and unnatural. Sexual desire between and attraction to opposite sex scored high (69.8% and 67.5% respectively). About 58.7% and 55.6% believed talks in classes and programmes in the community, respectively, will address same sex relationship. Most (81.7%) participants were straight/heterosexuals, while 3.2% each identified themselves as lesbians and bisexuals, respectively. Homosexuality as a risk factor for transmission of HIV/AIDS, STDs, and STIs scored 40.5%, need for LGBTI sector to practice safe sex and have equal access to health services recorded 73% and 47.6%, respectively. Knowledge of those who dress/act like opposite sex and acceptability was 60.3% and 36.5%, respectively. Fifty-seven (45.2%) participants indicated that the community should not encourage people to dress/act like opposite sex. The students are aware of the presence of LGBTI in WSU community. Generally, the activities and behaviour of LGBTI are not accepted by the community, as men who have sex with men have a disproportionate risk of HIV infection as a result of increased risk from anal intercourse. Yet, there are some contentions by a minority regarding justification and legality of condemning LGBTI. There is need for the University community to include in the school curriculum and design programmes that will enlighten members of the community concerning the concept and practice of homosexuality.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:16Z
       
  • Socio-economic characteristics and pre-disposing factors contributing to
           high blood pressure among hypertensive patients at Folovhodwe village,
           Limpopo Province, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Ramaano, N.S. Tugli, A.K. Akinsola, H.A. Ramathuba, D. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1342-1352 Abstract: Hypertension or high blood pressure, like HIV, is mostly asymptomatic, but can lead to a fatal disabling morbidity which is a serious threat to public health. The study investigated the socio-economic characteristics and pre-disposing factors contributing to hypertension among hypertensive patients at Folovhodwe village in Mutale Municipality of the Limpopo Province, South Africa. A descriptive cross-sectional quantitative design was employed where self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data. Of the 89 hypertensive patients who participated in the study, most (n=75; 84.3%) were females; 43(48%) were in the 40-50 year age group; 70(78.7%) were divorcees; about 1 in 4 (n=23; 25.8%) participants had no formal education and 40(44.9%) were unemployed. With regard to pre-disposing factors contributing to high blood pressure, a large proportion (n=58; 65.2%) of the participants reported having a family history of hypertension. Before being diagnosed of the condition, 4(5.5%) female and 7(50%) male participants reported smoking; 9(12%) female and 9(64%) male reported alcohol consumption and a larger proportion of females (n=61; 84%) than males (n=7; 50%) reported not exercising. These results bring to the fore some of the fundamental drivers of hypertension. The effective management of the condition requires sound knowledge, pro-active lifestyle adjustment including dietary changes, adherence to prescribed medication regime and regular medical check-ups.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:15Z
       
  • List of AJPHERD Reviewers 2014
    • Abstract: Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: i Abstract: AJPHERD expresses its profound gratitude to the highly esteemed academics and professionals who volunteered their services to review the articles that were published in volume 20(1-4) and supplements in 2014. Your precious and most valuable times are gratefully acknowledged.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:15Z
       
  • Experiences of students living with HIV/AIDS regarding the support group :
           a case of University of Fort Hare, Alice campus, South Africa
    • Abstract: Author: Kalipa, M.P. Bereda-Thakhathi, J.E. Tshotsho, N. Goon, D.T. Vol 20 Issue 4 Publication: 2014 Page: 1324-1341 Abstract: South Africa has the highest HIV and AIDS epidemic statistics in the world, especially people under 25 years of age. University students are implicated, thus support groups in this context are crucial to help them cope with their unique circumstances. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of support groups for students living with HIV/AIDS (SLWHA) at the University of Fort Hare, Alice campus, South Africa. Interviews were used to explore the experiences and challenges of SLWHA. The study shows that support groups are pivotal to the wellbeing of SLWHA in meeting diverse needs such as sense fo belonging, emotional, psychological, socio-economic and health needs as well as in providing the necessary information and knowledge. Support group members experience relatively similar living experiences, dynamic as their various lives are; they are able to share their emotions and problems arising from their HIV statuses, thereby lessening their burdens. Negative experiences like confidentiality, depression and stress were observed. University support groups can be improved through structured programmes that include various stakeholders like health professionals (wellness centre), university management and academics within the university. Also, expanding their borders via the use of social networks, and expanding their activities to include music, sports, vegetable gardening, group visitations, skills training, and other useful projects would help to improve the lives of victims and prevent infections of other community members.
      PubDate: 2015-02-17T14:03:15Z
       
 
 
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